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Northern Beaches Secondary College

Cromer campus
Stage 5 Representing Gender unit
Handout Title
1 Gender – solving the puzzle (6 pages)
2 Gender – putting the pieces together (2 pages)
OHP 1 Mindmap – factors influencing gender
3 Male or female? Understanding individual differences (4 pages)
4 Analysing birthday cards
5 Composing your own card
6 Analysing a fairy tale
7a Guided questions on Princess Smartypants
7b Guided questions for text analysis
8 Annotated example of visual analysis using Princess
Smartypants
9 Gender and the music industry (2 pages)
10 CD music covers – gender representations (2 pages)
11 The Simpsons: Lisa v Malibu Stacey episode
12 Malibu Stacey's “Rules for Success”
13 Evaluation of two website homepage designs
14 Scene by scene annotations (11 pages)
15a DVD Scene viewing guide (5 pages)
15b Answers for DVD Scene viewing guide (9 pages)
16 Shot by shot analysis of the “Free Kick” scene
17 Who, what, when of Bend it like Beckham
18 Motifs and symbols in Bend it like Beckham
19 Sound track (2 pages)
20 Narrative structure and suggested answers (5 pages)
21 Three Act Structure
OHP 2 Is Bend it like Beckham a formulaic film?

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 1 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 1
Gender – solving the puzzle
Page 1

Task:
Do you associate the following words predominately with either males or
females? Draw a line to indicate your selection.

NURSE

DOCTOR

FIREPERSON

DANCER

SECURITY GUARD

GARBAGE COLLECTOR

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 2 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 1

Page 2

ACCOUNTANT

LAWYER

BODY BUILDER

ENGINEER

PLUMBER

ELECTRICIAN

CONCRETER

BEAUTICIAN

HAIRDRESSER

SCIENTIST

SHOP ASSISTANT

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 3 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
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Handout 1

Page 3

CHILDCARE ASSISTANT

SOCCER

RUGBY LEAGUE

BALLET

CRICKET

GYMNASTICS

BOXING

CYCLING

SYNCHRONISED SWIMMING

HIGH JUMP

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 4 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
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Handout 1

Page 4

JAVELIN

TAP DANCE

YOGA

CULTURAL DANCING

FISHING

SAILING

BODY BOARDING

SKATE BOARDING

ROLLER BLADING

SKIPPING

HOCKEY

NETBALL

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 5 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
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Handout 1

Page 5

SENSITIVE

EMOTIONAL

AGGRESSIVE

LOVING

FORGIVING

COURAGEOUS

RELIABLE

IRRATIONAL

RATIONAL

NURTURING

PROTECTOR

DISCIPLINARIAN

HOUSEWORK

CLEANER

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 6 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
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Handout 1

Page 6

METAL TECHNICS

DANCE

BIOLOGY

MATHS

ENGLISH

WOOD TECHNICS

ART

MUSIC

DRAMA

FOOD TECHNOLOGY

PDHPE

HISTORY

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 7 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 2

Page 1
Gender – putting the pieces together

The activity you have just completed was designed to make you think about
the way individuals and society make assumptions about males and females.
These assumptions have a profound influence on the way individuals make
decisions and behave in life. For example, decisions regarding employment,
recreational activities and school subject choices are all influenced by the way
we perceive the expected roles of males and females.

What is Gender?
Gender refers to what it means to be male or female in daily life. Gender is
different to sex, which is the term used to describe biological differences
between males and females. Throughout history the roles of males and
females have changed.

1. Describe the way the role of females has changed in the last 50 years.
Why?
2. Describe the way the role of males has changed in the last 50 years.
Why?

Clearly, many different factors influence gender. Let’s create a mind map
which summarises some of these factors:

What influences
gender?

As you can see, gender is much more than simply being male or female. Our
family, friends, the media, cultural background all play a significant role in not
only determining the way we see ourselves, but also influence our
understanding about gender.

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 8 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 2

Page 2
Stereotypes

Insert your drawing of a table here

What is a stereotype?
A stereotype is an oversimplified and conventional idea or image, used to
label or define people or objects. We often have a preconceived idea of
people and think of them in terms of categories, rather than considering their
individual differences.

Task:
Identify three male or female stereotypes that you know exist in our society.
1.
2.
3.

Now read about stereotypes in soap operas: (see attached sheet)

The media plays an integral role in influencing the way people perceive
gender roles. Magazines such as Cleo, Dolly and Girlfriend are all clearly
targeted at a female audience, whereas magazines such as Men’s Health and
Wheels appeal primarily to males. Similarly, films project stereotypical notions
of gender roles which may not accurately reflect individual differences within
society.

List other examples of magazines targeted at males or females

Males Females
1. 1.
2. 2.
3. 3.

What are some common features of men’s magazines?

What are some common features of women’s magazines?

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 9 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Overhead 1
Mindmap – factors influencing gender

sex
family

stereotypes

friends What influences


gender?

media

ourselves culturally based assumptions

Task:
Rank each of the factors above in the order of their influence on gender.
Compare your answers with the rest of the class.

1. ___________________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________________

3. ___________________________________________________________

4. ___________________________________________________________

5. ___________________________________________________________

6. ___________________________________________________________

7. ___________________________________________________________

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 10 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 3

Page 1
Male or female? Understanding individual differences

Task:
Classify the following images as either male, female or gender neutral. Circle
your choice.

male, female, neutral male, female, neutral

male, female, neutral male, female, neutral

male, female, neutral male, female, neutral

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 11 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 3

Page 2

male, female, neutral male, female, neutral

male, female, neutral male, female, neutral

male, female, neutral male, female, neutral

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 12 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 3

Page 3

male, female, neutral male, female, neutral

male, female, neutral male, female, neutral

male, female, neutral male, female, neutral

Question:
Write a paragraph based on the following:
1. Do you think that society encourages individual differences from when
we are born?
2. Do you agree with societies stereotypical expectations in regard to
gender?
English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 13 of 68
NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 4
Analysing birthday cards

Let’s examine the stereotypical features of birthday cards including text,


colour and graphics.

Have you noticed that birthday cards are gender specific? This means that
they are targeted at either boys or girls.

Composers use particular graphics (pictures), colour and text (words) to


represent stereotypical characteristics of males and females.

Graphics
• What makes this image of a clown’s face
appealing to boys rather than girls?
• What other images would you expect to see Colour
on boys’ cards? • What are the
• What images would you expect to see on dominant colours on
girls’ cards? the card?
• Why have these
colours been chosen?
• Do you think they are
gender specific?

Text
• What gender
assumptions does this
card make about
boys?
• Do you think that this
is an accurate
representation of
males?

HAPPY 5TH BIRTHDAY


TO A BIG BRAVE BOY!

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 14 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 5
Composing your own card

You have analysed a range of birthday cards which have been specifically
designed for either males or females.

Task:
You have been employed by Hallmark to design a birthday for a 5 year old
child. This card should be gender smart (suitable for either a boy or a girl).
Your card should be as professional as possible. You may wish to use
technology such as Microsoft Publisher to assist you.

Date due:

Assessment criteria: (teacher to add)

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 15 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 6
Analysing a fairy tale

Choose a fairy story and complete the following:

1. Describe some of the qualities of the heroine/ princess of the story.


Make sure you include both a physical description and her personal
qualities.

2. Describe some of the physical and personal qualities of the prince/


knight protagonist of the story.

3. Describe the villain of the fairy story. Show how the physical and
personal qualities develop her/him as an evil character.

4. What is the climactic moment of the narrative? How is the narrative


resolved to create a happy ending?

5. What makes you believe that they will live happily ever after?

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 16 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 7a

Guided questions on Princess Smartypants by Babette Cole

1. What does the title of the story suggest and how is it linked to the
graphic on the front cover?

2. What do we normally associate the role of dragons with in fairy tales?


What meaning is created with the image of the princess leading a dragon
on a pet leash?

3. Explain how Princess Smartypants has reversed the traditional role we


normally expect of “pretty and rich” princesses.

4. How does Princess Smartypants respond to her parents’ request to


find a husband?

5. Comment on the gathering of the diverse array of princes.

6. Explain the use of puns on each prince’s name and how it links to their
individual challenge. What is amusing about their attempts to win her?

7. Where does the word ‘swashbuckler’ come from?

8. Explain how Prince Swashbuckle is presented as a true swashbuckling


hero.

9. How are the romantic expectations of the fairy tale reversed in the
ending?

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 17 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 7b
Guided questions for text analysis
Foregrounding:
Important images are placed in the centre and in a position of prominence in
relation to other images.

Size and shape of images:


Examine the size and shape of one image next to another to see if one
appears to be more important or more powerful than the other.

Exaggeration:
What details are exaggerated for effect? For example, bulging eyes, big
mouths, cluttered buildings.

Body language and gesture:


What aspects of the body are exaggerated to show emotion and reaction to
the situation?

Colour:
How is colour used symbolically to communicate associated emotions with
the text? For example, grey might link with depressing urban environments,
red with anger or passion, bold colours might be used for an uplifting mood,
yellow for happiness, pastels for gentleness, etc.

Fine detail:
What less obvious details, such as symbols or repetitions, could be described
that present other layers of meaning? Why are such details added?

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 18 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 8
Annotated example of visual analysis using Princess
Smartypants

(Students to look at specific page from Princess Smartypants)

(A) is the obvious positioning of the prince in the centre of the reading path.
Our attention focuses on the fine details of his wish to be a successful suitor,
such as the flowers, the removal of his hat in the greeting of a lady, his
masculinity shown by the sword by his side.

The red sports car (B) occupies the prominent foreground position as the
largest object. It acts as a symbol of his wealth and status as it bears his royal
crest and a flag.

The less salient feature of the partially framed princess’s face (C) obviously
shows her annoyance with her down-turned mouth. Her facial expression
shows her obvious distaste at being interrupted. Her lack of interest in
appearing beautiful is demonstrated with her red nose and messy hair. Her
demeanour is decidedly unglamorous.

The fine detail of the princess’s crest on her castle door (D) shows her
independence and her preoccupation with horses rather than suitors. The
heavy chain symbolises her wish to maintain her privacy.

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 19 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 9
Gender and the Music Industry
‘Top 10’ Video hits profile:

Activities:
1. Indicate how many of the 10 videos feature female or male lead
singers:
Female ______ Male _______ Both ________

2. Indicate with a tick which age bracket most of the singers featured in
the 10 videos would be placed:

15 – 20 years old ______ 21 – 30 years old _____

31 – 50 years old _____ Senior citizen _____

3. Nominate, from the options below, which style of music each video clip
represents:
pop music heavy rock reggae hip hop opera
pop rock rap rock blues jazz alternative

Clip
1. 1.
2. 2.
3. 3.
4. 4.
5. 5.

4. Consider the female artists in the Top 10 video clips. In what ways are
female gender stereotypes perpetuated through body image, fashion and
the activities they are seen to be involved in?
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 20 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 21 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
5. Identify any attempts by any of the female artists to challenge culturally
driven gender stereotypes throughout the film clip. (Consider satirical
images, lyric content, activities being represented).
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________

6. Consider the male artists appearing in the Top 10 clips. Which one best
represents your idea of a real guy. Give reasons for your choice.

