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CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION

Background of the Study

Diversity is one of the central ideas of Inclusive Education (IE) where it

promotes education right and equality for every student with and without

disability. Inclusion of learner with special needs into regular schools is one of

the next significant issue and challenging for everyone especially teachers

and faculties both national and international (United Nations Educational,

Scientific and Organization, 2019).

An inclusive school must recognize and respond to the different needs

of children by learning to harmonize educational differences ensuring effective

learning for all. It involves a restructuring of the school in many ways where it

should manage classes and students with a variety of educational needs

(pupils with difficulties, deficits, and complex disabilities), offering various

opportunities to promote the meaningful participation of such students in

school activities (Murdaca, Oliva and Corta, 2016). However, nowadays

research has started to address the experiences an outcome of students with

disabilities in inclusive education. It is agreed that several aspects play a role

in the process of including students with disabilities in regular school such as

class size (Scruggs & Mastropiere, 1996) and type of disability (Stoiber,

Gettinger, & Goetz, 1998). Another aspect describe as important are the

attitudes of typically developing students.

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The ongoing trend towards inclusive education are difficulties

experiences by students with disabilities in social participation led to an

expansion of studies focusing on the attitude of students without disabilities

over the last decade. Attitude is an individual’s viewpoints or disposition

towards a particular object/attitude to learn an grew to their full potential, it is

necessary to ensure the presence of a socially accepting a supportive

environment at high reload where students can be experience. Positive

interaction with peers develops meaningful friendship and enjoy increase

participation in all types of school activities (Christensen, 1996; Martin et. al.,

1998; Simeonseon, Careson, Huntington, Mchillen, & Brent, 2001). But in

contrary, negative peer attitude and generally recognize as being a major

barrier to full implementation of inclusive education (Christensen, 1996; Marth,

Jorgensen, & Klein, 1996). Negative attitude may result in low acceptance by

peers, few friendships, loneliness and or being bullied, these can have bad

effects on the lives of students with disabilities, resulting in difficulties in

joining group activities, dealing academic performance; and/or problem

behavior (Jackson & Bracher. 1998; Ollendick, Weist, Borden & Greene,

1992). In worst case it may lead to other mental issues (Aluede, Adeleke,

Omoike & Afer-Akpaide, 2008; Lund et. Al., 2009). Stoneman (1993) added

that negative attitude maybe obstructive as physical barriers, limiting those

with disabilities from participating fully in schools and communities. Nowicki

and Sandieson (2002) states that the attitude of regular students towards

those with disabilities are one of the major problems in inclusive education. In

Baybay City Senior High School, they are practicing inclusive education and
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there is only one case that approved and diagnosed with autism. With this, the

researchers are motivated to explore about the learner with special needs.

The purpose of this study is to know what the Baybay City Senior High School

students’ attitude and acceptance towards peer with special needs.

Statement of the Problem

This study aims to determine the student’s attitude towards learner with

special needs in Baybay City Senior High School. Specifically, this seeks to

answer the following questions:

1. What is the demographic profile of the Baybay City Senior High School

students that have a peer with special needs in terms of:

1.1. Age; and

1.2. Sex

2. What is the level of agreement of attitude and acceptance of students

having a peer with special needs?

3. Is there a significant relationship between the age of the students that

have a peer with special needs and their level of agreement of attitude

and acceptance towards peer with special needs?

4. Is there a significant difference between the level of agreement of

attitude and acceptance of male and female students towards a peer

with special needs?

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5. How do students react and show their attitude when peer with special

needs tantrums occur?

6. Why do the students have positive attitude towards peer with special

needs?

a. Acceptance

b. Kindness

Significance of the Study

This study provides more information about Inclusive Education, the

students attitude and acceptance towards peer with special needs. The study

benefits the following:

Policy Makers or School Administrator. They should consider

developing and improving ways about the beneficial outcomes of inclusive

education for the learner with special needs. Also, if ever it shows positive

results, more intervention should be implemented.

Teachers. They will help them to develop their knowledge on

how to handle a learner with special needs and be more considerate and

understand the situation.

Parents. To let their children to enroll in inclusive education and

it would be less concernment.

Students. To have more effective and efficient knowledge about

the learner with special needs.

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Scope and Delimitation of the Study

The respondents and participants are those students who has learner

with special needs. This study was conducted on the fourth week of

November to December 2019 at Baybay City Senior High School at 30 de

Deciembre St. Baybay City, Leyte. The respondents were 23 students and 8

participants. This study only covers the attitude and acceptance of students

towards learner with special needs.

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CHAPTER II

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

Inclusive Education

Learner with special needs in inclusive classrooms are provided a

chance to study in the same setting as their peers without handicapped. Now,

inclusive education has been increasing in number during the past decade.

The proponents of inclusive education believe that, sharing of educational

experience with non-disabled students brings advantages in both academic

and social skills areas to students with handicapped (Adibsereshki and

Salehpour, 2012).

Students Attitude towards learner with special needs

Attitude is one of the major barriers that is generally recognized to fully

implementation of inclusive education (Christensen, 1996; Marth, Jorgensen,

& Klein, 1996). Attitude has two faces the positive face and negative face. In

the study of Attitudes of Special Education Students towards Students with

Disabilities in General Classes related with some variables, the researchers

stated that the reason of positive attitude is the background and information

about educational course that the education students studied during their

class. This positive attitude supports the government when they need to apply

the inclusion experiences because there are many benefits of inclusion for the

children and families. For examples, all parents want their children to be

accepted by their classmates, have friends and lead “regular” lives. Inclusive

settings can make this vision a reality for many learners with special needs.
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When a student attends the classes that reflect the similarities and differences

of people in the real world, they will learn to appreciate diversity.

Characteristics of respect and understanding will grow and nurture when

children of differing abilities and cultures play and learn together, schools are

most significant place for the children to develop friendships and learn social

skills (Hamid, AE., Alasmari A., and Eldood, EY., 2015). In the other hand, the

major aspect that can affect inclusive education is the negative attitude of the

peers towards learner with special needs. Personality characteristics on

attitudes toward learner with special needs found a complex display of

attributes to be correlated with negative attitudes including anxiety, alienation,

authoritarianism, ethnocentrism, dogmatism, cognitive simplicity, intolerance

of ambiguity, conformity, ego-weakness, and body concept (Cloerkes, 1981).

Anxiety was found to be negatively correlated with attitudes toward learner

with special needs in all 14 studies related to this matter (Cloerkes).

