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Vaccai Practical Method for Soprano, Tenor

PREFACE BY N. VACCAro

ANYONE who wishes to sing really well should begin by learning how to sing in Italian, nut only because the Italian school of vocalisation is acknowledged to be superior to all others, but also on account of the language itself, where the pure and 8011orOU8 tone of its many vowel sounds will assist the singer in acquiring a fine voice-production and a clear and distinct enunciation in any language he may have to sing, no matter what may be his nationality.

Experience has shown us that not only in France and England, but also in Germany, and even in Italy, many who are studying as amateurs rebel at the thought of the weary time their professors require them to devote to "Solfeggio." Here they first urge that very trivial plea that, as they have no ambition beyond just singing to please a few friends in the restricted area of their own drawing-rooms, they need not dwell upon all those subtleties of the vocal art which they are ready enough to admit are indispensable for those desirous of commanding a larger and more critical audience from the public stage of the opera or the concert-room. It is to show the absurdity of such an argument, and to win over these faint-hearted ones to the true cause by more gentle means, and as it were, in spite of themselves, that I present this U Method n of mine to the public. They will find it new in design, very practical, very briefyet very effective-and, as physicians say, "very pleasant to take." The pupil will attain the same goal, and may even beat the record, but he will find the course far less lengthy and laborious, with spaces of contrasted sun and shade to beguile the tedium of the race.

As at first all must find a fresh difficulty in having, as they sing, to pronounce words in a language which is not habitual to them-a difficulty which is not altogether obviated byany amount of study in Solfeggio and Vocalising exercises on-the same modeI,-I have tried to make matters easier by this plan of mine, where I adopt. even on the simple notes of the diatonic scale, words selected from the fine poetry of Metastasio instead of just the mere names of notes or syllables conveying neither meaning nor interest. By these means I trust 1 have rendered the pupil's task so far less wearisome and thankless that he may even find pleasure in contracting the habit of clear articulation as he sings and, without experiencing any aversion, be led to the study of an indispensable form of exercise. I am of the opinion that not merely amateurs, but also those who think of entering the profession, will find my U Method" useful, for in each individual exercise I have sought to make the music illustrative of a dift'erent style of composition and of a distinct emotion, so that the pupil will learn more readily bow to interpret later on the spirit of the various composers.

The vocal part of the exercises has been kept within such a restricted compass, not for the greater ease of the greater number of voices, but because of the conviction that at the very beginning it is more advantageous not to strain the vocal organs, and to keep to the medium register exclusively. This is amply sufficient to demonstrate the requisite rules, and, besides, Ihould it be thought expedient, it is always easy to transpose the lesson into a key higher or Jower, as the individual capability of the singer may necessitate.

I

Vaccai - Practical Method - for Soprano, Tenor

'f'\ACCAI was born on March the 15th, ~ 1790, at Tolentino, near Ancona, Italy, whence the family soon removed to Pesaro, where they remained about twelve years, and where Niccolo received his first instruction in music. He was then brought to Rome for the purpose of studying law, to which he remained more or less faithful during some five years; but then, renouncing this profession as distasteful, he devoted himself entirely to music, taking lessons in counterpoint under Jannaconi, and later (1812) studying the art of operacomposition under the guidance of Paisiello, at Naples. While in Naples he wrote two cantatas and other church-music; in 1814 his first opera, I soiitari di Scotia, was brought out at the Teatro 111tOVO in that city. Shortly after, he repaired to Venice, where he stayed seven years, writing an opera in each, and also several ballets j but none of these ventures succeeded in winning for their author even the evanescent vogue of an Italian opera-composer; he consequently gave over dramatic composition in 1820 and turned his attention to instruction in singing, a vocation in which he was eminently successful in Venice, Trieste and Vienna. Again devoting his energies to composition, he wrote operas for several leading Italian theatres, yet still without success; but few of his dramatic works became known abroad, among them being La Pastorella, Timur Chan, Pietro il Gran, and Giulietta e Romeo. The last-named opera is considered his best, and its third act, especially, was so much liked that it has frequently been substituted for the same act of Bellini's opera of like name, not only in Italian theatres, but even in Paris and London. To the former city Vaccai journeyed in 1829, visiting London a few years later, and in both attained to great and deserved popularity as a singing-teacher. Again returning to Italy, he recommenced writing operas, one of this period being Giouanna Grey, written for Malibran, in honor of whom he composed, after her decease, in co-operation with Donizetti, Mercadante and others, a

funeral cantata. Most of these operas also met with hardly more than a bare succes d'estime, In 18;8, however, he was appointed to succeed 8asili as head-master and instructor of composition at the Milan Conservatory, which position he held until 184 t, when he retired to Pesaro. Here his last opera, Virginia, was written for the Teatro Argentino at Rome. He died at Pesaro August 5, 1848. Besides sixteen operas, he composed a number of cantatas, church-music of various descriptions, arias, duets and romances.

Although unable to secure a niche among Italy's favorite dramatic composers, Vaccai's lasting renown as a singing-master shows that he was possessed of solid, if not brilliant, artistic attainments. His famous "Metodo pratico di canto italiano per camera" is still a standard work in great request, and his "Dodici ariette per camera per l'insegnamento del belcanto italiano" are scarcely less popular

The general plan of the "Practical Method" is to render study easy and attractive, without omitting essentials. No exercise exceeds the limit of an octave and a fourth (cl-P, transposable to suit any voice). There are fifteen "Lessons," which are not bare solfeggi on single vowels or syllables, but melodious exercises-for scale-practice, for skips of thirds. fourths, etc., up to octaves; on semitones, runs, syncopations, and all graces usually met with-written to smooth Italian verses, with excellent English translations. The extraordinary and undiminished popularity of this method is attested by the numerous editions through which it has run; yet it is not merely the method for dilettanti, but can be used profitably in conjunction with any other system of voice-cultivation, being admirably calculated for strengthening and equalizing the medium register, for giving confidence in taking difficult intervals, and for enforcing habits of precise and distinct articulation and phrasing.

2

Vaccai - Practical Method - for Soprano, Tenor

ITALIAN.

HINTS ON PRONUNCIATION.'"

Vowels:

General rule: The vowels are very open, and never to be pronounced as impure vowels or diphthongs; they are 100Zg in accented syllables which they terminate,-short in unaccented syllables, or in accented ones ending with a consonant.

a like ah or dh (never d) ; e.g., amare [pron. ah-mah'-n!h].

e ay in bay (without the vanish 1); l in bed; a in bare (before r).

.. ee in beet; I in bit; i before a vowel, like y (consonant).

o aw, or oh (without the vanish il); "in opinion.

u 00 in boot; tt in bull.

Consonants:

General rule: Even the hard consonants are somewhat softer than in English; the soft consonants are very delicate.

b, d, C, I, m, n, p, qu, s, t, v, as in English.

c like k, before a, 0, u, or another consonant except c, as below.

c .. eh in chair before e or i," cc like I-ch before e or i,

g .. g hard before a, 0, u, or another consonant; except before I (pronounce gllike I-y [consonant], e.g. mgli, [pron. sool' -ye]), and n (pronounce gn like ,1 in canon [kan' -yon]).

g .. z in azure (or a very soft}) be-

fore e or i, h is mute.

j like y in you.

r, pronounce with a roll (tip of tongue

against hard palate).

Where a doubled consonant occurs, the first syllable is dwelt upon; e.g., in ecco [pronounce ek' - ko, not ek' - 0). - Accented syllables take a less explosive stress

• These U hints" are offered as an aid for tyros, and not in the least as an exhaustive set of rules.

than in English, being prolonged and dwelt upon rather than forcibly marked.

sc like sh, before e and i. Z .. ds (very soft Is).

GERMAN.

Vowels:

The simple vowels as in Italian: y like German i or ii.

Modified vowels:

ii. like a in bare, but broader; l in bed, a has no English equivalent; long " can be pronounced by forming the lips to say oh, and then saying it (as in bay) with the lips in the first position; short '" by saying l (as in bed) instead of a. LN. B.-Long" is the French eu (injeu)].

ii has no English equivalent; pronounce long it by forming the lips to say 00 (as in boot), and then saying ee (beet) with the' lips in the first position; short a, by saying f (as in bit) instead of ee, [N. B.-Long it is the French u.]

