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GENERAL INTRODUCTION

1.0 Background and Rationale


The Quezon City Government ant with the provisions of the Local
through the City Development Council Government Code. Quezon City has
(CDC) has undertaken the preparation adopted the said “Rationalized Local
of the city’s Comprehensive Develop- Planning System” as the guiding
ment Plan and review of the existing framework in the preparation and/or
Comprehensive Land Use Plan in revision of its comprehensive plans,
view of the significant transfor- its zoning ordinance and investment
mations in the social and ecological programs. The City has also engaged
conditions of the city since the Plan’s the services of the author of the RPS
updating in 2011. The timing for this himself, Prof. Ernesto M. Serote of the
undertaking could not be more auspi- UP School of Urban and Regional
cious. The Bureau of Local Govern- Planning as in-house consultant to
ment Development of DILG is current- help facilitate the conduct of various
ly disseminating the “Rationalized activities required.
Local Planning System (RPS)”, a new
planning guideline that is fully compli-

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN


LONG TERM SETTLEMENT PROTECTION PRODUCTION INFRASTRUCTUR
DEVT PLAN POLICIES LAND POLICIES LAND POLICIES E POLICIES

ZONING PLAN / ORD

COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN


MEDIUM TERM ENVIRON- ADMIN &
SOCIAL DEVT ECONOMIC
DEVT
PHYSICAL &
INFRA MENTAL FINANCIAL
DEVT PLAN COMPONENT COMPONENT MGMT
COMPONENT COMPONENT DEVT
COMPONENT

LOCAL DEVT REGULATORY


INVESTMENT PROGRAM MEASURES
IMPLEMENTATION NON-CAPITAL CAPITAL • OTHER PLANNING LAWS
INSTRUMENTS “SOFT” “HARD” • TAXATION /FISCAL MEASURES
PROJECTS PROJECTS • INCENTIVES TO PRIATE
INVESTORS
• ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS

GENERAL
FUND
BUDGET

• IMPROVED PUBLIC
OUTPUTS SERVICES
• NEW OR IMPROVED
PRIVATE SECTOR
INVESTMENT IN LOCAL
Chapter 1: GENERAL INTRODUCTION

PUBLIC FACILITIES / ECONOMIC & SOCIAL DEVT


INFRASTRUCTURE

• CHANGE IN SOCIAL & ECONOMIC WELL-


BEING OF RESIDENTS
• CHANGE IN CONFIGURATION QUALITY OF
OUTCOMES THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT
• CHANGE IN LOCAL INSTITUTIONAL
CAPABILITIES

Figure 1.1 Local Planning and Development Model


as Mandated by the Local Government Code
Chart by E.M. Serote
QUEZON CITY

The Local Government Code man- zenry to feel a strong sense of owner-
dates all LGUs to prepare their Com- ship. This entails approaching the ac-
prehensive Land Use Plans (CLUP) and tivity in an institutional mode rather
their multi-sectoral Comprehensive than in the usual project mode. This
Development Plans (CDP). The CLUP is approach has the following practical
the long-term guide for realizing the implications:
desired spatial pattern of development
by regulating the type and location of a. Consultants were not contracted
private and public investments. The to produce the required documents.
instruments for regulating investments Their role was limited to that of facili-
are the zoning ordinance, subdivision tators rather than contractors in the
regulations, and the building code as traditional sense. To be sure, the con-
well as positive incentives in the form sultants have brought their skill, in-
of liberal taxation and other fiscal poli- sight and perspective to bear on the
cies. The multi-sectoral development organization, analysis and interpreta-
plan, on the other hand, is the medium tion of relevant planning information.
term and annual guide to public invest- But they did not try to impose their
ments implemented through the Local value judgments nor claim superiority
Development Investment Program in the interpretation of their findings
(LDIP) and the annual budget. (Please over those of the city constituents
refer to Figure 1.1). themselves. Every opportunity for the
local residents to participate in various
The concepts and terminologies stages of the planning process was en-
used represent a faithful interpretation couraged. (Figure 1.2)
of, and compliance with the pertinent
mandates of the Local Government b. That the planning process
Code (Sections 20, 106 and 458, among serves as a venue for public participa-
others). These are the plans that LGUs tion and consultation. Each public con-
are required to produce. sultation is the culmination of a cluster
of activities (module) which include
1.1 Institutional Capacity Building seminar-workshops conducted by the
facilitators to effect technology trans-
Traditionally, the preparation of fer among their local counterparts.
the said plans has been initiated by (Please refer to Figure 1.3.)
Chapter 1: GENERAL INTRODUCTION

outside agencies and so the city cannot


entirely claim ownership of the plan 1.2 The Local Planning Structure
outputs. This time around Quezon City
has made sure that planning is entirely An important implication of the insti-
the initiative of the city government. It tutional capacity building approach is
also made certain that the process of that the organizational structure for
preparing the above-cited plans is participatory planning and governance
highly participatory and consultative as envisioned in the Local Government
to allow the city’s officialdom and citi- Code, was activated or revitalized. Ac-

2
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

ment Office (CPDO), sectoral


and functional committees of
the CDC, and local special bod-
ies, among others. The CPDO
serves as Secretariat to the
CDC and coordinates the ac-
tivities of the various sectoral
and functional committees.
(See Table 1.1)
The Sectoral/Functional Com-
mittees, constituted pursuant
to Sec. 112 of the Local Gov-
ernment Code, have the most
inclusive multi-sectoral com-
position. The membership of
the sectoral committees, pur-
suant to DILG Memorandum
Circular No. 114 s. 2007 is
shown in Table 1.2.
The local planning structure is
the formal mechanism for
participatory and consultative
planning processes. Neces-
sarily, it must be inclusive and
multi-stakeholder in composi-
Figure 1.2 Structure for institutional Capacity tion so that it exhibits the fol-
Building for Planning in Quezon City lowing features:

 Government and non-government


cordingly, the planning structure con- sectors are represented;
sisting of a deliberative / decision  Within the government sector, na-
making body and technical working tional government agencies and the
Chapter 1: GENERAL INTRODUCTION

groups as provided for in the Code was LGU are engaged in mutually mean-
put to work in this undertaking. The ingful ways;
deliberative body, viz, the City Devel-  Within the LGU, both elective and
opment Council (CDC) and the ultimate appointive officials and staff as well
policy making body, viz, the Sangguni- as both the executive and legislative
ang Panlungsod are the real “planners” branches are involved; and,
of the city. But because these bodies  Within the executive branch of the
are composed mainly of politicians, city government, not only is the
they are provided with technical sup- CPDO but all other departments and
port by the City Planning and Develop- CPDO but all other departments and
offices are represented.
3
QUEZON CITY

Political Compo- Technical The sectoral committees, representing


nent Component the five development sectors, have a
 Sangguniang  City Planning and flexible membership structure to ena-
Panlungsod Development Office
ble the CDC to reduce or expand partic-
 City Develop-  City Government.
ipation in specific activities when the
ment Council Department Heads
 Congressman’s  Local Special Bodies occasion calls for it. Sectoral commit-
Representative  CDC Sectoral/ Func- tees serve as standing committees of
 Civil Society tional Committees the CDC. Functional committees, on
Organizations  National Govern- the other hand, are ad hoc issues-
ment Agency – based multi-sectoral bodies. These are
Chiefs of their Local organized as the need arises, with
Offices members drawn from the sectoral
 Private Sector/ CSO committees.
Representatives

1.2.1 Composition of Sectoral Com-


mittees
Chapter 1: GENERAL INTRODUCTION

Figure 1.3 The CLUP-CDP-LDIP Process Flow Chart

4
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

When their work is Table 1.2 Sectoral Committees


over, the functional
committees are dis- FULL
BLOWN
banded and the mem- SECTORAL
SECTOR CORE TWG EXPANDED TWG
bers thereof return to COMMITTEE
their mother sectoral
CPDO CPDC CDC
committees. Of course, Social Devel- SSDD NSO Other interested
other groups or individ- opment QCHEALTH
CDC REP (BGY.)
CDC SOCIAL SECTOR COMM.
QCGH
groups and
individuals
uals who are recognized CDC REP (CSO) NDH
DIV. OF CITY CITY LIBRARY
experts in particular SCHOOLS QCRO
fields may be invited to HCDRD QCPU
DPOS SYDP
take part in functional SANGGUNIAN REP. QC AMORANTO
committees. GAD QC FIRE DEPT.
HURA
OSCA
QCCI
1.2.2 Functions of the CPDO PESO
CTAO DTI
Sectoral and Function- SIKAPBUHAY TOURISM COUNCIL CDC
al Committees (as per Economic
CDC REP (BGY.)
CDC REP (CSO)
CDC ECONOMIC SECTOR
COMM.
Other interested
groups and
Rule XXIII, Art. 182 (g) Development
BPLO TRU individuals
MDAD QCBAO
(3), IRR of RA7160) SANGGUNIAN REP. LLRB

a. The LDC may form CPDO/ ZONING MERALCO DPWH CDC


sectoral or functional Land Use/
Infrastructure
CEO/
DBO
MWSS
BAYANTEL
Dtr
DITC
Other interested
groups and
committees to assist Development CArD PLANADES MMDA individuals
CDC REP (BGY.) ACADEME HLURB
the Council in the CDC REP (CSO) AYALA LAND
performance of its SAU TF COPRISS
SANGGUNIAN REP ARANETA CENTER, INC.
functions; CDC LAND USE/INFRA SECTOR
COMM.
b. To ensure policy co- BFAR
ordination and uni- DENR
CPDO PIEP
formity in operation- EPWMD LLDA
al directions, the CDC REP (BGY.) JUNKSHOP ASSN. CDC
CDC REP (CSO) MIRIAM COLL. SCHOOL OF Other interested
functional and sec- Environmental
Management
PDAD ENVIRONMENT groups and
toral committees DRRMO
SANGGUNIAN REP
SANITARY INSPECTOR
POG
individuals
Chapter 1: GENERAL INTRODUCTION

shall establish link- INDUSTRY SECTOR REP.


