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Confidentiality Agreement

The undersigned reader acknowledges that the information provided by ________________ in this
marketing plan is confidential; therefore, reader agrees not disclose it without the express written
permission of ________________.

It is acknowledged by reader that information to be furnished in this marketing plan is in all respects
confidential in nature, other than information which is in the public domain through other means and
that any disclosure or use of same by reader, may cause serious harm or damage to
________________.

Upon request, this document is to be immediately returned to ________________.

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This is a marketing plan. It does not imply an offering of securities.


Table of Contents

1.0 Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

2.0 Situation Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1


2.1 Market Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
2.1.1 Market Demographics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2.1.2 Market Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2.1.3 Market Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2.1.4 Market Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2.2 SWOT Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2.2.1 Strengths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2.2.2 Weaknesses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2.2.3 Opportunities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2.2.4 Threats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2.3 Alternative Providers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2.4 Service Offering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2.5 Keys to Success . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2.6 Critical Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

3.0 Marketing Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6


3.1 Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.2 Marketing Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.3 Financial Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.4 Target Markets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.5 Positioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.6 Strategy Pyramid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

4.0 Financials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
4.1 Break-even Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
4.2 Funding Forecast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
4.3 Expense Forecast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

5.0 Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
5.1 Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
5.2 Marketing Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
5.3 Contingency Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
The Players Theatre Company

1.0 Executive Summary

The value of live theatre is immeasurable. The Players Theatre Company offers self-growth
and education to all of its audiences. Our classes for students are focused on building self-
confidence through theatre games and performance. Our classes for educators offer new and
interesting ways in how to approach traditional academic subjects, such as math and social
studies. We also teach new ways in how to relate to students and how to optimize the learning
time in the classroom. Moreover, The Players rework traditional pieces and create new pieces
to fit in with the fast-paced times of the end at the 20th century. Our performances are always
a new experience for audiences even if it is a new rendition of Romeo and Juliet. We try to
relate as performers to our contemporary audience and offer new insights on our society.

2.0 Situation Analysis

The Players Theatre Company has just emerged in the press as a reputable, quality theatre
company. There has been an increased interest in the community in our classes and
productions. Currently, traditional theatre is available to the public, but there has been a call
for educational performances. We want to take advantage of this current popularity to grow in
funding and in audience (both quantitatively and geographically).

2.1 Market Summary

We are experiencing growth in interest in theatre from the community and the current trend in
education and entertainment. Also our demographics are widening, encompassing more and
more people from different walks of life. There is definitely an opportunity here to be seized.

Target Markets

General Audience
Educators
Parents

Page 1
The Players Theatre Company

Table: Market Analysis

Market Analysis
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Potential Customers Growth CAGR
General Audience 30% 130,000 169,000 219,700 285,610 371,293 30.00%
Educators 50% 25,000 37,500 56,250 84,375 126,563 50.00%
Parents 20% 50,000 60,000 72,000 86,400 103,680 20.00%
Total 30.88% 205,000 266,500 347,950 456,385 601,536 30.88%

2.1.1 Market Demographics

Market Geographics

As a theatre company (as opposed to an established theatre), we have the flexibility to move
from region to region giving us greater access to a wider audience. Currently we are restricted
to our county because of our limited contacts, but we are focusing on growing to eventually
encompass the entire West Coast and possibly the rest of the country.

Market Demographics

Most people who go to the theatre go to see live theatre. Since movies, home video rentals
and TV are prevalent, a theatregoer is not a hard sell. They want to be there. They have made
a conscious choice about how they wish to be entertained. These people can be of any age,
any nationality, and any gender. We have low ticket prices so we can include all levels of
economic status, but most theatregoers are of middle economic status since most theatres
tend to have high ticket prices ($15-$20). The common factors, however, are the following:

• Value the arts.


• Usually a high level of education.
• Background of exposure to the arts, or even an education in the arts.
• Ages vary from young adults to the elderly.

Market Behaviors

Theatregoers are loyal consumers. If they like a show, they will come back for other
performances. However, the frequency with which the average audience member goes to a
show is most likely once a month, oftentimes less. Teachers and students, however, want
more and more live performances to energize their curriculum and the call for theatre is
frequent.