Diphthongs:

ai and ei like long i in bite. ae like Ii.

au .. 071) in brow.

eu and au like oi (more exactly all -il,

closely drawn together). '-'

Consonants:

(, h, k, I, m, n, p, t, as in English. band d, beginning a word or syllable, as in English; ending a word or syllable, like p and t respectively.

c like k before a, 0, and U," like Is before e, i, and Ii.

g usually hard, but like z in azure in words from the French and Italian in which g is so sounded; -ang, eng, ing, ong and ung terminate, at the end of a word, with a k-sound (e.g., Be'-bungt).

3

HIRTS ON PRONUNCIATION.

j like y (consonant). qa" n.

r either with a roll. or a harsh breathing.

• beginning a word or syllable, and before a vowel, like • (soft); ending a word or syllable, like sharp s; bel ore / and p, beginning a word, usually like sll (e.g. st"mm. pron. shtam [u as in bull]) ; otherwise as in English.

~ like f:

w .. ,,(bat softer. between v and "'). a .. Iu <also when beginning a word). ... Is.

Compound consonants:

ch is a sibillant without an English equivalent; when beginning a syllable, or after e, i, a, i, u, ai, n. a~, ~u, and au, it is soft (set the tongue as if to pronounce d, and breathe an II through it ; e.g. Strid" pron. shtrtd-ji}; after a, 0, u, and au, it lS liard (a guttural II).

chslike x, • ch .. sll.

.p and st, see s, above. th like t.

Accented syllables have a forcible stress, as in English. In compound words there is always a secondary accentt"), sometimes a tertiary one("'), depending on the number of separate words entering into the composition of the com~und word; e.g, Z1vi'sdun' alliS "musik", Bo'gl!nllam"m~rkla· oier'"; The principal accent is regularly marked (') in this work.

FRENCH.

Vowels:

& as in Italian, but shorter, often approaching English d.

!Iike all.

e .. "in but; I!·final is almost silent

in polysyllabic words. 6 .. ny in bay.

~ I! in there.

a German Ii. and always long.

i or i like u in beet; short I as ill English.

o as in Italian.

u like the German e.

Diphthongs:

ai like oj in bait; but before I-linal, Of' II, is pronounced as a diphthonc (a4;;!~. drawn closely together). ai and ei like I.

ea, eu and C2U like German o.

oi like 011·411' (drawn closely together). ou and 01£ like 00 in boot.

eau like 0 long, without the vanish II.

Modified by a following n. m, M, "lor ml at the end of a syllable, the vowels and diphthongs are nasal (exception,-verbal ending of 3rd pers. plural).

Consonants as in English. with the

following exceptions:

C like s in song before e. I, i, I, and i. ch .. sll.

I' .. :: in azure before e, I, ),1, and i. go as in Italian.

b is often mute; no extended rule can be given here.

j like 1/1 in azure .

11 after i is usuaHy sounded like English y (consonant). and frequently prolonfs the i (~<'l; e.g. Iral'ai/l~r trlih-vllh-yay']. In",'luil/e [trllhngkee'Y]'

n nasal, see above; otherwise as in English. [The nasal effect il accurately obtained by sounding ,,(or ",) to.l{~tk~r 7J!itk (instead of after) the preceding vowel; but the sound of e is changoed to ah, i to d (in bat). and _ to m.]

m, nasal in certain situations. r with a roll.

s-final is silent.

t-final is silent.

er, et, es, est, ez, as final syllable., are pronounced like I.

Accentuation. The strong English stress on some one syllable of a polysyllabic word is wanting in French ; the general rule is st,tAl" to accent the last syl/alJk.

4

Lesson I

The Diatonic Scale

In this 1s_t Lesson, Signor Vaccai has not grouped the letters of the Italian syllables according to the correct rules of spelling, but in such a fashion that the pupil may per ~ ceive, at the very first glance, how his voice should dwell on the vowels, exclusively, to the extreme value of the note or notes they influence, and how with a swift and immediate articulaj ion of the consonants he should attack the following syllable. This will greatly facilitate him in acquiring what the Italians cal l the Canto legato (Chant lie) _ though, of course, we need hardly say that here the teacher's example and oral explanation is better than all written precept.

Adagio

Voce

f'l
,'" .4. .. v t ! I I
~ Child, tho' Jour way seems 10nK, Since f'irst " e start. ed , Corne, learn 111)\\"
, 4- .. - u .,. , - , I
~la- nea so - He - ci - ta piu de-Ilu - tHL - to, a - n{,o-reht,
~ Adag-io --- I I
I
~ -9 .. .. r___.,r '" - r .. ~ I I
< P
b .. -.. .". b. --.... .......-.....
.
. Voice

Piano

J
... __ .... W~lt. .. - - ,
~ faith and song Keep men brave- heart-ed. spring- re - joic , es, And
~ -_ .... 4- • - - I
s'a - gi - ti co - nlie _ ve fia - to, fa - ce ehe pa - lpi - ta
~
~ '- _ .. --- ... .... ., -6:_ .. ...... ~
-
-... I I ,/. b~. -
I
I r I I ~
·
c. 'tis I ... .. 4-
I'jwhile yet day, Out with your voic- es, And march.march a - way.
·
t. I - •• .. 4-
pre - sso a-l mo - rir, fa - ee ehe pa - Ipi - fa pre- sso a - I mo • rir.
I '1 ~~ \ I------r---.." I _, ~
tJ I
·
~ I I ~ / " I 1 ....__ - _ .. ·.._it ...
if p ......--,.
-- !;:':. -
. 5

Intervals of the Third

Andantino

'} l
e. Ahl for r r it r When the ~
fJ those who feel no pI - y, Slm - ple dove, so
.,
e. Sem-pli - eet - fa ~ r ehe ~e _ deil
tor - to - rel - la, non suo pe-
__.
fJ Andantino l l 1
'- r" .... ... ... .. ... .. ... • ... • .. .. • *
- - - - • • .. • - -
.
. ~ ~
t. pret-ty, 'Mid the ar- rotvs, shel-ler ,I" Here and there, and sore .~
1"1 su - mg, dIS -
t. ri-glio, fug - gir dil. eru-d~r - ti - gfio vo - lajn g rembo al ~
per cae - CIa-
~
'- '--' ... ... .. .. .. .. ... • -. -- -. .-
• • • •
·
· ~
'- ., :_* • r ,. T
fJ tressd, Wound-ed falls with gen- tle coo-ing, Wound-ed f'alls.with gen - tle
'- ~ ... - • r r I
tor, per fug - gir dal eru - doar - ti-glio, per fug _ gir dal eru-~-
'-" -I--
~ ~ 10.. 1-
, «:> ~ .,.. T' . .
'- ... .r I I
<
...-- "' ... b •• --- -
~ · .
· .
. . . ~
t. cooing, On tre fowl-er's f~ith-less breast, On the fowl-er's faith-less breast.
fJ
t.J vo -lrin grembo al I ~o-lvn gremb'Lal
ti-glio cae - eia - tor, eae - cia - tor.
fJ I~" ~l
t. "--' - - ... ... -:i. ~ ~ ~ ~
...--... _. .". .. l l
·
·
:iij :iij -- 6

Lesson II Intervals of the Fourth

Adagio

u
• Ah! .. - .. '
.... 'tis sad- ness, Not mere mad-ness, Not mere
... L . 'I .. do
1\ .... Adag-io a-scia i li - do,e il m~ll - fi - a sol -
~ ~ .::;::---..._ ~
,
.. -' , t r .,
p ~
- - ...--
.
.
.- Iiii""""'"
...... - - - fiiiIII"""" ~ .... l >-
.. - t. Thro' those d;eadful deaf'ning' .,'
1\ .... want that oft-times ur - ges, surg_es, Far, ~
.. {- .. .. - ..
car tor-nail noc - C Ie - ro, e pur sa ehe men- zo - gne - ro al - tre
.... ._., ,..__ ~ ...-." ~ .c--.... ~
I ......___:" -==-- ~, 11 t ..
• r .>
........-:-~ ~ .. ..--- - - ~
·
·
- - I"" - ~ -
- IiiiI"""'" - - - fl .... ::> '::> >-
.. lnd forth to One who kJ'ows What storms ~ be! -
far sea, One who
1\ .... ::> >- >. >.
.. vol- fe iin - gan ~l - l'in - :._../ no, -
- no, al - tre te gan - al - tre
~.I!I --"'" ~ ~ ,..._, ~
t .. -- ~~~ ~ ... -..__,....>-
~~ ~
·
·
- - ~ .-I!!!!!I -
- fJ .... '::> >- l l
'" _r r be, All t?O r -.._....., be!
~ .... knows w~t storms g!n well what storms can
.. vel - l'e I'" r no, a~re tol - te fin - -___" no.
m - gan - gan -
_lj .... .--. ~ ~ C".
,
... --- - ~~~ T r ~
~ .. ~ ~
·
·
-- - I---' 7