CDC ENV. SECTOR COMM.
ages with NGAs and
such sectoral or func- CPDO ATENEO SCH. OF GOVERNANCE CDC
Institutional CA CDC INSTL SECTOR COMM. Other interested
tional committees Development C ASSESSOR LGOO-DILG groups and
organized by the CDC REP (BGY.) AMO individuals
CDC REP (CSO) CPO
government for the CBO RADIO COMM.
development, invest- CTO
BOC
ACCOUNTING DEP’T.
CDSO
ment, and consulta- CRO CITY LEGAL DEP’T.
HRMD PAISO
tive purposes; VICE MAYOR CITY SEC. OFFICE
SANGGUNIAN REP CCRO

5
QUEZON CITY

c. Consistent with national policies ning structure. To do this the entire


and standards, the sectoral or func- planning process was designed as a
tional committees shall: learning experience for everyone who
was involved. But because of the antici-
1) Provide the CDC with data and
pated large number of participants, the
information essential to the for-
learning venues and activities were
mulation of plans, programs and
varied according to the stratification
activities;
suggested in Table 1.2. Thus, the core
2) Define sectoral and functional
membership of the sectoral commit-
objectives, set targets, and iden-
tees underwent seminars conducted at
tify programs, projects and ac-
the School of Urban and Regional Plan-
tivities for the particular sector
ning, UP Diliman Campus. The trained
or function;
core groups plus the expanded groups
3) Collate and analyze information
conducted technical workshops to
and statistics and conduct relat-
produce the intermediate outputs re-
ed studies;
quired in every module. Outputs of
4) Conduct public hearings on vital
technical workshops were then pre-
issues affecting the sector or
sented in public consultations with the
function;
all-inclusive membership participating.
5) Coordinate planning, program-
ming and implementation of
1.3.1 Conduct of Formal Training
programs, projects and activi-
ties within each sector;
The formal training was designed
6) Monitor and evaluate programs
for the core technical working groups
and projects; and,
(TWG) of the Sectoral/ Functional
7) Perform such other functions as
Committees of the City Development
may be assigned by the CDC.
Council (refer to Table 1.2). Each core
TWG is anchored by the relevant tech-
When the above planning struc-
nical staff or sectoral division of the
ture is functioning properly one of the
City Planning and Development Office
outcomes that can be reasonably ex-
(CPDO). The main rationale for target-
pected is the emergence of a culture of
ing the core TWGs as the recipients of
planning among both city officialdom
intensive training stems from the need
and the citizenry. Also, when planning
to institutionalize planning knowledge
Chapter 1: GENERAL INTRODUCTION

is done in the institutional mode, it be-


and know-how among the career mem-
comes truly an integral part of local
bers of the city government bureaucra-
governance.
cy to enable them to spearhead future
planning activities by themselves with
1.3 Program of Technology
minimum assistance from external
Transfer
agents.
Another aspect of institutional ca-
pacity building is the on-the-job train- The contents of the training
ing of the members of the local plan- course included contexts, concepts and

6
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

analytical techniques of planning. The 1.3.3 Conduct of Public Consulta-


curriculum is divided into four mod- tions/ Hearings
ules. After completing one module, the
participants were expected to lead in Public consultations are an essen-
the conduct of the technical workshops tial requisite of a consultative partici-
involving core TWGs and the Expanded patory process. It is in these occasions
TWGs. The intermediate and final out- where the analysis and interpretation
puts were prepared in the technical of the TWGs are validated, issues and
workshops under the guidance of ex- concerns further clarified, and pro-
ternal consultants. posals refined and accepted. It is in
these public consultations where the
The method of delivery of the full-blown sectoral committees, the
course basically consisted of classroom political component, and all other
lectures, discussions and simulated groups and individuals are given the
practical exercises. The training venue opportunity to participate.
was the School of Urban and Regional
Planning (SURP) of UP Diliman. The 1.3.4 Coaching and Outputs Eval-
SURP supplied the bulk of the lectur- uation
ers. Other resource persons for specific The consultants guided the partic-
topics were sourced elsewhere. ipants in the proper application of ana-
lytical tools and techniques to ensure
1.3.2 Conduct of Workshops that the outputs were of acceptable
The technical workshops followed quality. On some occasions the con-
and complemented the formal training. sultants provided additional conceptu-
Participation included the Expanded al inputs in their respective sectoral
TWG in addition to the Core TWG. In workshops. Technical workshops
these workshops the Core TWG were were held in various venues in the
given the opportunity to apply their Quezon City Hall and the Philippine
learning in the actual analysis of the Social Science Council Auditorium.
various sectors and areas of the City
1.3.5 Targeted Outputs
and to produce the required outputs.
The outputs of this undertaking
Chapter 1: GENERAL INTRODUCTION

In these technical workshops, par-


are the following:
ticipants who did not receive direct
 Updated Ecological Profile of
formal training indirectly received
Quezon City
training from the Core TWG members
 Revised Comprehensive Land
by taking part in sectoral and inter-
Use Plan
sectoral analysis, brainstorming and
 Draft Revised Zoning Ordinance
related activities. They could also
 Comprehensive Development
bring their own knowledge and exper-
Plan
tise into the analysis of specific issues
 Local Development Investment
and concerns.
Program

7
QUEZON CITY

a) Ecological Profile use of property within the city jurisdic-


tion, for regulating subdivision devel-
This is an enriched version of the opments, and for reclassifying agricul-
traditional “Socio-economic Profile” tural lands into non-agricultural uses
with the addition of greater amounts of (RA 7160 Sec. 458, 2, vi-x). Being com-
information about the natural and prehensive in geographical scope, the
physical resources and the environ- CLUP covers the entire territorial juris-
ment. The latter addition is an effort to diction of the city including those areas
localize the implementation of the Phil- that are the traditional domain of the
ippine Agenda for Sustainable Devel- national government. The authority to
opment in the 21st Century (PA21). plan and manage these latter areas
The Profile is a comprehensive set of shall now be shared between the LGU
information about Quezon City orga- and the national government (Sec. 3, i).
nized under the five development sec- To adequately cover every part of the
tors introduced in Table 1.3. It con- territorial jurisdiction of the city, the
tains the latest data available present- CLUP embodies appropriate policies
ed with minimum of analysis so that for each of the four land use policy are-
the data can serve as a general refer- as: protected areas, settlements, pro-
ence and can be utilized by a wide duction areas, and infrastructure sup-
range of readers for various purposes. port areas. Moreover, the CLUP is a
To the extent possible, the data are long-term policy guide that spans sev-
presented in historical sequence and eral terms of local officials so that con-
are aggregated or disaggregated in dif- tinuity of development programs is
ferent spatial scales or geo-political assured.
units. This three-dimensional display
of information will allow readers to c) Zoning Ordinance
form a more concrete picture of the
city. The Profile served as the princi- The principal instrument for en-
pal data base for preparing all the forcing the locational policies and per-
plans produced in this undertaking. formance standards of the CLUP is the
zoning ordinance. Unless the CLUP is
b) Comprehensive Land Use enacted into a zoning ordinance it re-
Plan mains an indicative plan with only per-
Chapter 1: GENERAL INTRODUCTION

suasive force and effect and people can


The Local Government Code man- afford to ignore it. Once the zoning
dates all LGUs to prepare their com- ordinance is enacted, however, the
prehensive land use plan as the prima- right of property owners to develop
ry basis for determining the future use their property is transferred from the
of land and other natural resources individual to society and everyone who
(RA 7160 Sec. 20, c). The CLUP shall wants to develop his/her land must
also serve as the basis for prescribing seek permission or clearance to do so
reasonable limits and restraints on the from the local government.

8
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

d) Comprehensive Development of residents depend on sound econom-


Plan (CDP) ic development. The economic devel-
This plan is referred to in the Code opment plan embodies what the local
as the “long-term, medium-term and government intends to do to create a
annual socio-economic development favorable climate for private invest-
plan” that local development councils ments through a combination of poli-
are directed to prepare (Sec. 106), or cies and public investments necessary
the “integrated economic, social and to enable private investments to flour-
physical plan” [Sec. 476 (b) (1)]. It is ish. Ultimately, this assures the resi-
comprehensive in that it covers the dents of a steady supply of goods and
five development sectors and their re- services and of jobs and household
spective subsectors. Each of these sec- income. A very significant component
tors has a complete development plan of this sectoral plan is the LGU’s sup-
in itself and the time frame is prefera- port to food production activities to
bly three (3) years to coincide with the help achieve local and national food
term of local officials so that they can security. The status of the local econo-
use it as their program of government my also determines to a large extent
or their executive-legislative agenda. the amount of locally derived revenues
The central concerns of each sectoral of the LGU.
plan are described briefly in the suc-
ceeding sections. 3. Infrastructure and Land Use
Development Plan
1. Social Development Plan
This component deals with the
This component of the CDP deals infrastructure building program and
with the identified issues and concerns the land acquisition program required
relative to improving the state of well- for use as right-of-way or easements of
being of the local population and up- public facilities. The physical develop-
grading the quality of social services ment plan may also involve urban re-
such as health, education, welfare, newal or redevelopment schemes for
housing and the like. Questions of eq- inner city areas, opening up new urban
uity and social justice and gender equi- expansion areas in the urban fringe, or
Chapter 1: GENERAL INTRODUCTION

ty are also addressed by this sectoral development of new growth centers in


plan. conformity with the chosen spatial
strategy.
2. Economic Development Plan
Although it is not the business of 4. Environmental Management
government to go into business in gen- Plan
eral, it is government’s responsibility
to ensure that the local economy is in a The enactment of Republic Act
sound state of health. This is because 10121 otherwise known as the Philip-
the level of family income and employ- pine Disaster Risk Reduction and Man-
ment and hence, the level of well-being agement Act of 2010 and Republic Act

9
QUEZON CITY

9729 or the Climate Change Act of The outputs of each sectoral plan
2009 laid the bases for consolidating may be grouped into three forms: pro-
the environmental implications of all ject ideas or project briefs, non-
development proposals within the city projects or new services, and new poli-
with the provision of mitigating and cies or ideas for new legislations. The
preventive measures for their antici- first form of outputs will serve as an
pated impacts. It embodies programs input to the local development invest-
for maintaining cleanliness of air, wa- ment program and the annual budget.
ter and land resources and for rehabili- The second type of outputs will be
tating or preserving the quality of nat- used in the crafting of the institutional
ural resources to support the require- capacity building program, and the
ments of economic development and third type of outputs will be included
ecological balance across generations. in the legislative agenda of the Sanggu-
niang Panlungsod.
5. Institutional Development Plan
e) Local Development Investment
As stated in RA 7160 or the Local Program
Government Code of 1991, decentrali-
zation was legislated with the aim of The LDIP is a program to allocate
efficient and effective delivery of pub- the investible portion of the annual
lic services, thus the plan focuses on general fund budget for implementing
strengthening the capability of the lo- the development programs, projects
cal government bureaucracy as well as and activities identified in the CLUP
that of elected officials to plan and and the CDP. The LDIP is coterminous
manage their territory and serve their with the term of the Local Chief Execu-
constituency. Capability building in- tive, i.e., it has a time frame of 3 years
cludes manpower training, scholar- broken down into annual streams of
ships, seminars, workshops, study fund allocation for projects determined
tours and similar activities. Member- to be of high priority by the incumbent
ship in different functional and sec- officials. As a guide to public spending,
toral committees and professional the LDIP is intended to result in im-
leagues and participation in their proved socio-cultural well-being of the
planned activities is also encouraged residents as well as accelerated local
and supported by this sectoral pro- economic development. Although the
Chapter 1: GENERAL INTRODUCTION

gram. The involvement of voluntary LDIP involves public sector invest-


groups or civil society organizations is ments principally, it has the effect of
likewise promoted in the preparation, eliciting and orchestrating desired pri-
implementation, monitoring and evalu- vate sector investments as well. This
ation of the different sectoral pro- volume pertains to the Comprehensive
grams, projects and activities as a vital Development Plan (CDP) and the pro-
component of this sectoral develop- cess involved in its preparation only.
ment plan. The other outputs are presented in
separate volumes. 

