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CONTENTS

Page No.

Regulations

1

Syllabi

M.E. Applied Electronics

29

M.E. Communication Systems

54

M.E. Computer Science and Engineering

72

M.E. Engineering Design

92

M.E. Power Electronics and Drives

114

M.E. Software Engineering

138

M.E. Structural Engineering

160

M.E. VLSI Design

182

M.Tech. Biotechnology

191

Regulations 2007

2

RULES AND REGULATIONS M. E. / M. Tech. Programmes

(for the batches of candidates admitted in 2007-2008 and onwards)

1. Conditions for Admission

(i)

Candidates for admission to the M.E. / M.Tech. degree programme will be required to satisfy the conditions of admission thereto prescribed by the Anna University, Coimbatore and Government of Tamil Nadu.

(ii)

Part–time candidates should satisfy conditions regarding experience, sponsorship, place of work, etc., that may be prescribed by Anna University from time to time, in addition to satisfying requirements as in Clause 1(i).

2. Duration of the Programme

(i)

Minimum Duration: The programme will lead to the Degree of Master of Engineering (M.E.)/ Master of Technology (M.Tech.) of the Anna University and extend over a period of two years. The two academic years will be divided into four semesters with two semesters per year.

(ii)

Maximum Duration: The candidate shall complete all the passing requirements of the M.E. / M.Tech. degree programmes within a maximum period of 4 years / 8 semesters in case of full-time programme and 6 years / 12 semesters in case of part-time programme, these periods being reckoned from the commencement of the semester to which the candidate was first admitted.

3. Branches of Study

The following are the branches of study of M.E. / M.Tech. Programmes

M.E.

Branch I

Applied Electronics

Branch II

Communication Systems

Branch III

Computer Science and Engineering

Branch IV

Engineering Design

Branch V

Power Electronics and Drives

Branch VI

Software Engineering

Branch VII

Structural Engineering

Branch VIII

VLSI Design

M.Tech.

Branch I

Biotechnology

4. Structure of Programmes

(i) Curriculum: The curriculum for each programme includes courses of study and detailed syllabi. The courses of study include theory courses (including electives), seminar, practicals, Industrial training / Mini- project, Project Work (Phase I) and Project Work (Phase II) as prescribed by the respective boards of studies from time to time.

Full-time Programme: Every full-time candidate shall undergo the courses of his/her programme given in clause 10 in various semesters as shown below:

Semester 1:

6 Theory courses and two Practicals

Semester 2:

6 Theory courses, one Practical and a Technical Seminar

Semester 3:

3 Theory courses, Industrial Training and Project Work (Phase I)

Semester 4:

Project work (Phase II).

3

Part-time Programme: Every part-time candidate shall undergo the courses of his/her programme in various semesters as shown below:

Semester 1:

3 Theory courses and one Practical

Semester 2:

3 Theory courses and one Practical

Semester 3:

3 Theory courses, Technical Seminar and one Practical

Semester 4:

3 Theory courses and Mini Project

Semester 5:

3 Theory courses and Project Work (Phase I)

Semester 6:

Project Work (Phase II)

(ii)

Theory Courses: Every candidate shall undergo nine core theory courses of his/her degree programme as given in clause 10 and six elective theory courses. The candidate shall opt electives from the list of electives relating to his/her degree programme as given in clause 10 in consultation with the Head of the Department. However, a candidate may be permitted to take a maximum of two electives from the list of courses of other ME / M Tech degree programmes with specific permission from the Head of the Department offering the programme.

(iii)

Project Work: Every candidate shall undertake the Project Work (Phase I) during the third semester (fifth semester for part-time programme) and the Project Work (Phase II) during the fourth semester (Sixth semester for part-time programme). The Project Work (Phase II) shall be a continuation work of the Project Work (Phase I). The Project Work shall be undertaken in an industrial / research organisation or in the college in consultation with the faculty guide and the Head of the Department. In case of Project Work at industrial / research organization, the same shall be jointly supervised by a faculty guide and an expert from the organization.

(iv)

Industrial Training / Mini-Project: Every full-time candidate shall undergo an industrial training or mini project under the supervision of a faculty guide for a minimum period of two weeks prior to the commencement of the third semester.

(v)

Credit Assignment: Each course is normally assigned a certain number of credits with 1 credit per lecture hour per week, 1 credit for 1 or 2 hours of practical per week (2 credits for 3 hours of practical), 1 credit for 3 hours of seminar per week, 2 credits for the Industrial Training / Mini-project, 6 credits for the Project Phase I and 12 credits for the Project Phase II. The exact numbers of credits assigned to the different courses of various programmes are decided by the respective boards of studies.

(vi)

Minimum Credits: For the award of the degree, the candidate shall earn a certain minimum number of total credits as prescribed by the respective board of studies as given below:

M.E./M. Tech. Programmes

Total Credits

M.E. Applied Electronics

88

M.E. Communication Systems

88

M.E. Computer Science and Engineering

88

M.E. Engineering Design

88

M.E. Power Electronics and Drives

88

M.E. Software Engineering

88

M.E. Structural Engineering

88

M.E. VLSI Design

88

M.Tech. Biotechnology

88

4

5.

Requirements for Completion of Study of a Semester

(i)

Candidate will be deemed to have completed the study of any semester only if he /she has kept not less than 50% of attendance in each subject and atleast 75% of attendance on an average in all subjects in that semester put together. However, a candidate who has secured attendance ≥ 65% but less than 75% in the current semester due to medical reasons (hospitalization / accident / specific illness) or due to participation

in

College / University / State / National / International level sports events with prior permission from the

Principal may be exempted from this attendance requirement.

(ii)

his/her progress has been satisfactory, and

(iii)

his/her conduct has been satisfactory

6. Assessment and Passing Requirements

(i)

Assessment: The assessment will comprise continuous assessment and final examination, carrying marks

as

specified in the scheme (clause 10). Continuous assessment will be made as per the guidelines framed

by

the College from time to time. All assessments will be done on absolute marks basis. However, for the

purpose of reporting the performance of a candidate, letter grades and grade points will be awarded as per clause 6(v).

(ii)

Final Examinations: Final examinations will normally be conducted during November / December and

during April / May of each year. Supplementary examinations may be conducted at such times as may be decided by the College.

A

candidate will be permitted to appear for the final examination of a semester only if he/she has

completed the study of that semester satisfying the requirements given in clause 5 and registers

simultaneously for the examinations of the highest semester eligible and all the courses which he/she be in arrears of.

A

candidate, who is not permitted to appear at the final examination of a semester, is not permitted to

proceed to the next semester. A candidate who is not permitted to appear at the final examination of any

semester has to register for and redo the courses of that semester at the next available opportunity.

(iii)

Rejoining the Programme: A candidate who has not completed the study of any semester as per clause 5

or

who is allowed to rejoin the programme after a period of discontinuance or who on his/her own request

is permitted to repeat the study of any semester, may join the semester which he/she is eligible or permitted to join, only at the time of its normal commencement for a regular batch of candidates and after obtaining the approval from the Anna University if required. No candidate will however be enrolled in more than one semester at any point of time. In the case of repeaters, the earlier continuous assessment in the repeated courses will be disregarded.

(iv)

Industrial Training, Mini-project and Project Work:

Every candidate shall submit reports on Industrial training / Mini-project, Project Work (Phase I) and

Project Work (Phase II) on dates announced by the college / department through the faculty guide to the Head of the Department. If a candidate fails to submit the reports of any of these courses not later than the specified date, he/she is deemed to have failed in it. Every candidate shall present seminars in each of the relevant semesters about the Industrial training / Mini-project, Project Work (Phase I) and Project Work (Phase II). The seminars shall be presented before a review committee constituted by the Head of the Department. The Industrial training / Mini-project, Project Work (Phase I) and Project Work (Phase II) will

be evaluated based on the seminars, reports and viva-voce examinations. In case of the industrial training

for the full-time candidates, evaluation will be carried out in the third semester and the results of the same

will be included along with the other courses of that semester.

In

case of Project Work (Phase II), the viva-voce examination will be carried out by a team consisting of

an

internal examiner, usually the supervisor, and an external examiner, appointed by the Principal. Due

weightage will be given to the publications arising out of the Project Work, during the evaluation of the Project Work (Phase II).

5

A candidate is permitted to register for the Project Work (Phase II), only after passing the Project Work

(Phase I).

A candidate who fails in Industrial training / Mini-project, Project Work (Phase I) or Project Work (Phase

II) shall register for redoing the same at the beginning of a subsequent semester.