Intervals of the Fifth

Andante

flJ# --..
.
.
.... _tiI do • mock It Call I
1'lJ# Then not me, me no era ...:. ven,
.
.
.. AV .. • t'e- re - - for _ r to
- vez-zQJt vi - sen - za con -
~ J# Andante - ~ ~
t. P 0 :i:~~ .... j ijl"':j tJU 1!'ft·J1 l .~
<c::« '--"" ----- -----
.
.
11 11 ~ ii .. ... ill 11 ~ J# :>
t- 'I'oss'd in mid - lta - ven, And furl'd all my sail.
~J# :>
I. in mea-zo al por - to pa - Yen - to il mar,
'-"
~J# ,....,..., _~ - -
--I. ~.,--"". ~.~ 0 ~ -j «:» s:» ~.~ .~ .. ~
----- <c:»: \,i'" <c:»: -..__../
·
·
qll ~:t =i 1i j,li ::;; ::;
:.. .. ~J#
t- ,. d • t !'. - • _I ';' - s~~ -
~J#_ Where WlO S mos fa - vor me, Most 1m de - ing_
I. • • ... • 1 f~ -
Av - vcz-zQjt VI - ve - re sen - za con - to
~ J# ~ ~
I. :;j .. ~ ~ .~ 1[.~ I~" I 'I._) IlI~ ~ ~
J '--"" I '--"" <c:»:
-
·
·
• .. 'IT I flJ# :>
t- Alt! sad ~ ,. If I til,
~J# sea - far - 109, no fear pre - vall.
I. u .. I til
in mez-z~l por - to pa - ven - to il mar.
flJ# - _,....
t- 4 *j 4"'~ ~ .. ~ .. ~ .. j I lI~lI ....... 4 Co
-'" ------ '--"" ~ ~
·
·
4 4 11 -,J .. ::::; '"
.. 8

Lesson III Intervals of the Sixth

Andantino

~ I
.. When un , just- ly blame thou bear-est All in si - lent scorn se-
~
.. Bel- la pro-v~3~ d'al - rna for - te l'es - ser pla - ci , d~e se _
~ I Andantino ~
t
• p~ .... !' .~ .. III ......... • __ III -4! ... -I ____ ...

t
I ~I i I ~ I ~ I ~ I Ii I ~ I Ii ~ ,
.. .. !" While the guilt-y so mean-Iy Sees and gives not look,11Or
~ , rene-ly, one
, .. .. sof - frir l'iD-giu- sta ' r col _ pa ehe hon
re - na nel pe - na du - Da
~ , J I
.. • --.!____:.--" .. ~ .. ~ .. '(1. ~. Y,--- T .,- __ y
...-- ~
1 ~ 1 ~ 1 Il I 1/ I Ii ~ :; _j ~ , l -
• sign, Then,tho' all un-seen.thou ,,!earlst Such a crown as Sai.nts deem
~
.. ha. Bel - la pro-va e d'al - rna f'or- tt' Ies - ser pIa - ci-da e se -
~ .. , I '-'~ J _I. I ~ 1 ~ )' l
I , :4 :; __./ .........
r-._f}: • J • I :I J ~J • I #: J
III .. ~ ,...,
.. f~ir-lst, .. ~. Brought from far Golc~Ja's ~ine .
~ Rarer far than gems the rarest
• ~e- fa nel sof-frir fin - gin - sta .. ... in - col- pa r !
pe- na Da ehe non ha.
~ I. I I.. - --- - ,...,...., I
.. :::: .. I ... .. .. ... ~ ..
.. .. ... ,. ,. .". ~
, ,. .. ,., ~ 9

Lesson IV Intervals of the Seventh

Adagio

~.
... ~' ~ ,nfd tfe I I
~ One gleam thun - der
'- _# r· .+ _.,: I I
~ Adagio Fra om - bre un l~ -. p~
..... . .
I
'- ~ . . . . .. . . . . .... •••
In .. Tn .. I T 1 .. rn .. I T l" In
.
.
~ I ~ I ~ ~ ~ ~ I :: =
11 11 flash -

- ing,

Where winds and ~es

are

so -

-10

ba - sta al nocchier

._,

sa

~ l._
'-'I dash- - ing; One glance, and .Io.l!0w the
.
'- ga- - ce che gia ri - tro - v;Ul
~ ._ - -
-
t
t P "~," .. " ..... ·1 i ~·il ~I·i 1t~.i ~~
if
, .
.
.. .. 4"- = ..:::
1; ~ 10

Intervals of the Eighth, or Octave

I)
I. .• r ;!w ."*
fl And at dawn's first
t.J .*' , .. ~
I) Quell OIl - da che ru -
t FPm~m 'Hm ~m ~

.
.
- - ~ - ~ ,

All gen- tly ris - ing,

ing,

bal - za, si fran-gu

mor - mo-ra,

-p. I

f

I) --
t..fl How fair these waves ap - pear, Fall - ing,
I. -. - " bal
rna lim - pi da 81 fa, za,
fl - -
I t.J rnrn rn~ - i~~
-
.. II- •
.
.
? ~ ¥ #~
I fall - ing, gen - tl

fall - ing, How

lim - pid, sweet and clear.

za, rna

::>.-

lim - pi - da si

fa.

11

Lesson V

Half - tones, or Semitones

Andantino

~
~ .. ' <; ~-
~ When leaf - let or
t. .. '
De - Ii- - ra dub -
~. Andantino
, P~J "tJ -JJ .J -JJ «:»
'I 'I 'I rI rI
.
, .
- - .. .. .. 11 ~
.
.
~ -...___.v-' - - I Ind
feath - er Have bro - ken their teth - er,
~
.
. .
t. ~ - - I r
bio - sa, in - cer - ta va - neg - gia 0 -
fl - - - - - -
~ «.: ... __./ qt_/ ~ ~ $t~ 'II!~ ~ ~
~ ~ " rI l~ • •
.
.
.. ~ 'I it- ~ ~ ~ ~
. .
t. ",rId r
win - try weath - er Has
r.
.
t. I r r
gni at - rna cht,.on - deg - gia fr~
'-'
~.
t. "'!_/ ~ -...__......... -...__......... -c::> ....._,

~ ~ ~ • ._ 'I
; v 12

'I -
·
.. tost them high; So ' . rnd
on con - SCIence
i'J -
·
• r it , r
mo - ti del cor. De - - ra dub -
fl ~ =- .....---::::" == == ~ --- I!!!!!!!I!!!!!I ~
.. ._ .. _../ ~ ~ -.___..; ~ -___...... L../ ... i:...-/
t'l ~
·
- :ij ~ ~ - .. ~ .....---...... -
. .
·
.. - . , r ,
~ rea - son, In pas - sions mad sea - son, May
~
. ·
·
.. - ,
bio - sa, in - cer - ta va - neg - gia o _
fl - - ~ =- - ~ I!!!!!!!!!!!!I! .... -
.. ~ .~ ....__., ::::-' ~ ~~ ~ ~ ~WL-/
'\ '\ '\ r'I r-.
·
• • 11 ~ ~ tt- ~
·
• ~ ~ , • tf!~
~ fal - ter and wa - ver L; ou: see, lest they __
.. ~ ~ , "* ~~
gni al - ma ehejm - deg - gia frai mo - ti
~ '-" '-"
t .. IJt_) 10 V ~1U :tu ~1L../" tJ ~~-:.:.:>-

·
·
~1 i 1i =.; .=.; ~ II II
.. .. ~ .. 1":\
~ die, Oh! see, l~st they die.
~ 1":\
.. cor, fr~ mo ti del cor.
-
fl - .- - -- - - 1":\
, ~J.U --- -___,., --- .___./ .. __./ "*_../ ~
:-., '\ '\ I
• - • ii 11 .. _.-J" -
I..:.J 13