10
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Table 1.3 Sectors and Subsectors in the Comprehensive Development Plan

SOCIAL ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE ENVIRONMENTAL INSTITUTIONAL


DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT
1. Population (size, 1. Primary Sector 1. Economic Support 1. Lands 1. Organization and man-
growth, distribu- a) Agricultural crops Roads, bridges, ports, Lands of public domain agement
tion) Fisheries (inland, terminals Private lands and alienable
brackish, marine) Transportation and disposable lands
c) Livestock Power generation
d) Forestry Irrigation systems
Flood control and
drainage
Telecommunications

2. Social services 2. Secondary Sector 2. Social Support 2. Forest Lands 2. Fiscal management
and status of well Mining and Waterworks and Protection forests
-being quarrying sewerage Production forests
Education and Manufacturing Schools
culture, Construction Hospitals
spiritual Electricity, water, Public socialized
health gas utilities housing
Recreation and Facilities for
sports vulnerable groups
Welfare
Housing
Protective ser-
vices
3. Gender and 3. Tertiary Sector . Parks and other 3. Local legislation
development Wholesale and retail reservations
trade
Transportation
Telecommunications
Finance, insurance
and related services
Real estate
Personal and com-
munity services
Tourism
4. Vulnerable 4. Water resources 4. LGU-NGO-PO
groups Freshwater (ground, sur- linkages
face)
Marine waters

5. Air quality 5. National-Local


Chapter 1: GENERAL INTRODUCTION

Government linkages
6. Waste management .6. City-barangay
Solid waste linkages
Liquid waste
Toxic and hazardous

11
THE CDP REVISION PROCESS

The Quezon City, between 2016 from the intensive seminars and work-
and 2017, undertook the revision shops. The principal output of these
process of its planning documents: sectoral workshops is the translation
the Socio-Ecological Profile, Com- of data into indicators of development
prehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP), consolidated in the format of a statisti-
and Comprehensive Development cal compendium. The analysis activity
Plan (CDP). The Local Planning Cy- is capped by inter-sectoral workshops
cle proposed by the Rationalized for the purpose of cross-validating the
Planning System guided the plan sectoral data, for making observations
updating and revision process. See about what the data mean, finding ex-
Figure 2.1 While this section pri- planations for the observed conditions,
marily refers to the revision, a brief projecting the implications to the city if
discussion of two relevant docu- these conditions are not changed sig-
ments, which also served as bases nificantly, and suggesting policy op-
for the CDP revision, is also pre- tions for the issues identified.
sented.
2.2 Revising the Comprehensive
2.1 Updating the Ecological Pro- Land Use Plan
file
The revision of the Comprehen-
Characterization and analysis, sive Land Use Plan (CLUP) involved
as components of the CDP process, four sub-activities, described briefly
involved gathering, collating, pro- below.
cessing or otherwise generating
latest information necessary to up- A review of the alternative spatial
date the 2010 Ecological Profile. strategies presented in the previous
The information were sourced CLUP was done. The spatial strategy is
from various agencies and offices the form or pattern of physical devel-
and were presented in the form of opment of the city that will contribute
statistics as well as thematic maps to the realization of the long-term vi-
and aerial photographs. The char- sion. Each pattern or form that is gen-
acterization is presented in the erated is envisioned to establish a sus-
2015 Ecological Profile. tainable balance between the built and
Chapter 2: THE CDP REVISION PROCESS

unbuilt environment. This is to ensure


Analysis of the data generated is that areas that ought to be preserved
the bridge between characteriza- in their open character are not built
tion and planning proper. Analysis over, on one hand, and that the built
is an attempt to make sense out of environment is directed into those are-
the data generated. This activity is as that are relatively free from hazards
done by each of the five sectors to the intended population, and that
through workshops among sectoral the type, size and intensity of develop-
committee members applying the ment are consistent with the capability
analytical techniques they learned of environmental resources to sustain,
on the other.
12
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Next, an evaluation of the alternative spatial strategies was conducted to de-


termine the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy. This was done by the
inter-sectoral technical working groups using the goal-achievement matrix (GAM)
or some other suitable tools to select the most preferred spatial strategy or urban
form

Given the data generated in the Ecological Profile and the preferred spatial
strategy chosen, the revised CLUP was prepared, presented and approved by the
Sangunian on April 15, 2016. It was then approved by MMDA on October 5, 2016
and finally approved by the Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board on September
14, 2017. The CLUP revision included activities such as delineating and mapping
the four general land use policy areas: settlements, protection, production and in-
frastructure and the specific land uses under each policy area and are integrated in
the Quezon City Comprehensive Land Use Plan 2011-2025.

The other major activities involved formulating land use policies and codify-
ing existing relevant national laws, identifying new needed policies and drafting
the revised zoning ordinance.

Chapter 2: THE CDP REVISION PROCESS

Figure 2.1 Local Planning Cycle

13
QUEZON CITY

2.3 Revising the Comprehensive ...continued (Social Development Committee)


Barangay /
Development Plan Committee Member
Organization
EDUARDO M. FIRMALINO Ramon Magsaysay
ERNESTO BERNANDINO Salvacion
2.3.1 Constituting the City Devel- LAMBERTO L. PASCUAL San Bartolome
opment Council ERNESTO R. BERROYA San Antonio
TELESFORO A. MORTEGA San Roque
CARLOS D. APO Sauyo
After the election of the new set of LARRY L. HANDAYAN South Triangle
RIZALDY C. NEPOMOCENO Sto. Cristo
local and barangay officials in 2016, SERGIO GONZALVO Sto. Nino
the Quezon City has its newly- ISABELITA GRAVIDES (C)
ROBERTO FORTUNO
U.P. Campus
Vasra
reconstituted City Development Coun- MA. TITA G. FERRER West Kamias
JOSEPHINE L. VELASCO 4Ks Task Force Solo Assn , Inc.
cil which undertook the revision of the EMMA J. BARJA (VC) Advocates for Human Power
Comprehensive Development Plan & Comm. Devt.
(CDP) and the Local Development In- BONJERICO L. UNTALASCO
Alyansa ng mga Kabataan para
sa Demokrasya at Kaunlaran
vestment Program (LDIP). The City has Caucus of Persons with Disa-
ALEXANDER L. MENDOZA
also engaged the services of the author bility Phil., Inc.
Damayan Ladies Association,
of the Rationalized Planning System MA. TERESA G. MARGALLO
District I, Area IV, QC, Inc.,
himself, Prof. Ernesto M. Serote of the ARLENE ANITA A. REYES
Felipe St., Neighborhood Assn.,
Inc.
UP School of Urban and Regional Plan- Konpederasyon ng mga Sama-
MARIETTA C. NACIONAL
ning as in-house consultant to facilitate han sa NGC East Side
Pagkakaisa at Gabay ng Sama-
the conduct of various workshops and TERESITA B. MONERA
han HOA
writeshops required for the prepara- MARILYN P. MALUPING
Samahan ng Magkakapitbahay
sa Abbey Rd.,
tion of the local development plans. Samahang Pinagbuklod ng 99
SIGFREDO A. NOVILA
A Sauyo Rd.,
The CDC is comprised of 201mem- EDEN B. RUIZ
Senior Citizens Association of
Vasra
bers from the five sectors. Unified Senior Citizens Asso.
ROMEO F. ALVAREZ
of D-3, QC, Inc.
Composition per sector and per
category 2. Economic Development Committee
1. Social Development Committee Barangay /
Committee Member
Barangay / Organization
Committee Member
Organization LEONARDO FLORES III Alicia
ELIZABETH DE JESUS Apolonio Samson LILIBETH T. MARCELINO Balon Bato
CRISELL BELTRAN Bagong Silangan JOHN M. ABAD Batasan Hills
RODOLFO PALMA Bagong Pagasa ABRIEL C. LEGASPI Blue Ridge A
ELMER C. MATURAN Bagumbayan RICARDO CORPUZ Bungad
Chapter 2: THE CDP REVISION PROCESS

TERESA V. MONTALBO Balingasa GUALBERTO B. CASAJE Damayan


MA. VICTORINA V. PADOLINA Quirino 3-A CORNELIO G. PABUSTAN Del Monte
CHRISTIAN A. CANDO Capri ROBIN C. PORLAJE Kalusugan
VICTOR D. BERNARDO Culiat ARMANDO LAZO Kristong Hari
RENATO TANYAG Damayang Lagi LENY LETICIA P. GLIVANO Libis
DANILO VILLANUEVA Escopa III MARY CATHERINE SIOSON- Lourdes
RONALD M. TAGUBA Escopa IV LETICIA Q. LIM Maharlika
CAESAR MARQUEZ Loyola Heights RAMON G. VELOSO Masambong
JULIET L. GINETE Masagana ALLAN P. FRANZA Matandang Balara
RANDY S. SERRANO Nayong Kanluran ALEJANDRO H. CUIZON Milagrosa
REYNALDO B. EBRON New Era ASUNCION VISAYA Novaliches Proper
OFELIA M. PONCE Pag-ibig sa Nayon VON ROMMEL YALONG NS Amoranto
EDGARDO A. PARAGUA JR. Paltok JULIETA B. PENA Payatas
DOMINIC P. FLORES Pansol CELSO DE VEAS Quirino 2B
EMMANUEL A. PILAR Pasong Tamo ORLANDO PAOLO CASIMIRO- Roxas
AUGUST F. DIAZ Quirino 2-C JOHN M. REYNO San Isidro Galas
NOEL R. AGDEPPA Quirino 2-A DANTE S. CAGUIOA San Jose

14
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

...continued (Economic Development Committee) ...continued (Environment Development Committee)


