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КЫРГЫЗСКО-РОССИЙСКИЙ СЛАВЯНСКИЙ УНИВЕРСИТЕТ

Кафедра иностранных языков

Рецензенты:
доцент Г.А. Вишневская
доцент С.Б. Карабечелова

Е.В. Верхолазова, Д.К. Таштанбекова Печатается по решению кафедры иностранных языков КРСУ

АНГЛИЙСКИЙ ЯЗЫК Верхолазова Е.В., Таштанбекова Д.К.


АНГЛИЙСКИЙ ЯЗЫК. ФРАЗОВЫЕ ГЛАГОЛЫ. Учебно-методи-
ческое пособие для студентов неязыковых специальностей 2–3 курсов. –
Бишкек: Изд-во КРСУ, 2009. – 48 с.
ФРАЗОВЫЕ ГЛАГОЛЫ
Учебно-методическая разработка по английскому языку составлена
Учебно-методическое пособие для студентов для студентов 2–3 курсов неязыковых специальностей в качестве учеб-
ного пособия для развития навыков устной речи, обогащения лексиче-
неязыковых специальностей 2–3 курсов ского запаса.
Цель разработки – показать разнообразие значений фразовых гла-
голов в английском языке, научить студентов понимать и использовать
их в своей речи.

Бишкек 2009 © КРСУ, 2009

2
4. Вместо того, чтобы постараться погасить огонь самой, она бросилась
к телефону вызывать пожарную команду.
5. Почти каждый вечер она выкладывала на стол старые, пожелтевшие
письма, брала одно, и не отрываясь читала его по памяти.
PHRASAL VERBS 6. Ты выиграл партию в шахматы? – Нет, проиграл. – Не расстраивайся,
выиграешь в следующий раз.
7. Мы не могли мириться с его странным поведением.
PUT 8. Конференция была отложена до следующего месяца.
9. Было бы очень интересно остановиться в старом, загадочном замке и
I. Read and remember провести там несколько недель.
1. To put out: a) to extinguish, cause to stop burning – гасить, тушить 10. Прежде чем идти спать не забудьте выключить свет.
огонь; 11. Оператор соединил меня очень быстро.
b) to annoy, worry – беспокоиться, расстраиваться,
причинять беспокойство; IV. Insert prepositions
c) to lay out, take out (about things) – выкладывать.
2. To put off – to postpone – откладывать
3. To put up – to construct, erect – строить, возводить
4. To put up (at) – to stay, lodge, shelter – останавливаться в гостинице,
давать приют, принимать гостей
5. To put up with – to tolerate, to stand – терпеть, мириться, выносить
6. To put smb through – put in communication with, by telephone, through
an exchange – соединить

II. Translate the sentences into Russian


1. Be sure to put out the gas before you leave.
2. He was very much put out by the loss of his purse.
3. Every morning I lay the table for breakfast I put out the knives, forks and
spoons and the cups.
4. Never put off until tomorrow, what you can do today.
5. They are putting up several new buildings in that block.
6. We can put up at this hotel for a week.
7. How do you put up with that noise all day long?
8. I shall be happy to put you up when you come to town.
9. The firemen worked hard but were not able to put out the fire.
10. They are tearing down that old building in order to put up a new one.
11. Put me through to the fire-station.

III. Translate into English using the phrasal verb “put”


1. Почему ты не хочешь отложить свой отъезд? – Я не могу сейчас уехать.
2. Как ты выносишь этот шум? Разве он тебя не раздражает?
3. Наш дом был построен два года тому назад.

3 4
a) out d) up
b) up with e) through
c) off

1. I refuse to put … his


carelessness any
longer.
2. To put … a meeting
means to postpone it.
3. There was a one-
storeyed house there
then they tore it down
last year and put … a
new nine-storeyed
building.
4. Call in the firemen to
put the fire ….
5. Don’t bother about
looking up their
number. Just call
“Fire!” and you’ll be
put straight … to the
fire-station.

V. Look at the pictures


and make up sen-
tences with phrasal
verbs
VI. Insert prepositions.
Translate the text
The connection was
very poor. I could hardly
understand what was said
at the other end, though
we were both shouting at
the top of our voices. I
only heard Alec shout he
had put __ __Victor’s;
then in a minute some

7
ехать
,
зада-
вить;
b) to
over-
flow
– пе-
ре-
лить-
ся
через
край,
убе-
жать.
3. To run down: a) to
stop
doing
or
work-
ing –
оста-
на-
вли-
вать-
ся,
пере-
стать
рабо-
тать;
b)
(pas-
sive)
to be
tired,
ex-
haust
ed, ill
– пе-
ре-
утом

9
6. To run away/off –
убегать, удирать.
II. Translate into Rus-
sian
1. Don’t run away and
leave me alone.
2. The clock has run
down and will stop if
not wound.
3. Run in and see me
this evening.
4. When I gave him the
news, he ran off at
once.
5. The money is run-
ning out.
6. The lightness of the
tea-tin at once told
her that she’d run out
of tea.
7. Be careful! Don’t run
over the dog.
8. He forgot to turn off
the tap and the water
ran over.
9. When looking
through the newspa-
per we ran across a
very interesting arti-
cle on Italian paint-
ing.
10. She is always running
down her younger
sister.
11. He is run down after
his examinations.