Moderato

Lesson VI Syncopation,

~ 1 -~ J ~
t. LTk~_ 'fill _ bees :'t .. _:.....- - ," iThaL t:.·ere~ life but
~~ sun 1- rise L, rang ing-,
. " .. :/ - .. .. ~ .. .. rhi~ ..
Nel_ con - tra-sto a - mor.c, s'ac - cell - de; eon L. ce - de 0
--- '-'
'1 ~ Moderato _ - - - - I ~
-
, 11 i- ~. ,. ._ v. t .:: :J t ..- ' '!"t .. _ _/ .... •
-- slim e ~
·
·
- - - Y' r Y' r ~ _l .l _l
" .. fong! cltang;g, Shone there_ bot, all.c; worlds a- bove, L;;;, _ - -
~ one ,., lo,oe'---r love,
t. "h' r r .. , ", b b - - -
C 1_ s'ar - ren - de mal S1_ ar - a- ro non e, mai,_ mai,_ mai
'l~ I P'""-I ) 1\ " ~ -
I
t. • - - ___ ~ .... • • - • .. 1 ~ ~f-~ ~ 1 1l"~
--- _l ._... ._... ._...
·
·
r Y' r 1: i~ 1.: l

.
" true .. Tlmes_a~d - '-. .. f~es, All r
'l~- loveJ":'\ chance~, a~d dr~ams_a~d range.i.and
.
.
" !' r - h' ..... h~ s'ar - ren - de maL ' .
- non e, Con_ et ee - de 0 e 1_ no S1
'l~ r.'\ 1-.- l I. - l .- " r .. r r .. e,__ r .. r -
bar - ba - ro_ non no mat c; si bar - ba - ro __ non e.
I"lli ---
t
" .. -- ... .. .. r v~
.. - .. .. .. .I. j~
, ·
·
-
14 Lesson VII

Runs and Scale-Passages

At first, the pupil should take the time of this exercise quite slowly. In after .study, he may work up to a sharp Allegro, progressively, as his capacity allows him. Scales should be sung with extreme smoothness, even and flowingly; but with each note clear and distinct. All jerking and slurring are equally to be avoided.

,.,~ .-I!!!!!!!I -- ---
~ L~-est and ~-est, -
When.snows are whit - est, O~!_peck the
~ ~ .-oI!!!I -- ~
II - d:i'Y- tat - ta ~ve e __ dun
Co - me_jl can - do - re bel
1~
t
'" 1 ..... .- ~~ t'int1ie.' \ ....... ... .. ...
.
.
- \ .. - ~ ~~ ~ --- l -
t. slight--: est, - flies. ~_friends~re --
Their _ beau-ty nea~ est,
~~ ~ ~ --- L
~ - - - ... uY or - J;.a. --
co - re la _ fe - del - til.. so - la
~~
,
II tfJ: :I::J: tf:J: :t :t ~:::: qr r r I .,. ......
~~ ~ .. ...
... ~~ .-Il!I!!!!!!I ~ -
II D~est,srn - - 0-;;:- doubt,the - T~ friendship
~ cer - est, mer - est,
--- -- ..,.---- -
t. ~in_se fi- t~ ta nun- .._.. la 1-;;:--- s~a _r
ce - ve, vo - bel -
~~ ,-
I
II 'S'rr 1 ......... ,. ,. .. ....... ... ... ...
·
·
... 'i '-.._ :e 1'.:
"l~ - --- -
t. dies; One - doubt, the - T~ friend-ship dies.
~~ ~- est,
• ta, tut~ ta ntiJI - - la l~~a bel - ta.
"l~ vo -
~ . "'''''fi' ,. .. .. ..... ~~ .. W;
·
·
~ ~ ~ 1.: 15

Lesson VIII

The Appoggiatura taken from above or below

The Appoggiatura (or leaning note) is the most expressive of all the musical adornments.

The effect is gained by borrowing the full value indicated from the note that follows. On some occasions,the singer may slightly lengthen the time; but never, in any case, abbreviate it.

Andante

I'l~
.
. '-
~ If in la - dys eyes Love wak - eth I I
~~ my nev - er,
. .
. ~
~ Sen _ fa - rna - bi - le Dio di Cit - te I
za - ra
~~ Andante
I
.. s> "It.Y ... ". " ... ... ... ..... ......
p~ ~ ssm» e
'I 'I
.
I .
~ ~ ... ... I'l~ ___.. - __....
.
.. - -
fl~ What _ need. of a - zure skies, May's_ sweet., en - deav - or? The
..-.-.'! ,....._, ~ -
.
v - d:--
i di_ non tor - na- no 1 __ pri - rna - ve - ra. Non
~ ~ .
.. ...... .. ...... ...... .... .. .. ...... .... ..
D 'I 'I 'I 'I :'\ i'l ~
I I'l ~ h ~,
. ·
~
..., r • d(ea!i-l~, The blossom all dies. If in
birds smg so my
1\ ~ ~
. ·
'- r z~f-t - ~o, Ler -
spi - ra un non spunta un fior. be suI
fl~ -
t
.. ;f4 q*" .... • .- .... ... ...... ..... Ilt-' It·
t't. r\ i'l ~ D
.
·
-41 • . ~ 11 11 i. 16

~ ~
.
· ·
41 Ia- dy's eyes Comes sweet re - lent ing, " l~ok that lrive [mplies,
- One
~ ~
· ·
41- mar-g i - ne del fon - tea - mi Ie pian-[e I ~ I
- co, ve - 0 - ve
'-'
I) ~ - -
.
41 ~ .. ; .. :;t :;t- :;t" 1" ~ .. T T .... ..,;
· · . .
·
. ·
=6. ~~ . "1.:' ~. -fl • ~~ . - __..
. .
41- word c~n - sent - ing,t:'\ Da~ breaks-on land and sea, The flo~_ re - a -
~ ~ One
.
41- suI I! pri - per.L, Iui_ ri ve , sto - no l'an - ti
col - l'<jt - co - - co., 0-
~ ~ _l.. t:"
I .
41- .. .. <::r ~ .. . - ...... -,t" ...... .-
__ " t:'\ JlI'I " '\ ) 1'1 ~
I ·
.
-6' .. . ,. I) ~ • ~ l l
·
.
41- rise: The ~irds sing r creel - l~, fills
so And day the
~ ~ b l
·
41- ~ i r, v[sfu _ ~o l'an -
nor, per In - rl - ti - co o -
~ ~ -
~ 41 ~ .. 11" ~ ~ .. ..... .. ... ... " :;t ...
~ ~ '\ '\
·
ill • ~ 11 11 ~ ~ ~ ~. l l
·
41 k' r r ~Ke .t, I I
~ ~ s res, The ~irds sing so ,leeri-Iy, And day fills the skies,
l
·
~ .
'-'
41- I r . .r r I l'an - ti I
nor, per lu - i rl - ve- sto- no - co 0- nor,
fl~ --., .....-:::::;.. - ~ ....---" ---
~ 4I.J ~ .. ...... ~~: s~~· .. ~ . .. f· It· .. f. ... ~
sprees:
~ t\ :\ I~
·
·
-ill • ~ ... 1 17

The Acciaccatura

The Acciaccatura (or grace note) differs from the Appoggiatura in borrowing nothing from the value of the note that follows, though it may slightly intensify its accent. It should be sung with extreme lightness and ease, swiftly, and with the least appreciable time stolen from whatever precedes it,

A d t'

fl lot!!. n an InO .k k Ie
t.J ~ r the r, r The
fl lot tf, - long nv - er - reach- es,
Jot- .... Ie
tJ r ohe ~i r r
Ben - sen - so pri - vo, fin
1\ ~ ~, Andantino
t. p ... .____.-T 'W.____.-'" j-" .-. t_J ,,-'I
<c:> ..._." <c:>
" "I " ~ "
.
.
.. .. .. .. .. .. ~,~ !! k J0.-
t. whisp'ring beech- es B~nd r wh.en night [s
1\ ~ !! wa - ter - down
,),. ..k.
t. ~ - ~ r l~ - r
l'ar - bo - seel ; IU gra - to quel - mi - co
I') ~~, - !!!!!!!!!!!I!!I
t. , 'I,t. 11 '1 'I ... - .... .... - .. .... --w 11 - ....
simi e.
" 1'1..
·
·
1 i .. .. .. .. 1\ Iot~, .....
t. r t~e { " And
~ lot !t. fall - ing, And drink in - gnng pool,
Ie Jot- ~
t. r r, r .r
ri - vo da cui rI - ce - vU - mor. Per
f1 ~ !!
t. ... 'W .- ... .·i ~~ *-; ., ..... 'W.y
..._." <c::> I <c:»: '-""
\
·
·
.. ~ "I 'I - 18