(v)

Letter grade and grade point: The letter grade and the grade point are awarded based on percentage of total marks secured by a candidate in an individual course as detailed below:

 

Range of Percentage of Total Marks

Letter

Grade Point

grade

(g)

90

to 100

S

10

80

to 89

A

9

70

to 79

B

8

60

to 69

C

7

55

to 59

D

6

50

to 54

E

5

0 to 49 or less than 50% in final examination

F

0

Incomplete

I

0

Withdrawal

W

0

“F”

“I”

“W” denotes withdrawal from the examination.

denotes failure in the course. denotes incomplete as per clause 5 and hence prevented from writing final examination.

After completion of the programme earning the minimum number of credits, the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) from the semester in which the candidate has joined first to the final semester is calculated using the formula:

(vi)

where

g

i

:

C

i

CGPA

=

g *C

i

i

C

i

Grade point secured corresponding to the course

: Credits allotted to the course.

Passing a Course: A candidate who secures grade point 5 or more in any course of study will be declared

to

have passed that course, provided a minimum of 50% is secured in the final examination of that course

of

study.

A

candidate, who is absent for the final examination or withdraws from final examination or secures a

letter grade F (Grade point 0) in any course carrying continuous assessment and final examination marks, will retain the already earned continuous assessment marks for two subsequent appearances in the examination of that course and thereafter he/she will be solely assessed by the final examination carrying the entire marks of that course.

A candidate, who scores a letter grade F (Grade point 0) in any course carrying only continuous assessment

marks, will be solely examined by a final examination carrying the entire marks of that course, the continuous assessment marks obtained earlier being disregarded.

6

 

A

candidate who is absent in the final semester examination of a course after registering for the same will

be

considered to have appeared and failed in that examination and awarded grade F.

7.

Qualifying for the Award of the Degree

A candidate will be declared to have qualified for the award of the M.E. / M.Tech. degree provided:

(i)

he/she has successfully completed the course requirements and has passed all the prescribed courses of study of the respective programme listed in clause 10 within the duration specified in clause 2.

(ii)

No disciplinary action is pending against the candidate.

8.

Classification of Degree

 

(i)

First Class with Distinction: A candidate who qualifies for the award of degree (vide clause 7) having passed all the courses of all the semesters at the first opportunity within four consecutive semesters (six consecutive semesters for part-time) after the commencement of his / her study and securing a CGPA of 8.0 and above shall be declared to have passed in First Class with Distinction. For this purpose the withdrawal from examination (vide clause 9) will not be construed as an opportunity for appearance in the examination.

(ii)

First Class: A candidate who qualifies for the award of degree (vide clause 7) having passed all the courses of all the semesters within a maximum period of four semesters for full-time and six consecutive semesters for part-time after commencement of his /her study and securing a CGPA of 6.50 and above shall be declared to have passed in First Class.

(iii)

Second Class: All other candidates who qualify for the award of degree (vide clause 7) shall be declared

 

to

have passed in Second Class.

9.

Withdrawal from Examination

(i)

A candidate may, for valid reasons, be granted permission to withdraw from appearing for the examination in any course or courses of only one semester examination during the entire duration of the degree programme. Also, only one application for withdrawal is permitted for that semester examination in which withdrawal is sought.

(ii)

Withdrawal application shall be valid only if the candidate is otherwise eligible to write the examination and if it is made prior to the commencement of the semester examinations and also recommended by the Head of the Department and the Principal.

(iii)

Withdrawal shall not be construed as an opportunity for appearance in the examination for the eligibility of a candidate for First Class with Distinction.

9.

(a) Class Adviser

i.

To help the students in planning their courses of study and for general advice on the academic programme, the Head of the Department of the students will attach a certain number of students to a teacher of the Department who shall function as Tutor for those students throughout their period of study.

ii.

Such Tutor shall advise the students and monitor the courses undergone by the students; check the attendance and progress of the students attached to him/her and counsels them periodically.

If necessary, the faculty adviser may also discuss with or inform the parents about the progress of the

students through the Head of the Department concerned

7

9

(b) CLASS COMMITTEE

(i) A Class Committee consists of teachers of the concerned class, student representatives and a chairperson who is not teaching the class. It is like the ‘Quality Circle’ (more commonly used in industries) with the overall goal of improving the teaching-learning process. The functions of the class committee include

Solving problems experienced by students in the class room and in the laboratories

Clarifying the regulations of the programme and the details of rules therein

Informing the student representatives the academic schedule including the dates of assessments and the syllabus coverage for each assessment

Informing the student representatives the details of regulations regarding the weightage used for each assessment. In the case of practical courses (laboratory / project work / seminar etc.) the breakup of marks for each experiment/ exercise/ module of work, should be clearly discussed in the class committee meeting and informed to the students.

Analyzing the performance of the students of the class after each test and finding the ways and means of solving problems, if any

Identifying the weak students, if any and requesting the teachers concerned to provide some additional help or guidance or coaching to such weak students.

(ii)

The class committee for a class under a particular specialization normally constituted by the Head of the Department. However, if the students of different specializations are mixed in a class, the class committee is to be constituted by the Head of the Institution.

(iii)

The class committee shall be constituted on the first working day of any semester or earlier.

(iv)

At least 2 student representatives (usually 1 boy and 1 girl) shall be included in the class committee.

(v)

The chairperson of the class committee may invite the Faculty adviser(s) and the Head of the department to the meeting of the class committee

(vi)

The Head of the Institution may participate in any class committee of the institution.

(vii)

The chairperson is required to prepare the minutes of every meeting, submit the same to the Head of the Institution within two days of the meeting and arrange to circulate among the concerned students and teachers. If there are some points in the minutes requiring action by the management, the same shall be brought to the notice of the management by the head of the institution.

(viii)

The first meeting of the class committee shall be held within one week from the date of commencement of the semester in order to inform the students about the nature and weightage of assessments within the framework of the Regulations. Two or three subsequent meetings may be held at suitable intervals. During these meetings the student members, representing the entire class, shall meaningfully interact and express the opinions and suggestions of the class students to improve the effectiveness of the teaching-learning process.

9 (c) COURSE COMMITTEE Each common theory course offered to more than one group of students shall have a “Course Committee” comprising all the teachers teaching the common course with one of them nominated as Course Coordinator. The nomination of the course Coordinator shall be made by the Head of the Department / Head of the Institution depending upon whether all the teachers teaching the common course belong to a single

8

department or to several departments. The ‘Course committee’ shall meet as often as possible and ensure uniform evaluation of the tests and arrive at a common scheme of evaluation for the tests. Wherever it is feasible, the course committee may also prepare a common question paper for the test(s).

10. Scheme of Assessment and course of study

Sessional Scheme of Evaluation

(a)

The Sessional Scheme of Evaluation followed for I Semester of the 2007 Batch during the Academic year 2007–2008 is as given below.

 

THEORY

 

Internal Assessment: 50 Marks

Final Examination: 50 Marks

Assignment

05

Test 1

10

Test 2

10

Test 3

15 (A Model Test covering the entire syllabus)

 

40 (to be converted to 50)

 

Note: No passing minimum in Internal Assessment

 

PRACTICAL

 

(100% Internal Assessment)

Preparation

10

Conduct of Experiment

15

Observation & Analysis of Results 25 Record

30

A Model Test & Viva-voce

20

 

100

(b)

The Sessional Scheme of Evaluation followed for the II Semester of the 2007 Batch during the Academic Year 2007–2008 is as given below.

 

THEORY

Internal Assessment: 50 Marks

Final Examination: 50 Marks

Assignment / Seminar

10

Test 1

10

Test 2

10

Test 3

20 (A Model Test covering the entire syllabus)

50

9

(100% Internal Assessment)

PRACTICAL

Preparation

10

Conduct of Experiment

15

Observation & Analysis of Results 25 Record

20

A

Model Test & Viva-voce

30

 

100

(c) Sessional scheme of evaluation to be followed from the III Semester of 2007–2008 Batch and from I Semester

of the 2008–2009 Batch onwards is as given below.

Internal Assessment: 50 Marks

THEORY

Final Examination: 50 Marks

Assignment / Tutorial

05

Test 1

10

Test 2

10

Test 3

15 (A Model Test covering the entire syllabus)

Innovative Presentation

10

50

Note: Innovative Presentation includes Seminar / Quiz / Group Discussion / Case Study / Soft Skill Development / Mini Project / Review of State-of-the-art.

PRACTICAL

(100% Internal Assessment) Preparation

10

Conduct of Experiment

15

Observation & Analysis of Results

25

Record

20

A

Model Test & Viva-voce

30

 

100

Scheme of Assessment for Theory Courses carrying only Continuous Assessment and no Final Examination to be followed from the III Semester of 2007 Batch and from I Semester of the 2008 and subsequent Batches is given below.