Artist ______________________________________

Reasons:
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________

7. Music videos often depend on an explicit sexual content as a selling


strategy.
Nominate the video clip which you believe most supports this statement.
Provide evidence from the clip to support your choice:

Video clip: ___________________________________

Evidence:
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 22 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 10
CD Music Covers – Gender Representations
Cultural values and assumptions

Activities:
1. Which of the selected countries places the most emphasis on
representing the male and/or female body image on their CD covers?
Which country has the least emphasis?
Most: ______________________ Least: _____________________

2. Select a CD cover which you believe perpetuates a female or male


gender stereotype. Provide details/descriptions of the stereotype and
how it is represented.
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________

3. Select a CD cover from Australia which you believe best represents the
Australian culture and its values. Describe the images that appear on the
cover and explain why you think they provide a good reflection of the
‘Australian way of life.’
CD cover ___________________________________ (artist / title)
Description:
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
Explanation:
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 23 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
4. Identify a CD cover from somewhere other than Australia which supports
or challenges your understanding of the cultural values / gender stereo-
types often associated with that country. State two ways in which your
understanding of gender definitions in that country have been challenged
or supported.
CD cover ______________________ ______________________
(name of artist/band) (country)
Tick one: supports _____ challenges _____
Reason one:
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________

Reason two:
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________

5. Design a CD cover which challenges gender stereo-types as you


understand them. Use the front and back cover of the CD for your design.
Include a title for the CD and a list of at least five song titles on the back
side of the cover which reflect gender smart notions and ideals.

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 24 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 11

The Simpsons: Lisa v Malibu Stacey episode

View the episode of Lisa v Malibu Stacey and complete the following
questions:
1. When Lisa imagines that her dolls are at the “general assembly”, she
groans when Malibu Stacey utters her first words. What are the three
statements Stacey makes?
2. What is Lisa's explanation to Bart as to why it's not funny? What is a
“vacuous ninny”?
3. How do you think Bart feels about Lisa's comments?
4. Marge unconsciously makes a comment about strawberry ice-cream. She
mimics Stacey. What message is the composer presenting about Marge
with this ironic statement?
5. The narrator at the doll factory says, “And what does Stacey think of her
thirty five years of success and millions of friends worldwide?” Stacey
replies, “Don't ask me. I'm just a girl.” Comment on the point being made
about the role of females.
6. How does the tour guide react to the man's wolf whistles and comment.
“Hey, Jiggles grab a pad and back that gorgeous butt in here”?
7. Lisa finds the real Stacey Lavelle. She is an alcoholic recluse who has
been married five times. She appears to be neither happy nor healthy.
Miss Lavelle says, ”Thirty years of living her lifestyle has taught me some
very harsh lessons.” Whose lifestyle has Miss Lavelle led? How could
Stacey, the doll's lifestyle have affected Miss Lavelle?
8. Lisa and Miss Lavelle design the new doll. Bart reacts. One of his
comments is, “How about Blabbermouth, the jerky doll for jerks?” Wendy
Windbag? Ugly Doris? Hortense the mule faced doll”
9. Comment on why Bart is reacting as he does. Whose point of view is Bart
representing?
10. The board of directors at the Malibu Stacey tries to “sink” the Lisa
Lionheart doll by calling in a “favour from Washington”. The composer
intends this incident to be satirical and amusing. There is a sense in which
it trivialises the role of government. What do you think?
11. The market place is shallow and fickle. Consumers can be easily
manipulated to change their minds. How does the composer demonstrate
this message in the final scenes of the episode?
12. What is the meaning of Miss Lavelle Stacey's comment about $46,000 at
the end?
13. Do you agree with Lisa's final comment, “You know, if we get through to
just that one little girl, it'll all be worth it!”

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 25 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 12
Malibu Stacey's “Rules for Success”

The talking doll makes many statements or comments about the ways that
females should succeed in their lives.

Match up the “rule” beginning in the first column with the correct “rule” ending
in the second column.

When you have completed the task, discuss:


• Why might the makers of Malibu Stacey have chosen to use these
statements?
• What is the intention of the composers of the episode?

Beginning Ending

1. Let's bake some cookies a) with a big bowl of strawberry ice-


cream

2. Don't ask me; b) you can call me (a two-note wolf


whistle)

3. I wish they taught c) shopping in school.

4. Thinking too much d) I'm just a girl

5. My name is Stacey but e) for the boys

6. Now let's forget our troubles f) so the boys will like us

7. Let's buy makeup g) gives you wrinkles

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 26 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 13
Evaluation of two website homepage designs

Choose two website homepage design, either your own design and one by a
classmate or two designs planned by two classmates.

Use the evaluation guide below to evaluate the success of the designs

Design #1
1. What graphics has the designer used to highlight the important messages
on the homepage? (photos, drawings, how many graphics, outstanding
font?)
2. What use of colour has been made? Does the colour enhance the subject
matter?
3. Comment on the style of the icons used to indicate links to pages in the
site.
4. Describe the overall layout. Does it contain an appropriate amount of
information?
5. Does the designer plan to use sound as a feature of the homepage?
6. Who is the audience for the page?
7. Is the overall design of the page effective for the audience?

Design #2
1. What graphics has the designer used to highlight the important messages
on the homepage? (photos, drawings, how many graphics, outstanding
font?)
2. What use of colour has been made? Does the colour enhance the subject
matter?
3. Comment on the style of the icons used to indicate links to pages in the
site.
4. Describe the overall layout. Does it contain an appropriate amount of
information?
5. Does the designer plan to use sound as a feature of the homepage?
6. Who is the audience for the page?
7. Is the overall design of the page effective for the audience?

Compare Design #1 with Design #2. Which one do you think is better?
Explain your choice fully.

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NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Handout 14
Scene-by-scene annotations
• This is intended as a teacher resource, and should not be given to the
students. They will absorb and remember much more of what they
discover and write down for themselves.
• Numbers are reference only; some scenes have been combined for
practicality.
• Bold “chapter” headings are from the DVD.
• IF = see Interesting Facts; D = comments from the director
• // = CUT; >> = DISSOLVE
• WEGO camera = one at a low level so it gives the foot’s or ball’s POV
during a match

Scene/action Commentary
Southall Shopping
1. BLACK A fantasy sequence that seems very real
football/ cheers / O.S. commentary / until interrupted by Jess’s mother’s voice.
titles / ball / Commentator is top British football
EXT. FOOTBALL PITCH – DAY commentator John Motson
A game in progress – Manchester United Clip is from a genuine Man U game with
v. Anderlecht; Beckham passes and it is Jess being digitally inserted in place of
headed into goal by Jess Bhamra. Andy Cole.
INT. TV STUDIO
A panel discusses the new star whom Panel = BBC’s regular football comments
they predict will win England the World team. Gary Lineker, former England star
Cup. is the host of the panel; Alan Hansen –
ex-Scottish player; John Barnes - ex-
We are joined in the studio now by England player.
Jessie’s mother Mrs Bhamra.
Jess’s mother is asked how she feels; # Amusing start that also introduces the
she objects to her daughter showing her basic theme of culture and gender
legs to 70,000 people and to not learning expectations in a neat package.
how to cook. Introduces Jess and her mother in
fantasy sequence.
2. INT. JESS’S ROOM – DAY Introduces Jess and her mother in
Jess’s mother drags her back to reality, reality.
turns off TV.
Jess tells her picture of Beckham, Establishes the dramatic situation of the
I’m sick of this wedding and it hasn’t wedding.
even started. Signpost to future incidents.
ZOOM on ECU Beckham’s photo >> M: Beckham - her bedroom is a shrine to
TITLE Beckham.
3. INT. HALL – DAY Jess may protest but she still does as
Pinky has to do more shopping for her she’s told.
wedding; Jess has to go too. Introduces Pinky, Jess’s older sister.
4. EXT. STREET – DAY Broadway, in Southall, where director
FAST ZOOM to show shopping street on used to shop
CANTED angle Contrasts being established between
MONTAGE of street scenes / shopping // Jess and Pinky, and between Jess and
they meet three other girls – their other girls
cousins. Lively Indian music reinforces sense of
life, of vibrancy + cultural context
5. INT. LINGERIE SHOP – DAY We meet Jules Paxton and her mother.
Paula wants to buy Jules a blow-up bra – Paula’s outfit and badge tell us she
English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 28 of 68
NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
Scene/action Commentary
“You blow it up, just like a lilo,” - or at works in the shop. The clash between
least a lacy one; Jules looks at sports them summaries their differences.
bras. M: breasts
6. EXT. STREET – DAY Jess needs two A’s and a B to get in to
Pinky and Jess meet Tony and his university. Establishes her age (18) and
mother; they discuss their exams. that school has just finished; it is the
summer holidays (June-July)
Scouted
7. EXT. PARK – DAY song: “Baddest, Ruffest”
Several guys are playing football; Jules
jogs past as Jess walks along the path. Jess responds to sexual innuendo by
Tony asks her to play. “Can’t. Dad’s on returning it in a practical way.
earlies at Heathrow.” → establishing place
She plays and shows great skill; Jules M: Beckham (in dialogue)
watches.
8. INT. JESS’S ROOM – DAY
Inpoint = CU Beckham, PULL OUT as introduces idea of arranged marriage
Jess talks to him (O.S.): M: Beckham
It’s not fair – the boys never have to
come home and help. I wonder if I had Introduces her father – seems kinder,
an arranged marriage would I get gentler than her mother.
someone who’d let me play football Her father is a Sikh, with turban and
whenever I wanted to. beard.
Her father tells her that guests will sleep signpost
in her room for the wedding.
9. EXT. HOUSE – DAY D: a typical Hounslow house; exteriors
Jess helps her father put up lights to were filmed in Sutton Square, Heston,
decorate the house. West London
A plane flies in to Heathrow; light fades M: plane
to evening and then night; house is lit up Lit house contrasts with neighbours
Indian music helps to reinforce scene –
continues through next scenes.
10 INT. LIVING ROOM – NIGHT D: extras here = the director’s mother
. Inpoint = large plate of colourful food. and aunts. Speaking characters are
Jess offers tray to guests. A mobile actors.
phone interrupts the formal ceremonies – Phone creates a minor clash between
it belongs to Teets, the bridegroom, who two worlds.
is a mechanic. Contrast between the accented English
The ceremonies continue, with bracelets, of the older women and Teets’ London
food and money for the couple. accent.
M: mobile phones – great gag but also a
EXT. - the house lit up by its lights. comment: the culture can adopt new
technology, so why not new expectations
for its daughters?

Plot Point 1 for wedding plot.