~ ~ +i j,-
t ;;ow w{en noon fs r iKg, Their si! - ver leaf - lets
~ ~ flo. burn -
.. ri f:on-d(pr - r - ro, ce
lui na bel - la mer - gli
') ~ !!.
, _, .. ...... ~ «: ! ...... «:» #-t:_j
I. -..._/ -..._/ j) -..._/ j) -..._/
·
·
I D :;j ~
1i ~ Joj, 401. M ).. )..
.. .r r r t~e I .r' r'
~ Joj, +i. turn - lng, They shade s.: eep - lng kwa - ters, ALnd
~ r r r r ai f~n - ae
ren - de, dal sol· quan - do - il
1'1 Joj, ft. - - -
I
.. «:» «:» ql~ ~ i:s «:r
, ·
~ =i .. .. :. =
:.iii 'I .If !!.
~ ""'- - =- ...
fl .If lot fan them clear and cool; They shade the sleep- ing
~ - - '-' - -= --
suo be _ ne - fat - tor, dal sol quan - do di -
'I ~ lot
~ -:» ~.~ ~~. ~~i y~'" ~ ~ ....
-..._/ <c:»: -..._/ ~ <c;> j) -----
·
·
~ fti 4 4 .. -- 'I ~ +i ... k 1.- 1.-
.. And ~ IiiiiiiiiII IIIiiiii _ -
flJoj,+i wa - ters , ... keep., ), them., ~ clear_lo. and., cool.
.. fen - de - - IMiiiiii -
il suo_ be - ne - fat - tor.
fl~lot ~
t.J -..._/ ~ 1 • 1 '1 .)1 ~O:j
.101 ......_.", -..._/
,L
I ·
!) D i li .. 111 19

Lesson IX The Mordent

Of all the musical graces or embellishments the Gruppetto (or Turn) is, at once, the most varied and the most difficult, from the apparent ease and lightness with which it must be executed. It consists of 2 or 3 notes,and can impart great charm to the singing without influ _ encing the due sentiment of the phrasing of individual passages,or the general intention of the composer. It is, therefore, the only licence that the singer may occasionally take on his own responsibility. The slightest appearance of effort or premeditation is fatal. We may add that modern composers write the notes they wish to have sung, and it is impossible to condemn too strongly the singer's use of any Abbellimenti or vocal ornaments that are not indicated in the music by the composer himself. We are thankful to say this abuse has long since gone out of fashion.

Allegro

~~ ~ -
'0 ..
..
"""i: IiiI I .. I ..
f\ ~ ~ That tear in your_ laugh _ ter, That
-
00 ..
00
.. IiiiiiiI ~ - I ..
~ jJ, ~ Allegro La gio - Ja Vii - ra - ee, per
.,
.... -;J 1 ~ 1 1 t J ; • • • •
u
0
0
t:: ~ f ~ ¥ ~ r ~ f ~ r ~
jj " jJ, ~ - ..... --
.. ..
0
0
~ ... IiiiiiiII :L
,,~ ~ blush com- ing., af - - ter The whole __ world
- ..... --
.. ..
.
~ 0
dun - I ~
" jJ, .. far - si_ pa - Ie - - se, lab - bro 10 -
~ .
:t --. • .. ~ . .. • .. I
u, " " " "
.
.
!:: ~ ~/# ~ I ~ ~ I ~ f. f ~ r t
~
f\ jJ, .. .. ....-- --
.
. .
t.: ·t'___""" '--'" .. ..
know Ii it, They show plain. Some
II ~ ~ .> ~1 __ S0 __
.
.. 0 .
tJ .._.. <c:>
II jJ, .. qua- _ ee ~- s~- - gno __ non __ ha. La
~
j 0
t:J -. 1" ... ~ ... -i ~~ ~.
" ~ i--,J\
l= ~I ~ 1 ..fl •
~ 20

- - ,....... :::::::-- =-==--
~ .Ii +t _ ~ r-"II 1':\
. .
. . . .
·
t. ,..it ... .x-: '--"" - I - ~ I
se - cret __ they __ treasure Of pain or pleasure. Con-
'1 ~ +t ::::=-- _~1Ii :::::--=-- t:'.
--,...... -
. .
. . . .
· .
t. _flo" :::---- --- - I L-..II I
gio - ja_ve - ra - ee, per far - si_pa - Ie - se, d;'m _
~ .Ii +t I ~ ~ _It:'.
) .
~ ,," "---'" ===-
::::::::=-
IJ. 1':\
I I'\~+t r-II ~ ......... ,....
· . ..
. . .
t. -I • --.;;ji --...._....- --
fide it! to., hide it, You see, __ is_ in L,
~ .Ii +t I""i!B ~ - .....
· . ..
. . .
~ -I • - ....__.... --
lab - bro 10 - qua _ - ce bi - so - gno_lloll_
~ .Ii +t >- ~
t. • • J :J :I .. ~ .. · - ... - ,," -
LIo P
I ·
·
~ ~ r ~ r:;' ~ , 11 11 -.!l -is______......--
"" ~ ~ .Ii +t .--.. I!!!!!! _ - -
.. ·
.. - - --- -_ - i--III
vain. No,_no,_ nO,_no,_no,_no,_to_ hide it is ___ vain.
1'\.Ii +t -- - - - -
. ·
tJ r - - ----- -_ - I......iiiiiI
hal NO,_IlO,_IlO,_IlO,_ 1l0,_ no,_ bi - so - gllo __ nOll_ ha.
fJ ~ +t ______ J 1
~ t. II ~..., -_ • ... :~
:::>
< -
p_ ~
IJ. »:
·
·
'--'9 "l: .. -ill -ill ~ 21

Different ways of executing the Mordent Andantino

I'j
i:1'j Thd I tend you night and morn-ing, With such care your
i: L'Au - gel let-tvn lac - ci stret _ to per - che mai can -
-
Andantino simile
I"l
~ t: »;'4; ~ .~ ~ .~ . '! . .". . -4!" 11 11 -4 -4
---- - -,...._ .> ---
.
I -:;j_ 1'\
t: ,- dl .r Vain deav.or , My sweet bird Gr~ets~e
II cage a - orrr-mg, en - nev - er
t: tar s'a - T Per- ehe un' al - tra vol - ta di tor -
sool , ta? spe - ra
I'l
t --.- --.- --.- .. ... q. .. ... ... q~ .. .. - -
-
---- ..........___ -------
·
I I I I 1\ -. I!;:=a
i: wr I I I --- of la - dies,
ev - er th one sweet song. Tho' I love you, Queen
II 1;0:",. I!!E!!:o
-. I In }' ~ I, - ---
na - re I - er - tao L'Au - gel - let - tojn lac - ci stret- to
I"l 1 l ~ ~ l l
~ t: ~ --..-. .. ... ... qf- • ...
4 ~ ,---- r--..-. p l
~ I r i" ':;f 1\ .. .. I!I a I
tT More_I IO~'here dan- cing h d -, 'Mid:gr~ al - leys;Where s~ light_
s a e_lS;
II I!II lSI • • L
t. ,~ , r T "-"" .._.. un' - -
per - che mal_can - tar_sa _ scol - ta? Per - che_ spe - ra al - tra_
Il . ~ ~ L " ~ ~
~ '""i: ... .. • • • .. ~ ... .. .. qy
4 "'--."
l
I ·
·
-r i" r' r r 22

- ....

" 1 1 , hi
vol , ta di_tor - na - re
1'1 ~ ~ ~ ~
~ " .. .. ~~
I.- I ...
·
·
r ..



1 1 1 Y' 1 T r' J.:'

dal-lies, Leaf - lit_ val- leys.Where wild bees.rtbrong, Notes come., r ing-ing \\ hen

_ .... .. _ !iii"

1.- ,- I, ,..,

li - ber - ta,_ per- <:he_ spe - ra

)... 1\ I I. l

1'n

~ fiII!l ,_ - II! III ~l
" there.i.I'm _ wing- - ing, Sing - ing, sing- - ing- ,I strong-:_
Ioud Li.; and
~ - ~ - ~ .. ~I.
" al - tra_ vel - ta di_tor na - re in h ber - ta,
- -
'-"
~ l ~
" .. -i ... 4- • • ... ... .. .. .. ..
• l
·
-:J! ~ ~ ~ - == ,....., ~
" This _ way.L; that_w;Y;_ ~1l_ day.i, So -.....!
long, clear_and_ str ong , So
~. ~ - I!!II!I""'" ~ l
" :-- }' ~ r --
di __ tor - na - reJD_ I - ber - ta, in Ii - ber - ta, in
~ " l l
t- • • ... ... .. .. ~ .. ~ .... / ..
• I. l I.. SImi e
I ·
~ fl ... - -
t.J - _"I _r <c:»:
clear _and-strong The whole., day., 1t)rg, the whole.; day., long.
1'1 IIIII_
-
" - <;» " ~ -..._/ -, ,
u - ber - ta, III Ii - ber - ta, in u - ber - tao
~
" ........ -:J. .. -:;t .. y ... y" -:;J. .. ~ .. y41 .... ~ ... ~ .. -:;t
===---
• 23

Lesson X

Introductory to the Gruppetto or Turn

For the Gruppetto or Turn, the pupil follows the rules given in Lesson VII, for the study of Scale Passages.