Moreover, anxiety was correlated with many of the other above-mentioned

personality characteristics and has been considered to be possibly the most

important basis for these characteristics (Cloerkes). The relationship of

alienation to attitudes toward learner with special needs has been reported in

several studies (Cloerkes, 1981; Siller, 1984a, 1988; Zuckerman, 1980). In all

instances, alienation correlated substantially with negative attitudes.

Owing to the possible consequences of negative attitudes, it is

important to know which variables relate to the attitudes of typically

developing peers. Eventually, this may lead to appropriate interventions to

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predict, explain and manipulate reactions toward the attitude object. Previous

research on peers’ attitudes did examine the variables such as gender, age,

and experience with inclusive education (Nowicki & Sandieson, 2002), but a

clear overview of these variables is lacking.

Students’ Fully Acceptance towards learner with special needs.

In the area of inclusive education, acceptance of learner with special

needs has been the subject of many investigations. The study of Nikolaraizi et

al. (2005), which was about children’s attitudes towards individuals with

special needs, indicated that children in Greece and in the United States were

more accepting of individuals with special needs.

Research in the area of inclusive education has identified several

important factors contributing to its relative success. Among these is the

acceptance of the learner with special needs by his/her regular peers (Flatch

2000). Friendship is important for nurturing social skills and during children’s

life these skills are necessary to grow social relations (Gifford-Smith and

Brownell 2003). Acceptance is an effective factor for making friends (Gest,

Graham-Bermann, and Hartup 2001) and friendships provide the context for

social, emotional and cognitive development. Furthermore, they believe that

this kind of situation will provide the experience for school peers without a

known disability to develop a better understanding and tolerance for individual

differences (Kalambouka et al. 2007; Horn and Timmons 2009; Prater 2010).

Negative attitudes may result in low acceptance by peers, few

friendships, loneliness and even being rejected and/or bullied. This can have

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dramatic effects on the lives of young learner with special needs, resulting in

difficulties of joining group activities, declining academic performance,

dropping out of school and/or problem behavior (Jackson & Bracken, 1998;

Ollendick, Weist, Borden, & Greene, 1992).

Conceptual Framework

Age Sex

Negative Positive
Attitude Students Attitude and Acceptance Attitude

Learners with
special needs

Figure 1. Conceptual Framework

This framework shows the relationship between the independent

variable which are the age and sex that may affect the dependent variable

that is students’ attitude and acceptance towards learners with special needs.

In the age, it may have significant relationship with the students and their level

of agreement of attitude and acceptance, and sex may also have significant

difference with the level of agreement of their attitude and acceptance


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towards peer with special needs. The students’ attitude and acceptance may

have the two faces the negative and positive attitude, if the attitude is positive

therefore, the acceptance would be positive and vice versa

Operational Definition of Terms

Inclusive Education – equal education for every student’s with or

without

peer with special needs.

Attitude – a manner that act towards a student having a peer with

special

needs.

Acceptance – the action of accepting the situation of student with

special

needs.

Learner with special needs – requires additional accommodations or

special attention and it needs special help or care.

CATCH - Chedoke-McMaster Attitudes towards Children with

Handicapped this is the tool or the standardized questionnaire

that the study utilized to measure attitude and acceptance of

students toward the peer with special needs.

Hypothesis of the Study

There is no significant relationship between age of the students and

their attitude and acceptance towards learner with special needs.


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There is no significant difference between the attitude and acceptance

of male and female students towards learner with special needs.

CHAPTER III

METHODOLOGY

This chapter presents the research methodology which consists of the

research design and source of data, data collection, data analysis, ethical

considerations, acknowledging bias, and trustworthiness.

Research Design

This design is a mixed method of Quantitative Research and

Qualitative Research. Explanatory Sequential Design is used for it gathered

first the Quantitative Research before it explores and explains the study with

the Qualitative Research. Phenomenological approach was used with the goal

to fully understand the attitude and acceptance of the students having learner

with special needs classmate.

Sample

In Quantitative Research, the researchers used a Complete

Enumeration which considered all the 23 students and in the Qualitative

Research, Purposive Sampling was used with 8 participants from Baybay City

Senior High School. Specifically, it only covers one section in grade 11

because only one student in Baybay City Senior High School that has been

diagnosed with autism.


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Instruments

To assess the demographic profile and the attitude and acceptance of

the Baybay City Senior High School students, the study utilizes the use of

standardized questionnaire that is adapted from the study of Abiola Olaleye,

Olorunfemi Ogundele, Samson Deji, Oluseye Ajayi, Omolara Olaleye, Titilope

Adeyanju entitled Attitudes of Students towards Peers with Disability in an

Inclusive School in Nigeria; Chedoke-McMaster Attitudes towards Children

with Handicapped Scale or CATCH scale to measure attitude of the students.

The researchers used a journal/field notes to record the responses of

participants/informants and for a wider scope of responses, an audio-

recording of responses are also used with the full consent of the

participants/informants.

Data Collection Procedure

A letter addressed to the school principal IV, asking permission on

conducting the study in Baybay City Senior High School. The researchers

prepare a consent letter to the adviser and students. After its approval, the

researchers start to conduct the Quantitative Research in the classroom of

learner with special needs where it informs them the title of the study and its

purpose of the research undertakings and asked them for their cooperation in

sharing their experiences of having a learner with special needs classmate.

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After gathering the quantitative data, the researchers proceed to conduct the

Qualitative Research. In the interview, open-ended interview questions are

used. Proper instructions were given to the informants before the start of the

interview. The interview was in-depth with a collaborative and conducive

setting. The feelings of the participants as well as their comments during the

interviews are also considered and interpreted. Collecting data is done and

findings are recorded. The researchers personally administer the interview by

meeting the informants and facilitating the interview for them to share and

give their responses. Lastly, the data collected was analyzed and interpreted.

Data Analysis Procedure

The accumulated data were analyzed using necessary tools and a

computer software to obtain the attitude and acceptance of Baybay City

Senior High School students towards learner with special needs.

Frequency Count and Percentage was used to tally the number of sex

and their age of Baybay City Senior High School students. Also, it computes

the percentage.

Mean was used to have the average of the level of agreement of

attitude and acceptance of students having a learner with special needs

classmate and to know what the result is.

Table 1. Scoring Criteria to Categorized the mean.

Rate Range
Strongly Agree 3.26 – 4.0

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Agree 2.51 – 3.25
Disagree 1.76 – 2.50
Strongly Disagree 1.0 – 1.750

Spearman Rank Order Correlation Coefficient at 0.05 (5%) level of

significance was used to know the significant relationship between age and

level of agreement of attitude and acceptance towards learner with special

needs.

Mann Whitney Test at 0.05 (5%) level of significance was used to

determine the significant difference between the level of agreement attitude

and acceptance of male and female students towards learner with special

needs.