Reinforces the idea that this house is
different.
Music ends here.
11 EXT. PARK – DAY Contrast extended – Jess is still a virgin,
. Jess is playing football with the guys. unlike these girls. Her straight-laced
Jess’s three cousins watch and comment attitude to sex is emphasised throughout.
// Tony is only Jess’s “mate”. Jules is a
Jules is watching // Jess scores // “gori” = white, non-Indian.
Jules invites Jess along to try out for
Hounslow Harriers Girls’ team. It is the closed season for football but
they are playing in a summer
tournament.
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# Inciting incident / Plot point 1
“She’s got balls”
12 EXT. PITCH – DAY song: “Do Your Thing”
. MONTAGE – girls training / playing / ball Jess has never played a proper game so
skills / heading / coach runs past // CU she improvises – Beckham plays up
Jess watching // asked where she plays, front, on the right.
she says: Joe unimpressed by her Beckham shirt.
Up front… on the right is best.” Jess lies that her parents support her.
/ she has no boots // plays well // 1st step towards her dream = getting
Joe explains that the girls’ team was selected
started because Jules complained. As Jess, Joe, Jules walk off the pitch, it
When he busted his knee, he set up a is one long, uninterrupted reverse
girls’ side. tracking shot, filmed by Steadicam.
// Jess is asked back; Jules tells Jess Irony that it is in America, where football
she wants to go to America where there is so minor as to barely be noticeable,
is a pro league for women. that there is a professional league for
women; in England, where football is a
national passion, women hardly play at
all. (Or maybe that is why.)
13 INT. JESS’S ROOM – DAY
. inpoint = Beckham poster, TILT DOWN M: Beckham
to Jess talking to him – excited about the
team, envies Jules the support of her
parents.
I don’t even know how to tell Mum and 1st obstacle to overcome in pursuit of
Dad about Hounslow Harriers. dream.
Hounslow Harriers
14 EXT. PAXTON GARDEN – DAY Juxtaposition – Jules may be allowed to
. Jules is playing football with her dad; play but her mother is just as hostile as
Paula complains that football is not Jess’s mother. She too wants her
feminine enough. daughter to conform to ideas of
femininity.
Alan, when are you going to realise that Her father, on the other hand, is very
you have a daughter with breasts, not a supportive.
son? No boy’s going to want to go out
with a girl who’s got bigger muscles than M: breasts
him.
15 EXT. GRANDSTAND – DAY
. Joe gives Jess some boots and a kit. M: boots
16 INT. DRESSING ROOM – DAY Intro to Mel, the captain - the only other
. The other girls change openly; Jess actress (singer, actually) in the team; all
struggles into her kit under her shirt. the other team members are real
footballers.
17 EXT. PITCH – DAY M: boots
. inpoint = balls and boots as the girls Contrast developed = the other girls train
warm up; Jess is sitting in the stands; in cropped tops; Jess in a big loose shirt.
she has an ugly burn scar on her legs; → “the painters and decorators’ –
Joe persuades her not to worry – at least presumably making the (unnecessary?)
her scar doesn’t stop her playing. point that menstruation doesn’t need to
interfere with playing sport.
MONTAGE: training 2nd obstacle: scar
Comparing scars develops a rapport.
[See IF]
The training is serious and professional.
song: “She’s a Lady” [see IF]
Mum Trouble
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Scene/action Commentary
18 EXT. PARK – DAY Juxtaposition of girls and boys playing –
. Jess tells Tony about the team/ plays a with the girls being better.
bit / Taz picks her up bodily because he Scar referred to again.
can’t beat her otherwise/ her mother
sees it
19 INT. LIVING ROOM – DAY # wonderful scene
. Mrs B lectures Jess; high angle on Jess Behind her is the picture of Guru Nanak,
looking small on couch: the C15 founder of the Sikh religion;
You’re not a young girl any more. Baba-ji = ‘honoured father’. Mrs B’s
gesture echoes his
Jessie, putar, now that your sister has - last time scar is mentioned.
got engaged, it’s different. You know
how people talk. → Foreshadowing future problem
→ Generation differences.
I was married at your age.
Divorce is a shame to the family
What family will want a daughter in law
who can run around kicking football all → We will see her making them later
day but can’t make round chapattis? 1st obstacle overcome – they know;
replaced by 3rd obstacle
No more football. ‘A proper woman’ = cultural and gender
expectations.
Your mother is right. You must start
behaving like a proper woman. OK?
20 EXT. PARK – DAY Reinforces that Jess is a “good” girl.
. Jess complains to Tony: Anyone can
cook aloo gobi but who can bend a ball → we will see her do both later
like Beckham? M: Beckham
Deceiving parents is a thread that runs
Tony advises her to play without telling through the whole story.
her parents. Jules says the same:
My Mum’s never wanted me to play. You Theme of need for persistence.
just can’t take no for an answer.
Reiteration that Tony and Jess are just
Jules says an American scout is coming mates.
over and suggests Jess should pretend
she has a job at HMV for the summer. → foreshadowing
They play.
/ a plane flies over M: plane
21 INT. / EXT Deceit in action.
. Jess skips breakfast to go to ‘work’ // song: “Move On Up”
picks up her bag from the garden where Street signs locate it on the A4 near
it is hidden // runs to the game. Hounslow, Heston, Southall, where the
exterior filming was done.
22 EXT. PITCH – DAY/NIGHT Not the same strip but Man U wear red
. MONTAGE: game /goals / training / night (and black).
game / fun and games / at home / / Jules [see IF]
hugs Joe / Jess and Jules running in → foreshadowing future problem
park / game / training with Joe / Jules
and target board /Jess and mother 2nd step – training, playing
cooking aloo gobi – Jess bouncing
onion, capsicum, cabbage on her knee.
“Don’t you want a boyfriend?”
23 EXT. HEATHROW CAR PARK – DAY song: “The Power of Love” (Indian
. Plane takes off / PAN over car park to a version)
rocking white car / Pinky and Teets are D: choice of songs very important; often
interrupted by her mobile phone – she is chosen early in the writing stage so that
to pick Jess up from work parts of the film were written around the
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Scene/action Commentary
songs.

24 INT. DRESSING ROOM – DAY She is more comfortable now – her


. Jess admits to the team that her parents earlier embarrassment has gone.
don’t know she is playing.
Indian girls aren’t supposed to play Jess explains that love matches are OK
football. as long as it is to an Indian.

Jules: It’s not just an Indian thing. How


many people come out and support us?
25 EXT. - Jess hides her bag.
. INT. LIVING ROOM – DAY Pinky is in a uniform; the badge on her
inpoint = TV programme jacket says ‘Flight Cars’ – presumably an
Mrs B is sewing. Pinky “just missed” airport rental firm.
picking her up from work. Pinky can’t Pinky has deceived her parents over
believe Jess would lie over something Teets.
like football. 4th obstacle – Pinky knows/ keeps secret
Don’t you want a boyfriend like everyone (for now)
else?

// tape measure – Pinky and Jess are


measured for saris: Contrast: Pinky wants hers tight and
Your first sari is when you become a form-fitting; Jess wants hers loose.
woman. M: breasts: “these fleabites/juicy, juicy
mangoes”
Jess says she needs money to buy
shoes. M: shoes
New Boots
26 EXT. STREET – DAY Song: Mel C: “My Independence Day” –
. MONTAGE of shopping: words re-written to fit the film.
Jess meets Jules at the station / buys Hounslow Railway Station; emerge in
football boots // go into a pub in Soho to Central London at Regents Street
have a drink (they are both 18) // WIDE (Piccadilly Circus Tube Station)
of Piccadilly Circus // Carnaby St was centre of fashion in the
60s; now just another street of clothes
shops.
Jess seems to be drinking Coke; Jules
has a beer. The other patrons are the
film crew.
3rd step: her own boots
27 INT. LIVING ROOM – DAY Jess smells of cigarettes from the pub
. inpoint = TV screen – Indian Karaoke visit.
programme Her black shoes are not feminine
Jess has been out all day // Pinky grabs enough.
the shopping bags and Jess’s secret is 5th obstacle: her secret is out – but no
out // consequences seem to come from this
revelation.
D: Whole scene filmed by a motionless
camera in one single shot and not
intercut with CU or reaction shots – not
an artistic decision but one forced by
budget and time restraints: had only 10
minutes in which to shoot the scene.
28 EXT. PITCH – DAY purpose of scene = to develop intimacy
. training // Jess is punished for between them, and to extend the parallel
gossiping // between them and the problems with
twists her ankle// Joe explains that he their parents.
got injured because his father pushed 6th obstacle – minor injury
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Scene/action Commentary
him too far. Juxtaposition: Jess limps with her arm
round Joe’s shoulder // next scene
inpoint = photo with Jules’ arm round
Joe’s shoulder.
Wedding Cancellation
29 INT. JULES’ BEDROOM – DAY M: shoes (with bows on!!)
. inpoint = photo of Jules and Joe // CU Women’s United Soccer Association in
shoes: Jules lends her mother’s shoes to USA – called soccer there (as it is in NZ)
Jess // they watch some WUSA soccer // because football = gridiron
Paula comes in; Jess hides the shoes.
Mia Hamm’s picture is on the wall behind
All these great butch women on the wall. them; is seen in video – ‘world footballer
of the year’ [She is helping to promote
Jess, I hope you can teach my daughter this movie in US, since they don’t know
a bit about your culture – including Beckham and she is well known and a
respect for elders and the like. star.]
She’s a footballer, like me.
A lovely moment: Juliet Stevenson’s
reaction is superb.
30 BUS STOP –DAY # crucial scene – it leads to
. they laugh together / discuss Joe. Jules misunderstanding and shifts the course
says he is off limits. of the next part of the film.
31 INT. HOME – DAY Midpoint scene for wedding plot.
. Pinky is in tears – the wedding is off. NB: Teetu’s mother in Indian suit but his
Teetu’s parents saw Jess “being filthy” father in western clothes.
i.e. kissing a white boy.
Pinky: Why can’t you do it in secret like secrecy theme
everyone else?
D: straight from my mother’s mouth.
Sometimes these English girls have such
short hair - you just can’t tell. 7th obstacle: this time the obstacle is real
Pinky tells their parents that Jess is still – she misses two training sessions.
playing football.
“No time for games”
32 MONTAGE song: “Power of Love”
. The lights come down
// Pinky and Teets in car at Heathrow repeat of earlier scene but now they’re
again arguing.
Pinky wants Teets to talk to his parents
>> [see ‘Deleted Scenes’]
PAN across love tokens etc >> Jess
comforting Pinky contrast between Pinky and Jess
emphasised, at same time as Jess
comforts her.
33 EXT. PITCH – DAY
. training – Jess has missed two training as above
sessions
34 INT. DINING ROOM - EVENING The Bhamras have come from Nairobi, in
. Joe calls to persuade the Bhamras to let Africa, to England, reflecting the same
Jess play. Mr B says he was not allowed journey of the director.
to play cricket when he arrived in D: Much of the story (though not the
England. He is afraid that Jess will have football component) is autobiographical.
her hopes raised and end up Lovely shot of Joe looking at Guru
disappointed too. Nanak.
8th obstacle: father’s bad experience
Allusion to England cricket captain
Nasser Hussain – but he is Muslim so no
role model.
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Scene/action Commentary
Hamburg
35 EXT. BUS STOP - DAY song: “Atomic”
. Pinky drops Jess off so she can go to Van belongs to Yeading Football Club,
Germany with the team// bus to airport where the filming was done.
PAN to plane with team disembarking in Scenes filmed in Hamburg – including
Hamburg interiors in the Hamburg hotel - and real
MONTAGE: sightseeing in Hamburg game played against a professional
women’s team there. [see IF]
Montage emphasises friendship bet,
Jess & Jules.
36 EXT. PITCH – NIGHT They have drawn the game and the
. night game / Jess’s penalty is saved and result is being decided in a penalty shoot
they lose the game. out.
Foreshadows the crucial free kick she
will take in the final.
9th obstacle: possible loss of confidence
37 Jess phones home // Mr B sees
. something in paper and says to phone
Jess back in Croydon / opens paper and
we see a team photo
38 HOTEL ROOM/ EXT. HOTEL
. Jess has no clothes to go night- another step in the Jess/Joe relationship
clubbing / Jules calls Mel // Jess looks
very glamorous // MS Jess // CU Joe
noticing her//
39 NIGHT CLUB song: Victoria Beckham: “I Turn to You”
. dancing // Jules insists on dancing with A real Hamburg nightclub called The
Joe // Jess is drinking wine // the three of Bunker, in a concrete bomb shelter built
them dance // Jess goes outside during WW2. The Hamburg footballers
are among the dancers.
[The tan lines from training and playing in
sports bras not noticed until editing
stage.]
40 NIGHT CLUB BALCONY light effects from flames
. Joe follows Jess out // Jules follows and Jess feeling the worse for the wine – she
sees Jess about to kiss Joe: “You bitch.” is not used to alcohol
song: “I Wish”
Midpoint scene: Joe/Jess and Jess/Jules
plots
Culture Clash
41 EXT. song: “Tere Bin Nahin Lagda” – through
. Jess’s family is at the bus stop. next 4 scenes
42 INT. HOME 10h obstacle: now they are really upset
. Cooking chapattis // parents’ age old Parents sitting on Jess’s bed – allows
complaint / Pinky tells Jess to leave contrast with Pinky’s room: pink, teddy
white boys alone – “They all look the bear, feminine (and also means they
same, innit?” - and settle for an Indian don’t need to build another set.) [Interior
boy, like Tony. sets built in studio.]
43 INT. JULES’ BEDROOM Parallels Jess taking down her photos of
. She throws away her photo of Joe. Beckham
44 INT. JESS’S BEDROOM M: Beckham
. inpoint = CU of Jess; looks at Beckham Jess is unhappy – faces a real dilemma;
and goes to bed. Outpoint: Beckham Becks has no answer
BLACK
45 INT. / EXT. CLUB – DAY Jess loosens her hair before seeing Joe
. Joe is being considered as coach of the – making herself more attractive.
men’s team // Jess is faced with the Continues the parallels between Joe’s
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Scene/action Commentary
dilemma of letting down the team or experiences with his father and Jess’s
making her parents really angry with her parents.
D: The difficulties of location shooting.
They want to protect me… This is taking The master shot was completed easily
me away from everything they know. but the rest of the shooting – close-ups,
reaction shots etc - took five hours
Joe backlit, with sun behind him (like a because of noise from planes and trains,
halo). which constantly interrupted. Some of
the dialogue had to be redone in post-
production.
Wrong Conclusions
46 INT. JULES’ BEDROOM More examples of people seeing what
. Jess visits Jules: “I know what I saw.” // isn’t there – both Jules and Paula.
Paula overhears Jules tell Jess she has Jules’ over-reacting? a bit adolescent?
hurt her, betrayed her // thinks Jules is in Allusion to George Michael = when he
love with Jess // was outed. Alan is comforting and shows
solid good sense
47 EXT. PARK BAND ROTUNDA – DAY Extends the theme of gender
. Jess suggests to Tony they go out expectations – in a gentle and
together and he tells her he is gay. understated way. Funny line, too.
“But – you’re Indian.” D: Also alludes to the fact that Beckham
is a gay icon – and is quite comfortable
with it.
M: Beckham
Red Card
48 EXT. HOME - DAY song: “Red Alert”
. Jess has a “cold”; the others are going to POV of Guru Nanak – and his high angle
the temple. She leaves in her kit // Mr B of Jess.
returns and realises she has gone Her mother is relentless.
49 EXT. PITCH/DRESSING ROOM SFX: fading of sound when goal scored
. MONTAGE: the game // the crowd – They win – will meet QPR (Queen’s Park
Tony and his mates // game // Alan // Mr Rangers) in the final.
B arrives // Jess passes, Jules scores // Normally a red card means a two-match
Mr B applauds // Alan applauds // Jules suspension. Should be an obstacle but
passes. Jess scores // Mr B jubilant // no consequences.
Jess is fouled and over-reacts; is sent off Climax of Act 2
// Joe shouts at her and then comforts Step 4: her father sees her and is proud;
her/ Mr B sees them 11th obstacle: he sees her being hugged
by Joe.
50 INT. HOME - DAY song: "Jind Mahi"
. Teet’s parents have decided to allow the Jess’s dilemma is even tougher now.
wedding after all. Sunday 25 is the only
day the hall is free – and that is the day 12th obstacle – and a biggie: the date
of the football final. clash.
“Your sister needs you.”
Plot Point 2 – A and B stories
Teriyaki Rules
51 Jess cleans her boots in tears // D: this scene was written and filmed for
. earlier in the film but moved here during
# the protagonist at her lowest ebb at the editing, where it works better. [That’s
start of Act 3 why she is cleaning the wrong boots – if
you’d noticed.]
52 Joe doing accounts, Jules screams at OK so she is hurt, but it is more of a
. him: “You never think about anyone but description of herself.
yourself.” // the American scout is
coming to the final //