Barangay / Barangay /
Committee Member Committee Member
Organization Organization
MELECIO C. ADVINCULA San Martin de Porres CARLITO C. SAMALA Greater Heights Christian
EMMA C. DE JESUS Siena Worship Center
JOSE DE GUZMAN Socorro HENRY ASISTIN Kapatirang Bayan Bagong
Pilipino Foundation, Inc.
GERONIMO HECTOR Tandang Sora Order of Triskelion, QCH
RODEL LOBO Tatalon RIZZA JOY E. LAUREA Chapter, Inc
ZARINA YASMINE XENELLE Ugong Norte ROTC Hunters Neighbor-
EVELYN S. GALANG hood Asso.
JORGE
VIRGILIO FERRER U.P. Village JOSEBEL A. PERALTA Samahan ng Nagkakaisang-
Kapitbahay ng Manresa, Inc.
JOSE ARNEL L. QUEBAL Barangay Fairview TODA, Inc. ELVERA ALLADO Samcao Block 2 Homeown-
ers Asso.
AMELITA R. IBANEZ Batasan Women’s League, SHERLITA FLORES Upper Everlasting Block 2
Angel’s Chapter
EMMANUEL SOLIDUM BF Homes, QC Homeowners’
Community Asso. 4. Land Use and Infra
MIRANDA VERDADERO Kapit-bisig QC Vendors Asso. Development Committee
Inc.
BRIAN JAMES LU National Economic Protec- Barangay /
Committee Member
tionist Association, Inc. Organization
CARLOS A. NATAVIO People’s Consultative Council, RICHARD V. AMBITA Bagbag
DENNIS CABOBOY Bahay Toro
PATRICIA P. CABASAL Samahan ng mga Kababaihan
RONALD N. TAGLE Claro
sa Area 9 Veterans Village
ESTER GUTIERREZ Damar
Pasong Tamo, Inc.
OSCAR Q. CONCEPCION Dioquino Zobel
RICARDO I. LOPEZ Senior Citizen Federation of ANTONIO CALMA Don Manuel
District II, QC, Inc. ANDRES NARCISO Dona Josefa
PATRICIO P. ACHAS Welfare for the Community MARVIN C. MORALES Escopa
Foundation Inc., RENATO U. GALIMBA IGreater Lagro
MERLY CHRISTINA BARLAAN Women’s Federation for FRANCISCO AGUILAR Horseshoe
World Peace, Phil., Inc. RAMON SALAS © Immaculate Concepcion-
ALFREDO S. ROXAS Kaligayahan
3. Environment Development Committee JULIOUS C. SECILLANO
JULIAN SANTOS
Katipunan
Krus na Ligas
Barangay / JOSE MARIA RODRIGUEZ Laging Handa
Committee Member
Organization CICERON M. ADA Manresa
ARSENIO DE GUZMAN Amihan REGINA CELESTE C. SAN MIGUEL Mariana
RAULITO R. DATILES Bagumbuhay FELICIANO F. DELA CRUZ Nagkaisang Nayon
EDGARDO F. PANGILINAN Bayanihan MANUEL A. CHUA North Fairview
ARTURO S. DIMAYUGA Blue Ridge B EVANGELINE F. DUNGCA Pasong Putik Proper
MANUEL CO Commonwealth VINCENT T. SAAB Pinagkaisahan
CARLO S. DE MESA Duyan-Duyan ALBERTO FLORES Sacred Heart
MARCIANO R. BUENA-AGUA JR. E. Rodriguez JOSELITO SAHAGUN San Isidro Labrador
DOMINADOR SOLIVEN, JR. East Kamias RAMONCITO M. MEDINA Santol
FERNANDITO M. ORTIZ Escopa II ANNABELLA CURACHO Sikatuna Village
ARTICER QUEBAL Fairview RENALDO R. BAENA St. Peter
REY ALDRIN TOLENTINO Gulod ERNESTO B. BAETIONG Sta. Cruz
FERNANDO P. ASIA, JR. Malaya NELSON C. ALCANTARA Sta. Monica
NENITA C. VALDEZ Mariblo RICHARD N. YU Sto. Domingo
Chapter 2: THE CDP REVISION PROCESS

WILLIAM MANUGAR S. CHUA Paang Bundok CECILIA M. CONCEPCION Tagumpay


RYAN NAVERO Paraiso LUZ P. SAVILLA Alyansa ng Maralita sa
SIMPLICIO EJ HERMOGENES Phil-Am Nova , Inc.
JESUS LIPNICA Pinyahan JOSEPHINE B. CUSTODIO (VC) Arlegui HOA, Inc.
VICENTE HONORIO C. LLAMAS V Project 6 HUBERT M. RAYMUNDO Brgy. Pinyahan Sr. Citizens
EDWIN S. TANSINGCO St. Ignatius Asso. Inc.
VIRGINIA C. ONGTAUCO Talayan VICENTE R. PUERTA Construction Industry
URSULA JUAN Talipapa Workers Council, Inc.
ANNA MILLONADO Valencia HERMINIGILDO P. AVILES Kapatiran Kaularan HOA
CLARITO C. DE JESUS Veterans Village
ROMEO ESCOBER Magkakasama HOA Inc.
REYNALDO B. RIVERA Villa Maria Clara
NOEL V. LOPEZ West Triangle RENATO N. ROBEL NFA Multi-Purpose Coop
TERESITA P. IGUICO White Plains JOY D. RENDON Samahan ng Magkakapitba-
VIRGINIA S. MALINAO Botanical Community hay ng No. 4 Katipunan, Inc.
Organization MA. THERESA M. NATOR United Tribu Block I HOA
EUGENIO N. KATIGBAK CBE Town Senior Citizens ZACARIAS P. ASUNCION Urban Poor Alliance of Bgy
Asso., Inc. Nagkaisang Nayon

15
QUEZON CITY

5. Institutional Development Committee


Barangay / Barangay /
Committee Member Committee Member
Organization Organization
EDUARDO JUAN Baesa LOLITA SINGSON Teachers Village East
JOSE ANTONIO C. Bagong Lipunan ng Crame
FEDERICO JONG Teachers Village West
TALAMAYAN, JR.
ORLANDO G. MAMONONG Unang Sigaw
BENJAMIN EREDIANO Botocan
GREGORIO TOLENTINO Camp Aguinaldo RHODORA A. BOHOL Brgy. Paligsahan Sr. Citi-
ROSA D. MAGPAYO Central zens Association, Inc.
ZANDY A. ZACATE Dona Aurora RACHEL MARTIN Council for the Restoration
CONCEPCION MALANGEN Dona Imelda of Filipino Values
FELICITO VALMOCINA Holy Spirit
SOLITA T. ANDA Jubilee East Ville HOA, Inc.
JAYSON G. ENCOMIENDA Kamuning
MA. TERESA ATENTAR Kaunlaran JOVEN EVANGELISTA Legal na Ayuda para sa
CESAR DELA R. FUENTE, JR. Mangga mga Inaapi at Dukha, Inc.
RAUL ADDATU Marilag MARISSA A. CANEGA New Sunshine HOA
JOSE SEGUNDO Obrero
MAURICIO C. GUTIERREZ Old Capitol Site MARY ANN GATBONTON Nutrition Foundation of
LEOPOLDO A. TIAMSON- Paligsahan the Phil.
RAMIRO OSORIO San Agustin ROLANDO P. MONTIEL People’s Movement for
KRISTHINE DEL G. San Vicente Democratic Governance,
ADRANEDA-ADVINCULA Inc.
ROLANDO QUITORIO Sangandaan HARRY D. FRANCISCO (VC) Rising Sun II HOA
REYNALDO NITRO Silangan
WILLIAM R. BAWAG Sta. Lucia REYNANTE P. CUNANAN Samahang Makatao at
LORENZO REYES V Sta. Teresita Makatarungang Paninira-
han sa NGC Inc.

and Natural Resources, Institutional


The City Development Council of was presented. Discussed too were the
Quezon City, was convened for an composition of the sectoral commit-
Orientation Program on March 29, tees and the respective core concerns
2017. The orientation centered on of each sector.
the local planning structure and its
respective functions. The important Also, selected members of the CDC
role of CDC and sectoral committees (10) and personnel (14) of the City
in local development was also em- Planning and Development Office par-
phasized. ticipated in the QC Executives and Leg-
islators Planning Course (QC EXCEL), a
The composition of the local program aimed at capacitating key
planning body, which comprises of
Chapter 2: THE CDP REVISION PROCESS

players in meaningful and effective


the CDC in plenary, Executive Com- planning strategies facilitated by the
mittee, Secretariat, and sectoral or University of the Philippines School of
functional committees: Social, Eco- Urban and Regional Planning (UP
nomic, Infrastructure, Environment SURP) between March 23-June 2, 2017.

16
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Fig. 2.2 Sectoral Development Planning Process

2.3.2 Revisiting the QC text. In a plenary discussion, the body


Development Vision assessed if the three roles, based on
perceptions of actual and potential ad-
The local development planning vantages of the city are still relevant. It
process starts with the setting of vision resulted in the adoption of the current
as indicated in Figure 2.2. As such, a roles with a revision only of the last
review of the vision statement for Que- role, which was expanded to Asia and
zon City was done through an inter- the Pacific.
sectoral workshop, held in April 2017, (1) As the green lung of Metro Manila,
Chapter 2: THE CDP REVISION PROCESS

which proceeded with the discussion (2) As the knowledge industry capital
of two components of the vision. of the country, and
(3) As health and wellness center in
a) Vision’s Outward-looking com- Asia-Pacific.
ponents
For each of the three roles, break
The process involved getting a con- up groups evaluated the current suc-
sensus on the desired role or roles of cess indicators and brainstormed on
Quezon City in the wider regional con- their current levels of attainment.

17
QUEZON CITY

b) Vision’s Inward-looking com- 4) A well-linked, balanced and at-


ponents tractive cityscape
5) A dynamic, sound and participa-
These inward-looking components tive governance.
characterized Quezon City as a desira-
ble human habitat from the perspec- Chapter 3 discusses in detail the re-
tive of the five sectors – social, eco- sults of the vision revisiting workshop.
nomic, environment and natural re-
sources management, land use/ 2.3.3 Tracking Sectoral Progress
infrastructure and institutional devel- and Sectoral Planning
opment.
The CDP formulation process bene-
Each sector retained the set of de- fits from the wealth of data gathered
scriptors i.e. words and phrases with and analyzed for the Ecological Profile,
which to indicate the desired qualities the statistical compendium, maps, and
of the future city population, the local other data outputs. The intra- and inter
economy, the natural and built envi- -area and inter-sectoral analyses sur-
ronment, and the local leadership. The- faced the various sectoral issues and
se descriptors still formed part of the concerns, their implications and their
revised vision statement. Furthermore, possible solutions. Given these sectoral
the sectors reviewed each descriptor’s concerns and plans, the CDP revision
set of success indicators that will make proceeded with tracking of each sec-
it easy to measure the current level of tor’s progress to be inputted for sec-
attainment and at any point in the fu- toral planning. The planning body in-
ture. The success indicators were stat- cluding the CDC, Executive Committee
ed in the superlative degree so that and Secretariat and sectoral commit-
when matched with the current devel- tees conducted the following work-
opment indicators as embodied in the shops between April to May 2017.
LDI Table, the difference or gap can be
easily determined. This perceived gap a) Vision-Reality Gap Analysis
became the basis for formulating sec-
toral goals, objectives and targets The success indicators are com-
pared with the indicators of current
Chapter 2: THE CDP REVISION PROCESS

As such, in order to attain a high state of development which yielded


Quality Community the city must information on the difference or gap
have: between the vision and current reality.
Each sector went into workshop using
1) A healthy, educated and secure
citizenry; the Vision-Reality Gap analysis frame-
work and the latest sectoral data from
2) A local economy that is diverse, the Ecological Profile to indicate the
strong and vibrant; current reality.
3) A clean, green and resilient envi- For each of the sector’s three de-
ronment scriptors, the success indicators were

18
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

analyzed by looking into the current Statistical


reality, gap, explanation for the gap, Compendi- Observed
Explana-
implications for the unfilled gap, and conditions tions
the recommended policy options. The Map
vision-reality gap results matrix served Overlay
as the basis for the formulation of sec-
toral objectives and targets.

b) Problem-Solution Matrix Implica- Policy


tions op-
Additional analysis was done using
the Problem-Solution Matrix frame- Figure 2.3 Analytical Logic for Planning and Policy-Making
work. Within each sectoral group, the
corresponding LDI Table was analyzed c) Identifying Cross-Sectoral De-
to determine which of the suggested velopment Challenges and Opportu-
indicators are useful to the sector. The nities
indicators that are deemed not useful
were deleted while the success indica- Development challenges are issues
tors generated as part of the vision and that appear on their face value as
any new indicators suggested in the QC problems and constraints to the devel-
EXCEL lectures were added. opment of Quezon City. However, such
perceived problem situations can be
The other indicators that are not turned around into opportunities for
used in the Vision-Reality Gap analysis promoting the general welfare of the
were analyzed through a four-step pro- inhabitants. This poses the supreme
cess as follows: challenge for the effective governance
1. Make observations. of the city. Part of the plan revision
2. For each observation, ask for process was to update and identify
explanations. these challenges and opportunities. A
3. Imagine the implications of the cross-sectoral analysis workshop was
observed condition if nothing is done held on May 30, 2017. The objectives
to change it. of the workshop included:
4. Suggest policy options to change 1. To identify development issues
Chapter 2: THE CDP REVISION PROCESS

the observed condition for the better. and concerns that are cross-sectoral in
character
Finally, using these data, a report 2. To analyze such multi-
was prepared on the performance of dimensional issues and concerns from
each sector at how much closer the different perspectives
sector has gone toward achieving its 3. To come to a consensus on for-
goals. Figure 2.3 presents the analyti- mulating policy interventions for these
cal framework for planning and policy- development issues and concerns.
making.