III. Translate into Eng-


lish using the
phrasal verb “run”

11
IV. Insert prepositions
a) over d) across
b) off e) out of
c) down

1. I’m awfully run ….


Why such a hurry?
2. Oh, bother! He had
run … … ink.
3. You will never guess
whom I ran … .I met
the Smiths.
4. A child ran across the
road and the driver
put on the brakes
suddenly. Hadn’t he
done it he would have
run the child ….
5. The girl’s mother
called her from the
garden and the child
ran … .

V. Fill in the blanks us-


ing phrasal verbs
and translate the
sentences
a) to run out of d) to run across
b) to run down e) to run in
c) to run over f) run away

1. What’s wrong with


your watch? It’s not
working. I think it
_____ .Wind it up.
2. I ___ Mr. Green in
the park this morning.
3. It seems to me we
____ the vegetables.
Will you go and buy
some?

13
TAKE

I. Read and remember


1. To take in – to under-
stand – понимать.
2. To take after – to re-
semble a parent or
close relative – похо-
дить на кого либо.
3. To take smb for – to
mistake a person for
someone else – при-
нять кого-либо за.
4. To take off – to leave
the ground – взле-
теть (о самолете).
5. To take to – to form a
liking for, fall into
the habit of – полю-

15
ьс
я
за
чт
о-
ли
бо
;
c) to
co
nti
nu
e

пр
од
ол
ж
ат
ь.

II. Read and translate


into Russian
1. She read various la-
bels and displays
without taking a word
in.
2. Iris hastily took up
her package and left
the shop.
3. Which of your par-
ents do you take af-
ter?
4. The plane took off at
exactly four o’clock.
5. With her dark skin
and eyes I took her
for an Italian.
6. Sally wants to take up
medicine when she
leaves school.

17
чится хороший док-
тор.
7. Она быстро подняла
книгу, положила ее
на стол и вышла из
комнаты.
8. Когда-то он любил
путешествовать.
9. В темноте мы при-
няли собаку за вол-
ка.
IV. Fill in the blanks
using phrasal
verbs. Translate
the sentences
a) take in (2) d) take off
b) take after(2) e) take to(2)
c) take for f) take up

1. Did the accident oc-


cur while the plane
was landing or while
it ___ __ ?
2. The little child ___
___ her new nurse at
once.
3. Jane ___ ___ her
mother in many
ways.
4. I ___ her ___ my
cousin, but when she
turned to me I under-
stood my mistake.
5. I felt so tired that I
couldn’t ___ ___ a
single word of the let-
ter.
6. What ___ your
brother ___ ___ at the
University?

19
a) to d) in
b) up e) after
c) for

1. The porter was telling


me something, but I
couldn’t take a word
… . I didn’t know
Spanish.
2. All … my relatives
say that I take … my
father.
3. The boy took … my
luggage and put it on
the counter before the
customs examiner.
4. My brother and I took
… reading since our
childhood.
5. He was thin, his suit
was worn-out that’s
why I took him … a
beggar.

TURN

I. Read and remember


1. To turn away – to
turn in a different di-
rection; refuse to look
at –отворачиваться.
2. To turn up: a) ap-
pear,
arrive

вне-
запно
поя-
вить-
ся,
put
out –
ис-
клю-
чить,
вы-
гнать
, уво-
лить;
b) to
empt
y in
order
to
searc
h or
ex-
amine
– вы-
вер-
нуть
(кар-
ман);
c) to
prove
to be

ока-
зы-
вать-
ся.
7. To turn over – to
overturn, place up-
side down – пере-
вертывать(ся), оп-
рокинуть(ся).
8. To turn into – пре-
вращаться во что-
либо

23
2. Не бойся, если ты
не тронешь собаку,
она на тебя никогда
не бросится.
3. Я вижу, ты не ожи-
дала, что я появ-
люсь так рано.
4. Выключи газ или
суп перекипит. (boil
over)
5. Если моя история
окажется достаточ-
но хорошей, я ото-
шлю ее издателю.
6. Во многих сказках
злые ведьмы пре-
вращают людей в
животных.
7. Переверни страницу
и ты найдешь текст,
который ты ищешь.
8. Том вывернул кар-
маны, но не нашел
ни цента.
9. Сделай телевизор
громче, я ничего не
слышу.
10. Комедия оказалась
очень смешной.
11. Свет зажегся, и она
увидела незнакомца
в комнате.
12. Он появился в кон-
це вечеринки и сра-
зу же привлек вни-
мание всех.

IV. Complete the sen-


tences with phrasal
verbs. Translate
the sentences

25
tences with phrasal
verbs

27
VI. Insert prepositions
a) on d) away
b) up e) off
c) out
1. If my story turns …
good enough, I’ll
send it to a publisher.
2. You shouldn’t turn
… when you see a
boy beating a dog or
cat; you ought to in-
terfere and stop it.
3. We turned … the
main road and soon
we saw a large beau-
tiful field.
4. The dog turned … the
cat rather fiercely;
but in spite of the fact
that the cat looked
tiny and helpless, it
made dog retreat.
5. I’m trying to find
some warm and beau-
tiful scarf, but noth-
ing has yet turned …

Test

Choose the letter corre-


sponding to the
correct answer
1. World War II ___ in
1939.
a) came to, c) broke in,
b) brought about, d) broke out.
2. She ___ when she
heard the sad news.
a) broke down, b) broke off,

29
c) turned away, d) turned over.
SUPPLEMENTARY
READING

Text 1
1. Read the text and
insert phrasal verbs
a) turn away, c) turn up,
b) take smth away, d) come up.