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Scene/action Commentary
53 House lights go back up; Jules visits
. Jess: Jules wears shirt with No. 6 on it.
If you give up football now, what are you
going to have to give up next?
54 PAXTON HOME # wonderful little scene
. Alan explains the offside rule to Off side rule is hardest for outsiders
Paula. to understand.
Results
55 Canted shot of plane taking off// M: plane
. Jess has the results she needs – Ll.B =
High angle of Mrs B praying to Guru Bachelor of Law = 13th obstacle – more
Nanak before Jess opens her A Level expectations.
results. [See ‘Deleted Scenes’]
D: “My mother does this – prays to Guru
Nanak - over every script I write.”
song: Shaznay Lewis (Mel) “Dream the
dream…”
56 MONTAGE: song: “Noorie”
. Washing/ kicks ball away / Jules tell Joe Line of washing foreshadows the sari-
that Jess won’t be at the game / Jess clad ‘wall; Jess will face in the final.
takes her football pictures down / training Two symbolic actions - though she has
/ Mr B looks at Beckham picture // to take the pictures down anyway since
her room is being used by wedding
guests.
D: the washing scene was the first time
she kicked a ball in front of the camera –
and she did ‘bend it like Beckham’. The
whole crew cheered.
57 SATURDAY Pinky stunning in green suit.
. Wedding festivities // Joe training Jules // 88-year old actress plays Jess’s
Jess serving at wedding // grandmother.
High angle shot into garden of the CROSS-CUTS from now between
brightly coloured women PAN across to wedding and football.
empty backyard next door and up to sky
>> team training as sun sets WEGO camera used here.
58 EVENING
. Wedding // women preparing food // Joe men cooking too
comes to tell them about the scout: spinning camera – blurs the crowd
Don’t let her talent go to waste.” [I am told there is no symbolic
// Mr B tells Jess, significance in all this – it is just part of
Don’t play with your future, putar. the fun, what people do.]
Joe says;
I asked that scout to come for you, too.
He’s interested in both of you.” He music: Punjabian di Shaan”
wishes her luck.
Inside, they are dancing. A Sikh – Jess’s cousin from Nairobi - is
// The house is lit up against the interested in Jess but quickly transfers
deepening darkness // FADE to BLACK his interest when she does not
as music finishes reciprocate.
The Big Match = the final and the wedding, both
‘matches’
59 EXT. PAXTONS – DAY
. Paula is dressed as if for Ascot to go to
the match.
60 Wedding – being videoed Ragu = a brand of tomato-based pasta
. Pinky in red and gold. sauce sold in England.
She looks like a jar of Ragu. song: “Inner Smile”
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Scene/action Commentary
61 CROSS-CUTS between game and Now we see why the Hounslow Harriers’
. wedding: inpoint = red sock over shin strip is red – the wedding is all red and
pads // red underwear //wedding gold also, and this provides a visual
procession // dressing room // wedding parallel
procession // dressing room // pitch and
coaches // temple // etc Contrast between opulence of colours
and fabrics / bare sports setting,
uniforms
62 Tony drags Jess out and says he will
. take her to the game. Her father says music: “Darshan”
she can go if it is the only way she will be M: plane – symbolic, of course
happy. [see IF re wedding]
Play well and make us proud. Step 5: father’s permission to play
/ dancing / plane flies over D: this is the first time you will see a Sikh
/ Jess changes in car / Teets in white kissing on the big screen.
and Pinky in red and gold dance / game
– QPR scores / Jess arrives // Jules
scores // dancing // Jess is brought down waving arms in both scenes
//
63 Jess takes the free kick. # Great little scene: vertical crane shot,
. so she looks very small and alone; sound
To the strains of “Nessun Dorma”, she fades so it is as if in a vacuum; “Nessun
faces the wall – and it is composed of Dorma” – last line is “Vincero” = I will
her mother, sister, grandmother etc in win.
gorgeous saris; she bends it like
Beckham into the goal. Step 6: scores winning goal

The excitement at the pitch INTERCUT climax of both A and B stories/ of Act
with glee at wedding – Jess is lifted by 3.
her team as Pinky is lifted by Teets //
whistle bows to end the match. D: “cheesy but it works”
64 The girls dress Jess in her sari. Lovely circular movement as they dress
. Joe brings the scout; Jess and Jules hug her – reflects the circles in the wedding
and kiss before the horrified eyes of scenes.
Paula. They have both been offered
scholarships to Santa Clara in California. Santa Clara is the top women’s soccer
team in US.
// Jules in car with parents // Jess and Step 7
Tony back to wedding. aural bridges: Jules’ voice overlaps two
scenes; wedding music starts while shot
still with car
Shoe Shocker
65 Paula is upset – she blames the football The issue of lesbianism is handled with
. for making Jules a lesbian. humour rather than heavily.
Paula offers to take Jules to meet Jess D: The fight does not further the story but
at the wedding // is there because you can’t have an
there is a fight over the video // the Indian wedding without a fight. My one
wedding party leaves. piece of indulgence as a director. I kept
only a few seconds of a 90-minute take.
66 Paula and Jules arrive// Paula calls Jess M: shoes
. a hypocrite, is outraged to see her shoes
on Jess’s feet //
67 Jules puts her mother right. Juliet Stevenson is sheer brilliance in this
. scene; her timing is masterful.
Two Daughters Made Happy
68 INT. HOME # scene ties up several plot threads
.
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Scene/action Commentary
How am I going to tell them, Tony? I’ll
have to now or I’ll end up a solicitor
bored out of my mind. high angle on parents = Jess’s POV
Step 8: permission
Tony’s solution – he and Jess will get - seems a major turnaround for Mr B but
engaged as long as she can go to the director says this is based on her
America to university. Jess tells the truth. own father; this is the sort of thing he
Her mother grabs the first complaint – would have said. Maybe Mrs B accepts it
that Mr B gave her permission to play. just too easily – but the film needs to
Her father gives her his blessing. wind things up.
Goodbyes
69 PITCH – NIGHT light effects: behind and shining on top of
. Jess tells Joe that she is allowed to go, their hair
but that a white boyfriend is one step too
far. FADE to BLACK [The film should have ended with their
hug.]
70 HEATHROW Paula’s gift = shirt with number 9
. big plane / farewells ‘feel-good happy ending’
Joe has turned down the job of coaching D: by kissing Joe, she is finally doing
the men’s side to remain coaching the what she wants to instead of trying to
girls’ team which will turn professional. / please her parents.
kisses Jess // they see Posh and Becks, M: Guru Nanak
but Jess is more interested in Joe // the [see IF]
girls leave Hero worship has been replaced by the
real thing.
song: “Cause you make me feel”
song: “Move on Up”
71 photos etc from Santa Clara// Pinky is Joe bowls Mr Bhamra out – which
. pregnant // Mr B plays cricket with Tony actually happened so they kept it in the
and Joe film.
PULL BACK and UP – Mr Whippy and a The ice cream van because Gurinder’s
tiny plane in the background father had one for a while.
Closing Credits
72 Cast and crew sing “Hot, Hot, Hot”
. beside the tail credits

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Handout 15a
DVD Scene viewing guide
Scene 1 – Southall shopping
1. What is the purpose of opening the film with this sequence?
2. What does Jess’s room tell us about her?
3. What initial impression do you get of Jess? of her mother?
4. In what ways is Jess different from her sister Pinky?
5. What is the purpose of the scene in the bra shop?
6. What does it tell us about Jules? about her relationship with her mother?
7. How is Jules’ relationship with her mother different from Jess’s with hers?
8. What is the purpose of the scene with Tony in the street?
9. Identify examples of the following production techniques. Comment on
their effect / suggest reasons for their use:

a) people playing themselves b) VO (voice over)


c) aural bridge d) CGI = Computer generated
image
e) comic juxtaposition f) a canted (tilted) shot
g) ZOOM in h) ECU
i) CU j) O.S. (voices out of shot)
k) contrast l) RAPID ZOOM

Scene 2 - Scouted
1. List the signifiers that help to set the scene in time, place, society.
2. Jess suggests that there are different expectations of boys and girls. What
does she say?
3. We meet her father. What do his turban and beard tell us?
4. What technique is used to show the passing of time?
5. What is Teets’ job? How do you know?
6. Why are the three girls (Jess’s cousins) shown watching the game?
7. What do they call Jules? What does it mean?
8. Identify examples of the following production techniques, and comment on
their effect/suggest reasons for their use. Don’t repeat anything you have
already said.

a) an inpoint to a scene b) PULL OUT


c) O.S. (out of shot dialogue) d) repeated motif
e) sight gag f) high angle shot
g) WIDE h) ELS
i) shot/reverse shot j) over the shoulder shot
k) tracking shot l) Steadicam shot
m) contrast

Scenes 3 and 4 – “She’s got balls”/ Hounslow Harriers


1. Who started the Hounslow Harriers Girls’ team, and why?
2. Joe is initially very sceptical about this new player. Why?