19
QUEZON CITY

Two sectors were grouped togeth-  Proceed with analysis using the
er at a time. The pairing scheme, illus- PSM framework.
trated in Figure 2.4, generated ten
 Representatives of the CPDO shall
workshop pairs:
make available data from the up-
1. Social and Economic dated Ecological Profile in case
2. Environment and Institutional validation is needed.
3. Social and Environment  After the group discussion, the
4. Institutional and Infrastructure recorder/documenter assigned to
5. Economic and Institutional each pair/group shall finalize the
6. Environment and Infrastructure outputs.
7. Economic and Infrastructure  A reporter assigned to each pair/
group shall present the outputs in
8. Social and Institutional
plenary.

Chapter 4 discusses the develop-


ment challenges and opportunities dis-
cussed during the Cross-Sectoral work-
shops.

d.) Processing Proposed Policy


Interventions

A next step in the CDP revision pro-


cess involved transforming sectoral
goals into actions or solutions. With
the analysis workshops, sectotral goals
Figure 2.4 Cross Sectoral Workshop Pairing
were elaborated and proposed inter-
ventions were identified. The actions
9. Social and Infrastructure or solutions are finally classified into
10.Economic and Environment any of the three implementable forms,
Chapter 2: THE CDP REVISION PROCESS

namely:
In each pair/group the following
were done: a) Programs and projects which
serve as inputs to the LDIP/AIP or
 Show the pre-identified common forwarded for possible funding by
concerns. the national government or by the
 Review the PSM of each sector private sector.
and identify additional concerns b) Non-projects or services which
common to both sectors.
are taken into consideration in the

20
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

 Screening out of obviously im-


allocation of the MOOE of specific
practical or undesirable projects,
departments or offices or else in
crafting the institutional capacity  “Parking” of projects that are
building program. more appropriately taken up by
other levels of government or the
c) New legislations which support private sector.
the implementation of the plan  Application of the “Project/
through regulation of certain unde- Resource Impact Matrix” to short-
sirable actions or encouragement list sector projects
of desirable ones. These are taken
up by the Sangguniang Panglunsod Programs and projects necessary to
to form part of their legislative realize the objectives and achieve the
agenda. targets of the sectors and subsectors
are identified. In generating the sec-
From the policy interventions iden- toral programs and projects, distinc-
tified in the VRG Analysis, PSM Analy- tion is made as to what agency, level of
sis and Cross-Sectoral Workshops, an- political jurisdiction, private sector or
other workshop held on June 22, 2017 non-government organizations are
proceeded with the following steps: responsible in implementing them.

 Sifting of projects from non- This is important in that it allows


projects the LGU to identify those projects for
which it is solely responsible (Refer to
 Classification of projects by ad-
Sec. 17, RA 7160). These types of pro-
ministrative ownership or respon-
jects are the inputs to the local devel-
sibility
opment investment program (LDIP).
 Processing of non-projects for For other projects that are not under
possible upgrading into projects the responsibility of the LGU but which
 Screening of the needed legisla- are deemed essential to local develop-
tion through the legislative clear- ment, the LGU can apply various forms
inghouse of persuasion and/or pressure so that
Chapter 2: THE CDP REVISION PROCESS

the concerned agencies will implement


With the programs and projects them at the right time and in the de-
identified as owned by the city, the fol- sired locations.
lowing steps were done:
Each workshop generated a final list
 Conduct of initial screening and of sectoral projects, of which the level
prepare inputs to the LDIP of urgency was determined through a
 Consolidation of redundant or re- 6-point rating scale.
petitive projects

21
QUEZON CITY

Table 2.1 Project Rating’s Categories


of Urgency The proposed interventions includ-
ed sectoral policies and programs
RATING/ which cannot fully be implemented by
CATEGORIES CRITERIA
means of development projects alone.
OF URGENCY
These may require enactment by the
 Cannot be reasonably be Sanggunian Panglunsod of regulatory
postponed
1 – URGENT  Would remedy conditions measures or by the provision of certain
[Agarang dangerous to public health, incentives to attract private invest-
Kailangan/ Hindi safety & welfare
maaring  Needed to maintain critical- ments. These needed new legislations
ipagpapaliban]
ly needed programs are also presented in the sectoral
 Needed to meet emergency
situations plans.

 Required to complete or As a result of the sectoral project


make usable a major public prioritization, a long list of policy op-
improvement tions was prepared with correspond-

2–ESSENTIAL Required to maintain mini-
mum standards as part of on ing brief project description. This was
[Kinakailangan] -going programs subjected to plenary project ranking
 Desirable self-liquidating
projects and prioritization during the CDC Reg-
 External funding is available ular Meeting held on July 20, 2017.
The short list of 44 priority projects
 Should be carried out to was then approved and adopted for
meet clearly identified and inclusion in the Local Development
3–NECESSARY anticipated needs
[Mahalagang  Needed to replace obsolete Investment Program 2017-2020 dur-
Magkaroon] or unsatisfactory facilities ing the said meeting through Resolu-
 Repair or maintenance pro-
jects to prolong life of exist- tion 001-Series of 2017.
ing facilities
For each project that is classified as
 Needed for expansion of
existing projects urgent, the proponents were asked to
4 – DESIRABLE
 Designed to initiate new
[Kanais-nais na programs considered appro-
prepare a project brief. The CDP being
Magkaroon priate for a progressive an action plan, it should yield consider-
community able amount of project ideas. Project
 Nice to have, but can be post- ideas are then translated into project
5–
ACCEPTABLE poned without detriment to pre- briefs of not more than one page each,
sent operations if budget cuts are
Chapter 2: THE CDP REVISION PROCESS

[Katanggap- containing among others, details that


necessary
tanggap pero briefly describe the project such as:
maaring
ipagpaliban]
 the name and type of project
(generally, “soft” or “hard”) and
 Recommended for postpone- the proponent or originator of the
6– ment or elimination from immedi- project idea
DEFERRABLE ate consideration in the current
[Maaring LDIP  activity components
ipagpaliban]  Questionable in terms of over-all  estimated cost or resource inputs
needs, adequate planning or
proper timing.  the justification for the project
(derived from the CLUP or CDP)

22
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

 the intended beneficiaries ticularly from the sectors of society


(population sectors or geograph- that were not properly represented in
ical areas) various aspects and stages of the plan-
 target outputs or success indica- ning process. Projects are screened
tors and evaluated on the basis of their po-
 anticipated risks tential contribution to the realization
 expected private sector response of the long-term goals and, in the case
to take advantage of the effects of of land-based projects, their consisten-
the project cy with the preferred spatial strategy
or urban form. Cost estimates are then
The project briefs are collected and made for each project.
processed as inputs in the preparation
of the Local Development Investment b) Financial Analysis and Projection
Program (LDIP). (Stream II)

2.4 Formulating the Local Develop- The financial performance of the


ment Investment Program LGU for the past several years is ana-
lyzed. Then, on the basis of past trends,
This process provides opportunities the funds that are likely to become
for inter-sectoral integration. There available from regular and recurrent
are three streams of activities: prepar- sources are projected for each year of
ing the final project list, financial anal- the programming period. The funds
ysis and projection, and matching the available for public investments are
results to decide on the proper ap- those funds not earmarked for person-
proach to fiscal programming and al services, office maintenance and op-
management. Participants in the LDIP erations, debt servicing, mandatory
workshop are some members of the reserves and other statutory obliga-
City Development Council, all depart- tions
ment heads, and the expanded Local
c) Fiscal Management (Stream III)
Finance Committee (with the addition
of the City Assessor, the Sangguniang
The projected total funds available
Panlungsod Appropriations Committee
for investment is matched with the
Chapter 2: THE CDP REVISION PROCESS

Chair, and the City Accountant).


total funds required to implement the
The LDIP procedural flow is de- projects in the final list. If the funding
scribed briefly below. requirements exceed the available
a) Preparing the Final Project List funds, the LDC or the Sanggunian may
(Stream I) adopt any or a combination of the fol-
lowing options:
The final list of projects to be imple-
mented is lifted from the CLUP and i. Trim down the final list further
until the cumulative total cost
CDP. However, opportunities are still
matches with the available funds.
open for additional project ideas par-
23
QUEZON CITY

ii. Retain the project list and program the augmentation of the projected funds
by:
 Intensifying collection of revenue sources where the current collection effi-
ciency is low, and/or;
 Tightening the belt on non-essential expenditures;
 Enacting new revenue measures such as utilizing the special levies on pri-
vate property, e.g. idle lands tax, special benefit assessment, and the like, or
taxing new subjects and activities within the prescribed powers of the LGU.
iii. Contract for loans and other forms of indebtedness as authorized in the Local
Government Code. 