10

THEORY: Total 100 Marks

Internal Assessment: 50 Marks

Assignment/Tutorial

10

Test 1

15

Test 2

15

Innovative Presentation

10

50

At the end of the semester a model test covering the entire syllabus has to be conducted and assessed for 50 marks by the Course Teacher.

PROJECT WORK Review: 50 Marks

Review of Mini-Project / Project includes two presentations to be made by individual student or a group of students carrying out the project work and assessment be made on the presentation. Marks per presentation =

25

Report & Viva-Voce: 50 Marks

TECHNICAL SEMINAR

: 100 Marks

Three Seminars (3 X 25)

: 75 Marks

Report

: 25 Marks

INDUSTRIAL TRAINING

: 100 Marks

2 Weeks Visit

: 30 Marks

Report

: 30 Marks

Viva-Voce

: 40 Marks

The Question Paper pattern (for Theory Examination) to be followed for UG & PG Courses is given below:

PART A

Max. Marks: 100

Time: 3 Hours

Short Answer Questions: 10

(10 X 2 Marks)

20

(Two Questions from each unit)

 

PART B

Long Answer Questions: 5

(5 X 16 Marks)

80

(Either Or Type, One from each unit)

 

Total

100

11

Syllabi of

M.E. Software Engineering

12

07SE01 APPLIED PROBABILITY AND OPERATIONS RESEARCH

4 0 0 4

Unit I Probability and Random Variables Probability concepts – Random Variables – Moment Generating function

Poisson - Rectangular or Uniform – normal - Exponential distributions - Functions of Random variables - Two

dimensional Random variables.

– Standard distributions - Binomial -

10 Hours

Unit II Stochastic Processes Classification – Stationary and Random process – Markov process – Markov chains – Transition probability – Classification of Markov chain – Limiting distribution – First passage time – Poisson process – Birth and death process.

10 Hours

Unit III Queue Models Single and Multi – Server Markovian queuing models – Customer impatience – M/G/1 queuing system – Queuing applications.

10 Hours

Unit IV Simulation and Applications Introduction – Types of simulation – Limitations of simulation techniques – Phases of simulation study – Generation of random numbers – Monte Carlo simulation – Applications to queuing problems.

10 Hours

Unit V Classical Optimization Theory Unconstrained external problem – Newton Raphson method – Equality constraints – Lagrangian method – Kuhn Tucker conditions.

Textbooks:

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

1. Veerarajan T, “Probability, Statistics and Random processes”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company Ltd,

2003.

2. Sharma S.D, “Operations Research”, Kedar Nath , Ramnath & Co, Meerut, 12 th Edition, 1998.

References:

1. Gupta S.C. and Kapoor V.K., “Fundamentals of Mathematical Statistics”, Sultan Chand & Sons, 2001.

2. Bhat U.N., “Elements Applied Stochastic processes”, John Wiley and Sons, Second Edition, New York,

1984.

3. Taha H.A, “Operations Research – An Introduction”, Prentice Hall of India Ltd, 6 th

1987.

Edition, New Delhi,

07SE02 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING METHODOLOGIES

4 0 0 4

Unit I Introduction A Generic View of Processes – Process Maturity – Process Models – Agile Process and Models – Software Cost Estimation –Risk Analysis – Software Project Planning and Scheduling.

10 Hours

Unit II Requirement Analysis System Engineering Hierarchy – Requirement Engineering- Tasks- Initiating the Process-Eliciting Requirements- Developing Use Cases – Negotiating Requirements – Validating Requirements – Building the Analysis Models- Concepts – Object Oriented Analysis – Scenario Based Modeling – Data and Control Flow Oriented Model – Class

Based Model – Behavioral Model.

10 Hours

13

Unit III

Software Design

Design Concepts – Design Models – Pattern Based Design – Architectural Design – Component Level Design – Class Based and Conventional Components Design – Real-time System Design - User Interface - Analysis and Design.

10 Hours

Unit IV Software Testing Software Testing – Strategies – Issues – Test Strategies for Conventional and Object Oriented Software – Validation and System Testing - Testing Tactics- White Box Testing - Basis Path Testing – Control Structure Testing – Black Box Testing - Object Oriented Testing – Testing GUI – Testing Client/Server – Test Documentation.

10 Hours

Unit V Software Quality Assurance Software Quality Concepts – Quality Assurance – Software Technical Reviews – Formal Approach to Software Quality Assurance - Reliability – Quality Standards – Software Quality Assurance Plan – Software Maintenance - Software Configuration Management – Reverse Engineering and Reengineering – Use of CASE Tools

Textbooks:

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

1. Roger S. Pressman, “Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach”, Sixth Edition, Tata McGraw Hill,

2005.

2. Sommerville I, “Software Engineering”, Fifth Edition, Addison Wesley, 1996.

References:

1. Pankaj Jalote, “An Integrated Approach to Software Engineering”, Springer Verlag, 1997.

2. James F Peters and Witold Pedryez, “Software Engineering – An Engineering Approach”, John Wiley and

Sons, New Delhi, 2000.

3. Fairely, “Software Engineering Concepts”, Tata McGraw Hill, 1995.

07SE03 SOFTWARE DOCUMENTATION

4 0 0 4

Unit I Introduction Need for Software Documentation - Understanding task orientation - Analysing users - Writing user scenarios - User informational needs - Document goals - User work motivations - User analysis checklist - Constructing a task list - Categorization - Writing steps as actions - Task analysis.

10 Hours

Unit II Documentation Planning and writing documents - Task list and Schedule - Guidelines - Documentation process - Documentation plan - Document review form - Review plan - Schedule - Checklist.

10 Hours

Unit III Documentation Testing Usability tests - Advantages of field testing - Editing and fine tuning - Problems - Designing for task orientation - Page showing elements of document design - Screen showing elements for online help design - Solutions to the design problem for printed and online documentation.

10 Hours

Unit IV Documentation Layouts Laying out pages and screens - Elements of page and screen design - Designing type - Effective writing style - Using graphical that support decision making - Functions of graphics - Type and elements of graphics.

14

10 Hours

Unit V Documentation Guidelines Writing to guide - Procedures - Guidelines - Writing to support - Reference - Structural - reference entry - Checklist - Designing index - User oriented index - Case studies.

Textbook:

10 Hours Total: 50 Hours

Thomas T. Barker, “Writing Software Documentation - A Task Oriented Approach”, Allyn and Bacon Series of Technical Communication, 1998.

Reference:

Edmond H.Weiss, “How to Write Usable User Documentation”, Second Edition, Oryx Press, 1991.

07SE04 COMPUTER NETWORKS ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT

4 0 0 4

Unit I Introduction Network Architecture –-Topologies – Error Detection – Reliable Transmission Technique – IEEE standards 802.3, 802.5, 802.11 – Bridges.

10 Hours

Unit II Switching & Inter Networking Switching and Forwarding – Cell Switching – Simple Internetworking – Routing – Subnetting and Supernetting -

IPV6.

10 Hours

Unit III Transmission Controls UDP – TCP – Retransmission – Timeout - Congestion Control and Avoidance – Quality of Service – Compression.

10

Hours

Unit IV Protocols DNS – FTP - Email – HTTP – Telnet – RTP – RTSP – Socket Programming.

Hours

Unit V SNMP Management SNMP v1 Network Management – Organization and Information Models – Communication and Functional Models – SNMP v2 Management.

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

Textbooks:

1. Peterson Davie, “Computer Networks – A System Approach”, Third Edition, Harcourt Asia Pvt. Ltd.,

10

2003

2. Mani Subramanian “Network Management – Principles and Practice”, First Edition, Pearson Education,

2004.

References:

1. Behrouz A. Foruzan, “Data communication and Networking”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2004.

2. William Stallings, “Data and Computer Communication”, Sixth Edition, Pearson Education, 2000.

3. Douglas E. Comer, “Internetworking with TCP/IP – Volume I”, Prentice Hall Of India , 1997

15

07SE05 OBJECT ORIENTED SYSTEMS

4 0 0 4

Unit I Object Oriented Design Fundamentals The Object Model - Classes and Objects – Complexity – Classifications – Notation – Process -Pragmatics - Object types - Object State - OOSD life cycle.

10 Hours

Unit II Object Oriented Analysis Overview of Object analysis - Shaller / Mellor – Coad / Yourdon – Rumbaugh - Booch - Object Analysis Classification - Noun Phrase approach - Common class patterns approach – Use Case Driven approach – classes - Responsibilities and Collaborators.

10 Hours

Unit III Object Oriented Design Methods UML - Class diagram – Use - Case diagram - Dynamic Modeling – Extensibility - Comparison with other design methods.

 

10

Hours

Unit IV Object Oriented Development OO Design process and Axioms - Designing Classes - Access Layer - View Layer – Testing.