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3. When Jules says to Joe, “She’s got balls,” what does she mean and how
does she know?
4. What is Jules’ ambition?
5. Jess lies to Joe. When?
6. What is Jules’ relationship with her father like? How does it differ from
Jess’s relationship with her father?
7. In what way is Jess different from the other girls in the dressing room?
Why?
8. What happened to Jess’s leg?
9. Identify examples of the following production techniques, and comment on
the effect of them:

a) inpoint b) juxtaposition
c) TILT DOWN d) MONTAGE
e) Steadicam shot f) reverse tracking
g) comment via music h) low angle shot
i) back lighting j) CU
k) ELS l) POV shot

Scene 5 – Mum Trouble


1. Why does Mrs Bhamra get upset with Jess? What does she decree?
2. What evidence is there that she is stricter than Mr Bhamra?
3. What is the point of the story about Jess’s cousin at her?
4. Both Tony and Jules give Jess the same advice. What is it?
5. Why is Jules so keen for Jess to keep playing?
6. Why are there so many scenes of training?
7. What do the shots of the planes suggest (apart from that they live close
to Heathrow)?
8. Identify examples of the following production techniques, and comment
on the effect of them:

a) MONTAGE b) motif
c) signposting d) comment via music
e) high angle shot f) WIPE

Scene 6 – “Don’t you want a boyfriend?”


1. What is the purpose of the scene in the car?
2. Jess behaves quite differently in the dressing room compared with the
earlier scene. In what ways?
3. Jess gives us some important cultural information in this scene. What?
4. What is Pinky’s reaction to where Jess has been going?
5. When they are measured for their saris, Pinky and Jess have
contrasting attitudes. What are they and what do they tell us about the
two girls?
6. How does Jess’ attitude reinforce other information we have been
given about her?
7. In what way are Jess and Pinky similar?
8. Identify examples of the following production techniques, and comment
on the effect of them:

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a) PAN b) inpoint
c) WIDE d) juxtaposition
e) high angle shot f) shallow focus

Scene 7- New Boots


1. Why does Jess ‘need’ to go shopping? What else does she buy?
2. What is the significance that she goes shopping in the centre of
London and not Broadway where she went earlier with Pinky? What
signifiers tell us it is the centre of London?
3. Where else do she and Jules go? How does this almost get her into
trouble at home?
4. What is the main purpose of the shopping trip for the story?
5. Why does Joe make Jess do extra laps? What is the real reason? (the
sub-text)
6. Identify examples of the following production techniques, and comment
on the effect of them:

a) inpoint b) comment via music


c) one shot scene d) CU

Scene 8 – Wedding Cancellation


1. What evidence is there that Jules is fonder of Joe than she admits?
How dos this lead to misunderstanding later?
2. What does Paula say about Jules’ posters? This is a ‘signpost’ of
future developments. Explain.
3. What does Paula say she hope Jess will be able to do?
4. When Jules says, “Mum, stop embarrassing yourself,” what does she
really mean? (sub-text)
5. Why have Teetu’s parents called off the wedding? What does Mrs
Bhamra say is the real reason?
6. What impression do we get of Teetu’s parents?
7. What evidence is there of standards of conduct quite different from
usual European standards?
8. When Teetu’s mother says that “children are a map of their parents”,
why is this ironic?
9. How does Mrs Bhamra explain the confusion?
10. Identify examples of the following production techniques, and comment
on the effect of them:

a) inpoint b) two shot


c) O.S. d) CU
e) LS f) shallow focus
g) POV shot

Scene 9 and 10 “No Time for Games” / Hamburg


1. When Pinky asks Teetu to talk to his parents, what dos he reply? What
does this suggest?
2. How does Pinky’s room reinforce the differences between her and
Jess?

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3. Why does Joe visit the Bhamras? What is the response? Why is this
an important moment for Jess?
4. How does Jess manage to get to Hamburg to play?
5. The Hamburg scenes are crucial scenes for several of the storylines.
Explain.
6. What signifiers show us that Jess has had too much to drink?
7. How does Mr Bhamra find out that Jess is in Hamburg?
8. Identify examples of the following production techniques, and comment
on the effect of them:

a) PAN b) MONTAGE
c) POV shot d) CU
e) MS f) light effects
g) visual metaphor

Scenes 11 & 12 – Culture Clash / “Wrong conclusions”


1. What visual indicator shows the rift in the friendship between Jess and
Jules?
2. Mrs Bhamra’s complaints could be made by any parent. What does
she complain about?
3. What signifiers suggest the unhappiness of all in the Bhamra
household?
4. What is Pinky’s advice to Jess? Why does she tell her this?
5. Jess is faced with a dilemma. What is it?
6. What does Paula overhear that she misunderstands?
7. What is Jess’s solution to the problem of Joe and Jules? Why doesn’t it
work?
8. Identify examples of the following production techniques, and comment
on the effect of them:

a) CU b) symbolism
c) allusion d) parallels

Scene 13 & 14 – Red Card / Teriyaki Rules


1. How realistic is it that Jess is able to continue playing, continue
deceiving her parents?
2. Pinky continues to help Jess even after saying it was Jess’s fault that
the wedding was called off. What does this tell us?
3. What do you think about the comments made by the boys in the
crowd?
4. Does the rift between Jess and Jules affect their game? Explain.
5. Why does Joe shout at Jess? Is he justified? Is there another reason
he shouts? [sub-text]
6. Is Jess’s behaviour on the pitch in character?
7. Another parallel is made between Jess and Joe. What is it?
8. Why have Teetu’s parents changed their minds about the wedding?
What is unusual (by our standards) about the scene?
9. Why does Jules visit Jess?
10. What is Jess telling us when she chooses to be at the wedding rather
than the final?
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Scene 15 - Results
1. What is the importance of the scene with the A Level Results? Would it
matter if this scene were left out?
2. What is the significance of the way Jess kicks the ball away beyond the
clothesline?
3. What is the significance of the way she takes all her pictures down?
4. Identify examples of the following production techniques, and comment on
the effect of them:

a) high angle shot b) PAN


c) contrast d) back lighting
e) side lighting

Scenes 16 , 17, 18, 19 and 20 – The Big Match / Shoe Shocker / “Two
Daughters made happy”/ Goodbyes and Closing Credits
1. What is unusual about the way Paula is dressed?
2. Why does her father give Jess permission to go and play?
3. How much time is left in the game when she gets there?
4. What does Mrs Bhamra see during the wedding that upsets her?
5. What does Paula see after the game that upsets her?
6. What does Paula say has made Jules a lesbian? Is this possible?
7. Why does Paula call Jess a hypocrite? What is Jess’s reaction?
8. Why does Paula take Jules shoes?
9. Does the fight over the video add anything to the plot? Should it be
there?
10. Identify examples of the following production techniques, and comment
on the effect of them:

a) CROSS-CUTS b) motif
c) inpoint d) contrast
e) crane shot f) climax
g) musical comment h) fantasy sequence
i) INSERT j) comic undercutting
k) allusion l) sound effects
m) aural bridge n) low angle shot

11. Why does Tony ask if he and Jess can get engaged?
12. Why does Jess tell the truth?
13. Why does her father finally agree that she can play football?
14. Why does Jess turn Joe down?
15. Many people think the film would be better, more honest, if it had finished
with the hug between Jess and Joe. What do you think? Why did the
writers and director add the last few scenes?
16. What is significant about the present Paula gives Jess?
17. Why is a pregnant Pinky included in this scene?

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Handout 15b
Answers to DVD Scene viewing guide
Scene 1
1. Quickly and effectively establishes the subject of the film - football, and the
dream of success. The culture clash, and cultural and gender
expectations, are set up straight away. Makes the immediate connection
with the title. It is amusing – establishes tone.
2. It is shrine to Beckham – shirt, posters etc - tells us where her heart and
ambitions lie. Jess has her own TV – not a poor family.
3. She has imagination, a sense of humour, knows her mother well; is
respectful and obedient. May complain a bit but does as is expected. Her
mother is sharp, demanding, conservative, takes the TV remote and turns
it off; doesn’t wait to see if Jess obeys – she knows she will. Jess in
trackies; her mother in Indian clothes – modern v. traditional.
4. Pinky enjoys shopping, loves the clothes; Jess obviously bored by it. Pinky
seems stressed by the engagement/wedding preparations – important to
her that everything is done properly.
5. Introduces Jules and Paula – important characters for both plot and
theme. Jules has come to buy a bra where her mother works but won’t
look at the pretty ones.
6. She is not interested in making herself attractive to boys; her interest is
sport. She is self confident, self-assured, takes no notice of her mother.
7. Jess does not question her mother’s right to make demands on her; Jules
is much more independent. Paula begs; Mrs B demands, insists.
8. Introduces us to Tony as a character, showing an Indian man being dutiful
and helpful to his mother; establishes age (18) and situation (they have
both just sat A Levels); introduces idea of marriage etc; shows the
courtesy and respect shown to elders. Jess is sweet, understanding, kind;
Pinky quite nasty about people, but courteous and lovely to their faces.
9. Identify examples of the following production techniques, and comment on
the effect of them:
a) people playing themselves: the panel members on TV. Their reactions
are funny.
b) VO (voice over): John Motson’s commentating the match. Both a. and
b. add verisimilitude, make the fantasy seem real.
c) aural bridge: Mrs Bhamra’s voice links the TV studio with the next
scene in Jess’s room. Humorous contrast between her voice and the
fantasy.
d) CGI = Computer generated image: Jess inserted into the footage of the
real game. Gives a visual manifestation of her dream.
e) comic juxtaposition: the serious and fulsome praise of Jess as a
player / her mother’s complaints about showing her legs.
f) a canted (tilted) shot: the first view of the shopping street. Suggest
busy-ness, perhaps.
g) ZOOM in: onto Beckham’s picture on her wall; onto Mrs Bhamra in the
studio.

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h) ECU: Beckham’s picture – stresses his role in film as icon, motif and
focus of dreams and ambitions. He is the one Jess talks to about
football before she meets Jules. Once she is playing, he becomes less
important to her until she virtually ignores him in the airport.
i) CU: Jess – to give us a good look at our heroine. Very pretty, quite
serious. Fed up.
j) O.S.: Pinky’s voice from downstairs as Jess looks at Beckham’s
picture.
k) contrast: Pinky and Jess and their cousins – the way they dress, tattoo.
Mrs Bhamra, traditionally dressed, in the high tech TV studio.
l) RAPID ZOOM: out to show the shopping street, Broadway. [Pause the
picture to show the blurred images.] Suggest busy-ness, perhaps.
Reinforced by a RAPID PAN later.

Scene 2
1. The park where they play, with the houses across the street;
the plane flying over; Jess – “Dad’s on earlies at Heathrow.”; the mobile
phones (contemporary, now, not in the past); Indian clothing, fading light =
evening; home = modern, TV, dishwasher, fridge etc (middle class and not
poor). Shopping street; lots of Sikhs and women in saris and Indian suits;
London buses. Accents are West London and lower middle class.
2. “It’s not fair – the boys never have to come home and help.”
3. He is a traditional Sikh [a religious sect from the Punjab]. Tony
and the other boys are clean-shaven and do not wear turbans (though
Tony covers his head at the wedding.)
4. The light fades over the house; the lights are put up, then we
see them lit. The house is empty, then full of guests.
5. A mechanic. The phone call is about work on a car.
6. Partly to establish contrast with Jess – they dress very
revealingly, which Jess never does, and talk about the boys suggestively;
to Jess the boys are mates she plays football with. One comments that
Jess is still a virgin (important for establishing character. Jess is Western
re sport but not in other ways), in contrast with the other two girls who are
quite promiscuous. “We’re not all slags like you lot.” Their comments about
the boys are paralleled later by the boys’ comments about the girl players.
7. A ‘gori’. A white girl. (A white male = gora.)
8. Identify examples of the following production techniques, and
comment on the effect of them:
a) an inpoint to a scene: Beckham’s picture
b) PULL OUT: from the picture
c) O.S. (out of shot dialogue): Jess talks to Beckham while the camera is
on the picture. All these reinforce his role as motif, icon, confidant etc,
and make him a real presence in Jess’s life.
d) CU: on the photo; on Jess at party, showing how much she dislikes talk
of men and marriage
e) sight gag: all the old ladies and their mobile phones
f) high angle: of the whole room just before the phone rings – establishes
situation
g) WIDE: same as ‘f’.