In Qualitative Data Analysis, only two steps IPA (Pietkiewicz and

Smith, 2012) they are, Transform Notes into Emergent Themes and Seek

Relationships and Clustering Themes.

Ethical Considerations

In the conduct of the research study, the researchers take into

consideration ethical concerns so as to promote ethicality knowing that the

researchers were dealing with students’ attitude and acceptance towards

learner with special needs.

In the protection of the participants of the study, the researchers

develop trust in them by promoting research integrity. In addition, the

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researchers ensure that they respect the rights, needs, values, reputation and

identities of the participants observing ethical considerations.

Risk-Benefits Assessment. The researchers make sure that the

participants of the study are free from risk and will be intentionally protected

from any harm or feeling of discomfort in their participation for the research.

The benefits overcoming the risk is assessed with open communication

between the researchers and to the participants. The researchers ensure the

participants that no personal information is revealed about them in the

analysis, interpretation, and presentation of research findings and results.

Constant Comprehension and Documentation Of Informed

Consent. The researchers observe the informed consent as an integral part

of ethical considerations in research which primarily involves a clear and

comprehensive negotiation between the researchers and the selected

participants for the study so they would know their status with their

participation. The researchers thoroughly explain to them the goals of the

study. And also specify to the participants what data is being collected and

how they are used. Researchers hold the responsibility of fully informing the

participants on the concerns and aspects that are covered in the research

procedure. In addition, the researchers make them understand the nature of

commitment that they give for their participation which should be voluntary.

The informants were also informed on their selection which is not personal but

rather more on their opinion that they can contribute meaningfully to the

successful result and outcomes of the study. The identity of the researcher,

the nature of the study, the role of the participants, the objectives of the
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research, the presentation of outcomes and results and the process to how

the results are used and published is thoroughly explained to the participants.

Furthermore, the researchers also let them understand the potential risk and

benefit in their participation for the study. In this way, they can decide for

themselves if they voluntarily participate or not. Likewise, alternatives and

compensation were also be talked in detail with the participants and most

importantly their confidentiality and voluntary consent.

Confidentiality Procedure. The researchers let the participants know

that the information that the researchers get from them are strictly confidential

and their identity are also protected. Researchers ensure the participants that

no personal information about them are revealed in the research findings and

results that are analyses, interpret, and present.

Debriefing, Communication and Referrals. The researchers make

sure that all in the participants of the study were briefed and debriefed with

regards to their participation in the study and the information they share as

their responses. Researchers foster an open and positive communication with

the participants making them feel secure and comfortable with the process

that they go through in their participation in the study. The researchers have

follow-up meetings with them for researchers let them go through their

responses from which they have the right to withhold, omit, or change.

Incentives. The researchers provided them a simple token of

appreciation and snacks considering the precious time that they lend to the

study.

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Conflict of Interest. The researchers make sure that there is no

conflict of interest between researchers and the participants who are also in

the same school where researchers belong. Researchers let them understand

the interest to which researchers moved to conduct the study and let them

express also their own side with regards to their participation in the study so

both our interests are met and are not in conflict.

CHAPTER IV

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

This chapter presents the analysis of data followed by a discussion of

the research findings. The findings relate to the research questions that

guided the study.

Table 2. Percentage of Age of Students Having Peer with Special Needs

Age 16-20 21-25

Number of Students 22 1

Percentage 96% 4%

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Sex

16

Female Male

Mostly of the respondents that the researchers interviewed are 16-18

years of old, they are about 22 participants and only one adult respondent

was interviewed with the age of 24. It is expected that, almost of the

respondents were middle adolescence.

Figure 2. Percentage of Sex of Students Having Peer with Special Needs

The respondents are mostly female that has a number of 16

respondents while male respondents are only 7, a total of 23 respondents.

Undoubtedly, the female students are dominant than male students.

Table 3. The mean level of agreement of attitude and acceptance of students

having a learner with special needs classmate

Item
Items Mean Interpretation
No.
I wouldn’t introduce learner with
2 1.78261
special needs to my friend. Disagree
I wouldn’t know what to say to a
4 2.47826 Disagree
learner with special needs.
I would be afraid of a learner with
10 2 Disagree
special needs.

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I would talk to a learner with
11 2.82609 Disagree
special needs I didn’t know
Learner with special needs
12 1.78261 Disagree
doesn’t like to make friends.
Learner with special needs dent
14 2.34783 Disagree
feels sorry for themselves
I would try to stay away from a
16 1.82609 Disagree
learner with special needs
I wouldn’t like a learner with
18 special needs friend as much as 2 Disagree
my other friends
In class I wouldn’t sit next to a
20 1.86957 Disagree
learner with special needs
I try not to look at someone who
22 2.13043 Disagree
is a learner with special needs
Learner with special needs
24 1.95652 Disagree
doesn’t have much fun
I would invite learner with special
25 2.43478 Disagree
needs to sleep over at my house
Being near someone who is
26 learner with special needs scares 1.91304 Disagree
me
I feel jealous towards learner with
Strongly
28 special needs because they are 1.73913
disagree
more prioritize.
I would tell my secret to a learner
29 2.34783 Disagree
with special needs
Learner with special needs is
30 2.21739 Disagree
often sad
I would not go to a learner with
32 2.04348 Disagree
special needs house to play
I feel upset when I see a learner
34 1.86957 Disagree
with special needs
I would miss recess to keep a
35 learner with special needs 2.17391 Disagree
company
I would be embarrassed if a
Strongly
37 learner with special needs invited 1.52174
Disagree
me to his birthday

Disagree

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Item
Items Mean Interpretation
No.

1 I wouldn’t mind if a learner with 3.47826 Strongly Agree


special needs sits next to me.
Learner with special needs can
3 3.13043 Agree
do lots of things for themselves.
learner with special needs like to
5 3.17391 Agree
play.
I feel sorry for handicapped
6 2.82609 Agree
student.
I would stick up for a learner with
7 special needs who was being 3.30435 Strongly Agree
teased
Learner with special needs wants
8 2.95652 Agree
lot of attention from adults
I would invite a learner with
9 special needs to my birthday 3 Agree
party
I would like a learner with special
13 2.82609 Agree
needs to live next-door to me
I would be happy to have a
15 learner with special needs for a 3.26087 Agree
special friend.
Learner with special needs is as
17 2.91304 Agree
happy as I am
Learner with special needs
19 2.82609 Agree
knows how to behave properly
I would be pleased if a learner
21 with special needs invited to me 3.04348 Agree
to his house
I would feel good doing a school
23 project with a learner with special 2.73913 Agree
needs
I would enjoy being with a learner
31 2.56522 Agree
with special needs
27 Learner with special needs is 3.34783 Strongly Agree
interested in lots of things
33 Learner with special needs can 3.34783 Strongly Agree
make new friends
36 Learner with special needs need 3.30435 Strongly Agree
lot of help to do things
Agree

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Children with Handicapped Scale is used to test the mean level of the

agreement of attitudes and acceptance of students having a learner with

special needs classmate. The researchers found out that students tend to

have positive attitude and acceptance towards learner with special needs.