 

10

Hours

Unit V Case Studies in Object Oriented Development

 

10

Hours

Textbooks:

Total: 50 Hours

1. Ali Bahrami, “Object Oriented Systems Development”, McGraw Hill International Edition.1999.

2. Craig Larman, “Applying UML and Patterns”, Addison Wesley, 2000.

References:

1. Grady Booch, “Object Oriented Analysis and Design”, Addison Wesley, 5 th Edition, 1997

2. Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh, IVAR Jacobson. “The Unified Modeling Language User Guide”, Addison - Wesley Longman, 1999.

3. Fowler, “Analysis Patterns”, Addison Wesley, 1996.

4. Shlaer, S., Mellor, S, “Object Lifecycles: Modeling the World in States”, Prentice Hall of India , 1992.

5. Coad, P., Yourdon, E.; “Object-Oriented Analysis”, Yourdon Press, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1990.

07SE06 INTERNET PROGRAMMING AND TOOLS

4 0 0 4

Unit I Basic Internet Concepts History of internet - Internet addressing – TCP/IP - DNS and directory services - Internet Applications - Electronic mail - New groups UUCP – FTP – Telnet - Finger.

10 Hours

Unit II World Wide Web

Overview – Hyper text markup language- Uniform Resource Locators – Protocols - M Browsers –Plug – Ins - Net

meeting and Chat-Search Engines.

10 Hours

Unit III Scripting Languages Java Script Programming - Dynamic HTML - Cascading style sheets - Object model and Event model - Filters and

Transitions - Active X Controls – Multimedia - Client side script.

10 Hours

16

Unit IV Server Side Programming Introduction to Java Servelets – Overview and Architecture – Handling HTTP get and post request – Session Tracking – Multi-tier Application - Implicit objects – Scripting – Standard actions – Directives – Custom Tag libraries. 10 Hours

Unit V Case Study – Amoeba

Connecting to Databases – JDBC Principles – Database access – XML – Introduction – Structuring Data – XML

Namespaces – XML vocabularies – Web server.

10 Hours Total: 50 Hours

Textbooks:

1. Deital and Deital, Goldberg, “Internet and World Wide Web, How To Program”, Third edition, Pearson Education, 2004

2. Jame Jaworski, “Java Unleased”, SAMS Techmedia Publications, 1999.

References:

1. Naughton , Herbert Schildt , “Java2, Complete Reference”, 4 th edition, Tata Mc Graw Hill, 2000

2. Deital & Deital, “Java How to Program”, Prentice Hall of India, 2000.

3. Gary Cornell, Cay S.Horstmann, “Core Java Vol.1 and Vol.2”, Sun Microsystems Press, 1999.

4. Ted coombs, Jason Coombs, Brewer, “Active X Source book”, John Wiley and sons, 1996.

07SE11 COMPUTER NETWORKS LABORATORY

0 0 3 2

(All the programs are to be written using C)

List of Experiments:

1. Simulation of ARP / RARP.

2. Write a program that takes a binary file as input and performs bit stuffing and CRC Computation.

3. Develop an application for transferring files over RS232.

4. Simulation of Sliding-Window protocol.

5. Simulation of BGP / OSPF routing protocol.

6. Develop a Client – Server application for chat.

7. Develop a Client that contacts a given DNS Server to resolve a given host name.

8. Write a Client to download a file from a HTTP Server.

9. Study of NS2.

10. Study of Glomosim / OPNET.

 

Total: 50 Hours

07SE12 INTERNET PROGRAMMING LABORATORY

0 0 3 2

List of Experiments:

1. Exercises on creating HTML pages

2. Implementation of Package Bio-Data

3. Shapes Class Hierarchy

4. Animation using Java Applets

5. Multi Threaded implementation of Producer Consumer Problem

6. Implementation of simple TCP/IP Client and server

7. Operations on Employee table using JDBC

8. Bubble sort implementation using RMI

9. Bubble sort implementation using RMI

10. Constructing a simple database using XML

11. An interactive Web application in JSP

12. Using cookies to track users in browsers from the web servers

13. Constructing a secured FTP client – server application

17

Total: 50 Hours

07SE07 SOFTWARE IMPLEMENTATION AND TESTING

4 0 0 4

Unit I Introduction Purpose of Testing – A model for testing – A taxonomy of Bugs – Path testing – Predicates - Path predicates and Achieving paths – Path sensitizing – Path instrumentation - Implement and application of path testing.

10 Hours

Unit II Transaction -Flow Testing Transaction Flows – Transaction - Flow Testing techniques – Data – flow testing Basics – Data – Flow testing Strategies – Domain and paths – Domain testing – Domain and Interface testing – Domains and testability.

10

Hours

Unit III Metrics Metrics - What and Why – Linguistic Metrics – Structural Metrics – Hybrid Metrics – Metrics Implementation.

10

Hours

Unit IV Syntax Testing Why – What - and How – A grammar for formats – Test Case Generation – Implementation and Application – logic based testing – Overview – Decision tables – Path expression – KV charts – Specifications.

10 Hours

Unit V

Implementation

Overview – Strategies for programmers – Strategies for independent testers – Tests as Software Products – Tools.

Textbook:

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

Boris Beiser, “Software Testing Techniques”, Second Edition, Dreamtech press, New Delhi, 2003.

References:

1. Edward Kit, “Software Testing in the Real World – Improving the Process”, Pearson Education, 2004.

2. William E. Perry, “Effective Methods for Software Testing”, Second Edition, John Wiley, 2000.

07SE08 SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

4 0 0 4

Unit I

General Design Fundamentals The Nature of Design Process – Objectives – Building Models – Constructs - Design Qualities – Assessing the design

– Design Viewpoints for Software – The object Model – Classes and Objects – Complexity – Classification – Notation

– Process – Pragmatics

10 Hours

Unit II Structured System Analysis and Design Structured Design – Design Principles – Problem Partitioning and Hierarchy – Abstraction - Modularity – Top-down and Bottom-up Strategies – Transformation of a DFD to a Structure Chart – Transform Analysis – Transaction Analysis – Coupling – Cohesion – Multiple types of Cohesion in a module – Data Design – Normalization – Renormalizations – Procedural Design.

Unit III Object Oriented Analysis and Design

18

10 Hours

Overview of Object Oriented Analysis – Shaler/Mellor – Coad/Yourdon – Rumbaugh – Booch – UML – Use case – Conceptual model – Behaviour – Class Analysis Patterns – Overview – Diagrams – Aggregation – UML – Diagrams – Collaboration – Sequence – Class – Design Patterns and Frameworks – Comparison with other design methods – Managing Analysis and Design – Evaluation testing – Coding – Maintenance – Metrics.

10 Hours

Unit IV Design Methods The Architecture Concepts – Design Methods – Design Patterns – Rationale for Methods – Design Processes and Strategies – Design by Template – Designing with Patterns – Stepwise Refinement – Incremental Design – Prototyping – DSDM – Structured Systems Analysis and Structured Design – JSP – JSD.

10 Hours

Unit V

Case Studies Domain Name System – Email – World Wide Web (HTTP) – Simple Network Management Protocol – File Transfer Protocol – Security – Mutimedia applications.

Textbooks:

10 Hours

Total: 50Hours

1. David Budgen, “Software Design” Second Edition, Pearson Education, 2004.

2. R. S. Pressman, “Software Engineering”, Sixth Edition, Tata McGraw Hill Inc., 2005.

References:

1. Steve McConnell, “Code Complete”, Word Power Publishers, 2001.

2. Ed Downs, Peter Clare, Jan Coe, “Structured System Analysis and Design Methods Application and Context”, Prentice Hall Of Indiafs, 1998.

3. Suteliffe A.G., “Human Computer Interface Design”, Second Edition, Macmillan, 1995.

07SE09

INFORMATION SECURITY

4 0 0 4

Unit I Symmetric Key Cryptography Security problem in computing – Elementary Cryptography – Mechanisms and Attacks – Block Cipher principles – Data Encryption Standard – Strength of DES – Evaluation Criteria for AES – AES Cipher.

10 Hours

Unit II Public Key Cryptography Principles of public Key Cryptosystems – RSA Algorithm – Key Management – Diffie Hellman Key Exchange – Elliptic Curve Cryptography.

10 Hours

Unit III Message Authentication MD5 Message Digest Algorithm – Secure Hash Algorithm – HMAC – Digital signature Standard – Kerberos Version 5 – X.509 Authentication Service

10 Hours

Unit IV E-mail Security and IP Security Pretty Good Privacy – S/MIME – IP Security Overview – IP Security Architecture – Authentication Header – Encapsulating Security Payload – Combining Security Associations – Key Management.