THE GIRL ON THE


BUS
by William Sansom
(Abridged)

[Once leaving Haga,


a park in Stockholm, on
a winter day Harry met a
girl, trudging up on skis.
When she was quite
near him he glanced up
at her face, and the
beauty of the girl ___ his
breath ___ He immedi-
ately fell madly in love
with her. The girl cast a
glance at him, but he
never knew whether she
saw him at all, or looked
past or through him. But
the girl passed him and
soon disappeared, and
Harry remained there,
alone, with never a hope
to see again. On the next
day he was to leave this
country for England.
Naturally, he felt nerv-
ous, frustrated, dull.]

31
I remember distinctly I
once saw you in Haga,
you speak Swedish? You
see, my father and I —
we've lost our seat reser-
vations. Could you tell
me what is best to do? . .
. We're new here . . .
Harry's heart leapt.
The lights in the station
seemed to ___ ___, it
suddenly almost sunny.
With delight he showed
them to the end of the
train where he knew
there were empty car-
riages. Together they
travelled to London and
never stopped talking. He
insisted on driving them
to their hotel.
Harry and his lady
have now been married
some seven years. He has
never, so far as can be
known, regretted the re-
quital.
Notes on the text
1. A boat train – a train
that takes people to or
from a steamer (e.g.
from central London
to the docks).
2. Esbjaerg – a town in
Denmark.

2. Retell the text using


phrasal verbs.

Text 2

33
“Rose is out,”l my
wife informed me. “What
on earth arc we to do?”
“I am here, dear,” I
reminded my wife.
“Leave everything to me.
One thing at a time.”
“Do-do something,
Henry, for goodness'
sake.”
Now, if ever,
seemed to be the time to
use the telephone.
I grasped the re-
ceiver. Smoke wreaths
curled up my nostrils.
Clearly no time must be
lost. “Exchange! Fire!” I
screamed.
I groped for my
wife. She was gone.
Good heavens! was she
at this moment lying in-
sensible? Panic-stricken,
I attacked the telephone
once more. After what
seemed an eternity I
heard a voice say, “Fire
station.” Through at last.
“Fire!” I gurgled,
“292, Pembroke Road.”
“The brigade's ___
___ ,” I was informed
briefly.
It was the final
blow. As I reeled beneath
it I fell into the arms of
my wife, who had just
emerged from the haze.
“The brigade's gone
out,” I said wildly.

35
us at least welcome our
friends as warmly as we
can.”

2. Retell the text using


phrasal verbs.

Text 3
1. Read the text and
insert phrasal verbs:
a) put on (2), c) run about,
b) take out, d) turn into (2).

THE GOLDEN TOUCH


(Greek mythology)

Midas thought for a


while. "I am tired of col-
lecting my treasures with
so much trouble," he said
at last, "and still the heap
is so small after I have
done my best. I wish eve-
rything that I touch to be
changed to gold."
The stranger's smile
grew so very broad that it
seemed to fill the room
like a great sunbeam.
"The Golden
Touch!" exclaimed he.
"But, friend Midas, are
you quite sure that this
will satisfy you? Will
you never regret your
wish?"
"Of course not!"
answered Midas.

37
was his joy, when he
found that this white
covering was now the
brightest gold. The
Golden Touch came to
him with the first sun-
beam.
Midas jumped out
of bed, and ___ ___ the
room, seizing everything
that happened to be in his
way" He pulled aside a
window curtain and the
curtain grew heavy in his
hand — a mass of gold.
He hurriedly ___ ___his
clothes, and was happy
to see himself in a suit of
gold cloth, which was
still soft although rather
heavy, he thought. He
___ ___ his handker-
chief, made by little
Marygold. That was also
___ ___ gold.
This last transfor-
mation did not quite
please king Midas. He
remembered when
Marygold climbed on his
knee and put the hand-
kerchief in his hand. It
was her work, but now
he could not use it — it
was so hard.
Midas now took his
spectacles and ___ them
___ his nose (in those
days, only kings wore
spectacles) He was rather
disappointed, however,

39
a) give up, d) look at,
b) walk down, e) look about.
c) get up(2),

THE HOTEL STEFANI


by John Millington Ward

Paul shook his head


tiredly as he ___ the
steps of the hotel and got
back into the car. "No.
This one hasn't any
rooms either."
"Oh, dear," said
Patricia, crossing off the
name of the hotel from
the list in her hand. "I'm
beginning to despair.
This is the eighteenth
you've tried — and it's
nearly midnight. Do you
think we may have to
sleep in the car?"
Paul stopped the car
in front of the brightly-lit
and inviting-looking
building that he had seen
on the square, and the
two went tiredly but
gratefully into the warm
and friendly atmosphere
of the restaurant-cafe.
All the tables were
occupied.
As they ___ ___
them, a pleasant-looking
middle-aged man with
white hair___ from the
table at which he was sit-
ting, and beckoned to
say. We have a room
empty, it s true. But it
has been reserved."
He paused, and
Paul waited, with a sink-
ing feeling.” Yes, I think
you may have the room.
"Thank heavens!"
"Let me make sure whom
I'm speaking to, please.
I've telephoned so many
hotels. Let's see – yes –
you are Hotel Stefani,
aren't you?"
"That's right. The
Hotel Stefani."
"Where is your ho-
tel, please?"
"Right in the centre
of St. Moritz"
Paul left the tele-
phone booth and walked
happily back to Patricia.
The pleasant white-
haired man who had ___
___ his table for them
was also returning from
somewhere to his own
seat. Paul and he smiled
warmly at each other as
they sat down.
"Yes, my dear!"
said Paul, taking
Patricia’s hand and
squeezing it. "We’ve got
a room. We don’t have to
sleep in the car."
"Thank goodness!"
said Patricia. "I’ve just
heard that it’s begun to
freeze outside. I suppose