Most of the response were positive for the reason that they possess

acceptance and they understand the differences between them, this result is

supported with the study of Alnhadi (2019) he stated that students expressed

accepting attitudes, with an overall mean of 24.5. This can also be described

as “fairly tolerant attitudes towards peers with disabilities”, as expressed by

Bossaert et al. (2011) regarding a Belgian sample with mean of 25.37.

Table 4. Spearman Rho’s Correlation Distribution Results between age of

students and the level of agreement of attitude and acceptance towards

learner with special needs

N Correlation P-value
Correlation Distribution
Results between age of
Coefficient
students and the level of
agreement of attitude
and acceptance towards 23 0.270 0.213
learner with special
needs.

Note: Level of Significance- 0.05 or 5%

P-value of 0.213 and the correlation coefficient is higher than the 0.05

level of significance therefore, the relationship of age and the level of

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agreement of attitude and acceptance of students towards learner with special

needs is not significant.

Thus, the result of the study has failed to reject the null hypothesis.

This is because the respondents age has the range of 16-18, they show a

similar attitude towards learner with special needs which is positive.

This result has a similar result to the study of Tamm and Prellwitz

(2000), they state that the peers are willing to include the child with disability

in their activities

Significant Difference Sex N Sum of Mean Rank P-value


Results between sex Rank
of students and the
level of agreement of Male 7 96.00 13.71 0.422
attitude and
acceptance towards
learner with special Female 16 180.00 11.25
needs.
Total 23

Table 5. Mann Whitney’s Significant Difference Results between sex of

students and the level of agreement of attitude and acceptance towards

learner with special needs.

Note: Level of Significance- 0.05 or 5%

P-value of 0.422 is greater than the 0.05 level of significance it appears

therefore that the male and female responses on the level of agreement of

attitude and acceptance of students towards learner with special needs is the

same, there is no significant relationship.

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Consequently, the result of the study has failed to reject the null

hypothesis. This claim is in line to the result of Doreen and Kurniawati (2018)

that peers whether male or female have the same attitude towards learner

with special needs, their study results that girls have a slightly more positive

than boys but still there is no significant differences of gender in dealing with

students with disability.

How do students react and show their attitude when peer with special

needs tantrums occur?

Cluster Theme: Attitude and Reaction

Attitude is a relatively enduring organization of beliefs, feelings, and

behavioral tendencies towards socially significant objects, groups, events or

symbols. A feeling or way of thinking that affects a person’s behavior (Hogg

and Vaughn 2005, p.150).

On the other hand, reaction is a defense mechanism in which person

perceives their true feelings or desires to be socially or, in some cases, legally

unacceptable, and so they attempt to convince themselves or others that the

opposite is true--often in a very exaggerated performance(Speciale, 2019).

It was noteworthy that, the participant of the study shows a positive

attitude towards learner with special needs. While in reaction, at first, some of

participants show different reaction like being irritated, feel strange, and

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startled every time its tantrums occur but even though they feel that way they

still understand its situation for they know that their peer is intellectually

different to them.

Basic Theme: Irritated, Startled, Weird, Understand, Strange,

Familiarity

Irritability

According to the study of Barata, Holtzman et. al (2016) irritability is an

emotional process that is characterized by a proneness to experience adverse

emotional conditions, such as anger, annoyance, and frustration, which may

or may not be externally voiced. Irritability frequently includes a feeling that

one’s emotional responses are inconsistent to the immediate source, but

difficult to control.

In connection with the study, the participant slightly felt to be irritated

with the action of her learner with special needs classmate. Based on the

response of one of the participants, if the autism disorder of their learner with

special needs classmate suddenly occur, she gets a little bit disappointed

especially if the learner with special needs gets ahead of himself.

“Malain gamay kay kana bang kalit-kalit ra siya… niya kanang

mugara”(Miya).

Startled

As stated in Negative Emotion Typology (n.d.), startle is a feeling when

something suddenly and unexpectedly happens in no time, which could be

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something bad. This is an immediate urge to find out what is going on in the

surroundings.

In corresponds with the participants answer, participants often get

shocked every time their learner with special needs classmate situation gets

worse that cause it to occur. Mostly of the participants responds that when

their learner with special needs classmate tantrums occur, they were startled

but not to the point that they will get disappointed because they know what

their classmate is experiencing.

“Oo, kanang malubatan mi niya. Dili man ko malain niya kay kanang musabot

raman mis iya sitwasyon” (Cara)

“Malubatan mi, pero okay raman. Sabton nalag kay first time man nako nagka

classmate og parihas niya” (Neneng B)

“Malubatan ra, di manko malain,makatawa rako.” (Cardo)

Weird

According to Giridharadas (2010) Weird is a feeling that is used by a

subject to make others feel alienated or separated, with their ways of thinking

framed as deviant, not different.

It should be mentioned that, whenever the learner with special needs

disorder occur some of the participant feel strange due of its behavior, one of

the participants said that she feels strange whenever his classmates disorder

occurs, but it was just normal.

“Makuyawan, pero normal raman na sa iya.” (Judy)

Understanding
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Understanding is possible when it holds a particular valuable in part

due to what it requires in a special grasp or awareness of something, deep

appreciation, grasp of explanatory and other coherence -making relationships

(Kvanvig, 2003)

It is expected that, mostly of the participants understand the situation of

their learner with special needs classmate, they grasp the idea that their

classmate has an autism spectrum disorder. Participants response that they

get shocked if their classmates ASD occur but even though they witness that

state, they will understand their classmate’s situation.

“Oo, kanang malubatan mi niya. Dili man ko malain niya kay kanang

musabot raman mis iya sitwasyon” (Cara)

“Malubatan mi, pero okay raman. Sabton nalag kay first time man nako

nagka classmate og parihas niya” (Neneng B)

“Malubatan mi pag first, pero misabot rami kadugayan.” (Macky)

Familiarity

Along with the study of Alnhadi (2019), Familiarity with student with

special needs and students without special needs in general has a positive

influence on students’ attitudes and acceptance.