10 Hours

Unit V Web Security and Firewalls Web Security considerations – Secure Sockets Layer and Transport Layer Security – Secure Electronic Transactions – Intruders – Intrusion Detection – Password Management – Firewall design principles – Trusted systems.

19

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

Textbooks:

1. William Stallings, “Cryptography and Network Security”, Third Edition, Prentice Hall of India, 2003.

2. Charles B.Pfleeger, Shari Lawrence Pfleeger, “Security in Computing”, 3rd Edition, Person Education, 2003.

References:

1. Matt Bishop, “Computer Security – Art and Science”, 1 st Edition, Person Education 2003.

2. Charlie Kaufman, Radia Perlman, Mike Speciner, “Network Security”, Second Edition, Prentice-hall, 2002.

3. Atul Kahate, “Cryptography and Network Security”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2003

List of Experiments:

07SE13

SOFTWARE TESTING LABORATORY

0 0 3 2

I. Do the following testing for a chosen software implementation using any commercial or freeware tools:

1. Path-testing

2. Transaction-flow testing.

3. Data-flow testing.

II. Do the following measurements on a chosen software implementation:

1. Halstead’s metrics

2. McCabe’s metrics

III. Simulate a test driver

IV. Develop a simple software testing tool implementing any testing technique of your choice.

Total: 50 Hours

07SE21 SOFTWARE QUALITY MANAGEMENT

4 0 0 4

Unit I Introduction Concepts of Quality Control - Quality Assurance - Quality Management - Total Quality Management - Cost of Quality - QC tools - 7 QC Tools and Modern Tools - Other related topics - Business Process Re-engineering - Zero Defect - Six Sigma - Quality Function Deployment – Benchmarking - Statistical process control.

10 Hours

Unit II Software Engineering Principles Software Engineering Principles - Software Project Management - Software Process -Project and Product Metrics - Risk Management.

10 Hours

Unit III Software Quality Assurance Models Software Quality Assurance - Statistical Quality Assurance - Software Reliability - Models for Quality Assurance - ISO-9000 – Series – CMM – SPICE - Malcolm Baldrige Award.

10 Hours

Unit IV Software Processes & Testing Software Process - Definition and implementation - internal Auditing and Assessments - Software testing – Concepts – Tools – Reviews - Inspections and Walkthroughs - PCMM.

10 Hours

Unit V TQM Total Quality Management – Introduction, Software reuse for TQM - Software testing method for TQM - Defect Prevention and Total Quality Management - Zero Defect Software Development - Clean room Engineering.

21

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

Textbooks:

1. Watt.S. Humphery, “Managing Software Process”, Addison - Wesley, 1998.

2. Allan Gillies,”Software Quality Theory & Management”, Thomson International Press, 1997.

References:

1. Roger Pressman, “Software Engineering”, 5th edition, McGraw Hill, 1999.

2. Gordan Schulmeyer G., James, “Total Quality Management for Software”, International Thomson Computer Press, 1998.

3. Philip B Crosby, “Quality is Free: The Art of Making Quality Certain”, McGraw-Hill, 1992.

07SE22 SOFTWARE METRICS

4 0 0 4

Unit I Software Measurement The representational theory of measurement – Measurement and models – Scales – Scale types – Meaningfulness in measurement – Goal based framework for software measurement

10 Hours

Unit II Software Metrics Metrics Choices – Simple and Complex Metrics –Object oriented Metrics - Designing a Metric System – Metrics Data Collection - Data Visualization

Hours

Unit III Software Engineering Measurement Measuring internal product attributes: Size, Structure – Measuring external product attributes

Hours

Unit IV Software Reliability Measurement and prediction – Resource measurement: productivity - teams and tools - Making process predictions:

cost estimation – models of effort and cost – problems in models

10

10

10

Hours

Unit V Measurement and Management Planning a measurement program – Measurement in practice – Empirical research in software engineering

Textbook:

10

Hours

Total: 50 Hours

Alan Perlis, Frederick G. Sayward, Mary Shaw, “Software Metrics: An Analysis and Evaluation”, the MIT Press,

2003

References:

1. Norman E. Fenton, Shari Lawrence Pfleeger, “Software Metrics: A Rigorous and Practical Approach”, Course Technology Publisher, 1998 2. Engineering David A. Gustafson, “Schaum's Outline of Theory and Problems of Software”, Net Library, Inc, 2002

07SE23 SOFTWARE AGENTS

4 0 0 4

Unit I Agent and User Experience Interacting with Agents - Agent from Direct Manipulation to Delegation - Interface Agent Metaphor with Character - Designing Agents - Direct Manipulation versus Agent Path to Predictable

22

10 Hours

Unit II Agents for Learning Agents for Information Sharing and Coordination - Agents that Reduce Work Information Overhead - Agents without Programming Language - Life like Computer character - Software Agents for cooperative Learning - Architecture of Intelligent Agents

10 Hours

Unit III Agent Communication and Collaboration Overview of Agent Oriented Programming - Agent Communication Language - Agent Based Framework of Interoperability

10

Hours

Unit IV Agent Architecture Agents for Information Gathering - Open Agent Architecture - Communicative Action for Artificial Agent

10

Hours

Unit V

Mobile Software Agents Mobile Agent Paradigm - Mobile Agent Concepts -Mobile Agent Technology - Case Study: Tele Script - Agent Tel

Textbooks:

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

1. Jeffrey M.Bradshaw, “Software Agents”, MIT Press, 2000

2. William R. Cockayne, Michael Zyda, “Mobile Agents”, Prentice Hall of India, 1998

References:

1. Russel & Norvig, “Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach”, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall of India,

2002

2. Joseph P.Bigus & Jennifer Bigus, “Constructing Intelligent agents with Java: A Programmer's Guide to

1.

Smarter Applications”, John Wiley and Sons Publishers, 1997. http://www.agents.media.mit.edu

2. http://www.cs.umbc.edu

07SE24 AGENT BASED INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS

4 0 0 4

Unit I Introduction Definitions - Foundations - History - Intelligent Agents - Problem Solving-Searching - Heuristics - Constraint Satisfaction Problems - Game playing.

10 Hours

Unit II Knowledge Representation and Reasoning Logical Agents - First order logic - First Order Inference - Unification - Chaining - Resolution Strategies - Knowledge Representation - Objects - Actions-Events

10 Hours

Unit III Planning Agents Planning Problem - State Space Search - Partial Order Planning - Graphs - Nondeterministic Domains - Conditional Planning - Continuous Planning – Multi Agent Planning. 10 Hours

Unit IV Agents and Uncertainity Acting under uncertainty – Probability Notation - Bayes Rule and use - Bayesian Networks - Other Approaches - Time and Uncertainty-Temporal Models - Utility Theory - Decision Network - Complex Decisions.

23

10 Hours

Unit V Higher Level Agents Knowledge in Learning - Relevance Information - Statistical Learning Methods - Reinforcement Learning - Communication - Formal Grammar - Augmented Grammars - Future of AI.

10 Hours Total: 50 Hours

Textbooks:

1. Stuart Russell and Peter Norvig, “Artificial Intelligence - A Modern Approach”, 2 nd Edition, Prentice Hall of India, 2002

2. Michael Wooldridge, “An Introduction to Multi Agent System”, John Wiley and Sons Publishers,

2002.

Reference:

Patrick Henry Winston, “Artificial Intelligence”, 3 rd Edition, Addison Wesley, 1999. Nils.J.Nilsson, “Principles of Artificial Intelligence”, Narosa Publishing House, 1992

07SE25 COMPUTER COMMUNICATION

4 0 0 4

Unit I Data Communication Fundamentals Overview of Data Communication and Networking - Analog and Digital signals and transmission - Simplex / Half and Full duplex and Synchronous / Asynchronous communication - Multiplexing - Transmission Media - Circuit switching and Telephone network - DSL - ADSL and Cable Modem - Network Configuration.

10 Hours

Unit II Packet Switched Networks OSI and IP models, Ethernet (IEEE 802.3) - Token ring (IEEE 802.5) - Wireless LAN (IEEE 802.11) FDDI - DQDB - SMDS: Internetworking with SMDS

10 Hours

Unit III High Speed Networks Frame Relay Networks - Asynchronous transfer mode - ATM Protocol Architecture - ATM logical Connection - ATM Cell - ATM Service Categories - AAL - High Speed LAN’s - Fast Ethernet - Gigabit Ethernet - Fibre Channel - Wireless LAN’s.

10 Hours

Unit IV Congestion and Traffic Management Queuing Analysis - Queuing Models - Single Server Queues - Effects of Congestion - Congestion Control - Traffic Management - Congestion Control in Packet Switching Networks - Frame Relay Congestion Control.