2.1.2 Market Needs

The value of live theatre is immeasurable. The Players Theatre Company offers self-growth
and education to all of its audiences. Our classes for students are focused on building self-
confidence through theatre games and performance. Our classes for educators offer new and
interesting ways on how to approach traditional academic subjects such as math and social
studies. We also teach new ways on how to relate to students and how to optimize the
learning time in the classroom. Moreover, The Players rework traditional pieces and create new
pieces to fit in with the fast-paced times of the end at the 20th century. Our performances are
always a new experience for audiences even if it is a new rendition of Romeo and Juliet. We try
to relate as performers to our contemporary audience and offer new insights on our society.

Page 2
The Players Theatre Company

2.1.3 Market Trends

The trend in education is towards breaking traditions and discovering new ways in how to
teach and how to relate to students. For example, teachers are going to seminars about the
different ways people learn: visual, aural, etc. The call for something new is where our theatre
company steps in. Not only do we offer classes but also performances that draw from history,
social issues, and literature, and we present them in a new non-traditional format.

As theatre becomes more and more commercial, and with the burst of touring Broadway
shows, more and more people are becoming interested and aware of the value that live
theatre has for our communities. Even non-traditional shows are selling out to audiences who
just five years ago would have never stepped inside a theatre.

Market Forecast

400,000

350,000

300,000

250,000
General Audience
200,000 Educators
150,000 Parents

100,000

50,000

0
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

2.1.4 Market Growth

The market trends discussed in the previous topic point toward a market growth currently
estimated at 30% for the next two years. We would like to take advantage of this and try to
create growth in our audience by at least 50% by expanding our tours beyond our home
county and then outside of the state, and so on.

Page 3
The Players Theatre Company

Target Market Growth

50.00%
45.00%
40.00%
35.00%
30.00%
25.00%
20.00%
15.00%
10.00%
5.00%
0.00%
General Audience Educators Parents

2.2 SWOT Analysis

The following is an outline of The Players Theatre Company's strengths, weaknesses,


opportunities, and threats. Currently our strengths and opportunities outweigh our
weaknesses; however, our weaknesses punctuate our need for more of the following
resources: time, employees, and funding.

2.2.1 Strengths

• Dedication of volunteers and management.


• Creative company members.
• A cooperative work environment.
• Members are well-educated in areas of expertise.
• Efficient in use of materials.
• Low overhead and designed to adapt to the market's needs.
• Offering an affordable theatre experience.

Page 4
The Players Theatre Company

2.2.2 Weaknesses

• Limited employees.
• Limited time because of employees.
• Limited financial resources.

2.2.3 Opportunities

• Excellent reviews of current productions.


• Letter of recommendation from local school district head.
• Possible interview with American Theatre magazine.
• Need for live theatre in our market.
• Diminishing experiences offered through schools and other publicly supported
performance activities.

2.2.4 Threats

• Loss of government grants.


• Bad reviews.
• Change in audience attendance (most hurtful).
• Competitive experiences, including dinner theatre.
• Challenges securing performance facilities.

2.3 Alternative Providers

Other local theatre companies offer performances of lesser quality compared to ours, which
has been stated repeatedly in newspaper and theatre magazine reviews. Also, our tickets are
priced from $3-$8 less than other companies, making us more accessible to a wider audience.
Two companies: the Shakespearean, and the Downtown, have opened classes to students at,
however, a higher price, and in a limited venue. We take our classes to the schools and offer a
sliding fee scale, so that any student can attend. What is most unique about The Players, is
that we take our performances on tour to regional school districts and will sometimes,
depending on our financial situation, offer these free to poorer communities.

Also we must keep in mind, that there are other forms of entertainment, such as movie
theaters, video rentals, and the option of theatregoers travelling to other markets with live
theatre, i.e.. New York. However, we are focusing on offering services that none of these
provide, such as educational seminars. Film entertainment is very different from a live theatre
experience so just in that aspect, we offer something unique. Travelling to view live theatre is
often not an option for many people, and our tours fill this gap in the market.

Page 5
The Players Theatre Company

2.4 Service Offering

• Live theatrical performances cost us $1,000 for a four week run for a general audience.
• Theatre seminars cost us $50 per class.
• School/Tour performances cost us $1,000 per show (sometimes already accounted for
with an established show) plus travel expenses ($500-$1,000) for educators and
students, and occasionally a general audience in a small community, ie. Warm Springs
Reservation.

2.5 Keys to Success

The following we consider to be our keys to success:

• Interns and dedicated volunteers.


• Re-use of previous sets, costumes, and props to save money.
• Market awareness.
• Funding to support the organization.