It appears therefore that, familiarity is a good indication to the students

that has learner with special needs classmate to cope up with its situation.

Linked to the participants response, some of them said that they are familiar

with their classmate’s situation, so it is normal already for them to saw that

kind of scenario.

26

“Excellence is our Culture”


“Malubatan mi oyy sa una pero naanad naman mi kadugayan.” (Ariana).

“Wala ra, normal ra kay naanad naman ko” (Pablo).

Why do the students have positive attitude towards peer with special

needs?

Acceptance

All of participants had said that they are delight to have a learner with

special needs classmate because it is a great feeling to experience something

new, they have learnt that the learner with special needs cause no harm and

the learner with special needs shows good treatment like he is being friendly

to all of them “yes, happy kaayu kay magkasinabot mi.” Cardo stated; “oo,

okay ra kaayu siya kay buotan man siya” Judy, his seatmate. Adibsereshki

and Salehpour (2012) pointed out that the regular education students benefit

from inclusion because it leads to a greater acceptance of students with

disabilities, facilitates understanding that students with disabilities are not

always easily identified, and promotes better understanding of the similarities

among the students with and without disabilities.

Kindness
27

“Excellence is our Culture”


It is in nature of Filipinos that they are hospitable and kind with their

fellowmen. Just like what the participants response “tabangan siya namo

kung naa siyay wa nasabtan or nahibaw’an.” Neneng B. It implies that when a

person is in need, they do not see them as a less human for humanity works

and they cultivate kindness. In connection with this, Annon (2005) also

indicates that “all human beings have the right to be treated with dignity and

respect”. The concept of respect shows that we believe someone as a valued

person therefore, respect is how we show our regard for each other. Friedman

(2017) conveys that respectful treatment and interaction enhance a person’s

self-esteem and result in positive perception and most essentially needs to

someone with intellectual disability so that they cannot feel differences among

to normal people.

28

“Excellence is our Culture”


CHAPTER V

CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION

Conclusion

In depth research and attention has been given to this study.

Researchers revealed the following.

The results show that most of the respondents were 16-17 years of age

or middle adolescence and in sex, mostly of them were female. In affirmation

of this, there is no significant relationship between the age of the students and

their level of agreement of attitude and acceptance towards peer with special

needs and also in sex of the students and their level of agreement of attitude

and acceptance towards peer with special needs shows no significant

difference. Correspondingly, the respondents presented positive attitude and

acceptance towards a peer with special needs. And, it is in nature of individual

what is its attitude towards a learner with special needs

29

“Excellence is our Culture”


It also reveals that when the tantrums of learner with special needs
occur, at first, the participants felt strange, weird and irritation but at the time
goes by, they tend to understand the situation of peer with special needs and
they also used to it because the students exposed with the peer with special
needs. In addition, students disclose that they have positive attitude towards
peer with special needs for they accept and understand what kind of the
learner with special needs experiencing is. Equally, the students accepted the
learner with special needs open arms.
In overall, the respondents and participants show positive attitude and

acceptance towards a classmate with special needs.

Recommendation

 Inclusive Education should be promoted for it has a positive and great

impact to the learner with special needs.

 Seminars for teachers and students is a must so that they can be

knowledgeable about learner with special needs and they can deal with

them with the right attitude.

 The study implies that schools must push for more contact among

learner with special needs and their peers, especially in fun and

enjoyable activities for it might help increase familiarity and decrease

stereotyping of learner with special needs.

 The researchers recommend to the future researchers that if ever you

got a chance to conduct in another school, it would be better

particularly if the school is diverse to a learner with special needs. Also,

larger sample is important to confirm the study result, especially to


30

“Excellence is our Culture”


compare them based on certain independent variable. Likewise, further

studies with a sex comparison would be informative and exploring with

different range of age would be more concrete and significant.

Correspondingly, enough time and perseverance are the key to unluck

the truth.

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Christensen, C. (1996). Disabled, handicapped or disordered: `What’s in a

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Cloerkes, G. (1981). Are prejudices against disabled persons determined by

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Doreen, R. A. & Kurniawati, F. (2018). Gender Differences in Attitude Toward

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Friedman, C. (2018). R-ES-P-E-C-T: The Relationship Between Being

Respected and Quality of life of Disabled People. Disability Studies

Quarterly, 38(2). Retrieved February 9, 2019 from

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Flatch, P.B. (2000). Education of exceptional children in regular schools.

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Elementary Education Department, Edinburgh University, Edinburgh.

Gest, S.D, Graham-Bermann, S.A., and Hartup, W.W. (2001). Peer

experience: Common and unique features of number of friendships,

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Gifford-Smith, M.E., and Brownell, C.A. (2003). Childhood peer relationships:

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Hamid A. E., Alasmari A & Eldood, E. Y. (2015). Attitudes of Special

Education

Students towards including Students with Disabilities in General

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related with Some Variables. University of Jazan, Special Education

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Jackson, L. D., & Bracken, B. A. (1998). Relationship between students’

social status and global domain-specific self-concepts. Journal of

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Nikolaraizi, M., Kumar, P., Favazza, P., Sideridis, G., Koulousious, D., & Raill,

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mainstreaming/inclusion, 1958–1995: A research synthesis.

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(pp.210±227). Orlando: Grune & Stratton.

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relationship/

Stoiber, K. C., Gettinger, M., & Goetz, D. (1998). Exploring factors influencing

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Bricker (Eds.), Integrating young children with disabilities in a

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Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.

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Health Sciences. 27, 223-240.

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strength. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, New York University.

Appendix A
Letter to the Principal

Republic of the Philippines


Department of Education
Region VIII (Eastern Visayas)
Baybay City Division
BAYBAY CITY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
Baybay City, Leyte
November 18, 2019

Roger O. Lingatong
Principal IV
Baybay City Senior High School

Dear Sir. Lingatong:

Good day!

We, the grade 12-ABM AMAZON students are currently conducting a


research study for our Inquiries, Investigation, Immersion subject entitled
Case Study: Students Attitude and Acceptance Towards Learner with Special
Needs in Baybay City Senior High School aims to determine the significant
relationship between the age and sex of the students and their attitude and
acceptance towards learner with special needs. With this, we humbly ask for
your permission regarding the conduct of our study this month of November.
Hoping for your positive response. Thank you and God bless!