10 Hours

Unit V Protocols for QOS Support RSVP - Goals and Characteristics - Data Flow - RSVP operations - Protocol Mechanisms - Multiprotocol Label

Switching - Operations - Label Stacking, Protocol details - RTP - Protocol Architecture - Data Transfer Protocol -

RTCP

10 Hours Total: 50 Hours

Textbooks:

1. Forouzan, “Data Communications and Networking”, Tata McGraw Hill Company, 3 rd Edition, 2004.

2. Brijendra Sing, “Data Communication and Computer Networks”, Prentice Hall of India, 2004.

24

References:

1. Michael A. Gallo, William A. Hancock, “Computer Communication and Networking Technologies”, Thomson Asia, 2003.

2. Warland, Pravin Varaiya, “High Performance Communication Networks”, Second Edition, Jean Harcourt Asia Pvt. Ltd., 2001.

3. Irvan Pepelnjk, Jim Guichard, Jeff Apcar, “MPLS and VPN Architecture”, Cisco Press, Volume 1 and 2,

2003.

07SE26 ADVANCED NETWORK CONCEPTS

4 0 0 4

Unit I Introduction Circuit Switched Networks: SONET - Introduction – Layers - Frame structure - SONET multiplexing - DWDM - Fiber to the Home - Passive optical networks - Passive Photonic loop-Hybrid Scheme - DSL - ADSL – ISDN – BISDN – CATV – Layout -Layer network - Services

10 Hours

Unit II ATM Main features of ATM – ATM protocols - Addressing Signaling & Routing - Meta signaling-ATM adaptation layer for signaling - Signaling Protocols for CS1 – PNNI - Header Structure – ATM Adaptation layer - Type 0-Type 1- Type2-Type 3/4 - Type 5.

10 Hours

Unit III Management and control Fault Management - ATM Traffic & Congestion control - Network status monitoring and Configuration - Flow control - Error detection - Error control Internetworking with ATM: LAN - IP over ATM - Multiprotocol over ATM - Frame Relay over ATM

10 Hours

Unit IV Wireless Networks The wireless channel - Link level design - Channel access - Network design - standards.

10 Hours

Unit V Recent Trends Optical Networks - Cross-connects - LANs - Voice Over IP - Multimedia Networks.

Textbooks:

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

1. Walrand J. Varaiya, “High Performance Communication Network”, 2nd Edition, Morgan Kauffman- Harcourt Asia Pvt., Ltd., 2000.

2. Bates & Donald W. Gregory “Voice & Data Communications Handbook”, 3rd Edition, McGraw Hill, 2000.

References:

1. William Stallings, “ISDN & Broadband ISDN with Frame Relay & ATM P III”, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall

2000.

2. Rainer Handel, Manfred N. Huber, Stefen Schroder, “ATM Networks, Concepts, Protocols Applications”, 3rd Edition, Addison Wesley, 1999.

3. Kurose J.F. & Ross K.W., “Computer Networking- A Top-down Approach Featuring the Internet”, Addison Wesely, 2001.

25

07SE27 ADHOC NETWORKS

4 0 0 4

Unit I Introduction Introduction - Fundamentals of Wireless Communication Technology - The Electromagnetic Spectrum - Radio Propagation Mechanisms - Characteristics of the Wireless Channel - IEEE 802.11a,b Standard – Origin of Ad hoc Packet Radio Networks - Technical Challenges - Architecture of PRNETs - Components of Packet Radios – Ad hoc Wireless Networks -What Is an Ad Hoc Network? Heterogeneity in Mobile Devices - Wireless Sensor Networks - Traffic Profiles - Types of Ad hoc Mobile Communications - Types of Mobile Host Movements - Challenges Facing Ad Hoc Mobile Networks-Ad hoc wireless Internet

10 Hours

Unit II Ad Hoc Routing Protocols Introduction - Issues in Designing a Routing Protocol for Ad Hoc Wireless Networks - Classifications of Routing Protocols -Table-Driven Routing Protocols - Destination Sequenced Distance Vector (DSDV) - Wireless Routing Protocol (WRP) - Cluster Switch Gateway Routing (CSGR) - Ad Hoc On-Demand Distance Vector Routing (AODV) - Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) -Temporally Ordered Routing Algorithm (TORA) - Signal Stability Routing (SSR) -Location-Aided Routing (LAR) - Power-Aware Routing (PAR) - Zone Routing Protocol (ZRP)

10 Hours

Unit III Multicast routing in Ad Hoc Networks Introduction - Issues in Designing a Multicast Routing Protocol - Operation of Multicast Routing Protocols - An Architecture Reference Model for Multicast Routing Protocols -Classifications of Multicast Routing Protocols - Tree- Based Multicast Routing Protocols- Mesh-Based Multicast Routing Protocols - Energy-Efficient Multicasting - Multicasting with Quality of Service Guarantees - Application-Dependent Multicast Routing - Comparisons of Multicast Routing Protocols

10 Hours

Unit IV Transport Layer, Security Protocols Introduction - Issues in Designing a Transport Layer Protocol for Ad Hoc Wireless Networks - Design Goals of a Transport Layer Protocol for Ad Hoc Wireless Networks -Classification of Transport Layer Solutions - TCP Over Ad Hoc Wireless Networks - Networks - Security in Ad Hoc Wireless Networks - Network Security Requirements - Issues and Challenges in Security Provisioning - Network Security Attacks - Key Management - Secure Routing in Ad Hoc Wireless Networks

10 Hours

Unit V QoS and Energy Management Introduction - Issues and Challenges in Providing QoS in Ad Hoc Wireless Networks -Classifications of QoS Solutions - MAC Layer Solutions - Network Layer Solutions - QoS Frameworks for Ad Hoc Wireless Networks Energy Management in Ad Hoc Wireless Networks –Introduction - Need for Energy Management in Ad Hoc Wireless Networks - Classification of Energy Management Schemes - Battery Management Schemes - Transmission Power Management Schemes - System Power Management Schemes

Textbook:

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

Siva Ram Murthy C. and Manoj B.S., “Ad Hoc Wireless Networks: Architectures and Protocols”, Prentice Hall of India, 2004.

References:

1. Toh C.K., “Ad Hoc Mobile Wireless Networks: Protocols and Systems”, Prentice Hall of India , 2001

2. Charles E. Perkins, “Ad Hoc Networking”, Addison Wesley, 2000

26

07SE28 DATA BASE TECHNOLOGY

4 0 0 4

Unit I Data Base System Concept File systems - Database systems - Database systems architecture - Data models - Relational model – Hierarchical model - Network model - Entity-Relationship model - Data Dictionary - Database Administration and control. 10 Hours

Unit II Relational Databases Codd's rules - Base tables - Views - Domains and key concept - Integrity rules - Relational Algebra – Relational calculus - Commercial query languages - Embedded SQL - Normalization and database design.

10 Hours

Unit III Database System Design File and storage structures - Indexing and Hashing - Query processing - Database recovery - Concurrency control - Transaction processing - Security and Integrity - Triggers.

10 Hours

Unit IV Distributed Databases Centralized versus distributed databases - Fragmentation - Distributed database architecture - Client / Server databases

- Distributed transactions - Locking and Commit protocols - Distributed concurrency Control – Security and reliability

- Parallel databases.

10 Hours

Unit V Advanced Databases The World Wide Web - Object oriented database - Object Relational database – XML - XML/QL - Data Analysis and OLAP - Data mining - Data warehousing.

Textbooks:

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

1. Abraham Silberschatz, Henry. F. Korth, S.Sudharsan, “Database System Concepts”, 4 th Edition, Tata McGraw Hill Book Company, 2002.

2. Ramez Elmasri, Shamkant B. Navathe, “Fundamentals of Database Systems”, 3 rd Edition, Addison Wesley,

2004.

References:

1. Jim Buyens, “Step by Step Web Database Development”, Prentice Hall of India, 2001.

2. Stefano Ceri & Giuesppe Pelagatti, “Distributed Databases - Principles and Systems”, McGraw Hill Book Company, 1987.

3. Date C.J., “An Introduction to Database System”, Pearson Education, 7 th Edition, 2003

07SE29 DATA MINING AND DATA WAREHOUSING

4 0 0 4

Unit I Introduction Introduction to Data Mining – Functionalities – Patterns Classification - Major issues - Data Warehouse and OLAP technology for data mining- Data warehouse - Multidimensional data model - Data warehouse architecture – Implementation - Development of data cube technology - Data mining to data warehousing

27

10 Hours

Unit II Data Preprocessing Data Preprocessing - Reason for data preprocess - Data cleaning - Data integration and transformation - Data reduction - Discretization and concept hierarchy generation - Data mining primitives - Languages and System Architecture: data mining primitives - Data mining query language - Designing graphical user interfaces-architectures of data mining Systems

10 Hours

Unit III Concept Description Data Generalization and Summarization - Analytical Characterization - Mining class Comparisons - Mining Descriptive Statistical Measures in Large databases - Discussion - Mining Association Rules in Large Databases - Association Rule Mining - Mining Single-Mining Multilevel Association Rules from Transaction Databases - Mining multidimensional Association Rules from Relational Databases and Data Warehouses - Association Mining to Correlation Analysis - Constraint Based Association Mining

10 Hours

Unit IV Classification and Prediction Issues Regarding Classification and Prediction - Classification by decision Tree Induction - Bayesian Classification - Classification by Backpropagation - Classification Based on Concepts from Association Rule Mining - Classification Methods -Prediction - Classifier Accuracy - Cluster Analysis: Types - Categorization of Major Clustering Methods - Partitioning Methods - Hierarchical Methods - Density Based Methods - Grid Based Methods - Model Based Clustering Methods - Outlier Analysis.