2.6 Critical Issues

Our major issue to face is lack of audience. We have a solid foundation of dedicated, creative
workers that make things happen, but our business depends on there being an audience--a
good-sized audience at that. If our following decreases even to 500, that is not enough for us
to grow or even sustain our business. However, with the combined experience, education,
dedication, and innovation of our company, we can implement plans and strategies that will
not only guarantee a growth in audience but in our business as well.

3.0 Marketing Strategy

In our company, we have a pool of resources in our staff to draw from. We plan to use our
combined effort to establish a stronger relationship with our local community and regional
communities by performing and teaching seminars at the surrounding schools.

Our strategy is based on the concept that:

1. Awareness precedes ticket sales.


2. Quality performances generate repeat purchases.

Page 6
The Players Theatre Company

3.1 Mission

The Players Theatre Company was created to bring a higher level of entertainment to people
from all walks of life. We are dedicated to bringing quality education, self-growth, self-
confidence and social issues to our public schools by establishing relationships with
communities and their educational institutions.

3.2 Marketing Objectives

Our objective is to increase our audience by at least 50%, to expand it geographically into
other regions of the state, and to gain more recognition among the public school districts and
other educational institutions.

1. Increase general audience by 50% (measured in ticket sales...currently we have the


capacity to sell 1,200 tickets per month, but on average we are only selling 80% of
that).
2. Set up a tour that includes at least one school from each district in the state which will
start spring term of 2000 with two performances per school.

3.3 Financial Objectives

Our financial objectives include the following:

• Increase funding by 50%.


• Increase public contribution (both corporate and individual) by 10%.
• Meet our financial obligations for the fiscal year of 1999.

3.4 Target Markets

We are targeting a general audience that consists of adults, children, and the elderly with an
interest in entertainment and the arts. We are also targeting parents of children from the ages
of 5 to 17 for the theatre seminars we hold at the schools and at the after-school care
programs. Another target market for us is educators from all levels of education. We offer a
unique and valuable experience for their students and themselves with our performances and
seminars.

3.5 Positioning

For educators and parents alike who value education and positive experiences, The Players
Theatre Company offers a self-esteem boosting, awareness-strengthening, and educational
theatrical experience for the children and the educators involved. Unlike the other companies
in town, we focus our energies on education and self-growth for our pupils and audiences with
innovative and informative productions and seminars.

Page 7
The Players Theatre Company

3.6 Strategy Pyramid

Strategy:

Strengthen our relationship with school districts and other educational institutions that are our
major supporters in funding and business.

Tactics:

• Sample performances to gain notice.


• Connect with school administration.
• Contact and communication with audience members.

Programs to implement our tactics:

• Provide sample performances of popular texts for English and other Literature classes
at local high schools during the months of September and October 1999.
• Free performances at the local folk festival in July 1999.
• Attend school board meetings for the rest of the school year.
• Introduce ourselves to the school district administration by performing at the
fundraising gala in June.
• For every Sunday matinee, hold a seminar after the performance for interested
audience members, beginning with the start of the next show in June 1999.
• Monthly mailings of informational brochures to area school districts and districts in
other counties as well, starting June 1999.
• Opening night after-performance parties for cast and audience, inviting reviewers and
other special audience members (ie. School representatives).

4.0 Financials

Right now, we perform three nights a week per a four-week run, which gives us a net sales
(after production costs of approx. $1,000) of $7,400 per month. We expect to grow in
audience by 50%, which will increase our sales by $4,200 per month.

4.1 Break-even Analysis

The fixed costs are based on our monthly budget for a show, including production and
promotional materials. The Average-Per-Unit revenue is based on what we receive per person,
per month, i.e. ticket sales and seminar fees. The Average-Per-Unit Variable Cost is based on
how much it costs us per person for each show and seminar.

Page 8
The Players Theatre Company

Break-even Analysis

$1,000

$500

$0

($500)

($1,000)

$0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500


Monthly break-even point

Break-even point = where line intersects with 0

Table: Break-even Analysis

Break-even Analysis

Monthly Revenue Break-even $1,017

Assumptions:
Average Percent Variable Cost 13%
Estimated Monthly Fixed Cost $1,000

4.2 Funding Forecast

We are expecting sales of $94,500 for the year 2000 based on current earnings. With the
expected growth of our audience, and in consequence our reputation, we expect to grow in
audience by 50% and in individual and corporate sponsors by a total of 40%. The seminars are
expected to grow 30%. The NEA government grant of $10,000 is budgeted over the year, and
we are hoping to receive another grant for the following year.