43
tains and dusty windows.
She fell better.
She halted a mo-
ment outside the super-
market, staring through
the glass windows at the
rich stacks of food in-
side. She sighed and
went in, blinked and at
once stopped thinking.
She took a tray without
noticing, and walked
slowly on, her lips parted
and her eyes sparkling.
With an effort she
dreamily paused and read
various labels and dis-
plays without ___ a word
___. Quickly she took a
box of candied fruit, a tin
of anchovies, and a
cheese that glowed
golden through its trans-
parent wrap. Then a
sponge-cake with cream-
filling and a packet of
chocolate biscuits. Her
face was slightly flushed
and she seemed hardly to
be breathing at all.
With the addition of
bottles of pickles and
tomato-ketchup, she
reached the barrier where
stood the cash-register.
Her breath came quicker
and the glazed look faded
from her eyes. Clutching
her purse, she looked
round as if she had
dropped something, then

45
gan crying. “Oh, I left
my list at home,” she
said, “but I know I
wanted potatoes.”
A long notice de-
clared: “Don’t ask for
credit as a refusal often
offends.” Iris couldn’t
help reading this through

2. Retell the text using


phrasal verbs.

INTRODUCTION
PHRASAL VERBS

Phrasal verbs and


one-word verbs have
similar meanings.
Phrasal verbs are ex-
tremely common, more
expressive1 than the
synonyms they replace
,especially in spoken
English, and are used
more informally than
their Latinate synonyms,
e.g. use up vs. consume;
gather together vs. as-
semble; put out vs. extin-
guish. Phrasal verbs de-
fine only those combina-
tions that form an idiom,
a phrase the meaning of
which cannot be pre-

1
Martha Kollyn, Un-
derstanding English Gram-
mar.

47
• transitive (direct
object).
Here are some ex-
amples of phrasal
verbs:
P Examples
hr M
as ea dir
al ni ect
ve n obj
rb g ect
s
Int ris
ge I don't
ran et like to
siti fr
u get
ve o
p up.
phr m
asa be
l d
ver br ce He
bs ea as was
k e late
d to be-
o fu cause
w nc his
n ti car
on broke
down.
Tr p po We the
ans ut st will mee
itiv of po have ting
e f ne to put .
phr off
asa tu re They my
l rn fu turne offe
ver d se d r.
bs o down
w
n

49
ple with the separable
phrasal verb "switch on":

t The
s
h se
w
J e are
it
o or all
Di- c
h na pos
rect h
n d sibl
ob- e
i e
ject, d
o
pro-
t
nou s
h
ns w
J e
mus it
o r o
t go c
h a n
be- h
n d
twee e
i
n d
o
the
s
two
w
part J
it
s of o o
c it
tran- h n
h
si- n
e
tive
d
phra
sal s Thi
verb w s is
J
s it not
o o
c it pos
h n
h sibl
n
e e
d

Prepositional Verbs
Prepositional verbs
are a group of multi-
word verbs made from a
verb plus another word
or words. Many people

51
Prepositional verbs
cannot be separated.
That means that we can-
not put the direct object
between the two parts.
For example, we must
say "look after the baby".
We cannot say "look the
baby after":

Preposi Who This


tional is is
verbs look- poss
are ing af- ible
insepar ter the
able baby?
Who This
is is
look- not
ing poss
the ible
baby
after?
Phrasal-prepositional
verbs
Phrasal-
prepositional verbs are a
small group of multi-
word verbs made from a
verb plus another word
or words. Many people
refer to all multi-word
verbs as phrasal verbs.
Phrasal-prepositional
verbs are made of: verb
+ adverb + preposition.
Here are the exam-
ples of phrasal-
prepositional verbs:

53
prepositional verbs can-
not be separated. These
are the examples:

ran
o
ufu
W
t
Phrasal-
preposi- o
tional f
verbs are ran
insepa- o
rable u
W
t it

o
f

So, the phrasal


verbs are more informal
and much more common
in everyday speech:

Phrasal verb One –


(infor- Word
mal) Verb
(mor
e for-
mal)

Bring up raise
Figure out solve
Wake up awaken

Separable transitive
phrasal verbs
Subject Verb Particle Direct
Ob
jec

55
be transitive and verb di-
intransitive. rect object
Most transitive verbs We set up an ex-
are separable. periment.
This means that Phrasal verb
when the direct direct object
object I picked up an
is a noun , it can come apple.
:
-after the verb + parti-
cle or Verb+partic
le
d.o.
We cleaned up
-between the room.
the verb and its Or
particle . Verb
►Be careful! When d.o. par-
the direct object ticle
is a pronoun, it We cleaned the
must come be- room up.
tween the verb
and the particle. d.o.
We cleaned it up.
Not We cleaned
up it.