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h) ELS: Extreme Long Shot - Jules sitting on park bench watching Jess
play. It is the POV of the girls.
i) shot/reverse shot: when Jules comes to talk to Jess, the camera looks
at each of them in turn
j) over the shoulder: same scene
k) tracking shot: camera follows Jules while she jogs.
l) Steadicam: camera follows Jess as she takes the plate around at the
party
m) contrast: Jess playing football, running in track suit / formally dressed,
serving food

Scenes 3 and 4
1. Joe set it up when his knee injury meant he could no longer play.
2. She has never played for a team, he wonders if she is committed, she
hasn’t any boots, she doesn’t know which position – and she wears a fan’s
No 7 Beckham shirt. All suggest someone not very serious.
3. That Jess is tough and committed. She saw Jess get tripped up in the
game with the boys, but it did not upset her; she simply got up and carried
on. Similarly, the episode over ‘chesting’ the ball suggests Jess can deal
with whatever comes up (which is why her over-reaction over the fouling
later is not really convincing).
4. To play professionally in America.
5. She tells him her parents are cool about her playing.
6. She has a good one. He plays football with her, and is happy that she
prefers football to chasing after boys. Jess’s father is more traditional;
Jess loves and respects him and he is very affectionate, but he does not
understand her need to play. He expects women to fulfil their traditional
role, and defers to Jess’s mother in the first confrontation. Jess does not
hesitate to deceive him over the football (though she hates doing so).
Jules would not need to deceive her father.
7. She is very modest and shy when she changes; does so under her shirt.
The others are open, wander about in underwear.
8. She burned it when she was 8 years old; trying to make beans on toast,
she set her jeans on fire. (The scar is real and this is what did happen to
Parminder Nagra.)
a) inpoint: Beckham poster; balls and boots in training
b) juxtaposition: Jess envies Jules her parents’ support / Paula shows she
does not support her at all.
c) TILT DOWN: from Beckham’s picture to Jess talking to him.
d) MONTAGE: training (two sequences) – a quick way to show the
amount they do, how tough it is, the skills, the dedication
e) Steadicam shot: as Jess, Joe and Jules walk from the pitch after her
first game.
f) reverse tracking: same as (e)
g) “She’s a Lady” – “She’s got style. She’s got grace. She’s a winner.”
Signposts future developments.
h) low angle: several during the first montage – makes the players seem
strong, confident, skilful
i) back lighting: again, during the training montage – adds a poetic quality
to their skills
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j) CU: Jess watching the training. She is impressed, wants to be part of
this. Talking to Beckham’s picture.
k) ELS: the team as seen from the stand
l) POV shot: as in k – Jess’s POV

Scene 5
1. She sees Jess playing with the guys in the park and sees Taz pick her up
bodily.
2. She says he was to blame for his niece marrying a ‘gora’ and getting
divorced.
3. It indicates that marriage is important, especially staying married. Getting
jobs, marrying Europeans, lead to divorce
4. Don’t give up on dreams or into restrictions. Don’t tell them – just do it.
5. She knows Jess will make her look and play better and so she’ll be more
likely to impress the American scout.
6. To emphasise how skilled, dedicated and hard working these girls are.
7. Symbols of freedom, of flying away, of following your dreams.
8. Identify
a) MONTAGE: games/training/cooking – emphasises the contrast
between the two contrasting aspects of Jess’s life – though she
combines them when she bounces an onion, a capsicum, a cabbage
on her knees.
b) motif: the plane taking off; balls and boots
c) signposting: the HMV job; the suggestion that “people talk”;
Jules hugging Joe, references to the scout.
d) comment via music: “Move on Up”, reflects Jess’s determination
e) high angle shot: Jess on couch while mother lectures – makes
her look small, ashamed, vulnerable
f) WIPE: between the onion, capsicum, cabbage in the montage
(sc 23)

Scene 6
1. It reinforces the later revelation that Pinky has sneaked out to see Teets
without her parents’ permission. The obviously loving - and sexual -
relationship between them makes Pinky’s unhappiness over the wedding
cancellation even more poignant. It also sets in motion the plot mechanics
for Pinky to discover Jess’s secret.
2. She is more relaxed, less shy; chats freely with the other girls.
3. She talks about the difference between arranged marriages and love
matches – the latter OK as long as it is an Indian boy; that Black, white
and especially Moslem boys are totally unacceptable.
4. Shocked that Jess prefers football to having a boyfriend.
5. Pinky wants hers tight fitting, to show off her figure; Jess wants her loose.
She is either shy about it, or simply does not want to seem sensual or give
off the wrong messages.
6. She dresses modestly, is not interested in having a boyfriend; even when
she falls for Joe, she never so much as kisses him whereas other girls,
both Indian and white, are revealed to be happy to sleep around.
7. They both have secrets from their parents – Pinky’s over Teets, Jess over
the football.
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8. Identify examples of the following production techniques, and comment on
the effect of them:
a) PAN: across the Heathrow car park – establish location
b) inpoint: TV programme – establish location (home) + recurring TV
image
c) WIDE: car park – establishing shot
d) juxtaposition: the white mini with the huge plane beyond it
e) high angle shot: on the girls in the dressing room
f) shallow focus: the camera focuses on the mini; the planes behind the
fences are out of focus

Scene 7
1. She has to get shoes for the wedding. She needs her own football boots.
2. Too many people would know her or her family on Broadway. She is
looking for women’s football shoes, not likely to be found there. Tube
station, Piccadilly Circus lights, Carnaby St sign.
3. They go into a pub, where Jules has a beer though Jess only has Coke.
She smells of cigarette smoke.
4. It shows the growing friendship between Jess and Jules; it provides a way
for Jess’s parents to find out she is playing football in spite of their ban.
[This revelation would probably have been better left out; it makes it
somewhat unlikely that Jess could continue to deceive them without their
getting suspicious.]
5. She is gossiping instead of concentrating. The real reason – he fancies
her and is afraid of being too soft on her so is too hard instead. It also
allows for another small scene between the two of them, without Jules
there (she was gossiping just as much) and that is needed for the
romance plot.
6. Identify
a) inpoint: TV screen – as above
b) comment via music: “Independence Day” – by buying football shoes,
Jess is asserting her independence from her parents’ expectations.
She also goes into a pub.
c) One-shot scene: the confrontation in the lounge – there are no inserts
of close ups or reaction shots. [reason = lack of time]
d) CU: Jess as her shoe is removed – to show pain; on her ankle; on Jess
as she looks at Joe; on Joe (her POV), etc

Scene 8
1. She has a photo of herself with Joe in her room. Earlier, we see her
hugging Joe. She says she would like a boyfriend “just like him’. Jess
believes what she says.
2. “All these great butch women on the wall.” She is afraid that Jules is a
lesbian.
3. “Jess, I hope you can teach my daughter a bit about your culture –
including respect for elders and the like.”
4. That she is embarrassed by her mother.
5. They saw Jess “kissing a white boy.” (She was with Jules.) That the
Bhamra family has never been good enough for Teetu’s family.

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6. That the mother is the boss; she is tough, stern, disapproving. No warmth.
(It’s those glasses.)
7. “Being filthy with a white boy” = kissing, which most European parents
would consider fairly harmless, especially in public. That the behaviour of
the sister should affect the marriage of the older. (NB. This is one of the
themes of Pride and Prejudice, written in the early C19.)
8. Because Teets, her son, and Pinky have been getting up to far more than
just kissing.
9. “Sometimes these English girls have such short hair you just can’t tell.”
10. Identify examples of the following production techniques, and comment on
the effect of them:
a) inpoint: the photo of Joe and Jules – important ‘signpost’
b) two shot: Jess and Jules – with photo = love triangle
c) O.S.: Paula’s voice before she appears; Teets’ father talking while
camera is on Jess
d) CU: Jess, Paula, Jules – important for showing reactions
e) LS: Paula as she comes into room. We see her whole feminine look cf
Jules.
f) shallow focus: Jess and Jules at bus stop with car, bushes etc out of
focus. Reflects their obliviousness to what has just happened.
g) POV: Jess’s view of living room when she comes in and they all look at
her in hostile way

Scenes 9 and 10
1. That he will talk to Pinky’s parents. That he is afraid of his own – or, at the
very least - knows it would be a waste of time. [See ‘Deleted Scenes’]
2. Her room is pink, feminine, full of romantic things. Her only interest is in
getting married; Jess’s is in football.
3. Jess has missed a couple of training sessions and he wants to persuade
her parents to allow her to play. Mr Bhamra is discouraging. He is afraid
that Jess will have her hopes raised and end up disappointed as he was.
Jess learns for the first time just how good Joe thinks she is.
4. She and Pinky tell their parents they are going to stay with cousins in
Croydon. [Presumably Pinky will be with Teets.]
5. Jess’s penalty is saved, which dents her confidence but signposts the
crucial free kick in the final; she and Joe tacitly admit their attraction to the
other; the friendship comes apart; Jess’s parents find out and this forces
yet another crisis.
6. She leans towards Joe, she trips, she walks a little unsteadily; complains
about her head.
7. He sees a photo of the team in the paper.
8. Identify examples
a) PAN: across Pinky’s love tokens; show her interests and Teets’
affection
b) MONTAGE: Hamburg sightseeing; EST location; builds up friendship
c) POV shot: when Pinky opens the door and sees Joe; Joe’s of Guru
Nanak; Joe’s of Jess looking beautiful in Hamburg; important step in C
plot.
d) CU: on Joe as he sees Jess dressed up
e) MS: Jess in her black satin
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f) light effects: the semi-light of the night game; the flickering flames
outside the nightclub = romantic + a suggestion of uncertainty
g) visual metaphor: When Jess, Joe and Jules dance in a triangle = the
love triangle

Scenes 11 and 12
1. They sit separately on the bus.
2. That they have given their daughters so much – car, computer, music
centre, TV, video - and look how they have been repaid.
3. The parents sit in their room, high angle shot emphasises their
separateness; they speak quietly. Pinky is miserable – shown in CU. Jess
is in Indian clothes, which she does not usually wear except for social
events.
4. To leave white boys alone. There are plenty of good-looking Indian boys -
they have good clothes, flashy jobs, even cook and wash up. Suggests
Tony. Because Jess asks what their parents would say if she brought
home a ‘gora’.
5. If she obeys her parents and gives up the game, she will be letting down
the team; if she continues to play – which she wants to – she will be letting
down her parents.
6. Jules says that Jess has betrayed and hurt her. Paula interprets this as
she does because that is what she fears.
7. To find an Indian boyfriend. She asks her best mate Tony – but he tells
her he is gay.
8. Identify
a) CU: on Jess, in her bedroom, considering her options
b) symbolism: Jules throws away the photo of her and Joe
c) allusion: to George Michael, who was outed.
d) parallels: between Jess’s and Joe’s experiences with their
fathers.