Respectfully yours,
Ibañez, Gil
37

“Excellence is our Culture”


Amen, Raipa M.
Carbon, Jessa
Gonzales, Jerry Mae
Leyson, Valerie Amor
Mazo, Nicollette
Perez, Maybeline
Salonoy, Michelle
Noted by: Approved by:
Leizl F. Abrantes Roger O. Lingatong
Research Adviser Principal IV, BCSHS

Appendix B
Survey Questionnaire
Good day students! We are the grade 12 ABM - Amazon from Baybay
City Senior High School. In behalf of our 3I’s, we badly need your kind
participation on helping us to gather valid data. Thank you!
I. Demographic Profile Survey (please fill up some necessary
information. Optional part can be answered or not).
Name:_________________________________________(Optional)
Age: Sex:
II. Check the following determinants or reason as to:
Rate
4 Strongly Agree (SA)
3 Agree (A)
2 Disagree (D)
1 Strongly Disagree (SD)
No. Questions SA A D SD
I wouldn’t mind if a learner with special needs
1
sits next to me.
I wouldn’t introduce a learner with special
2
needs to my friend.
Learner with special needs can do lots of
3
things for themselves.
I wouldn’t know what to say to a learner with
4
special needs
5 Learner with special needs like to play.
6 I feel sorry for learner with special needs.

38

“Excellence is our Culture”


I would stick up for a learner with special
7
needs who was being teased
Learner with special needs wants lot of
8
attention from adults
I would invite a learner with special needs to
9
my birthday party
I would be afraid of a learner with special
10
needs
I would talk to a learner with special needs I
11
didn’t know
Learner with special needs doesn’t like to
12
make friends.
I would like a learner with special needs to
13
live next-door to me
Learner with special needs feels sorry for
14
themselves
I would be happy to have a learner with
15
special needs for a special friend
I would try to stay away from learner with
16
special needs
Learner with special needs is as happy as I
17
am
I wouldn’t like a learner with special needs
18
friend as much as my other friends
Learner with special needs knows how to
19
behave properly
In class I wouldn’t sit next to a learner with
20
special needs

I would be pleased if a learner with special


21
needs invited to me to his house

I try not to look at someone who is a learner


22
with special needs
I would feel good doing a school project with
23
a learner with special needs
Learner with special needs doesn’t have
24
much fun

39

“Excellence is our Culture”


I would invite a learner with special needs to
25
sleep over at my house
Being near someone who is a learner with
26
special needs scares me
learner with special needs is interested in lots
27
of things
I feel jealous towards learner with special
28
needs because they are more prioritize.
I would tell my secret to a learner with special
29
needs

30 learner with special needs is often sad


I would enjoy being with learner with special
31
needs
I would not go to a learner with special needs
32
house to play
Learner with special needs can make new
33
friends
I feel upset when I see a learner with special
34 needs
I would miss recess to keep a learner with
35 special needs company
Learner with special needs need lots of help
36 to do things
I would be embarrassed if a learner with
37 special needs invited me to his birthday
Source: Chedoke-McMaster Attitudes towards Children with Handicaps Scale

“God bless us all”


The questionnaire is adapted from the study of Abiola Olaleye,
Olorunfemi Ogundele, Samson Deji, Oluseye Ajayi, Omolara Olaleye, Titilope
Adeyanju entitled Attitudes of Students towards Peers with Disability in an
Inclusive School in Nigeria.

40

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Appendix C

RESULTS OF MEAN LEVEL OF AGREEMENT

Age Sex 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
17 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 3 3 2
16 2 3 2 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 1
17 1 4 1 3 2 4 2 4 4 1 1
17 2 4 1 3 2 3 2 3 3 4 2
16 2 3 1 4 3 3 3 4 4 4 2
17 2 4 2 4 3 3 4 4 4 3 4
17 2 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 4 4 3
17 1 3 2 3 3 2 4 4 4 4 2
16 2 4 1 4 1 3 3 4 4 4 2
17 1 3 1 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 2
24 2 3 2 4 2 3 3 4 4 3 2
16 1 3 3 3 4 4 3 4 4 3 2
16 1 3 1 4 2 3 1 3 2 3 1
16 1 4 1 4 3 4 3 2 2 3 3
17 1 4 4 3 2 2 3 2 2 3 1
16 2 3 2 3 3 3 2 4 3 3 2
16 2 3 2 2 3 3 4 4 3 2 1
17 2 3 2 3 3 4 4 3 2 3 1
16 2 4 1 3 2 3 2 3 2 2 3
16 2 4 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 2 3
17 2 4 2 3 3 3 4 4 3 4 1
17 2 4 2 3 2 3 2 4 3 2 2
16 2 4 1 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 3
3.478 1.782 3.130 2.478 3.173 2.826 3.304 2.956 3 2

41

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261 609 435 261 913 087 348 522

1
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24
8
3 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 3
2 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 3 3
4 1 4 3 4 1 4 4 3 1 4 1 4 1
3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 2
3 2 3 3 4 2 3 4 3 2 3 2 3 3
3 2 3 3 3 2 2 1 3 2 3 2 2 2
3 2 3 2 2 2 2 1 2 4 3 4 2 2
2 1 3 2 4 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 1
3 1 3 2 4 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 4 1
3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 2 2 3 2
3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2
3 1 3 3 4 1 1 1 4 1 4 4 3 1
3 2 3 2 3 2 4 3 3 2 3 2 3 1
3 1 3 3 4 2 3 1 4 1 4 2 3 2
3 2 3 3 2 3 4 4 3 2 3 1 2 2
3 2 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 2 3 3 3 2
2 2 3 2 4 1 3 1 2 1 3 1 2 1
3 1 3 3 4 2 3 1 3 2 3 2 3 2
3 2 2 2 3 2 3 3 2 2 3 4 2 3
2 2 2 2 3 2 3 3 2 2 3 2 2 3
3 2 3 3 4 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 2
2 2 2 2 3 2 3 1 4 2 2 2 3 2
3 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 2
2.82 1.78 2.82 2.34 3.2 1.82 2.91 2.82 1.86 3.04 2.13 2.7 1.95
608 260 608 782 608 608 304 2 608 956 347 043 391 652
7 9 7 6 7 7 3 7 5 8 5 3 2

42

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27 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37
3 2 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 1 2.5
675
68
2 2 3 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 2 2.2
702
7
4 1 4 1 2 1 2 4 4 1 1 3 1 2.5
405
41
3 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 3 2 3 3 2 2.4
864
86
3 2 3 4 3 2 3 1 4 1 2 4 1 2.8
108
11
3 2 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 4 2 2.7
837
84
2 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 3 4 1 2.6
216
22
2 3 3 2 4 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 2 2.6
756
76
2 2 4 2 4 2 3 2 4 3 2 3 3 2.7
297
3
2 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 3 2 2.3
783
78
3 1 3 1 2 2 3 2 3 1 3 3 1 2.5
135
14
3 1 4 1 3 2 1 1 4 1 1 4 1 2.5
405
41
3 1 4 2 3 3 3 2 4 2 3 4 1 2.5
405
41
3 3 4 1 4 3 3 1 4 1 1 4 1 2.6
43