3. Some phrasal verbs ·We grew up in


are intransitive. Kyrgyzstan.
·I stood up to
help her.

Lesson 6

Exercise 1

а) Study the following


phrasal verbs:

57
1. loo a) re-
k gar
up d
to- wit
2. loo h
k con
do tem
wn pt
on b) de-
– pre
3. giv ss;
en c) (Fe
to – el)
4. get an-
on gry
one d) add
's icte
ner d
ves to;
- e) ad
5. get mir
do e;
wn f) get
- to
6. put like
off- ;
7. put g) hu
up mil
wit iate
h– ;
8. put h) bea
do r,
wn tol-
– er-
9. (fe ate;
el) i) be-
put co
out me
- at-
10. cut trac
up- ted

59
put a cigarette end in
the lasagne?
5. What do you think of
the title of the story?
What was the prob-
lem?
An unhappy relation-
ship
Veronica had al-
ways looked up to Philip.
Before too long, he had
taken to her as well. He
was given to Italian food
and she cooked him lasa-
gne every week.
Unfortunately,
Philip's mother, Betty,
looked down on Veron-
ica. The main problem
was that Veronica
smoked heavily wherever
she went. This really got
on Betty's nerves, but it
didn't put Philip off.
One day, Betty,
who was afraid that Ve-
ronica wanted to get off
with her son, decided to
talk to Philip directly.
"How can you put
up with someone who
always has a cigarette in
her mouth?" she com-
plained.
"Why does Veron-
ica make you feel so cut
up? Whenever she tries
to be friendly you always
put her down," he an-
swered.

61
2. Some able students
(to regard with con-
tempt) poor students.
3. She (to get to like)
video more than go-
ing to the cinema.
4. We don’t want our
children (to be ad-
dicted to) drugs and
alcohol.
5. Noisy children often
(to annoy) us.
6. Bad weather some-
times (to depress) us.
7. He (to feel angry)
when we were late
for his lessons.
8. I won’t (to upset) my
parents.
9. They always (to quar-
rel) when they lived
together with the par-
ents.
10. He does everything
(to please) his wife.

Exercise 3
Some phrasal
verbs have multitude of
different meanings de-
pending on the context.
For example, here are
some of the many ways
in which the phrasal
verb pick up is cur-
rently used.
Translate the sentences;
make up your own
sentences:

63
14. The lawyer picked up
his argument after the
noon recess (to con-
tinue after a break).
15. Retail sales always
pick up around the
holidays (to
improve).
16. She just picked up
and left town (to pack
one’s belongings).
17. The red pickup was
parked in the drive
(noun derived from
the verb – a type of a
truck).

Exercise 4
Translate the sentences.
Use the phrasal
verbs where it’s pos-
sible:
1. В лаконичной речи
главы государства
прозвучали слова
признательности за
вклад финансовых
работников в отече-
ственную экономи-
ку.
2. Мы не должны впа-
дать в депрессию
из-за трудностей
переходного перио-
да или политиче-
ских акций протес-
та, которые наблю-
дались в апреле.
3. Финансист- профес-
сия особо популяр-

65
ческого развития и
торговли.
10. День финансиста-
праздник молодой,
отмечаем его с 2003
года.

Exercise 5. Describe the


pictures, using the
phrasal verbs2:
1.

2.

do up one’s face – под-


пудрить лицо do up a
baby – запеленать ре-
бёнка

2
Pictures are de-
signed by Chinara Tashtan-
bekova and Sirga.

67
6. Make be ad- erate
7. Get dicted humiliate
8. Go to depress
9. Fall upset get to like
10. (feel)put quarrel
end a
quar-
rel
annoy
please
become
at-
tracte
d to
(feel) an-
gry

Lesson 7
Exercise 1
а) Study the following
phrasal verbs:
1. – 12. – по-
Put ста- Put дав-
one рать- dow лять
self ся n
out по-
мочь
2. – 13. – ус-
Fall лезть Kee ми-
ove из p рять
r кожи dow
one вон n
self
3. – 14. – вы-
Loo уха- Giv да-
k жи- e вать
afte вать awa
r за y
кем-

69
Cut упас Tak под-
do ть, e off ра-
wn сра- жать
зить

бо-
лез-
ни)
11. – 22. – ко-
Get быть Put ман-
the в бо- upo до-
bet- лее n вать
ter вы- над
of год- кем-
smt ном л.
h поло
же-
нии,
чем
кто-
л.

b) Match the phrasal


verbs with their
definitions:
1. Put one- a) take
self great
out – trouble
2. Fall over b) repress
oneself

3. Look c) betray
after –
4. Turn d) cheat
over a
new –
5.do in – e) suppress
6. Put f) be over
down anx-

71
(onesel
f) off
as –
21. Take u) attack
off –
22. Put v) pretend
upon – to be
as

Exercise 2
Read the text and an-
swer the questions:
1. Why do most children
put upon their par-
ents?
2. What should a person
do to turn over a
new leaf?
3. Is it natural for vio-
lence and corruption
to take place in the
world? Why?
4. Why do people fall for
politicians’ prom-
ises?