Scenes 13 and 14
1. In spite of what has happened, they probably find it hard to believe that
she would still defy them. When Mr Bhamra returns to the house, he
realises immediately where Jess has gone.
2. That they are very close, that they care about each other; that she realises
it wasn’t Jess’s fault.
3. No right or wrong answer. The director says they are not meant to be
taken seriously.
4. They continue to feed each other on the pitch but they do not join in the
celebration of the other’s goal.
5. She was sent off because she over-reacted to a foul. Yes. Players must
control themselves, no matter what the provocation. The real reason? He
says he has to treat her the same, but, as is often the case when emotions
are involved, he is probably harder on her to prevent himself being easier.
6. No, it is not in character. Being called a ‘Paki” is something Jess would be
able to take in her stride. But it is a useful plot device for furthering the
relationship, and can be explained by the stress caused by the rift with
Jules and the continuing difficulties at home.

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7. Being at the end of racist insults is something the Irish understand too. [In
The Commitments, they say the Irish are the “Blacks of Europe”.]
8. Because Teets is so unhappy. The four parents and Teets discuss the
wedding, but Pinky is not part of it.
9. To persuade her to play in the final, when the scout will be there.
10. That she is putting her family ahead of her own wishes and dreams; her
responsibility to them, her family feeling, are more important than her
loyalty to the team.

Scene 15
1. University and the future her parents have mapped out for her are one
step closer. She feels as if a trap is closing in.
2. Symbolically kicking the football away, accepting she will not be able to
play. And she does ‘bend it like Beckham’.
3. She takes them down so guests can use her room, but it also symbolises
the end of her dream.
4. Identify examples:
a) high angle shot: Mrs Bhamra praying to Guru Nanak that Jess’s A
Level results will be good, and on the family.
b) PAN: across from the colourful and lively garden to the bare and dull
one next door. Contrasts the ways of life.
c) contrast: as above; Jess’s miserable face among the happy guests;
Jules training/Jess in her sari serving food.
d) back lighting: team training against the sunset
e) side lighting: Jess talking to Joe – light/shade to suggest the two
worlds?

Scenes 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20


1. She is dressed up, with a hat, as if she were going to a garden party or
the races rather than to a football match.
2. She looks so miserable, she is spoiling the wedding for him.
3. 30 minutes
4. A Sikh – in turban and beard – kissing a girl, not “Indian behaviour” at all!
5. Jules kiss Jess in excitement after they are offered their scholarships.
6. Football. No, you are born that way.
7. She says that Jess is respectful and dutiful at home yet she is breaking
the rules by being a lesbian. Jess is bewildered. This is the second time
she has been accused of inappropriate sexual behaviour; not only is
none of it true, but she is very conservative sexually.
8. They are her shoes, which Jules lent her.
9. No. It is confusing since we don’t know what is going on or why they are
fighting. The director says that there is always a fight about something at
an Indian wedding and that is why it is there. Pity she couldn’t find a
reason connected to one or other of the plots.
10. Identify examples
a) CROSS-CUTS: wedding procession and wedding /game
b) motif: plane, shoes, footballs
c) inpoint: red sock going on over shin pad

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d) contrast: the glamour and vividness of the wedding and the
plainness of the football; Paula’s clothes and those of the others at
the game
e) crane shot: of the players, and then of Jess alone as she goes
to take her free kick – emphasises how alone she is at this moment.
f) climax: the goal/the wedding
g) musical comment: “Nessun Dorma” – I will conquer!
h) fantasy sequence: Jess seeing a line up of her Indian relatives
instead of the wall.
i) INSERT: the line up
j) comic undercutting: gorgeous Pinky being described as “like a
jar of Ragu.”
k) allusion: Ascot (most famous horse race in world.)
l) SFX: the eerie semi silence as Jess goes to take her kick –
emphasises that she is alone, it is up to her.
m) aural bridge: Jules’ voice starts over the end of the previous
scene, before the actual scene in the car starts – links the two
scenes.
n) low angle shot: of referee giving the free kick – emphasises the
significance of the moment.
11. So she will be given permission to go to America.
12. Because she is sick of pretending. She has to make a bid for
independence.
13. “I don’t want her to make the same mistake that her father made – of
accepting life, accepting situations. I want her to fight – and I want her
to win.”
14. Giving permission for her to go away is a big enough step for her
parents. A white boyfriend would be too much.
15. The last scenes were added for the ‘feel good’ factor. Getting Joe and
Jess together provide the obligatory happy ending.
16. She gives her a shirt. She has accepted Jules for who she is, and
stopped trying to make her in her own image.
17. To show that time has passed – several months, at least. And to show
that Pinky is happy.

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Handout 16
Shot-by-shot analysis of the ‘Free Kick’ scene
Jess takes the free kick to the strains of “Nessun Dorma”.
CU ball and Jess’s feet, opposition feet come into shot// lively wedding
LS Jess knocked over by opposition player; they fall, roll apart// music
low angle, WIDE of sky, ref comes into canted shot, arm raised// stops,

VERTICAL shot, Jess and other player on ground, camera circles as shouts,
other players come into shot; a Harrier pushes the fouling player away whistle
as teams converge, Jess still on ground// MS Joe, watching
concerned, // CU Tony// Jess on ground, holding ankle; helped up// crowd noise

VERTICAL shot Jess, players moving away; camera circling as Mel


brings ball and places it for free kick; pats Jess, moves away leaving her
alone; ref walks past with yellow card in hand as Jess waits//
VERTICAL shot of wall of two Harriers (including Jules) and four QPR crowd noise
players, TILT slightly to show them in LS from slightly high angle, PULL recedes as
back so they fill the screen and hide the goal (Jess’s POV) // Jess is left
isolated –
CU Jess // CU ball // MCU Jess // Jess’s POV of “wall” - now five Indian silence
women in saris - Pinky, her mother, grandmother and two others
(actually the director’s mother and aunt); slow ZOOM in on them as they
silently beseech Jess // MCU Jess looking bewildered // ELS of wall – music:
players again // MCU Jess // “Nessun
wedding // Dorma” -
CU Joe // LS stand with Paxtons // CU Tony // CU Jules – side view // chorus first
MCU Jess //

VERTICAL shot as she runs towards ball // CU ball as her boot connects
// LS wall, slow ZOOM as the camera follows the ball over the wall tenor’s voice
towards the goal and waiting keeper takes over
// MCU Mel watching ball // CU Jules and wall, turning to watch ball //
CU Joe //
LS keeper in goal, TRACK her as she leaps // ball in net //
wedding – Teets lifts Pinky in happiness //
CU Jules, overjoyed // CU Mel with QPR Player behind // MCU Joe // # reactions
MCU Tony // usually more
revealing and
VERTICAL of ecstatic Jess, arms up in ecstasy, being mobbed by her interesting
team, lifted up – circling camera// than showing
wedding, ecstatic Pinky, lifted high by circling Teets// what they are
MCU Jess, held high against sky with sunlight behind her // WIDE of watching
several team members as she drops to ground, TRACK as they run //
MS Joe, applauding, Tony behind // cheering
high angle in dressing room as girls circle Jess, as they help (or more underneath
like hinder) her putting on her sari. the music

# both sisters
achieve their
dreams

final whistle
sounds
music ends;
girls chatter

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Handout 17
Who, what and when of Bend it like Beckham

 director Gurinder
• style Chadha
 plot • pace
• tone

 cinematographer = Jong LIn


Director of Photography
 setting
 production designer Nick Ellis

 art director Mark Scruton


• colours
• motifs
Sara
 art designer/set decorator Neighbour
screenplay
• wit
Gurinder Chadha, Paul Mayeda Berges &
• humour
Guljit Bindra
• allusions
• motifs
• clichés actors  costumes Ralph Holes

 characters  makeup & hair Julie Van


Praag
 sound John Hayes
 sound effects (SFX)
 sound effects editing Micjael
Mullane,
Lisle Engle

 music Craig Pruess


Bally Sagoo
Liz Gallacher
 lighting Lou Bogue

 themes  visual effects Scott Billups

 editing Justin Krish


• pace, style, juxtaposition;
 structure montage

and many, many others


Note: the aspects in column 2 are not intended to be a match with aspects in
column 4
Pre-production: screenplay (and storyboarding); location scouting; set
design & decoration; costume design, casting, etc
Production: filming on set or location, actors, costumes, makeup;
cinematography, etc

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Post-production: editing, adding SFX, music, sound effects, sound effects
editing, etc

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Handout 18
Motifs and symbols in Bend it like Beckham
A motif is an image/idea/word that is repeated several times in a particular
work. It is a unifying device.

A symbol is an image/idea/word that represents something else, other than


itself. Symbols may have universal significance, e.g. the Christian cross, or
meaning only in the work in which they are used. They are short cuts in that
they express meaning in a quick way.

List the motifs and symbols that you noticed as you watched the film.
Explain meaning and significance of each symbol.

Some possible motifs and symbols:


footballs
an obvious motif in that the game is central but also used as a symbol, as
when Jess kicks it away, when she has accepted giving up several POV shots
from ball level; director describes them as the ‘ball’s POV’

shoes/boots
Jess has no boots inpoint = running shoes TILT up to middle-aged joggers
[sc. 24]; Jess buys boots and is found out; Jess borrows Paula’s shoes for
wedding; Paula takes them back very publicly; Jess is cleaning her boots and
weeping – symbolic end of her hopes

planes
a number of ‘plane shots’ help establish place used partly because that is
what it is like in Hounslow, so close to Heathrow; reflected in the use of a
planing action to indicate delight in scoring; both Jess and Joe do it.
Director: they are ‘poetic’ shots – to symbolise both immigrants, all those
people who have moved from one place to another, and the girls
who dream of moving out of there to another place. It is a way of
looking backwards (immigrants) and forwards (the future) at the
same time.
Beckham
symbolises the peak of football achievement; Jess idolises him and talks to
him; his picture is inpoint and outpoint of several scenes; Tony fancies him

mobile phone
engagement party gag; Teets and Pinky interrupted by one; Jess phones from
Hamburg

lights on the house


up and down depending on the state of wedding plans; Jess helps put them
up the first time, but not the second when her father is displeased with her

Guru Nanak’s picture


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a constant presence in their lives, looking down on all they do

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Handout 19
Sound Track

Only the names and performers have been listed here; for full details, see the
movie credits or www.imdb.com

‘Elevation’ ‘Kuria Punjab Diya’


Written and Produced by Bally Written by Dav Raj Jassal
Sagoo Performed by B21
Performed by Gunjan
‘Kinna Sohna’ ‘Baddest Ruffest’
Written by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan Written by Aniff Akinola and Lloyd
and Bally Sagoo Hanley
Performed by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan Performed by Backyard Dog
‘Do Your Thing’ ‘She's a Lady’
by Richard Mitchell, Felix Buxton Written by Paul Anka; Vocals by
and Simon Ratcliffe Austin Howard
Performed by Basement Jaxx Guitar Solo: Daryl Pruess;
Instruments: Craig Pruess
‘Move On Up’ ‘The Power of Love’
Written by Curtis Mayfield Written by Wolfgang Detmann,
Performed by Curtis Mayfield Gunther Mende, Jennifer Rush and
Mary Susan Applegate
Version ‘Sitam’ Vocals by Amar
‘Pag Ghungroo’ ‘Independence Day’
From the film Namak Halal Written by Melanie Chisholm and
Courtesy of Satyender Pal Eliot John Kennedy
Chaudhry Performed by Melanie C
‘Satgur Nanuk’ ‘Atomic’
Traditional, Arranged by Amerjit Written by Jimmy Destri and Debbie
Sidhu Harry
Performed by U.K. Bhangra Bands Performed by Blondie
‘No Imitation’ ‘I Turn to You’
Written and Produced by Bally by Melanie Chisholm, Rick Nowels
Sagoo and Billy Steinberg
Performed by Gunjan Performed by Melanie C
‘I Wish’ ‘Tere Bin Nahin Lagda’
by C Schack, K Karlin, P Biker and by Partners in Rhyme and Nusrat
E Wilde Fateh Ali Khan
Performed by Victoria Beckham Performed by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
‘IOU’ ‘Red Alert’
by Chris Braide, Victoria Beckham Written by Felix Buxton and Simon
and Andrew Frampton Ratcliffe
Performed by Victoria Beckham Performed by Basement Jaxx
Contains a sample from ‘Far
Beyond’ by Locksmith
‘Jind Mahi’ ‘Dream the Dream’
Written by Malkit Singh Written by Shaznay Lewis and Guy
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Performed by Malkit Singh Chambers
Performed by Shaznay Lewis
‘Noorie’ ‘Punjabian Di Shaan’
Written by Bally Sagoo and Nisar Written by Bally Sagoo and Debi
Akhtar Makhuspuri
Performed by Bally Sagoo featuring Performed by Hans Raj Hans
Gunjan
‘Inner Smile’ ‘Nessun Dorma’
Written by John McElhone, Music by Giacomo Puccini
Sharleen Spiteri, Rick Nowels and Words by Giuseppe Adami and
Gregg Alexander Renato Simoni
Performed by Texas Performed by Tito Beltran
‘Darshan’ ‘Rail Gaddi’
Written by Jagraj Sidhu Written by Kuljit Bhamra
Performed by B21 Vocals by Chirag Pechan
‘Putt Sardara De’ ‘My Final Peace’
Written by Shamshere Sandhu Written and Produced by Bally
Performed by B21 Sagoo
Performed by Gunjan
‘Hot Hot Hot’ - Written by Alphonsus Cassell
Main Vocals by Bina Mistry; Background Vocals by Parminder Nagra, Keira
Knightley, Archie Panjabi, Ameet Chana, Gurinder Chadha, Paul Berges,
Craig Pruess
Guitar: David Jackson