Page 9
The Players Theatre Company

Funding Monthly

$9,000

$8,000

$7,000

$6,000

$5,000
Ticket Sales
$4,000
Individual Sponsors
$3,000

$2,000

$1,000

$0
Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May

Table: Funding Forecast

Funding Forecast
FY 2002 FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006
Funding
Ticket Sales $94,500 $141,750 $153,090 $165,337 $178,564
Individual Sponsors $6,000 $7,200 $7,776 $8,398 $9,070
Total Funding $100,500 $148,950 $160,866 $173,735 $187,634

Direct Cost of Funding FY 2002 FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006


Ticket Sales $12,000 $18,000 $27,000 $40,500 $60,750
Individual Sponsors $960 $1,152 $1,382 $1,659 $1,991
Subtotal Cost of Funding $12,960 $19,152 $28,382 $42,159 $62,741

4.3 Expense Forecast

We have minimal fixed costs since a large part of our budget is based on cost per show. We
are committed to spending $1,000 per show. This includes royalties, rent of performing space,
printing of programs, posters and flyers, and production materials (wood, paint, costumes,
etc.). Of that $1,000, we have allotted $80 for paper ads (newspaper, magazines and
sometimes radio), and $50 for bulletins (posters and flyers). For our free performances, we
usually have a production in progress so we already have a complete set, costumes and props
to draw from. The only cost in this case is transportation for the company, rent of space (if
necessary) and food. This is estimated at $100, taking into account that many of our free
performances occur in parks with no fees or that we are invited to schools with no rental fees.
The brochure mailings cost of $500 per month is probably a high estimation, but this program
will be focusing on three different categories of our audience so it is worth it. These fees are
separate from the production budget.

Page 10
The Players Theatre Company

Monthly Expense Budget

$700

$600

$500

$400 Paper ads


Bulletins
$300
Other
$200

$100

$0
Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May

Table: Marketing Expense Budget

Marketing Expense Budget FY 2002 FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006


Paper ads $840 $924 $1,016 $1,118 $1,230
Bulletins $525 $600 $600 $600 $600
Other $6,000 $6,000 $6,000 $6,000 $6,000
------------ ------------ ------------ ------------ ------------
Total Funding and Marketing Expenses $7,365 $7,524 $7,616 $7,718 $7,830
Percent of Funding 7.33% 5.05% 4.73% 4.44% 4.17%

5.0 Controls

This plan will go into action by June 1999. We want to see our growth progressing by
comparing our month-end ticket sales with May. We want to connect with area and other
county school districts, laying the groundwork for a Fall season of touring. We will discuss and
monitor this growth with quarterly reviews of progress through year one.

5.1 Implementation

The following table maps out our milestones for the programs we want to start implementing
in June. The costs of the monthly mailings and opening night party are likely to change once
they are implemented and we are able to effectively determine our costs. The programs that
end in September may end earlier if they are successful in promoting our company and we
have no need to continue them. Most likely we will continue with the Opening Night party to
stay in touch with the desires and needs of our audience. All of our program managers are
aware of the following milestones and are already working on implementation. We are
determined to get all programs running by the first of June.

Page 11
The Players Theatre Company

Table: Milestones

Milestones

Advertising Start Date End Date Budget Manager Department


Other $0
Other $0
Total Advertising Budget $0
PR Start Date End Date Budget Manager Department
Sample performances for high school
9/1/1999 10/30/1999 $100 Camas PR
classes
Folk festival performance 7/1/1999 7/31/1999 $100 Kate PR
Performance at Fundraising Gala 6/1/1999 6/30/1999 $100 Kate PR
Sunday seminars 6/1/1999 9/1/1999 $150 Mark PR
Opening Night Party Company
6/1/1999 9/1/1999 $1,500 PR
Board
Total PR Budget $1,950
Direct Marketing Start Date End Date Budget Manager Department
Monthly mailings 6/1/1999 9/1/1999 $1,500 Kenne Direct
Other $0
Total Direct Marketing Budget $1,500
Web Development Start Date End Date Budget Manager Department
Other $0
Other $0
Total Web Development Budget $0
Other Start Date End Date Budget Manager Department
Attend school board meetings 6/1/1999 12/30/1999 $0 Ceri PR
Other $0
Total Other Budget $0
Totals $3,450

5.2 Marketing Organization

Our marketing organization consists of our board members: Ceri Gipson, Kate Lord, Mark
Zolun, Kenne Sage, and Camas Davis. We have divided responsibilities based on skill. We have
weekly meetings to discuss our progress and our budget. All issues are agreed upon fully
before implementation.