The world we live in


It is natural for par-
ents to look after their
own children. They put
themselves out to feed
and clothe them and fall
over themselves to give
them a good start in life.
Most children put upon
their parents. Some get
into a lot of trouble and
have to be taught to turn
over a new leaf.

73
do not mind this, but any
real protest or rebellion
would soon be put down.

Exercise 3
Circle the correct parti-
cle to complete each
phrasal verb.
Eat some leaves and
call me in the
morning
In 1972, Richard
Wrangham of Harvard
University set
1) out /up to study some
strange behavior of
chimpanzees in Tan-
zania. According to
Wrangham , the
chimps get;
2) by/ up at dawn and
look for Aspilia,
plants with furry
leaves. They pick
them and swallow
them whole.
Wrangham’s obser-
vations brought;
3) back / up a question.
Chimps clearly hated
the taste of Aspilia.
Why do they pick;
4) out / over this plant
bus pass;
5) out / up delicious fruit
nearby ? Wrangham
thought this question;
6) over / up for several
years. He then asked

75
feel healthier and look
phenomenal. With that
hope and with some in-
spirational photos of the
women in Hollywood
with the most gorgeous
skin, here are some tips
that we've never quite
gotten around to imple-
menting but still, just
make good sense:

1. Sleep on it. You


know how your face
feels sucked dry after
one of those too fun,
late-late nights?
You're not just feel-
ing the effects of a
lack of sleep, they are
also showing up on
your skin. There's
really no other way
around making this
kind of investment in
your skin's health
other than setting a
bedtime and sticking
to it.
2. Hydrate it. Yeah,
yeah, yeah… there's
always going to be
some debate about
how much water you
should be drinking.
You will feel more
alert, which means
you will look more
alert. Don't be afraid
to serve up your skin
a nice cocktail of

77
2.

3.

Check yourself! Write


the necessary parti-
cles:
Phrasal Definition Phrasal Definition
verb fall ver Be have
betray better
1. Cut b
cheat of

cheat 11.Turn Attack
2. Give
murder .... Obtain
……
take great A control
3. Do
trouble new of mimic

kill leaf Deceive
….
painlessly 12.Turn Attack
4. Do
suppress ... Cause to
some
take ad- 13.Take fall
one
vantage of ... Sacrifice
5. Do
pretend 14.Take Be tricked
….

79
ing рать, ou вать-
in t ся,
8. – бро-
Ta при- сать,
ke ни- 14. – из-
up мать Do ба-
ся за aw вить
что- ay ся от
ли- wit чего-
бо, h л.,
9. – ме- 15. –
Ta нять La обес
ke ся y пе-
ov мес- on чить,
er та- при-
fro ми, но-
m сить,
10. – об- 16. – вы-
Do хо- Gi да-
wit дить ve вать,
ho ся ou раз-
ut без t да-
чего- вать,
л.,
11. – 17. –
Pa про- Ke скры
ss пус- ep вать.
up тить, ba
упус ck
кать,
12. –
Gi бро-
ve сать
up что-
л.
де-
лать,
13. – от-
Cu казы
t

81
to
have
14. Do Start
away
with –
15. Lay on provide
– faciliti
es
16. Give earn, pro-
out – duce
as
reve-
nue
17. Keep abandon,
back – cease
doing

Exercise 2
Read the text and an-
swer the questions:
1. Why do people put by
part of their earn-
ings?
2. Why do people have
fear of poverty?
3. What does “family
ruin” mean for men
(women)?
4. What do you think of
“from rags to
riches”?

Text: From rags to


riches
The novels of
Charles Dickens docu-
ment people's great fear
of poverty during the
19th century. Even those
who were bringing in

83
There are also many
"rags to riches" stories
where orphans come in
for unexpected fortunes
and take over from dis-
credited landlords as the
owners of large estates.
Let's hope these heroes
don't take up drinking
and become like the pigs
in George Orwell's
"Animal Farm".

Exercise 3
Complete these conver-
sations. Use phrasal
verbs.
1. A: Don’t forget to put
on your mosquito re-
pellent!
B: Don’t worry! I’ll
put it on as soon as
we got here.
2. A: Can we take off
our hats ? It’s really
hot.
B: Don’t
______________ .
They protect you
from the sun.
3. A: How do you turn
on the generator?
B: It’s easy. You
________________
with the switch.
4. A: Did you cover up
the leftover food?
We don’t want the
ants to get at it.

85
to your nightly ritual
or using sunflower oil
might do as much or
more for your skin's
glow as all the prod-
ucts on your bath-
room counter.
4. Protect it. I admit that
as the seasons
change, I have a bad
and unconscious
habit of stowing the
sunscreen away as
soon as I pack up my
sandals. The reality is
that we can still get
loads of exposure to
harmful UVA and
UVB rays when it is
cloudy and we do
need the protection of
sunscreen all year
round. The two sec-
onds it takes to
slather on a bit of
block and it means
you will be guarding
your skin from sun-
burns today and from
cancer, wrinkles and
sunspots in the years
to come. And hello!
Have you seen Nicole
Kidman's porcelain
skin? It's gorgeous,
even under that giant
hat and what has to
be a pint of sun-
screen.
5. Gently address the
sins of your skin.