Moderato

~ L -
~ ~ - ·I~ '-!I ./
Sweet, how __ sweet when __ tears comec.L, well - ing,
fL t __II!IIl .......
t.. I = - ,...__,. -I~ ~/
Quan - do., ac - cen - de_ Ull_ 110 - bil __ pet - to,
I! l Moderato
l
eJ P s: Sloe! .. -j- j j .. ..
<
.
.
.. .. .. .. .. 'ill i i I! L - ~
V ~ ._. I ._;-~_J
-
Where some_ dear one's_ voice is __ tell - ing Deeds of __
I! L ........... - -
v ~ - - -- I -
e, .. )n - no - cen - tee __ pu - ro., at" - fet - to: de - bo -
""
I! L
eJ .. .. .. .. .. .. ... ... - -
• ._ ..
·
·
i 1 r' r' r' 1,1 111 'ill 111 ii Il L ~ - ...--. -=-
v - --- ,..
he - roes In days gone_ by. Tears_ Iike.L; these __ are
II t ~ - ~
t.J I - --- I - r
lez - za a - mor nOll_ e. Quail - do., ac - cen - de un
I! l _k .A- I.
V .. .. .. .. .. -
~
.. • .. .. •
·
·
1 i 111 ii ~ 1/ ~ ~ II ~ 24

~ L ... - -
ItJ ~ / '-._.../ -- - 'I-"'__"""'" I""
not an - man - nish; Ere_ tl1e_ grand __ old mem - 'ries
~ L l -
tJ ..:l / ......_- ~==- ,...__..., I' I""
no - bi! pet - to, e in - no - cen - te e pn - ro af_
._,
~ l
ItJ .. - - - - •
<
• • • ._ • • • • • •
I ·
·
~ V ~ ~ ~ V Ii Ii Ii ~ ~ l I!!!!I!!!!!!!I! - --
V ~~ ~ - --
van-ish, Love.L, it - se1f__ shall L, fall.L; and.L; die,
fJ L l!!!I _ -
V <is: ~ ~ - .......
fet- to: de - bo - Iez - za_a - mor_ non.L, e,
~ l l ....
Iv - - , • • 1 - - .. ..
<
~ ) ) • •
·
·
.. .. .. i .. • ,) ~ ~ II I - -
I tJ ~ I' - ~
Love it - self~ shall __ fall and die.
fJ l - ---
IV <, '1/ r ..... '" -~::..---
de - - bo - lez - za_ a - mor non e.
~ L
t I tJ -: ;: , • , ~ f
<
·
·
i i .. :::;; i i ..
oj 25

Poco andante

The Gruppetto or Turn

Execution: ~~~~~

III ~i

l
.
.
~ I -~ ~Y"
now - a-days, No one __ dis_
.
. .
....._......... ~ ..... v r
-
tro - va-no tra mil - It-a - 14!.J

1- r I
Tell me why,
-.
.
I r
pill non si
Poco andante Il l

_fj_L -- l
.
V - I r I - _.. 1
COY - ers, '"Mid all these mul - ti - tudes,
~ l ... l
.
.
V - 1 r I - 1
man - ti sol due bell' a - ni - me
~ L
IV ~ _...--...... »: -::::::.. simile
......----
I J ~ .J r -J ~ .J r.J~j
r J J J J .J J J J~J
.
.
~' ~ , ' ~ ~, ~ ~ , ~ ~' ~ ~ , ~ ~ Two __ con - stant loy - ers.

All for __ e - ter - ni-ty

~

che_ sian L; co - stan - ti,

e __

tut - ti par - Ia-no

26

fJ l - I - I
.
IV ..._ ,./ - I <c:> <c:»:
Swear __ they'll_ be kind, Yet_ but.L two
fj L - I -. I
. .
t) -- --- - I <c::> <c:»:
di fe - del - ta, e __ tut - ti
fJ L
I
t)
I.J .J J J J J J .J -j ~ J j~j I ~ I I J ~ J
·
·
~ , ~ ~ , ~ r to ~ ~ r r fJ L ::> - ,..... ,...... ::>
t) '-"'" ~ -- -
faith - ful.; ones.., Where shall., we.L find?
~ I ::> .-=. ~ ..... ::>
t) ~ --....:;v -... -
par - - la - no_ di fe • del - ta,
11 '-
t.J '*" '*It- -
r j ~ j J)~J r-j~j J J_.tJ L
·
·
~ I I l- f I 19- .f.i fJ l .. -""'I I _ t""'\ ~~ 1.. >- -
t) ~ - I ..... -~ -
Yet __ but_ two., faith - fuI ones Where can __ we_ find?
11 l - .... _,...., ~""A >- -
v ~ - I '-""" I _..._
e tut - ti_ par - - la- no di fe - - del - tao
~ I l
t) 41- .. • • jl f
I j i..l J..l J..l
I r-,
·
·
9- F' " , ' .. ...
~ 27

Lesson XI Introduction of the Trill or Shake

Allegro moderato

fJ
~ ... ---=-- ....... .;-
The wind seem'd L. ne'er to wea - ry;
~
eJ ... - ...-,
Se po - ve - fQ.,il ru - seel - - 10
~ Allegro moderato
eJ p" •• 1: .. ..... • • rrr r II"
r'I ~ I:'t D-
.
.
.. .. .. • .. .. ":i ::;j ~ ,., --- ...-
If) -- ---...r!---' .. ~ - I
Cold fell.L, the., rain, and drear - y, And all so ghost-ly and
fJ - ..-.
I~ --- - ~ .. ~ --
mor-mo - ra len - tQ..,e bas - so, un ra-mo - seel - 10, un
~
v ..... S • ..... .. ... .. .. .... ... S
to. ~ r'I I:'t I:'t
I ·
·
.. .. .. ~ ~ ~ .. .. .. ,., ...-'!!I ~
·
.
v ~ -
ee - rie Night-sank on sea.L and.L, plain. Were
,., --""""""'~
·
.
eJ ..._..- - ---
sas - so qua - sLar - re - star_ 10_ fa. Se
,.,
IV .. ... .. .. .. .... • ". .........
!', r'I ~
·
·
7i .. .. .. 28

'" I>
It) ---- .. ~~ ..
these dark __ wind - swept ~p(l(' - - es Once fair_witiL<;um-mer's
IJ I>
.~ - ------ ... ~~ ..
I'l po-\"!: - - rQjI rn - see] - - 10 I. I. III II r-Dl 0 - ra 11'11 - t~e
I~ rtiiftrs ....... ... ... .. .. .. .. .. ••• • •
" " • • ..
·
·
• • • ,) l) 1./ 11 11 ii fac - es_

(Ina - si,_

A ~
t) "- ne'er shall see <:»: g-ain? . --=:;:> r-
I a - Thq"t' d"arhll1.!'ht ___ Ion' - If __
'" - --
v qua - sUlr-re - star ---..__/ fa, ..._...-
10_ 1111 ra-mo - scel - 10..- 1111_
A
t) t: • ... ... ............... -...
to.. to.. to..
·
·
~ i "4 i .. .. .. "'- r(J
It) fae - es I ne'er shall r g-ain?
see a - - -
'" rail.
It) sas - f'0 qna - ;;Lar- rc - star In fa.
I'l - _..- ---.__ "'='
v .. .. .. ~i" i" rail. .. I •
b~ .. * I I
·
·
~ .. .. .. II