Table 2.2 : CDC Activities for CDP Revision

Schedule Activity No. of Participants


Participation of selected CDC Members, Heads/
March 23- Representatives of Departments/Offices, City Counci- 10 CDC
June 2, 2017 lors, and CPDO personnel in QC Executive and Legisla- 14 CPD0
tors Planning Course (QC EXCEL)
Orientation Program for the Newly Constituted City
March 29, 2017 CDC -85
Development Council
April 10, 2017 CDC Preliminary Workshop CDC - 49
April 11, 2017 CDC Preliminary Workshop CDC -29
Social Sector - 26
CDP Revision:
Economic Sector - 14
April 19, 2017 Environment Sector – 22
Plenary Goal Formulation Workshop
Infrastructure Sector - 19
Sectoral VRG and PSM Analysis Workshop
Institutional Sector - 10
May10-16 Sectoral Analysis Workshops
Social Sector - 20
Economic Sector - 13
Environment Sector – 18
May 30, 2017 Cross-Sectoral Analysis Workshop Infrastructure Sector - 7
Chapter 2: THE CDP REVISION PROCESS

Institutional Sector – 13
Department Representa-
tives- 5
June 19, 2017 Sifting of Projects CDC

June 22, 2017 Sectoral Project Prioritization CDC

July 20, 2017 Regular CDC Meeting and Project Ranking Workshop CDC

July 20, 2017 CDC Regular Meeting – Approval of the CDP CDC

24
DEVELOPMENT VISION AND
SECTORAL GOALS OF QUEZON CITY
COMPREHENSICE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Quezon City is unique and incom-  The Green Lung of Metro Ma-
parable in many ways. Gifted with the nila
biggest land area among the cities in
 The Knowledge Industry Capi-
Metro Manila, it holds the greatest po-
tal of the Country
tential for more diverse and well-
planned urban development. It has  The Health and Wellness Center
also the widest expanse of parks and in Asia-Pacific
open spaces that provides a natural The inhabitants of Quezon City like-
setting in an urban environment. wise perceive their city as a high Qual-
ity Community for living, working and
The city is likewise home to major playing. They dream of their city as
hospitals and medical centers, all the affording them a high quality of living,
media and entertainment networks, a more prosperous economy, a safer
top-ranked institutions of higher learn- and more livable cityscape that in-
ing, and key national government spires a good sense of place and civic
agencies and offices. pride, and a well-governed constituen-
cy.
Quezon City has now the fastest Quezon City is envisioned to be a
growing ICT industry being the loca- high Quality Community, a highly de-
tion of choice of business process out- sirable place ever blessed with –
sourcing firms. The City’s population  A healthy, educated and secure

Chapter 3: DEVELOPMENT VISION AND SECTORAL GOALS OF QUEZON CITY


is generally young, educated and em- citizenry
ployable and is the biggest market base  A strong, diverse and vibrant
in the country. A World Bank study economy
noted that “the center of gravity of all  A well-linked, balanced and at-
commercial activities in the coming tractive cityscape
years” is in Quezon City.  A clean, green and resilient envi-
ronment
Given its many assets and compar-  A dynamic, sound and participa-
tive governance
ative advantages, therefore, Quezon
City is poised to play a major role in
future developments beyond its bor- 3.1 Quezon City Roles Beyond Its
ders. A series of workshops conducted Borders
in April 2017 among the members of From its very inception Quezon City
the duly-constituted City Development has been outward looking. Being one-
Council reviewed, validated and identi- time the nation’s capital its very design
fied the following outward-looking vi- and layout, its initial infrastructures
sion: and investments were oriented to

25
QUEZON CITY

serving a much wider constituency Veterans Memorial Medical Center and


than its local inhabitants. Therefore, it the privately-owned Capitol Hills Golf
cannot afford to exist entirely for itself and Country Club and the QC Sports
even after the national capital has been Club. Other linear parks of regional
expanded into the entire Metro Manila, importance include easements of pow-
hence, the National Capital Region er transmission lines, center islands
(NCR). As a city oriented to the outside and tree-lined boulevards and side-
world therefore, Quezon City does, or walks provided with planting strips all
intends to project an ever widening with an aggregate area of 57 hectares.
spiral of influence first to its immedi- Add to these the aqueduct right-of-way
ate regional context – Metro Manila; with a total area of 65 hectares. These
then to the country as a whole; and patches of greenery in a vast metropo-
finally, to the growth continent of the lis provide a breathing space for the
21st century – Asia and the Pacific. burgeoning population. These also
provide refuge to various wildlife that
maintain a normal level of biological
3.1.1 The Green Lung of the Me- diversity despite the constant threat of
tropolis creeping urbanization.

This is the unique role of Quezon Between 2009 and 2016, the follow-
City being endowed with the most ex- ing conditions and development were
tensive expanse of open space and noted in relation to this component.
greenery in Mega Manila. In relative
 Quezon City still has the largest
Chapter 3: DEVELOPMENT VISION AND SECTORAL GOALS OF QUEZON CITY

terms, open space takes up about one-


fifth of the total land area of the city. share of greenery to total land area,
Considering that the city accounts for hence this role of the city is partly
one-fourth of the metropolitan land attained. However, a decrease in the
area its share of open space even in total area for open space from
absolute hectarage is unmatched by 3,265.87 hectares (has) in 2009 to
any other city. Contributing to this 3,186.23 has in 2013 was observed.
green lung of the metropolis are large  The La Mesa Watershed, as the last
parks which include the 2,570-hectare remaining forest in Metro Manila, is
La Mesa Reservoir and its watershed composed of variety of ecosystems
and the Quezon Memorial Circle and and habitat to more than 170 spe-
the Ninoy Aquino Parks and Wildlife cies of Philippine flora and fauna. To
nature center with a combined area of date, 72 endemic tree species have
over 42 hectares. In addition, Quezon been planted by a total of 20,000
City is host to huge university campus- volunteers in 1,344 has. of the wa-
es such as those of the University of the tershed. The 30-hectare La Mesa
Philippines Diliman, Ateneo de Manila Ecopark Resort’s amenities include
University and Miriam College and rec- an Orchidarium, Butterfly Garden,
reational greens of major institutions Hanging Bridge, picnic area and eco-
such as Camp Aguinaldo, Camp Crame, trails.

26
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

over by residential use, particularly


 The Quezon Memorial Circle is one
by informal settler families (ISFs),
of the most visited parks in the city lack of fresher concepts in parks
with a recorded number of and lack of ample accessibility
1,105,118 visitors from 2006 – mechanisms in the parks and open
2008. The proliferation of an in- spaces especially for the elderly and
creasing number of commercial people with disabilities.
spaces, if continued and unregulated  The city has partially fulfilled the
will undermine the function of the role to take the lead in the number
park and open space. There is no of green legislations enacted and
clear mechanism for encouraging implemented as the current admin-
and recording the number of visi- istration has been a pioneer and
tors from different cities. progressive advocate of solutions
for environmental issues, and cli-
 The Ninoy Aquino Parks and Wild- mate change adaptation and sus-
life Nature Center is the only zoolog- tainable solutions. Moreover, it has
ical and botanical garden located at enacted several laws on environ-
the southwest of the QMC which ment protection such as the Envi-
houses 38 species of trees and ronmental Protection and Waste
shrubs in 2009 represented by Management Code of Quezon City in
2,443 trees commonly found in Phil- 2014. It is the first city in the entire
ippine forests and has kept various country to implement a Green
species of endemic and endangered Building Ordinance. The city has
birds, mammals, reptiles and am- adopted various good green practic-

Chapter 3: DEVELOPMENT VISION AND SECTORAL GOALS OF QUEZON CITY


phibians in the open-air Mini-zoo es such as: the establishment of ma-
and Wildlife Rescue Center. It fur- terials recovery facility (MRF)
ther serves as venue for public edu- where collected garbage are sorted
cation, and training and research properly; an effective information
facility for future veterinarians and campaign on the practice of 3Rs or
biologists. It also includes other Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle; and, a
amenities like cottages available for green public transport system has
conferences, meetings, seminars, been initiated
children’s playground, visitor’s cen-
ter, a man-made lagoon for fishing, a For Quezon City to maintain this
rock garden and a craft village. role in the metropolis in the long term,
it shall see to it that:
 The city also faces some challenges
in the continued maintenance, de- a)it accounts for the largest share of
velopment and access of these na- greenery to total land area and main-
ture parks and center. Opportunities tains the most extensive proportion of
for other green areas are limited open space and greenery with the con-
and the existing green spaces are sideration that: the 25% open space
invaded by concrete surfaces; natu- and greenery will be retained with an
ral drainage corridors are taken increment of 1`% - 5% annually; some

27
QUEZON CITY

5% will be allocated to businesses and the city has now attained in the infor-
vendors; and, convert portions for mation and communication technology
amusement areas and wellness or fel- (ICT) industry. Moreover, Quezon City
lowship programs for citizens of the is home to all national television and
city and the metropolis. movie production outfits and universi-
b) its well-tended parks are patron- ty-based facilities for visual and per-
ized by the metropolitan population forming arts. But more than the pas-
through a clear public information sive role of providing sites and venues
campaign; development of these areas for the production and application of
as eco-tourism areas; and budget allo- knowledge, Quezon City intends to be
cation for the maintenance and devel- actively engaged in the promotion, en-
opment of these nature parks and cen-
hancement and preservation of the
ters.
sciences and the arts.
c) it encourages relevant research
and development activities and plan- From the time this vision was craft-
ning projects that will preserve the ed, the following conditions and devel-
open spaces and greenery in the cam- opment were observed in relation to
puses and major public and private the second component, which reflect
institutions. something to be desired in fulfillment
d) it explores renewable energy of such vision:
sources in the university campuses and  While the City hosts top ranked
major institutions with big reserves of universities and other institutions
Chapter 3: DEVELOPMENT VISION AND SECTORAL GOALS OF QUEZON CITY

recreational greens that the City hosts. of higher learning, it lacks program
it develops linear parks/open spaces in
to recruit other top ranked univer-
all barangays, in areas cleared by the
Pasig River Rehabilitation, and in the sities and the city university, Que-
Payatas Dumpsite. zon City Polytechnic University
(QCPU) would benefit from more
e) it continues to keep the lead in
government support.
the number of green legislation enact-
ed and implemented.  QC is the leading LGU in terms of
land area occupied (260.3 has.) for
3.1.2 The Country’s Knowledge
ICTs. It is however next to Makati
Industry Capital City in terms on the number of ICT
companies (52 in QC, 64 in Makati
Quezon City’s claim to this role is
City). If this is not aggressively sus-
boosted by the presence of top ranked tained and expanded through vari-
universities and other institutions of ous programs to attract investors,
higher learning. It has been cited also other cities like Makati and Taguig
as among the top 50 emerging global might overtake the role of Quezon
outsourcing cities, a definite advantage City as among the emerging global

28
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Asian Ministers of Education Organiza-


outsourcing cities.
tion (SEAMEO) Regional Center for
 The City is still home to all national Educational Innovation and Technolo-
television and movie production gy (INNOTECH) are some of the exist-
outfits and university-based facili- ing research institutes. There is how-
ties for visual and performing arts. ever much to be desired in the provi-
Aggressive feedbacking and con- sion/program to relocate research in-
sultation mechanism will be help- stitutes in QC and collaborative works
ful to prevent relocation and to with these already existing facilities.
sustain these facilities’ stay in Que-
 City-funded scholarship grants for
zon City.
post-graduate studies available for
 There is lack of LGU attention as competition among qualified candi-
evidenced by lack of major pro- dates nationwide
gram launched and budget for a
zoned knowledge industry precinct City-funded post-graduate studies
to house the community of re- grants are not yet offered city-wide,
searchers and innovators and to much more nationwide. These require
showcase new products and pro- high educational requirements and
cesses. standards. Such is being overtaken by
challenges of unemployment, lack of
As identified in 2009, indicators employment opportunities and lack of
that Quezon City is truly performing its establishments for job creation.
role as the knowledge industry capital