87
Let’s talk it over.
Work in groups. Imagine
that you are going to take
a group field trip. Decide
where to go – for exam-
ple, the zoo, a museum, a
park. Then assign tasks
and make a To Do list.
Try to include some of
these phrasal verbs.
Ca Cl Dr E Fi Ha

Lo
Lo M Pi

Pa Pi

Set Wr
Pu Ta

Ta Tu

Example:
A: I’ll write down the To
Do list.
B: Good idea. I’ll call up
to find out the hours.

89
s ... waive e

8. ob- 17. abol-
Co tain, Do ish,
me come ... get
... to ... rid of
have
9. earn,
Bri pro-
ng duce
... as
reve-
nue

Lesson 9
Exercise 1
а) Study the following
phrasal verbs:
1. – де- 10. –
Tu лать Fall умен
rn обо- off ьшат
ove рот ься
r
2. – 11. – со-
Go пред Cut кра-
for назна dow щать
чать n on

3. – 12. – ис-
La тра- Cut клю-
y тить out чить
out день-
ги
4. – 13. –
Put вло- Cut эко-
do жить back но-
wn круп on мить
ную
сум-

91
numbe
rs
3. Lay out c )reduce

4. Put down d) publish

5. Lay by – e)
elimin
ate
6. Come to f)
– econo
mize
7. Stand for g)
– withdr
aw
8. Come up h) be as
– good
as to
9. Put off – i) withdraw
10. Fall off j) appear
– in
print
11. Cut k) mean
down
on –
12. Cut out l) amount
– to
13. Cut m) suited
back on to

14. Bring n) pay
out – (mone
y) in a
lump
sum
15. Pull o) put
back – aside
16. Come p) aim at
out –
17. Pull out q) deter

93
included all the money
his grandparents had left
him, into a business ac-
count and persuaded his
younger brother Rick to
lay out nearly all his sav-
ings to support the
launch of their new com-
pany. Rick lay a small
proportion of his savings
by to finance his Open
University Degree in
Digital Electronics. Their
joint capital did not come
to very much, but the
performance of FACTS
in its first year of opera-
tion came up to the tar-
gets that they had been
advised to go for.
When the two
brothers brought out their
first set of accounts, it
seemed that the profit-
ability of FACTS Ltd
depended on sales of
their computerized
chipping machine, a
revolutionary device for
cutting potatoes into ex-
act shapes and sizes.
When the next set of fig-
ures came out, it was
clear that the same mas-
terpiece of digital tech-
nology, robotics and ra-
zor sharp cutting equip-
ment was making all the
money. Sales of "Mac-
rofish" and "Mi-
crofish", their twin high

95
(Room 215) , and 4.
(complete)___________
it ________ right away.
5. (submit)________ it
______ by May 1. Last
summer we collected
plants and identified
them. This summer we
plan to talk to local peo-
ple and 6. (dis-
cover)_________ how
they use plants in tradi-
tional medicine . This
trip is very challenging .
We travel to our camp by
canoe. When there are
problems , we 7.
(solve)_______ them
_____ by ourselves. We
8. (arise)_________ very
early and we work hard.
There is also some dan-
ger, so 9. (dis-
cuss)_______ the trip
______ with your fami-
lies before you decide .
We hope you won’t 10.
(reject)__________ this
chance to do important
“hands-on science.”
Put questions to discuss
the text.

Exercise 4
Read the text and give
your own opinion
about Frank Cow-
perwood: Financier3

3
Theodore Dreizer.

97
"Eighteen dollars,"
suggested a trader stand-
ing near the door, more
to start the bidding than
anything else. Frank
paused.
"Twenty-two!"
called another.
"Thirty!" a third.
"Thirty-five!" a fourth,
and so up to seventy-
five, less than half of
what it was worth.
"I'm bid seventy-
five! I'm bid seventy-
five!" called the auction-
eer loudly. "Any other
offers? Going once at
seventy-five; am I of-
fered eighty? Going
twice at seventy-five,
and" – he paused, one
hand raised dramatically.
Then he brought it down
with a slap in the palm of
the other – "sold to Mr.
Silas Gregory for sev-
enty-five. Make a note of
that, Jerry," he called to
his red-haired, freckle-
faced clerk beside him.
Then he turned to an-
other lot of grocery sta-
ples--this time starch,
eleven barrels of it.
Young Cowperwood was
making a rapid calcula-
tion. If, as the auctioneer
said, coffee was worth
seven dollars and thirty-
two cents a bag in the

99
that fellow Sampson will
ever know."
"All right, make the
transfer, George, but
don't fuss so. He won't be
a bookkeeper long,
though. I want to see if
he can't handle some of
these transfers for me af-
ter a bit."
The books of
Messrs. Waterman &
Co., though fairly com-
plicated, were child's
play to Frank. He went
through them with an
ease and rapidity which
surprised his erstwhile
superior,Mr. Sampson.

Discuss the text

Exercise 5
Describe the pictures,
using the phrasal
verbs:
Let on – делать вид;
притворяться
Bump into – случайно
встретиться
Bump against – уда-
риться, наскочить
на
Bump off – убить

101
… …

3. spend 12. elimi
Lay or Cut nate
… invest …
(mone
y)
4. pay 13. econ
Put (mone Cut omiz
…. y) in a …. e
lump …
sum
5. put 14. pub-
Lay aside Brin lish
… g ...
6. amou 15. with-
Co nt to Pull draw
me ...