“Excellence is our Culture”


486
49
3 2 4 2 3 3 3 2 3 1 2 3 1 2.5
675
68
2 2 3 3 2 2 3 2 3 1 1 4 2 2.4
594
59
2 1 4 2 1 1 3 2 4 3 2 3 2 2.2
972
97
2 3 4 1 2 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 1 2.5
945
95
1 2 4 1 1 2 2 2 4 1 1 3 2 2.3
513
51
1 3 2 1 1 2 2 1 3 2 2 3 2 2.2
702
7
3 1 3 1 2 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 1 2.5
675
68
2 1 4 2 2 1 3 3 4 2 3 4 2 2.4
864
86
2 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 1 2.2
972
97
2.4 1.9 3.3 1. 2.3 2.2 2.5 2.0 3.3 1.8 2.1 3.3 1.5
34 13 47 73 47 17 65 43 47 69 73 04 21
78 04 82 91 82 39 21 47 82 56 91 34 73
3 3 6 3 6 1 7 8 6 5 3 8 9

Appendix D

Thematic Analysis

Why do the students have positive attitude towards peer with special needs?
(Acceptance)
Cluster
Basic Theme/
Question Respondents Response
Theme Organizing
Theme
How are Miya “Okay raman kay Good Normal
you with friendly man sad
learner siya”

44

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Cara “Okay ra siya” Good

Judy “Okay ra kaayu” Good


“Nanibago kay first
time pa nako nagka
classmate og
Neneng B Good
ing’ana nay
deperensiya….pero
okay ra siya”
“Okay raman siya
Ariana murag rag wala Good
with siyay deperensya.”
special “Okay raman first
needs? time nako nagka
Macky Good
classmate og
ing’ana.”
“Okay ra kaayu, pag
Cardo first kay nabag’uhan Good
mi.”

“Okay raman, maka


Pablo adjust ramn sad sa Good
enivironment”

How do students react and show their attitude when peer with special needs
tantrums occur?
What is Cluster
your Basic Theme/
Respondents Response
reaction Theme Organizing
and Theme
attitude “Malain gamay kay Reaction and
when his kana bang kalit-kalit Attitude
Miya Irritability
tantrums siya…..niya kanang
occur? mugara”
Cara “Oo, kanang Startled and
malubatan mi niya. Understand
Dili man ko malain
niya kay kanang
musabot raman mis
iya sitwasyon”
45

“Excellence is our Culture”


“Makuyawan, pero
Judy normal raman na sa Weird
iya.”
“Malubatan mi, pero
okay raman. Sabton
nalag kay first time Startled and
Neneng B
man nako nagka Understand
classmate og
parihas niya”
“Malubatan mi oyy
sa una pero naanad Startled and
Ariana
naman mi Familiarity
kadugayan.”
“Malubatan mi pag
Startled and
Macky first, pero misabot
Understand
rami kadugayan.”

“Malubatan ra, di
manko Startled and
Cardo
malain,makatawa Chuckle
rako.”

“Wala ra, normal ra


Pablo kay naanad naman Familiarity
ko”

Are there Cluster


circumstan Basic Theme/
Respondents Response
ces that Theme Organizing
you got Theme
jealous for
Miya “Wala man.” Never
he is
prioritized
Equality
more. And “Wala man.fair man Fair
Cara
you know ug treatment sila sir” Treatment
the fact

46

“Excellence is our Culture”


that he has
disability. If “Ahhhhhhmmmm,
Judy Never
yes, why? murag wala man”
If no, why
not?
“Never man ko
Neneng B Never
nasuya sa iya.”

Ariana “Wala pa” Never

Macky “Wala man.” Never

“Wala kay normal


Never and
Cardo man mi,musabot
Understand
raman mi niya”

“No, fair raman ang


Fair
Pablo pagtrato sa mga
Treatment
teachers”

Why do the students have positive attitude towards peer with special needs?
(Kindness)
Cluster
Basic
Respondents Response Theme/Organ
Theme
izing Theme
“Oo….Kanang pag
Do you answer seth,
Miya Support
help him mangutana siya
when he is kung unsaon”
Cultivating
struggling? “Oo….Kanang
Kindness
mutabang man sad
Cara ko niya kung wala Support
siya kahibaw
unsaon”

47

“Excellence is our Culture”


“Oo perminte,
kanang mag quiz mi
niya kana bang wala
Judy Support
siya kasabot kung
unsaon ako siya
tabangan”
“Tabangan siya
namo kung naa
siyay wa nasabtan
Neneng B Support
or nahibaw’an.
Kanang hanas siya
labi nag sa English”
Seldom
Ariana “Oo, usahay”
Support
“Dili, di kay katigo
Smart
man siya kay
Learner with
Macky kanang murag
Special
bright pa siya namo
Needs
ba HAHAHA.”
“Tabangan…kanang
Cardo inig drawing- Support
drawing.”

“Yes, kaayo
Pablo Support
tabangan man”

Why do the students have positive attitude towards peer with special needs?
(Acceptance and Kindness)
Cluster
Basic
Respondents Response Theme/Organ
Theme
izing Theme
“Oo, kay kuan
kanang ganahan ko
Miya Delight
maka classmate og
Are you
ing’ana”
happy to
“Kanang okay ra. Acceptance
have a
Cara Happy kay kanang Glad and Kindness
classmate
murag okay ra siya”
like him?
“Oo, okay ra kaayu
Judy siya kay buotan Like
man siya”
48

“Excellence is our Culture”


“Oo…ginahan kay
Neneng B Like
buotan siya”

“Nalipay man pero


Ariana Strange
nabag’uhan ko.”

Macky “Happy kaayu.” Glad


“Yes, happy kaayu
Cardo kay magkasinabot Glad
mi.”