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Handout 20
Narrative structure and suggested answers

Narrative or plot structure is the term used to describe the order in which a
story is told, and the way in which different strands of the story are linked.
The most common ways in which stories are told are
• in chronological order, i.e. the order in which the events happen
• using flashbacks, i.e. earlier events are included later in the story
• with a frame of later time, and the whole story a flashback (book-
ending)
• with foreshadowing, in which future events are included earlier than
they actually happen.

Which of these descriptions best fits the structure of this film? Give
details to show this.
• chronological order
The main element that drives any film story is conflict. As well as introducing
characters and setting the scene, early scenes must set up the plot, providing
the basis for future conflict.

From whose point of view is the story told in this film? Is that consistent
throughout or are other points of view shown?
It is told basically from a neutral standpoint (eye of God) though much is from
Jess’s point of view. We go to the Paxton house, share Paula’s fears; are
given the Bhamras’ perspective, see Pinky with her fiancé; see Joe with Jules
etc. However, Jess’s perspective is the most common.

Narratives often involve a series of problems to be met and solved, or


obstacles to be overcome, like taking two steps forward and one step back,
until the resolution is reached.

What are the conflicts that provide the basis for the plot?
External: between Jess’s desire to play football and her parents’, especially
her mother’s insistence that she behave like an Indian woman.

Internal: between Jess’s need to play and her wish not to hurt and displease
her parents: desire versus duty.

What other conflicts develop as the story develops?


• between Jules and Jess over Joe.
• between the Bhamras and Teetu’s family.
• between Jess and Pinky over the postponement of the wedding.
• between Paula and Jules over Jules’ obsession with football.
• between Jess’s growing attraction to Joe and her awareness that her
parents would be unhappy if she had a non-Indian boyfriend.

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Are these conflicts resolved by the end of the film?
• Jess gets to play and to be at the wedding; she is given permission to
go to America to play.
• Jess and Jules make up their friendship.
• The marriage takes place.
• Paula takes an interest in football, and is reassured about her
daughter’s sexuality.
• Joe says he’ll wait for Jess and she agrees they will tell her parents.

How are the conflicts established?


• Contrast – clothes, ways of behaving, two worlds shown side-by-side,
touching and clashing.
• Jess’s parents express their wishes; Jess confides in her friends.
• Open argument and secret defiance.

List the main obstacles and/or problems faced in the story.


• Jess knows her parents will not approve of her playing
• her family obligations: “Boys never have to go home early to help”
• her scar
• she is forbidden to play: “No more football”
• the need to deceive her parents
• Pinky told to pick her up from work - she keeps the secret, but it is
there like a loaded pistol
• the football boots – her parents know she is playing
• seen “kissing a white boy” - the secret is out again
• sneaks off to Hamburg; parents find out
• Jess’s dilemma: to hurt her parents or give up on her dream
• her father sees her play, but sees her being hugged by Joe
• the wedding clashes with the final: family versus football; duty versus.
dream
• offered a scholarship – how to tell them?
• Joe, a ‘gora’

Early scenes will set up expectations of the main character(s) that will affect
the structure of the story.

Can you identify examples of character expectations?


Jess is shown to be polite, dutiful, respectful. She is not overtly rebellious so it
is in character for her to put her family duties over her own wishes.

Jules is shown to be more stroppy; her strong emotional reactions to her


mother are repeated in her emotional reactions to Jess and Joe.

Mr and Mrs Bhamra are both seen to be traditional – their clothes, etc. She is
more conservative; Jess’s father is accused of being too soft, so his change
of attitude at the end is believable.

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Time is always an important consideration in a screenplay; a feature film may
cover days, weeks, even years of real time, so ways of showing time passing
are needed.

How much time is covered in this film? Can you work out a timeline?
Several weeks, over the summer. At the beginning, Jess has just sat her A
level exams (May). The film finishes at the end of August - the school year in
America (and the UK) starts in September. This puts the wedding on August
25. The summer tournament would have taken the whole of the summer
holidays.

Some of the ways the passing of time may be indicated include:


• fades or dissolves • dates or times on screen
• changing light • seasonal differences – winter to
summer
• showing a clock or a calendar • references in dialogue
• a montage of brief symbolic or typical images
• cuts to the same scene at a clearly later time, eg from full plates to empty, or the
same people with different clothes or hairstyles, or in different places

What techniques are used in this film to show time passing?


• Montage is the most frequently used technique – games, wedding, etc
• Dissolves; fades from light to dark
• Characters in different clothes, places, etc

Film-makers may wish to show different things happening at the same time.
The usual technique for doing this is by cross-cutting. The editor cuts quickly
from one scene to another and back again several times. It is a very useful
technique for building tension and suspense, or for contrasting images and/or
ideas.

Can you identify examples of cross-cutting?


Games / crowd
Training /games / Bhamra home scenes
The whole of the climactic ‘match’ – game / wedding

Most commercial films – “classic Hollywood” type - are similar in structure to a


three-act play:
• the first act introduces the main characters and situation, and ends with
a scene that sets up a complication around which the plot will revolve
- the catalyst or inciting incident, that disrupts the equilibrium of the
original situation
• the second act develops this complication.
• the third act brings the situation to a climax and resolution, ie, get the
hero up a tree, throw things at him, get him down from the tree.

Each act is structured to end on a moment of heightened tension or interest, a


‘turning point’ that will change the direction of the story.

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Does this film follow the 3 act pattern?
See following diagram on OHP

The football plot, the main one, is structured in three acts. There is a clear
inciting incident: the invitation to try out; a clear second plot point to start Act
III: the dilemma of the date clash; and a resolution and dénouement in Act III.

However, there is no clear mid-point incident; the second act is made up of a


series of incidents that repeat but do not intensify the stakes (see diagram
below).

The wedding plot is structured very neatly in 3 acts.

The Jules/Jess friendship and the Joe/Jess relationship are also.

There is usually a state of equilibrium to start with, a basic situation that the
catalyst alters when it begins the dramatic action.

Describe the state of equilibrium at the beginning of this film.


Jess dreams of playing football but is an obedient and dutiful if frustrated
daughter. The family is preparing for Pinky’s engagement party.

The second act is usually the longest because it is built around a series of
actions taken by the main character(s) to get themselves out of the difficulty
created by the complication. This builds suspense because each successive
attempt to resolve the difficulty brings a reversal in fortune. The reversals gain
momentum because they are usually of greater magnitude each time they
occur.

Look back at your list of obstacles. Is each one of greater magnitude


than the one before?
Up to a point but much is just more of the same. She is forbidden to play but
keeps playing. Each time she is found out, she keeps on going. The wedding
clash with the final is a greater obstacle; getting permission to go to US is
greater still.

There will often be a central incident (coming about half way through the film),
a mid-point scene, which packs a dramatic punch and kicks the action to a
higher level.

Can you identify a mid-point scene? How does it affect subsequent


action?
In the wedding plot, it is the cancelling of the wedding.

In the Jess/Jules/Joe plots, it is the ‘kissing’ scene at Hamburg.


• both of these plots are seriously affected – Pinky is shattered, Jules
won’t speak to Jess, Jess goes looking for an Indian boyfriend.

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In the football plot, there is no clear midpoint scene. The wedding cancellation
leads to another revelation that Jess is still playing, but this does not seem to
change her pattern of behaviour; she continues to deceive her parents and
play. The saved penalty in Hamburg affects her confidence (and may be a
cause of her drinking and the ‘kiss’) but is a bit late in the storyline to be a
mid-point; nor does it seem to affect subsequent action in this plot-line.

Most stories involve the element of suspense, with the audience kept
wondering what will happen.

How has suspense been created in this film?


There is the ever-present fear that Jess will be found out. However, suspense
is not a major issue in a film like this: we know the end result will be happy, so
the question is how it will work out, not whether it will.

Suspense can be heightened by the use of a 'deadline’: the knowledge that


there is not much time left, and the overhanging question of whether they will
make it.

Is there a deadline? What is it and how does it affect the events?


Not in the sense of a race against time, but Jess does face university at the
end of the summer, and there is the suggestion that the die will be cast once
she starts.

Even stories that are told in a simple chronological structure will need to lay
the foundations for future events, as well as keep the audience involved and
expectant by hinting at the future.

Identify examples where future events are 'signposted'


• The insistence by both Tony and Jess that they are ‘just mates’
• Paula’s reference to Jules’ pictures as ‘butch’
• Mentions of the American scout

Some (not all) details will be like ‘loaded pistols’: there to be important later. In
other words, if you see a loaded pistol in an earlier scene, it is a good
indicator that someone will use it later.

How many ‘loaded pistols’ can you identify from early scenes in this
film?
• the No 7 shirt in Jess’s room
• Jules hugging Joe (even though she has said he is off-limits)
• the photo
• Pinky finding out that Jess is playing football

A film needs to keep its audience involved but also alert, off balance (a
comfortable audience may fall asleep) by changes of mood, eg from
suspense to humour and back to suspense again.

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Identify examples of mood change
# Less common in comedy than in drama
• The nightclub scene
• Paula when she overhears Jules
• Jess’s cheerful mood
• the wedding cancellation scene.

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Handout 21
Three Act Structure

Note: with so many plot strands, it is easier to stick to the main two. The
others can be added if wished.

Act I Act II Act III


First half Second half
dramatic dramatic
context context
training; playing playing /
Hamburg
the final

family life / Mid-point


dreams
wedding coping with the wedding
preparations cancellation

Plot Point 1 Mid-point Plot Point 2


incident
‘A’ story invitation to try none wedding or
out final?

‘B’ story engagement the wedding is wedding on


party cancelled again
Set-up Confrontation Resolution

• A ‘plot point’ is any incident or event that spins the action into another
direction
• The classic First Act question is whether to accept or refuse a
challenge: Come and try out for a real team.
• Jess’s dramatic need – that drives the whole story – is for her to fulfil
her dream of playing football.
• No clear mid-point incident for the football plot.

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 67 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english
OHP 2

Is Bend it like Beckham a formulaic ‘feel good’ film?


The emotional curve

tension

ACT I ACT II ACT III


climax = wedding /
final

dénouemen
t
exposition = leaving

time
confrontation: family versus football family wins both win

English Stages 4-5 January 2005 Page 68 of 68


NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12 Directorate
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/english