10 Hours

Unit V Multidimensional Analysis Multidimensional Analysis and Descriptive Mining of Complex Data Objects - Mining spatial Databases - Mining Multimedia Databases - Mining Time Series And Sequence Data Mining Text Databases - Mining the World Wide Web - Applications and Trends in Data Mining: Data Mining Applications - Data Mining System Products And

Research Prototypes - Additional Themes on Data Mining - Social Impacts of Data Mining-Trends in Data Mining.

Textbook:

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber, “Data Mining concepts and Techniques”, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers,

2002.

References:

1. Mehmed Kantardzic, “Data Mining Concepts, Models, Methods and Algorithms”, John Wiley & Sons Publications, 2003.

2. Margaret Dunham, “Data Mining: Introductory and Advanced Topics”, Pearson Education, NewDelhi, 2005.

3. Paulraj Ponnaiah, “Data Warehousing Fundamentals”, Wiley Publishers, Singapore, 2001.

07SE30 REAL TIME SYSTEMS

4 0 0 4

Unit I Introduction Architecture of Real time Systems / Embedded Systems – Operating Systems issues – Performance Measures – Estimating Program runtimes.

10

Hours

Unit II Task Assignment and Scheduling Uniprocessor Scheduling – IRIS Tasks – Tasks Assignment Mode charges – Fault tolerant scheduling.

Unit III Programming Languages and Tools

28

10

Hours

Desired characteristics based on ADA – Data typing – Control Structures – Packages – Exception Handling – Overloading – Multitasking – Timing specification – Task Scheduling – Just-in-time Compilation – Runtime support.

10 Hours

Unit IV Real Time Databases Basic Networking principles – Real time databases – Transaction processing – Concurrency control – Disk scheduling algorithms – Serialization and Consistency.

10 Hours

Unit V Fault Tolerance, Reliability and Synchronization Fault types – Fault detection and containment – Redundancy – Data diversity – Reversal checks – Obtaining parameter values – Reliability models for hardware redundancy – Software error models – Clocks – Fault tolerant synchronization – Synchronization in software.

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

Textbooks:

1. Krishna C.M., Kang G. Shin, “Real Time Systems”, McGraw-Hill, 1997.

2. Jane S Liu, “Real Time Systems”, Pearson Education, 2004.

References:

1. Prasad K.V.K.K., “Embedded, Real-Time Systems, concepts, Design and Programming”, DreamTeach,

2003.

2. Raymond J.A. Buhr, Donald L. Bailey, “An Introduction to Real Time Systems”, Prentice Hall International,

1999.

07SE31 PATTERN RECOGNITION

4 0 0 4

Unit I Introduction Pattern recognition - Classification and Description - Patterns and feature Extraction with Examples -Training and Learning in PR systems - Pattern recognition Approaches - Other Approaches to PR.

10 Hours

Unit II Statistical Pattern Recognition Introduction to statistical Pattern Recognition - Supervised Learning using Parametric and Non Parametric

10 Hours

Unit III Linear Discriminant Functions and Unsupervised Learning Introduction - Discrete and binary Classification problems - Techniques to directly obtain linear Classifiers - Formulation of Unsupervised Learning Problems - Clustering for unsupervised learning and applications

10 Hours

Unit IV Neural Networks Introduction to Artificial Neural Systems - Artificial Neurons, Basic-concepts - Perceptron - Representation - Linear Separability - Learning - Training algorithm - Supervised and unsupervised learning networks, back propagation networks (BPN) - The generalized delta rule – Practicalconsideration- BPN applications.

10 Hours

Unit V Neural Network Architectures Hopfield nets - Cauchy training - Simulated annealing - The Boltzmann machine - Associative memory -Bidirectional associative memory - Applications. SOM data processing – Applications - ART network description - ART1 - ART2 - Applications, Radial Basis Function Networks and Support Vector Machines - Applications.

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

Textbooks:

29

1.

Robert Schalkoff, “Pattern Recognition: Statistical, Structural and Neural Approaches”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc, 1992.

2. Duda R.O., Hart P.E. & Stork D.G, “Pattern Classification”, 2nd Edition, John Wiley Inc, 2001.

References:

1. James Freeman A. and David Skapura M., “Neural Networks - Algorithms, Applications & Programming Techniques”, Addison Wesley, 1992.

2. Yegnanarayana B., “Artificial Neural Networks”, Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd., New Delhi, 1999.

3. Laurene Fausett, “Fundamentals of Neural Networks: Architecture, Algorithms and Applications”, Prentice Hall of India, 1994.

07SE32 SOFT COMPUTING

4 0 0 4

Unit I Fuzzy Set Theory Introduction to Neuro Fuzzy and Soft Computing – Fuzzy Sets – Basic Definition and Terminology – Set-theoretic operations – Member Function Formulation and parameterization – Fuzzy Rules and Fuzzy Reasoning - Extension principle and Fuzzy Relations – Fuzzy If-Then Rules – Fuzzy Reasoning – Fuzzy Inference Systems – Mamdani Fuzzy Models - Sugeno Fuzzy Models – Tsukamoto Fuzzy Models – Input Space Partitioning and Fuzzy Modeling.

10 Hours

Unit II Optimization Derivative-based Optimization – Descent Methods – The Method of steepest Descent – Classical Newton’s Method – Step Size Determination – Derivative-free Optimization – Genetic Algorithms – Simulated Annealing – Random Search – Downhill Simplex Search.

10 Hours

Unit III Neural Networks Supervised Learning Neural Networks – Perceptrons - Adaline – Backpropagation Multilayer perceptrons – Radial Basis Function Networks – Unsupervised Learning and Other Neural Networks – Competitive Learning Networks – Kohonen Self – Organizing Networks – Learning Vector Quantization – Hebbian Learning.

10 Hours

Unit IV Neuro Fuzzy Modeling Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference Systems – Architecture – Hybrid Learning Algorithm – learning Methods that Cross-fertilize ANFIS and RBFN – Coactive Neuro-Fuzzy Modeling – Framework – Neuron Functions for Adaptive Networks – Neuro Fuzzy Spectrum.

10 Hours

Unit V Application of Computational Intelligence Printed Character Recognition – Inverse Kinematics Problems – Automobile Fuel Efficiency prediction – Soft Computing for Color Recipe Prediction.

Textbook:

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

Jang J.S.R., Sun C.T. and Mizutani E., “Neuro-Fuzzy and Soft Computing”, Pearson Education, 2004.

References:

1. Timothy J.Ross, “Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Application”, McGraw Hill, 1977.

2. Davis E.Goldberg, “Genetic Algorithms: Search, Optimization and Machine Learning” Addison Wesley, New york, 1989.

3. Eberhart R., Simpson P. and Dobbins R., “Computational Intelligence and PC Tools”, AP Professional, Boston 1996.

Unit I

07SE33 MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS

30

4 0 0 4

Introduction and QoS Introduction - QoS Requirements and Constraints - Concepts-Resources - Establishment Phase - Run-Time Phase - Management Architectures.

10 Hours

Unit II Operating Systems Real Time Processing – Scheduling - Interprocess Communication - Memory and Management - Server Architecture - Disk Management.

10 Hours

Unit III File Systems and Networks

Traditional and Multimedia File Systems - Caching Policy – Batching - Piggy backing –Ethernet - Gigabit Ethernet - Token Ring - 100VG Any LAN - Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) - ATM Networks - MAN - WAN.

10 Hours

Unit IV Communication Transport Subsystem - Protocol Support for QoS - Transport of Multimedia - Computer Supported Cooperative Work – Architecture - Session Management - MBone Applications.

10 Hours

Unit V

Synchronization

Synchronization in Multimedia Systems - Presentation-Synchronization Types -Multimedia Synchronization Methods

- Case Studies – MHEG – MODE - ACME.