Chapter 3: DEVELOPMENT VISION AND SECTORAL GOALS OF QUEZON CITY


of the country include that the follow-  Museums, art galleries, libraries and
ing facilities, events and programs are theaters for the performing arts put
a regular fare in the city. This section up by the city independently of the
reviews what have been achieved in universities’ own
recent years and what more can be In November 2015, the Quezon City
done to fulfill these indicators. Experience (QCX) an interactive "social
history museum” that allows visitors
 Research institutes in various fields
to learn more about the history and
of knowledge established
culture of the sprawling city opened at
the Quezon Memorial Circle. Govern-
With the City’s booming ICT indus- ment and private sector participation
try, 14 ICT schools and tertiary level can be enhanced in the establishment
education facilities of top-notch educa- of more of these facilities.
tional institutions such as 268 training
centers and research institutes are in  Regular arts and sciences events such
place. There are some tie-ups in specif- as conferences and seminar-
ic areas of research, such as on green workshops held with personalities of
building technology. The Bureau of Ag- international and national renown in
ricultural Research, Philippine Nuclear attendance
Research Institute and the Southeast
29
QUEZON CITY

While the Araneta Coliseum was The recent plenary workshop within
identified as a regular venue, there is the City Development Council expand-
still a lack in big venues available for ed the geographical scope from Asia to
such events. Asia-Pacific because of the number of
tourists who come from the Pacific for
Much has to be done in the following
healthcare services.
indicators:
From 2009, when this vision compo-
 City-sponsored awards and recogni-
tion for outstanding Filipino scientists nent was identified, the city had imple-
and inventors and artists conducted mented the following:
at least during jubilee anniversaries  Essential Health Care Package in 64
 Balikbayan programs for foreign- Health Centers
based Filipino name artists and scien-  Ambulatory care by the two (2) gov-
tists ernment hospitals
In addition to these previous indica-  Promotion of healthy lifestyle
tors, the CDC workshop identified ad-  Health programs and services of
ditional success indicators such as: public and private health facilities
 Improvement and promotion of tour-  Subsidy for medicines by the local
ist spots and government and DOH
 Installation of solar power in IT facili-
 Medicine package provided to the
ties. city’s senior citizens and indigents
Chapter 3: DEVELOPMENT VISION AND SECTORAL GOALS OF QUEZON CITY

 Health facilities such as seven (7)


3.1.3 Healthcare and Wellness
super health centers, 53 regular
Center in Asia-Pacific
health centers and 13 sub-health sta-
This is an emerging role of Quezon tions , dialysis centers, lying in clin-
City. The city already boasts of the ics, dental clinics and other private
health and wellness facilities
best medical facilities and services, the
proliferation of wellness centers, phys-
ical fitness centers, health clinics, phar- However, despite the envisioned
maceutical, food, beauty and sanitary healthcare and wellness industry as
products, caregiving schools, laborato- the city’s signal product under the One
ries, medical transcription firms, and -Town-One-Product (OTOP) program
the presence of the most advanced and of the Department of Trade and Indus-
specialized hospitals. Fully endorsed try (DTI), this has not been realized
yet. This has to be in the agenda of rel-
by the private sector and supported by
evant city offices and industry as this
the local government, the healthcare
can build up a critical mass of factor
and wellness industry is bound to endowments to propel it towards be-
flourish for the benefit of a wide rang- coming the premier hub of healthcare
ing clientele locally and abroad. and wellness in Asia-Pacific.
30
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

3.2 Quezon City as a Desirable Hu-


Too, while the previous plan identi-
man Settlement
fied the establishment of ‘hospitels’ as
a support to the city’s being a health
This inward-looking component of
and wellness hub has not been
the city’s vision describes the desired
achieved. In fact, none of the existing
characteristics of the city as a place in
64 hospitals –18 government and 46
which to live, work and play. Such
private have put up hospitels. The en-
characteristics are expressed in terms
hancement/upgrading of existing pri-
of choice descriptors for the desired
vate and public facilities, equipment,
kind of citizens, the local economy, the
and medical services are being priori-
built and unbuilt environment and the
tized by hospital owners rather than
institutions for the city’s governance in
putting up hospitels.
the future. Each descriptor is further
Also, there are observed apprehen- translated into success indicators to
sions on the part of investors due in facilitate monitoring of progress at any
part to the unclear benefits/incentives time in the future.
that can be derived in putting up hos-
pitels. Other factors noted, despite 3.2.1 Desired Qualities of the Citi-
some proposals are being processed, zenry
were: lack of coordination among
stakeholders in both public and private In order to attain a high Quality
sectors; not a priority and no resource Community the city must have a
allocation on the part of the city gov- healthy, educated and secure citizen-
ernment; lack of promotion. ry.

Chapter 3: DEVELOPMENT VISION AND SECTORAL GOALS OF QUEZON CITY


In the future, the following additional 1) A HEALTHY citizenry is charac-
facilities and services are to be terized by the following:
achieved in order for Quezon City to
rightfully claim this vision:  Morbidity rates reduced to
the minimum
 Hospitals that double as hotels or  Mortality rates at normal lev-
”hospitels” els
 Health and scientific conferences  Health insurance for all fami-
regularly hosted by the city lies provided
 Medicines and health services within
 All households have sanitary
reach of the poor, retirees, elderly toilet facilities
and differently abled persons  All households have access to
safe and potable water
 Health/medical tourism flourishing  Incidence of malnutrition
 World class pet care facilities for use eradicated
by local pet lovers and visitors alike.

31
QUEZON CITY

2) An EDUCATED citizenry can be  Drug abuse eliminated


observed or inferred when:  Standard police-population
ratio attained (1:500)
 100% literacy rate is achieved  Fire-free city
 All school-age population are  Standard firefighter-
in school including differently- population ratio attained
abled persons who are provid- (1:2000)
ed appropriate education  Standard fire station-land area
 Enrollment participation rate ratio met (1:4 sq.km.)
including SPED enrollees at  Standard jailguard-inmate ra-
maximum level tio met (1:7)
 Cohort survival rate at opti-  Standard inmate-cell space
mum level ratio met (1:4.70sqm)
 Dropout rate reduced to zero  Decent and affordable housing
 Excellent academic perfor- for all provided
mance in all basic levels of ed-  Families in all danger areas
ucation achieved relocated to hazard free areas
 Ideal classroom-student ratio  Informal settlers assured of
met (1:50) secure tenure in land and
 Ideal teacher-student ratio dwellings
met (1:50)  Standard Day Care Center-
 Training Centers & Research Pupil ratio met (1:25)
Institutes established and well  Standard Day Care Worker –
Chapter 3: DEVELOPMENT VISION AND SECTORAL GOALS OF QUEZON CITY

-maintained Pupil ratio met (1:25)


 Public school teacher compe-  Children in need of special
tence at par with or better protection (CNSP) are cared
than those of leading schools for
 Standard book-student ratio  Youth sector assisted and pro-
attained tected
 Scholarship grants for tertiary  Persons with disabilities as-
education to post graduate sisted and protected
study sustained  Women served and assisted
 Culture and arts developed,  Elderly assisted and protected
preserved and patronized  Solo-parent care provided
 Standard social worker-client
3) A SECURE citizenry is shown by ratio achieved: (Center based
or assured of the following: 1:15, Community based 1:60)
 Zero crime rate Of the three descriptors of the de-
 Crime solution efficiency rate sired attributes of Quezon City’s citi-
higher than that in Metro Ma- zens, that of being secure, both in their
nila persons and their communities seem

32
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

 Focused area for high-end in-


to be the ultimate goal. Even the other
formation technology busi-
qualities of being healthy and educated
nesses
contribute to the citizens’ ultimate se-
curity.  Access to high quality educa-
tion for all
 Nurture systems for the gifted
3.2.2 Desired Character of are in place
the City’s Economy
 Skilled manpower and human
A local economy that is diverse, resources are utilized
strong and vibrant ensures prosperity  Tertiary level education facili-
and sustainable growth for all. To at- ties (top notch educational in-
tain this goal the following success in- stitutions), training centers
dicators were set : and research institutes in place
1) DIVERSE : The local economy  Scholarship grants for ad-
is said to be diverse/diversified when vanced studies sustained
it exhibits the following characteris-  Preservation of culture and
tics: arts
 Museums and galleries and
 QC is functioning as public libraries established and
“Wellness Capital of Asia-Pacific” as maintained
shown by  Historical sites preserved
 Tertiary hospitals with ISO ac-  Balikbayan program for for-
creditation eign based Filipino artists im-

Chapter 3: DEVELOPMENT VISION AND SECTORAL GOALS OF QUEZON CITY


 Hospitals, health spas, specialty plemented
clinics (with high service quali-  Booming ICT (No. 1 in the
ty standard) in abundance country’s ICT industry)
 Well implemented Health/  Support for investors and inno-
Medical Tourism program vators
 World class training for health  Balikbayan program for for-
workers eign-based Filipino scientists
 Regular arts and science con-
 QC is truly the Knowledge ferences and competitions
Industry Capital of the Country  World class facilities in anima-
tion, sports and performing
 Number 1 in terms of number arts established
of firms and area coverage de-
 Ideal site for business invest-
voted to IT activities
ments both for the Service Sec-
 Nationally and internationally- tor (wholesale and retail,
recognized training institutions transport, storage and commu-
providing IT solutions / ser- nication, real estate, hotel and
vices restaurants, financial institu-
 As wi-fi enabled area tions, health, education, etc.)