5.3 Contingency Planning

The worst-case scenario that we have to be prepared for is losing enough of our sales and
funding that we have no marketing budget. In order to assure that we continue our marketing
programs, we must establish relationships with local businesses (like City Copy, newspapers,
Boyett catering) who in exchange for advertising in our programs and our referrals, we receive
reduced rates or even free services from. This is possible because we are aware that other
theatre companies have established the same relationships, and we have already established
such a relationship with a local printing company. This "plan B" will at least allow us to keep up
the minimum without much cost.

Page 12
Appendix

Appendix Table: Funding Forecast

Funding Forecast
Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May FY 2002 FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006
Funding
Ticket Sales 0% $141,75 $153,09 $165,33 $178,56
$8,400 $8,400 $8,400 $8,400 $8,400 $8,400 $6,300 $6,300 $6,300 $8,400 $8,400 $8,400 $94,500
0 0 7 4
Individual Sponsors 0% $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $6,000 $7,200 $7,776 $8,398 $9,070
Total Funding $100,50 $148,95 $160,86 $173,73 $187,63
$8,900 $8,900 $8,900 $8,900 $8,900 $8,900 $6,800 $6,800 $6,800 $8,900 $8,900 $8,900
0 0 6 5 4

Direct Cost of Funding Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May FY 2002 FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006
Ticket Sales $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $12,000 $18,000 $27,000 $40,500 $60,750
Individual Sponsors $80 $80 $80 $80 $80 $80 $80 $80 $80 $80 $80 $80 $960 $1,152 $1,382 $1,659 $1,991
Subtotal Cost of Funding $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $12,960 $19,152 $28,382 $42,159 $62,741

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Appendix

Appendix Table: Contribution Margin

Contribution Margin
Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May FY 2002 FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006
Funding $100,50 $148,95 $160,86 $173,73 $187,63
$8,900 $8,900 $8,900 $8,900 $8,900 $8,900 $6,800 $6,800 $6,800 $8,900 $8,900 $8,900
0 0 6 5 4
Direct Cost $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $12,960 $19,152 $28,382 $42,159 $62,741
Other Variable Costs of Sales $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- -----------
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Total Direct Cost $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $1,080 $12,960 $19,152 $28,382 $42,159 $62,741

Gross Surplus $129,79 $132,48 $131,57 $124,89


$7,820 $7,820 $7,820 $7,820 $7,820 $7,820 $5,720 $5,720 $5,720 $7,820 $7,820 $7,820 $87,540
8 4 6 3
Gross Surplus % 87.87% 87.87% 87.87% 87.87% 87.87% 87.87% 84.12% 84.12% 84.12% 87.87% 87.87% 87.87% 87.10% 87.14% 82.36% 75.73% 66.56%

Marketing Expense Budget Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May FY 2002 FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006
Paper ads $80 $80 $80 $80 $80 $80 $40 $40 $40 $80 $80 $80 $840 $924 $1,016 $1,118 $1,230
Bulletins $50 $50 $50 $50 $50 $50 $25 $25 $25 $50 $50 $50 $525 $600 $600 $600 $600
Other $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $6,000 $6,000 $6,000 $6,000 $6,000
----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- -----------
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Total Funding and Marketing
$630 $630 $630 $630 $630 $630 $565 $565 $565 $630 $630 $630 $7,365 $7,524 $7,616 $7,718 $7,830
Expenses
Percent of Funding 7.08% 7.08% 7.08% 7.08% 7.08% 7.08% 8.31% 8.31% 8.31% 7.08% 7.08% 7.08% 7.33% 5.05% 4.73% 4.44% 4.17%

Contribution Margin $122,27 $124,86 $123,85 $117,06


$7,190 $7,190 $7,190 $7,190 $7,190 $7,190 $5,155 $5,155 $5,155 $7,190 $7,190 $7,190 $80,175
4 7 8 4
Contribution Margin / Funding 80.79% 80.79% 80.79% 80.79% 80.79% 80.79% 75.81% 75.81% 75.81% 80.79% 80.79% 80.79% 79.78% 82.09% 77.62% 71.29% 62.39%

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