Textbooks:

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

1. Ralf Steinmetz and Klara Nahrstedt, “Multimedia Systems”, Springer, I Edition 2004.

2. Ralf Steinmetz and Klara Nahrstedt, “Media Coding and Content Processing”, Prentice Hall of India, 2002.

References:

1. Vaughan T, “Multimedia”, Tata McGraw Hill, 1999.

2. Mark J.B., Sandra K.M., “Multimedia Applications Development using DVI technology”, McGraw Hill,

1992.

3. Rao K.R., Zoran S. Bojkovic, Dragorad A. Milovacovic, D. A. Milovacovic , “Multimedia Communication Systems: Techniques, Standards, and Networks”, Prentice Hall of India, 1st Edition, 2002.

4. Ze-Nian Li and Mark S. Drew, “Fundamentals of Multimedia”, Pearson Education, 2004.

07SE34 C # and .NET

4 0 0 4

Unit I Fundamentals of C# UNIX Operating System – History – Commands – System Structure – Shell, Shell Programming – System / Calls – Unix Communications - Architecture – Kernel Data structures – File sub-system and Process – sub-system – User- Kernel modes – Process States and Transitions – Sleep and Wakeup.

10 Hours

Unit II C# C# data types – Variables – Operators – Statements – Input/output – Control flow – Methods – Debugging and error

handling – Namespaces – Array – Structs – OOP concepts – Classes – Abstract data type – Constructors – Destructors

- Conversions

Unit III Inheritance and Interfaces

31

10 Hours

Inheritance – operator overloading-Interfaces – Indexes – Delegates – Events – Variable argument Lists – Collection – Reflection – Events – Variable argument lists – Collection – Reflection – Dynamic creation and invocation – Preprocessor

10 Hours

Unit IV I/O Operations File and Folder operations – Dates and Times – browsing the Internet – Windows Form Controls – Advanced windows – Form features using dialogs.

10 Hours

Unit V Databases and Web Applications Developing Windows Applications – Accessing data with ADO.NET, .NET assemblies - Web programming basics – Web services – Case Study.

10 Hours

 

Total: 50 Hours

Textbooks:

1. Balagurusamy E., “Programming in C #”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2002.

2. Stanley B.Lippman, “C# Primer: A practical approach”, Pearson Education, 1991.

References:

1. Eric Gunnerson, “A Programmers Introduction to C#” , A Press, 2000.

2. Ben Albahari, Pter Drayton, Brad Merrill, “C# Essentials”, Oreilly & Associates, 2001.

3. Conard.J, “Introduction to .Net”, Wrox Press, 2000.

4. David.S.Platt, “Introducing Microsoft. Net”, Microsoft Press, 3rd, Edition, 2003.

07SE35 ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING

 

4 0 0 4

Unit I Enterprise Resource Planning Principle – ERP framework – Business Blue Print – Business Engineering Vs Business process Re-Engineering – Tools – Languages – Value chain – Supply and Demand chain – Extended supply chain management – Dynamic Models – Process Models.

10 Hours

Unit II Technology and Architecture Client/Server architecture – Technology choices – Internet direction – Evaluation framework – CRM – CRM pricing – Chain safety – Evaluation framework.

10 Hours

Unit III ERP System Packages SAP - People soft - Baan and Oracle – Comparison – Integration of different ERP applications – ERP as sales force automation – Integration of ERP and Internet – ERP Implementation strategies – Organisational and social issues.

10 Hours

Unit IV Oracle Overview – Architecture – AIM – applications – Oracle SCM - SAP - Overview – Architecture – applications -Before and after Y2k – critical issues – Training on various modules of IBCS ERP Package - Oracle ERP and MAXIMO - Including ERP on the NET.

Unit V ERP Procurement Issues

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10 Hours

Market Trends – Outsourcing ERP – Economics – Hidden Cost Issues – ROI – Analysis of cases from five Indian

Companies.

10 Hours Total: 50 Hours

Textbook:

1. Sadagopan. S, “ERP-A Managerial Perspective”, Tata McGraw Hill, 1999.

2. Jose Antonio Fernandez, “The SAP R/3 Handbook”, Tata McGraw Hill, 1998.

References:

1. Vinod Kumar Crag and N.K.Venkitakrishnan, “Enterprise Resource Planning – Concepts and Practice”, Prentice Hall of India, 1998.

2. Garg & Venkitakrishnan, “ERPWARE, ERP Implementation Framework”, Prentice Hall of India, 1999. Thomas E Vollmann and Bery Whybark, “Manufacturing and Control Systems”, Galgothia Publications, 1998.

3.

07SE36 COMPONENT BASED SYSTEM DESIGN

4 0 0 4

Unit I Basic Concepts Software Components - Component models and Component Services - Myths in Component Based Technology - Risk Factors - Success Factors, Component Based Software Development.

10 Hours

Unit II Components, Architecture and Process Component Architecture - Component Frameworks - Component Development - Component distribution and acquisition - Component assembly - Markets and components. 10 Hours

Unit III Design of Software Component Software Components and the UML Component Infrastructures - Business Components - Components and Connectors - Designing Models of Modularity & Integration 10 Hours

Unit IV

Management of Component Based Software Systems Measurement and Metrics for Software Components - Selecting the right Components - Software Component Project Management - Trouble with Testing Components - Configuration Management and Component Libraries - Evolution

Maintenance of Management of Component based Systems.

10 Hours

Unit V Component Technologies Overview of the Following Component Models: CORBA - COM+ - Enterprise Java Beans - Software Agents. 10 Hours Total 50 Hours

Textbooks:

1. George T.Heinemen, William T. Councill, “Component Based Software Engineering”, Addison- Wesley

Professional, 2001. 2. Clemens Szyperski, “Component Software – Beyond Object Oriented Programming”, Pearson Education, 2nd

edition, 2004.

References:

1. Thomas J. Mowbray, William A.Ruh, “Inside CORBA Distributed Object Standards and Applications”,

Addison Wesley, 2001.

2. Dale Rojerson, “Inside COM”, Microsoft Press, 2001.

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3.

Andreas Vogel, Keith Duddy “Java Programming with CORBA” John Wiley & Sons. 1998.

07 SE37 DISTRIBUTED OPERATING SYSTEM

4 0 0 4

Unit I Introduction Architectures of Distributed Operating Systems - System Architecture types communication networks- Theoretical Foundations - Lamp ports logical clocks – Vector clocks – Casual ordering of messages – Global state – Cuts of a distributed computation – Termination detection. Distributed Mutual Exclusion – The classification of mutual exclusion and associated algorithms – A comparative performance analysis.

10 Hours

Unit II Distributed Deadlock Detection Deadlock handling strategies – Issues in deadlock detection and resolution – Control organizations for distributed deadlock detection – Centralized and distributed deadlock detection algorithms –Hierarchical deadlock detection algorithms - Agreement protocols – The system model - A classification of agreement problems - Solutions to the Byzantine agreement problem - Applications of agreement algorithms - Distributed resource management - Architecture – Mechanism for building distributed file systems – Design issues –Log structured file systems.

10 Hours

Unit III Scheduling Algorithms Distributed shared memory – Architecture – Algorithms for implementing DSM – Memory coherence and protocols – Design issues - Distributed Scheduling – Issues in load distributing – Components of a load distributing algorithm – Stability – Load distributing algorithm – Performance comparison – Selecting a suitable load sharing algorithm - Failure Recovery and Fault tolerance – Classification of failures – Backward and forward error recovery - Backward error recovery - Recovery in concurrent systems – Consistent set of check points – Synchronous and asynchronous check pointing and recovery – Check pointing for distributed database systems- Recovery in replicated distributed databases.

10 Hours

Unit IV Security Systems Protection and security - The access matrix model and its implementations-safety in matrix model - Advanced models of protection. Data security – Cryptography - Model of cryptography - Conventional cryptography - Modern cryptography - Private key cryptography - Data encryption standard - Public key cryptography – Multiple encryption – Authentication in distributed systems.

10 Hours

Unit V Case Study (Linux / Windows) Case study(Linux / Windows) – Design and implementation of OS - Process model and structure in OS - Memory management - File system - I/O management and device drivers.

Textbooks:

10 Hours

Total: 50 Hours

1. Pradeep K.Sinha, “Distributed Operating System-Concepts and Design”, Prentice Hallo India,

2003.

2. Andrew S.Tanenbaum, “Distributed Operating System”, Pearson education, 2003.

References:

1. Naji, “Linux OS”, Prentice Hall of India, 2003.

2. Abraham Siberschetz and Peter B. Galvin, “Windows XP Update”, John Wiley, 2003.

3. Mukesh Singhal, Niranjan G.Shivaratri, “Advanced concepts in operating systems: distributed, Database and multiprocessor operating”, Tata McGraw Hill Company, 2001.

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