7. mean 16. ap-
Sta Co pear
nd me in
… ... print
8. be as 17. with-
Сo good Pull draw
me as to …
… …
9. deter 18. suite
Put Cut d to
… …

Lesson 10
Exercise 1
a) Study the following
phrasal verbs:
1. hold forth – рассуж-
дать, разглагольст-
вовать;

103
12. hold up – выстав-
лять; поддерживать;
грабить; задержи-
вать;
13. .turn to – обращать-
ся (за советом)
14. look to – обращать-
ся (за советом);
15. get over – объяс-
нять; убеждать; по-
кончить с работой;
16. put forward – пред-
лагать;
17. bring up – подни-
мать (вопрос), заво-
дить разговор; вос-
питывать (детей);
18. take up – обсуж-
дать, поднимать
(вопрос);
19. cut in (on) – преры-
вать, втиснуться пе-
ред кем-либо.

b) Match the phrasal


verbs with their
definitions:

1. Hold transmit
forth –
2. Put state
down – clearly
& defi-
nitely

3. Lay write
down – (down)
4. Take write out
down – (chequ
e)

105
Read the text and an-
swer the questions:
1. What reasons do
learners have for
learning English?
2. Is it polite or impolite
to cut in on other
speakers?
3. What should English
teachers lay down?
4. What do learners turn
to teachers for?
Text: Learning English
There are many rea-
sons for learning Eng-
lish. What I'm getting at
is that some learners may
need to put forward busi-
ness plans and hold forth
about different subjects,
while others from the
same companies may just
need to take down mes-
sages over the phone, put
down faxes and make up
short letters.
Teachers of general
English assume that
learners will want to put
across their basic re-
quirements, get over per-
sonal information, put
over their preferences
and opinions and take up
certain topics in conver-
sation or debate.
Teaching languages
often involves passing on
social skills such as cut-
ting in on other speakers.

107
проблемами будут про-
блемы учета. Но оказа-
лось, что это не так.
Основными оказались
проблемы человече-
ских отношений".
Мы убеждены в
том, что люди не нахо-
дятся полностью в вла-
сти своих привычек и
своего окружения. Они
могут изменять и пер-
вое, и второе. Мы наде-
емся, что эта книга по-
может Вам лучше
осознать Ваши реаль-
ные возможности, что-
бы управлять своей
судьбой, принимать
решения, развивать
свои этические взгля-
ды, повышать уваже-
ние к другим и понять,
что Вы рождены выиг-
рывать.
Is the text interesting to
discuss? Why?

Exercise 4
a) Read the text and an-
swer the questions:
1) How did the Cowper-
woods enjoy their
life?
2) Did Lillian Wiggin do
well in her mar-
riage?
call at – зайти куда-
либо,

109
house, that Frank met a
certain Mrs. Semple,
who interested him
greatly. Her husband had
a pretentious shoe store
on Chest-nut Street, near
Third, and was planning
to open a second one far-
ther out on the same
street.
In the meantime,
his interest in Mrs. Sem-
ple had been secretly and
strangely growing. When
he received an invitation
to call at the Semple
home, he accepted with a
great deal of pleasure.
Their house was located
not so very far from his
own, on North Front
Street, in the neighbour-
hood of what is now
known as No. 956. It
had, in summer, quite a
wealth of green leaves
and vines. There were no
children -a dispensation
of sex conditions which
had nothing to do with
her, for she longed to
have them.
She was without
any notable experience in
social life, except such as
had come to the Wiggin
family, of which she was
a member – relatives and
a few neighbourhood
friends visiting. Lillian
Wiggin – that was her

111
think over – обдумы-
вать;
go on – приближаться
(к возрасту);
turn out – увольнять;
take to – полюбить.

SENTENCE
& OPTI
OPTION O
- N
FEEDB S
ACK
1 By the time will be
the semes- getting
ter ends, I throug
___all my h
assign- will
ments. have
got
throug
h
2 By the time will be
the semes- mak-
ter ends, I ing up
___about my
which uni- mind
versity or will
college I have
would like made
to attend. up my
mind
3 By the time I will be
finish col- com-
lege, I ing by
___an will
MBA. have
(Masters come
degree in by
Business

113
___a few ing by
years of will
work- have
experience . come
by
9 By age 45, I will be
___toward going
becoming a on
manger or will
CEO5. have
moving= gone
working on
with a goal
1 By age 45, I will
___the es- have
sential as- figured
pects out
(things) of will be
managing a figur-
company. ing out
1 By the time I will be
reach the turning
age of will
sixty-five, have
my hair turned
___gray.(on
going)
1 By the time I will be
reach the work-
age of ing
sixty-five, I will
___for have
more than worke
forty years. d
1 By the time I will be
reach sev- turned

5
Директор предпри-
ятия – Chief Executive Of-
ficer.

115
Check yourself! Write
the necessary parti-
cles:
Phr Defi- Phr Defi-
asal ni- asal nition
ver tion verb
b
1. make 11. apply
Hol a Put for
d speec ...
… h ...
2. write 12.
ex-
Put (dow hibit,
Hol
… n) put
d ...
for-
ward
3. state 13. apply
Lay clear Tur to (for
… ly & n ... advice
defi- )
nitely

117
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