Pablo “Neutral ra” Neutral

CURRICULUM VITAE

Raipa Mamadaya Amen


Barangay Tinago Zone 11 Baybay City, Leyte
09153835737
snowgangster03@gmail.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Date of Birth : February 14, 2002 Civil Status : Single
Place of Birth: Ganassi, Lanao del Citizenship : Filipino
Sur
Height : 158 cm
Age : 18 Years Old
Weight : 45 kg
Gender : Female
49

“Excellence is our Culture”


Religion : Islam Fathers Name:
Cosain I. Amen
Mothers Name: Mayla A.
Mamadaya

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Elementary : Baybay II Central School (2013-

Junior High School : Baybay National High School (2017-2018)

Senior High School : Baybay City Senior High School (2019-2020)

ACHIEVEMENTS

 5th Placer Division Festival of Talents (Math Quiz)

 1st Placer Division School Press Conference (Editorial Writing)

SEMINARS

 Attending the BNHS Science and Technology Research


Seminar 2014

 Training Workshop in Conducting Investigating Science Project


(Grade 8)

VALERIE AMOR LEYSON


Brgy. Villa Solidaridad, Baybay City, Leyte
09069085336
amorvalrr@gmail.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Date of Birth : Nov. 14, 2001 Civil Status : Single
Place of Birth : Imus Cavite Citizenship : Filipino
Age : 17 Years Old Height : 5’2 ft.
Gender : Female Weight : 47 kg.
50

“Excellence is our Culture”


Religion : Roman Catholic Fathers Name
: Erwin S.
Mothers Name: Valentina L.
Salabao
Salabao

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Elementary : Baybay II Central School (2013-

Junior High School : Baybay National High School (2017-2018)

Senior High School : Baybay City Senior High School (2019-2020)

ACHIEVEMENTS

 Elementary (2nd Honor)

 Junior High School (With Honor)

 Senior High School (With Honor)

SKILLS

 Analytical Skills

 Creative

 Computer Literate

HOBBIES

 Singing

JESSA CARBON
Brgy.Buenavista, Baybay City, Leyte
09099305603
jessacarbon7@gmail.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Date of Birth : Dec. 16, 2001 Gender : Female
Place of Birth : Brgy. Civil Status : Single
Buenavista
Citizenship : Filipino
Age : 18 Years Old
Height : 5’3 ft.
51

“Excellence is our Culture”


Weight : 50 kg.
Religion : Roman Catholic
Mothers Name: Elgenia Carbon
Fathers Name : Rogelio
Carbon

52

“Excellence is our Culture”


EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Elementary : Buenavista Elementary School


(2013-2014)

Junior High School : Baybay National High School


(2017-2018)

Senior High School : Baybay City Senior High School


(2019-2020)

ACHIEVEMENTS

 Elementary (With Honor)

 Junior High School (With Honor)

SKILLS

 Analytical Skills

 Creative

HOBBIES

 Singing

 Reading

JERRY MAE O. GONZALES


Brgy. Palhi, Baybay City, Leyte
09487390633
gonzalesjmae08@gmail.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Date of Birth : April 8, 2000 Gender : Female
Place of Birth : Ormoc City Civil Status : Single
Age : 19 Years Old Citizenship : Filipino

53

“Excellence is our Culture”


Height : 5’2 ft. Mothers Name: Liza G. Empredo
Weight : 45 kg. Fathers Name : Rodolfo
Cabilus
Religion : Roman Catholic

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Elementary : Palhi Elementary School (2013-2014)

Junior High School : Baybay National High School (2017-2018)

Senior High School : Baybay City Senior High School (2019-2020)

ACHIEVEMENTS

 Elementary (With Honor)

 Junior High School (With Honor)

SKILLS

 Analytical Skills

 Creative

 Sketching

HOBBIES

 Singing

MAYBELINE P. PEREZ
Brgy. Gacat, Baybay City, Leyte
09268001055
maybelineperez53@gmail.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Date of Birth : April 6, 2002 Civil Status : Single
Place of Birth : Baybay City Citizenship : Filipino
Age : 17 Years Old Height : 5’1 ft.
Gender : Female Weight : 48 kg.
54

“Excellence is our Culture”


Religion : Roman Catholic Fathers Name : Bernito Perez
Mothers Name: Marichu Perez

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Elementary : Gacat Elementary School (2013-2014)

Junior High School : Baybay National High School (2017-2018)

Senior High School : Baybay City Senior High School (2019-2020)

ACHIEVEMENTS

 Elementary (With Honor)

 Junior High School (With Honor)

SKILLS

 Analytical Skills

 Creative

 Sketching

HOBBIES

 Singing

MICHELLE ANN SALONOY


Poblacion, Baybay City, Leyte
09094967348
salonoymichelleann@gmail.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Date of Birth : April 29, 2001 Civil Status : Single
Place of Birth : Baybay City Citizenship : Filipino
Age : 18 Years Old Height : 5’2 ft.
Gender : Female Weight : 42 kg.
55

“Excellence is our Culture”


Religion : Roman Catholic Fathers Name
: Allan V.
Mothers Name: Rechel L. Salonoy
Labrador

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Elementary : CPG Elementary School (2013-


2014)

Junior High School : Baybay National High School (2017-2018)

Senior High School : Baybay City Senior High School (2019-2020)

ACHIEVEMENTS

 Elementary (1st Honor)

 Junior High School (With High Honor)

 Senior High School (With Honor)

SKILLS

 Analytical Skills

HOBBIES

 Singing

 Reading

GIL R. IBANEZ
Brgy. Hipusngo, Baybay City, Leyte
09268002930
gilibanez@gmail.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Date of Birth : Nov. 15, 2001 Age : 17 Years Old
Place of Birth : Baybay City Gender : Male

56

“Excellence is our Culture”


Civil Status : Single Religion : Roman Catholic
Citizenship : Filipino Mothers Name: Violeta Ibanez
Height : 5’2 ft. Fathers Name : Freddie
Ibanez
Weight : 55 kg.

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Elementary : Hipusngo Elementary School (2013-2014)

Junior High School : Baybay National High School (2017-2018)

Senior High School : Baybay City Senior High School (2019-2020)

ACHIEVEMENTS

 Sepak Takraw 2019 (Champion)

SKILLS

 Beat Box

HOBBIES

 Singing

 Playing Sports

NICOLLETTE MAZO
Brgy. Gacat, Baybay City, Leyte
090477716484
mazonicollette3gmail.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Date of Birth : Sep. 9, 2001 Age : 18 Years Old
Place of Birth : Baybay City Gender : Female

57

“Excellence is our Culture”


Civil Status : Single Religion : Roman Catholic
Citizenship : Filipino Mothers Name: Grace Mazo
Height : 5’2 ft. Fathers Name : Cosme Mazo
Weight : 47 kg.

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Elementary : Baybay II Central School (2013-2014)

Junior High School : Baybay National High School (2017-2018)

Senior High School : Baybay City Senior High School (2019-2020)

ACHIEVEMENTS

 Elementary (3rd Honor)

 Junior High School (With Honor)

SKILLS

 Creative

 Computer Literate

HOBBIES

 Reading

 Cooking

58

“Excellence is our Culture”

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