29

Lesson xn Runs and Scale - Passages Allegretto moderato

Like ships from anch - or__ stray - ing, All

Siam Allegretto moderato

"-= '-'

na - vi al - l'on - de.; al - gen - ti

la -

p

bey - ing,

Sway - ing to each _ e -

si __

,., -
t) • • • • ~
rno - tion, We drift o'er life's _ dark_ o - cean.
,., -
t) • • .. ~ t-
yen - ti i DO - strt3f - fet - I __ SO - DO,
1"1
\v 11111111 1 I I I I I 1 I J"'JI~'
,
.
.
= :: :: :: • ~
II II II 11 30

<:» -.......:::; -.......:::;

Great.Lclouds.are Lgath - er - Ing.,

1'1 - ----
It) well, Ah! :~ if __ r
fast: Ah! day, ir.; day shall re-
1'1 ---- --
t) .~ '"
mar, ° - gni di -let - tQJJ __ seo - glio.; tut - ta Ia
1'1
It) •••••••• ; 1 i ; ; ; ; ; J;I't' ..... #'
<
~ ~ "\
, .
• • iii ii i • 31

Lesson XIII The Portamento

In order to acquire an effective Portamento, the pupil must be careful not to slur one note into the other, with that sort of quavering that one hears too frequently in ill-trained voices.L on the contrary, he must so blend the different registers and so bind the notes that they seem to flow into one even tone. When the true art of phrasing has been mastered by the means indicated in Lesson I, the Portamento will offer few difficulties., but here~ore than anywhere,is the practical demonstration by a teacher or a proficient of the first importance. railing these, we must be content with adding that the Portamento can be taken "by Anticipation" or "by Posticipation'' By the first of these methods.the singer attacks the value of the following note with the vowel of the preceding syllable,as was shown in the rules given for Lesson I. In certain phrases, where a great deal of sentiment has to be expressed, this manner is highly effective. For this very reason it must be used very sparingly, as in abuse it sounds affected.and the music grows languishing and monotonous. By the second method, which is less common, the singer attacks almost imperceptibly the syllable that follows with the value of the syllable 'that precedes. t

II Andante (P Wfl?f.L }r
.
i e) -.....- --.: --- - '- .._. -c:" ..._ -- ~
With _ eyes.inlgh blind withc- weep - ing, With poor _pale_ Iips..; that.i,
II - - -
.
e) I -.__o -- - - .__- -_, ..._ - '"
IJAndante Vor·· rei.,., spie-gar l'at" - fan - no, na - seon - der - 10_ vor -
I
e) p~~ «:» -lfI:..._;!!" ~T~ p" - ... -
I .
.
~ l.J l.J ~ .. ~ ~ l.J I ~ 1\ ~
..
..
e) t~ ble, - kl . - rKr
This se- cret, that I am eeping, That robs nights of
IJ -
. ..
..
eJ :.~. e men-tre i dub-hi mie >t eo - SJ ete- seen do
re - I, -
IJ ~ 10.. ~
eJ ~ ~ ~ <:» <:» -.____::_J' .. - - v
• • .- •
·
·
l.J ~ 1I 1/ V ~ l.J !'I'D l.J • 1\ ~ - _r-!
. eJ 1-' How long can ~ dis - sem - ble?
seep - 109,
II ~ - ~
It) --...: - Tut - to spie - ~ non
van - no, o - so,
IJ I'""'"'!"l ~ ....- ~ ,__ ~ ~
Ie) ~ ..._... p-' --.." ----~ ......., _'
~ ~tL~'" -- .. .. .....-:::: .. /j;;...._
·
·
~ -- 32

~ _:-.. l L _l I I .br ~ ~
tJ ..........., ~ - 4!f./
How.Iong can I_ con-ceal What I would most, what -_ I __ would most, would most re -
~ ~ .br ~ ~3
.
tJ ......... ~ -==::: 4H/
tut - to non 80_ ta - eer, tut-to spie-gar, tut - to __ non so, nOD-SO ta-
l'! ~ ......... ~
tJ ..._.... .....__.:. ;t.~ r:» ~ .. ~ ~
if p
....-:;;:.';" itt_ /'" t--.
·
·
-- I ~ h.-
It) - ---
veal? And tho' a smile 1m wear-Jng, Hope-less, de -
~ ~
tJ· - --
cer. Sol - Ie - ei - to, dub - bio - SO, pen - SO, ram-
~ ~ ~
ItJ ~ry <:»:«:» ~ '-...!!" .. ~ .. ~ ..
~ 1'\ Ib .. ~ ..
·
·
• • l) l) ~ ~ I) 1/ .1 J,
tJ I
spond-ent, de - spond-ent, de - sparr-ing, At _ heart a_grief I'
m_
~ )r =
ItJ
men - to, ram-men - to, e ve - do, e a - gliJlc-chi _ miei nOD _
~ ,....,.., ,..,.., ~ _I"'""I".,
I
tJ ~ ~ '----"'" ~ '-" '-" ~ .. ~ «:»
~ .....__..,.
f-. f-. j~ ,.. ~ ~
·
~ ~ ,I 1/ .. 11 33

II
t:J ~ I r r r
bear - ing, I_ know can., nev - er.L, heal; Ah! nev-er. ah! nev- er my pain can
Il I
IV ,_/ I r r , I ~
ere - flo, uou.; ere-d~Lmio pen - sier, non ere - do, non ere - do al mio pen-
Il ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
IV ~ ......_;- ~ --_/ ___... ~ .. .. ..__J- ~
1'\
·
·
.. .. 111 .. ) II .. .. Il I0Io Ii
IV r ~ I
heal, Ah! nev - er a hl nev - er such pain can heal, such
Il I0Io +t
IV r r I - 11
sier, non ere - do, non ere - do al mio pen - sier, non
Il rr-" - I0Io +t
tIV "._7 .. ~ .. +:» ~ .. J'" ~~
~
< p
~
I ·
·
~ 11 111 .. I

Il ~ +t ~~ ............... ...-... bf
. .
IV ..._. ............... I I <:» ~41 .g-
pain L, can.L. nev - erx... heal, such.; pain can- nev - er_ heal.
Il ~ +t ~~~ ....--...br
. .
IV ....... _~~' sier, I ~~. 6-
ere - dUI- IDlO_ pen- non_ ere-d~Lmio_peD - sier.
Il ~ +t ,.---....._ ~ ---- ,..-...
IV ft - .. - ~~ r;' - .. - - ~~ .g-
·
·
.L I ~.

*

34

Allegretto (2r111:al/.)

fl~
v ". '!_./ . r r., ~h ..
1lIJ. Ye call me de - CeiV - mg, e grey sea was griev-in~, "0
v • ~a - ci-dVl tria - ~e tu -
Il ~AllegrettoO - sin - ghi la spon -da, 0
v r::»: 111 • • W:_. ~- - ... 11 WI' WI'~ -~
PI ~ I
, , , ,
,
, ,
.. tlj,j. ~ :::::-
v iii'en reft of rea- son, Go ~efs wild sea - son. These mad winds, my
flit ' ;:::::..
v ·por - ta COIl Ion - da ter - ro-ru spa - ven - to: e col - pa del
flit
IV .__. WI' *_ .. ~ '-._.. '-._. '--.- ..... .~ ~ ~ ~
· . .
· . ,
. .
11 ' 1 . 11 1 1 - tl ~ j. ~ _1
IV mas - ters, Go chide them,not ,;'e! They ~use y~ur dis ·U _~
- as - - ters, Not
tl ~ _l _1 -~
IV ven - to, col pa nOD ~ ~ w~ol _ pa del ·~en -- fo, sua
sua - e,
tl ~ .
IV 1t_- .~ ~ ~ .- -_/ '--. ~,--", ~-~
I _I 1
, , ,
,
.' 11, 11 ' - :4j Il IJ. I!!!!!._ III!!!.
v 1'1;;"" ~ th-"- "These ~ad wi;ds, ~y ~ -
Il~ ._ Sal. _ .:. sea; mas - ters, Go ch~hem, not me!"
,.
t.! c'of-~:n~_ e, ~ PJ _ ttdel ~
e col - pa ven - to, sua col - pa non e.
Il ~ - _1
It.! .. ':.t-C~ ... ... , .. • • tt· .. ... ... .._ q • • ~
ISt1/lt e - ~
·
,
11 1 - ... II :;jj 11 ._. 35

Lesson XIV

We need hardly say; that nowhere is a clear enunciation of each word and syllable of more importance than in Recitativec, otherwise, it must perforce quite fail in its mission. When we come across two <irnilar notes at the end of a phra-e, or several repeated notes in till' body of a phrase, the note on which the word-accent falls should be entirely converted into an appoggiatura of the following note. To exemplify our meaning, we have marked with an "A "where such notes occur in the following exercise

fl eel a lYO A
t) Our fi~t earthly r R, tmf,ard s. country. How base and how mean
fl ~-ty
It) La I'll-tria tum tnt-fo at cfui .r parti, al cit - ta - di - no e
fl " ~ Slam
>J
.
t) f· .. 1...1 ...
. . .
. .
0
~ u ur , ~ r A R °t ti

A

ad - van - tage

in his coun-try's (tis - honor!

se stes- so

le - i.

se - pa - ra - to da

A

- i - ly,

no loss or gain

oji dan-no ch'ei

,.. l l
IV l' or w~t can shame !.f.-jure th~ l~d wlere »r we sfw the light.
P1sper, or
fl
IV " . uuocejal - la sua pa-trta cui ~i tut-t~~e - bi - tor.
gIO-va 0 a
fl I
e.J ,_ r::-~ • ~k:
,.- ...-.-..
.
.
I r L'u - ti - Ie

A

A

to

co - no - seer dee so - 10

che

A

A

36

fJ l L l
t) when frr her wel-fare r f~r - tune, life- ti~e, -
she bids us sac- ri-fice and e -Yen ollr
fJ l A '- L A
IV Quand.u suvdo v ri e,jl r Ie - i, nril - la del pro-prio ei
san-gue spar-ge per
fJ L~
t) f~ I'~------ ..

·
·
"oil P'*:.. .... A

A

A

fJ L l
.VI'l d~t ones, 'ns her due that we ren-der: She 'twas, who
L I
'!.J do - na, r~n - ae sol . , che deb-be . Es - sVI pro-
CIO
~ .~ I
.
It) v - '-. .... ':- .... ':-+ ...
l.. L .r: -- t--.-
·
· .
~ • ~ .... A

A

fJ l l _l It..
IV ~~de us what we have, what ~e are. Her laws pro - tect us in our homes, and a-
fJ ':4 ' L. A l L. L.
I t) d~ - l'e - du - ~o, ro r Con Ie leg- gi dagl'ln.sul - ti
us- se, nu - dr1. sue do -
I'l , .1..
.
V .,.. ......
~
·
· .
ii 4 • • .4

A

I'l L.
V broad her arms de - fend us, A~d her c6un -sels en -
I'l A ... A
It) me - sti - cUI di - fen - de, da - gli~e-sler - ni
fJ -------I con
It) f. .,.
·
·
"1-........ _!tI 37

11 A A A A
I t.J lig-ht us. She gives us safe - ty, gJp- ry, t t~r: name and
11 A._ A S]- ion,
@) I'ar - mi. El - la gli pre - sta no - me, ira - rio ld 0 -
11 ~I
t.J '[l
·
·
1' .......... _! .. 11 A A
tJ race, Re-wards our mer-its and vin - di-cates ;ur hon-or: With
11 A A
I@) nor pre-mi~o)l mer-to, d' - 1·[ fe - se, I
11 ' ~ ne ne ven- 1- ea lL-0 - e
@) I }~-~ .- .-
I I J J
·
·
.. 1Oo· 11
v all lov-ing kindness, un-ceas-ing- ly she w1ches our happi - n~ss and
~ A
v dre T' fab-bri -car s'af fan =na la sua fe - Ii - ci -
rna - a - man-te a -
/1
@) ,--!....!-~ '.- • • -~ '~
I I I I I
·
·
- A

A

.~.

11
.
v r lOf - - ~,r r
peace, 1, per - ad-vent-ure, mor-tal man can be hap-py out of GOd's heaven!
~ A A
v (- per quan - to Ii - ee al de - stin de mar -ta> Ii es-s~r Ie n. ce_3..-==t
a, -
11 I
.
@) -I.~ ~ .. . -
... I P;
·
· .
.. A

A

38

Lesson XV

A Recapitulation or Comprehensive Study of all the Rules given in the foregoing Lessons. d t

fJ~Mo era 0 :;:::::::::::-- III!!!!..
.
tJll.ol When now we go a - :\:I£-.. ~ ing, O'er hill and vale r stray ~ing-, Lilif'
a -
.
. .
tJll MAlr lnt stagi'on de' • rio ~ ri de' l,r - ri, II!'
e no-vel - Ul - mo - e
.01 0 era 0
'-' p" ~ ~ 11 ~ -.J:~ ~- - .. - - .. - __ .w --.
I st'mlle.
.
.
- - 11 11 1 11 I'l.ol ./' ~ ~
t) .. Like chi! dren -~ .. ,- ... - --
Il.ol go; - a- round us play ~ing, Soft
- ~
tJ .. ~' to ii - ~. ,- - dun
Il.ol ger; e gra - mol-Ie la - to
tJ ...... -~- - q... - - ... - • .. - - ... --' --.
I -I
.
.
7J 7J 1 .. - Il .01 ---- ~
It) zeph -- ._... - '-_. "I • N- II-(_~
Il.ol - - yrs come and go. ow sighing; now
~ ~
It) ....... - - ,-.' ,.1_' .. II:_'; _
Il.ol zef - - - I-TO leg - ger. o ge-ma, 0
I
tJ ... ... .... .. ~ .... - . ~~
I I
:
4J it .. .. -~ 39

1l1t ,..., ...
It) r" -- r - <:» --y
sigh-ing'. They seem.._ to f~ a - dy - ing, Then light-ly, So
II ... I -
I~ r -...! r - ~-- 7"
ge-ma, 0 ge - rna fra_ Ie fron - de; 0 len - to, 0
II ... L ~
lit) <:» .... " ~ ....... plt__7
__ h ,... ..-
·
·
"-"" - 1 1 --.... - ~CJi II ... I - I!!!!!I!!!!!!I!
lit) y~ - -~ 1
bright-ly, The stream L, makes L, glad_ re - ply - ing,
II ... I - - .- -
lit) .. -~ -~ ,
Ien - to, 0 leo - to_ in - ere - spi __ Ion - de.
Il~ j_ L
I
It) - llij , j j • • • •
i
L
·
·
P6~ " .. .. .. .. p ~ , - , ~ , ~ , Il~ L
lit) "Mer - ry ones! y •
a-round us glid - iog, Oil! why keep hid-ing
Il~ L
lit) r . • _-
Zef - fi - ro in o - gnl la - to com - pa - gn~,e del pia-
Il~
1«.1 ~ .. ~ .. ~.~ ~1~
I
·
P* 1 i 4 P .. ~ 40

Ia - to,

so? "'C_ see your trac - es,

cer, _

In., 0 - gni

in.; 0 - gni.;

enm -

Why won't you

e- del pia - cer, com ;

- pa-gno, com -

fac

~
.
- -~ .........
ea., Oh!_ why
~
.. ~
- gno c __ del pia- -

_li-...........

IV' "'-

fac-es, yourL~:::===::::=-_

11 ... --- ........ - T--... ./

r - "'-

pa-gno, com -

not

-

- - pa

..

.............

11

1

1

1

1

41

~~ -- ~--.....
Itl r ,. _yo - ..;...>"' ft- - .......
~~ show, Your. rae - es, your
tI y ~-~. r - -...? ft- - -
~~ eer, com - - - pa - guo, com - - -
It) .. • .. .. ... ~ -..- •
1\ !\_ ~ ~
·
·
~ ~ ~ 4 ~w b ____ ...::::;::::: ~ -
t) _! you~' rae - - ~-
Il w rae - es, - es,_
----- ~ -.. .--;::::::= ~ ....;..
tI - -"- - ~
Il~ pa - guo, com - - - pa - - - gno., e_
v • • • • I·· ... ... ... ...
·
·
11 11 11 11 4 II~ l " l
.
t) - f.. hide 1\ so, Oil! why hide
~~ why not_ show, Oh1 why
... - ~
.
It) - I e ... del ~ ~
del pia - cer, pia - cer, . del ... pia-
~~
it) ..... ~~~ ,," .. .. -
"
·
·
11 11 ... 4 11 - ... 4i 11 II~ .. - .
v - f O~! ,,;y:_ ~ r show?"
so, y~ ae - es, not
~-~ .
It) com~ - .. d~
cer, - pa - gno e pia - eer. ~
~~ r.-. ::>
IV - ......... .. .. .. ~ ~ r> ~T
r':\ ::>
·
·
~ ~ 4 11 11 11 .:
11 42