33
QUEZON CITY

and Industry Sector  QC as a globally competitive


(manufacturing, construction, growth center
electric, gas and water)  Low cost of doing business
 Leading tourist destination in  Skilled and abundant human
Metro Manila catering to vari- resources
ous types of tourists (local and  Well placed infrastructure sup-
foreign) in fields of medical, port facilities
educational, political, business/  Responsive government to
investors, etc. business needs
 A culinary tourism destination  Healthy and peaceful business
environment
2) STRONG : A strong local  Sustained growth in new and
economy can be seen or inferred from old investments
the following indicators:
 Near-zero incidence of busi-
 Site for the leading businesses ness closures
in the country  Steady increase in business
 Locally produced products and start-ups
services developed, promoted
and distinctly branded as QC
3.2.3 Desired Quality of the
 Abundant supply of food and
Environment
commodities that are afforda-
ble to all A Clean, Green and Resilient en-
 Fully employed human re- vironment is conducive to healthy and
Chapter 3: DEVELOPMENT VISION AND SECTORAL GOALS OF QUEZON CITY

sources (with skills relevant to safe city living and is attractive not on-
the needs of the industry) ly to the local residents but also to visi-
 Reduced unemployment rate to tors.
a single digit In order to determine success in
 Reduced poverty incidence to achieving this goal, certain indicators
levels below the national level were set to measure performance in
 QC as no. 1 in business tax col- various areas of concern.
lection in the country
1) The city is successful in being
 Institutionalized cooperation /
CLEAN when, in terms of:
partnership between the city
and private sector / NGOs Solid Waste
 Productive and properly regu-  Its surroundings are garbage
lated informal sector free
 Its solid waste generated/
3) VIBRANT: A vibrant local
disposed daily is reduced to
economy is the generic descriptor of a
50%
diverse and strong economy. It is at-
 Residents are using ecological-
tained when the following indicators
can be observed: ly-sound practices

34
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

 Its parks are well-patronized


 Disposal of toxic, hazardous
by local and metropolitan resi-
and healthcare wastes properly
dents alike
managed.
 All its barangays have accessi-
Air Quality ble and resident-friendly parks
 People and all sectors are
 Ambient air is maintained at proud of their environment
levels within EMB standards and are actively engaged in its
(TSP level-90 mg/cu.m) care, protection, preservation
and promotion
Water Quality
 Surface water quality is main- 3) The city has a RESILIENT en-
tained at levels within EMB vironment when -
standards (BOD-7 mg/l below
and DO – 5 mg/l up)  Exposed communities are pro-
 Controlled and minimized tected from natural and man-
groundwater extraction made hazards.
 Individual within and between
communities are connected
2) The city shall be known as the and coordinated through net-
Green Lung of the metropolis. Its envi- works that manage resources
ronment is GREEN when it has - ensuring aid agreements.
 The city government can effec-
 The largest percentage of tively address and efficiently

Chapter 3: DEVELOPMENT VISION AND SECTORAL GOALS OF QUEZON CITY


greenery to total land area manage all types of emergen-
among component LGUs in cies
Metro Manila
 Recovered, greened, developed
3.2.4 Desired Character of the Built
and protected its easements
Environment
and open spaces for the public
 An inter-connected system of
A well-linked, balanced and at-
parks, green areas and open
tractive cityscape makes city living
spaces
pleasant and enjoyable.
 A well-protected and preserved
wildlife This goal is said to be attained
 Promoted popular/wide use of when the following success indicators
renewable energy are observed to be existing:
 Access to and wide use of alter- WELL-LINKED : The city is well-
native fuels linked externally and internally when -
 Green pedestrian-friendly thor-
 An established inter-connected
oughfares
hierarchy of roads and streets
 The largest number of green
 All-weather roads and bridges
legislations enacted and imple-
are properly constructed and
mented
35
QUEZON CITY

managed tive governance enable the city’s effort


 Travelling comfort for motor- in building a high Quality Community.
ists and commuters 1) DYNAMIC governance is indi-
 Walking and other non-motorized cated by :
modes of mobility can be used
safely  Innovative processes and sys-
 Safe and convenient commuter tems (management systems,
facilities are provided operations and communication
 Mass transit systems are in systems) institutionalized
place  Strategic Organizational Struc-
ture
BALANCED : The landscape is  Effective Human Resource De-
balanced when - velopment Program
 Comprehensive Manual of Op-
 Urban development is evenly erations for the whole City Bu-
distributed throughout in self- reaucracy
contained communities
 Teamwork in Executive
 Built-up areas are integrated
 Competent and well-trained
with the city’s open spaces
employees
 Standards on open spaces re-
 Adequate data base to support
quirement are complied with
the plan
ATTRACTIVE : The city appears  Professional attitude and be-
attractive when - havior of leaders
Chapter 3: DEVELOPMENT VISION AND SECTORAL GOALS OF QUEZON CITY

 Governance and leadership


 Effective drainage and sewer- recognized by international
age systems are installed and national award-giving
 Blighted areas are redeveloped bodies as well by the City to its
 Open spaces within the built- barangays
up areas are greened and de-
2) Fiscal management and local
veloped
legislation are SOUND when -
 Urban landscape is enhanced
(interlink park system,
Fiscal Management
streetscape)
 Historical sites and landmarks are  Revenue generation increases
preserved and maintained progressively (RPT, business
 Utilities are installed under- tax)
ground  City finances are relatively self-
reliant
 Resources are utilized based on
3.2.5 Desired Qualities of Local the community’s need and re-
Governance quirement
A dynamic, sound and participa-  Graft and corruption is reduced
to zero
36
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

3) There is PARTICIPATIVE gov-


 100% compliant with manda-
ernance when-
tory/statutory obligations
 Citizens’ participation in pro-
Local Legislation grams and projects is institu-
tionalized
 Adequate and appropriate local
 There is strong linkage or part-
ordinances are enacted and nership with the NGOs/POs,
are properly implemented by academe, research and training
the Executive institution, etc., at the city and
 There is active stakeholders the barangay level
and people participation in leg-  Information on plans, pro-
islation and policy formulation grams and activities are acces-
 Strong coordination between sible (transparency) to all
the Legislative and Executive stakeholders
branches of the LGU exists  Venues for airing complaints
or grievances are available 

Chapter 3: DEVELOPMENT VISION AND SECTORAL GOALS OF QUEZON CITY

37
DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES
AND OPPORTUNITIES
QUEZON CITY

This chapter summarizes the Quezon City has induced the suburban
important issues and observed moves of former residents of the inner-
conditions that each sectoral group core cities of the metropolis such as
has identified from the analysis of Manila, San Juan and Caloocan. Also,
various data sources, notably the the presence of the top universities
socio-ecological profile, the LDI whose student population is recruited
Table, and the annual State of the nationwide is another factor that con-
City reports of the Chief Executive. tributes to the influx of migrants. Many
These issues appear on their face of the students stay on after gradua-
value as problems and constraints tion to join the city's workforce and
to the development of Quezon City. then become permanent residents.
However, such perceived problem
situations can be turned around A positive view is that a large and
into opportunities for promoting fast growing population can be regard-
the general welfare of the inhabit- ed as an asset to the city in that it pro-
ants. This poses the supreme chal- vides dynamism to the local economy
lenge for the effective governance by supplying the needed product and
of the city. factor markets. A city's large university
-based population also has the poten-
In the first section selected tial to create a critical mass of academ-
cross-sectoral challenges are dis- ics and professionals, artists and scien-
cussed. Development challenges tists who constitute the city's intellec-
specific to the sectors are present- tual capital.
ed in the second part of this chap-
ter. On the other hand, migration pours
into the city a steady stream of the low
4.1 Selected Cross-Sectoral Devel- -skilled unemployed who expect to
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

opment Challenges find jobs but finding insufficient place-


ments are largely dependent on social
4.1.1 High population growth services and welfare programs.
rate
4.1.2 High incidence of poverty
Quezon City is not only the most
populous city in the metropolis but Although poverty alleviation pro-
it has had a higher average growth grams have been given high priority by
rate than either Metro Manila or the current administration for the last
the country as a whole for the last 8 years, poverty incidence or the num-
3 decades. This is attributed to the ber of families below the poverty line
momentum of a large base popula- decreases to 3.9%. Pro-poor social de-
tion to start with, and to the con- velopment programs such as those on
tinuous stream of movers and mi- basic health and nutrition, socialized
grants. The presence of extensive housing, scholarships at all levels and
open areas in the northern part of livelihood assistance have had sub-

38
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

stantial share of the city's annual budg- the first controlled dump with biogas
et. But this is not nearly enough to harvesting. Quezon City has also con-
bring down the poverty incidence to sistently made a sustained effort to
single-digit levels. This is due in part to maintain the largest network of parks
the high in- migration rate discussed and open spaces resulting in a level of
earlier. Also, local employment oppor- biodiversity and wildlife abundance
tunities simply cannot cope with the that is not typical of an urban environ-
growing demand for jobs. ment. Another plus factor is the in-
creasing tertiarization of the economy
4.1.3 Proliferation of slums and resulting in the disappearance of old
informal settlements factories from the cityscape. Hence, the
city can now experience cleaner air
Given the vast area of vacant spac-
and surface waters. However, due to
es and its easy proximity to the inner
its very extensive networks of arterial
core of the metropolis, Quezon City has
roads which carry the biggest volumes
been the receiver of movers who have
of vehicular traffic, the pollution of the
transferred or had been displaced from
air from mobile sources continues to
Manila and other inner-core cities. The
be a serious environmental challenge
low-income families among these mi-
to the city.
grants built their shanties on any avail-
able lot, whether private or govern- 4.1.5 Growing engagement of non
ment owned. Others established their -government sectors
abode along rivers and creeks, road
shoulders and traffic islands, under The city boasts of a fully organized
bridges, within utility easements and and functional planning structure
similar high-risk areas. This explains which consists of the CDC proper, its
the proliferation of informal settle- special bodies, and its sectoral and
ments resulting in unsatisfactory socio functional committees. The Council
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

-spatial patterns of city growth. Anoth- conducts two regular meetings a year,
er impact of proliferating informal set- as provided for in the Local Govern-
tlements is the increasing informaliza- ment Code and CDC's internal rules of
tion of the local economy. Continued procedure. It is in the area of non-
occupation of hazardous areas increas- government sector participation, how-
es the size of vulnerable population to ever, that leaves more room for im-
disaster that needs addressing. provement. This is particularly so in a
city that has the most number of orga-
4.1.4 Leadership in green govern- nized civil society groups. There are
ance over 800 NGOs and POs accredited and
many more have yet to apply for ac-
True to its role as the green lung of creditation. Some of these unaccredit-
the metropolis, Quezon City is taking ed ones are simply not interested
the lead in green governance. Among while others are either unaware of the
other initiatives, Quezon City operates process or find the accreditation pro-
cedure too tedious.

39
QUEZON CITY

Despite the growing clamor of attributed to lack of financial re-


many groups to participate howev- sources of couples. Other reasons
er, only 50 sectoral representatives are that preferred brands by some
are formally elected to the regular users are not available in the health
membership of the CDC. This is to centers. On the part of the city gov-
comply with the minimum NGO ernment resources to track or moni-
participation set by law. The chal- tor users are not made available.
lenge for the city government is This situation eventually leads to
how to create opportunities and high birth rates.
expand the venues in which non-
c) Few mothers practice
government sectors can be more
breastfeeding
directly and meaningfully involved
in governance activities. A growing number of working
mothers are unavailable to breast-
4.2 Sector-Specific Development feed their newborn babies. Some
Challenges mothers are not motivated to
breastfeed due to the absence of
4.2.1 Social development chal- support groups at least within their
lenges reach. If the situation continues, in-
fants are not assured of adequate
1) Health nutrition, thus are prone to illness-
es.
a) Increase in maternal
mortality rate d) Tuberculosis among top 10
leading causes of mortality
Not all pregnant women un-
dergo early pre-natal check-up. The denial tendencies of family
Some deliveries are still attend- members with TB cases, inadequate
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

ed by "hilots". medicines in health centers, risky life-


style of the population and poor envi-
Safe birth facilities for use
ronment contribute to the spread of
by government midwives to at-
the disease. If unabated, this in effect
tend to these deliveries includ-
will continue to be one of the top caus-
ing supply of blood during deliv-
es of death in the city.
eries are at times inadequate.
These factors result in high risk
e) High prevalence of malnutri-
of not only maternal deaths but
tion
neo-natal and infant deaths as
well. The incidence of child malnutri-
tion may be brought about by the fol-
b) Low Contraceptive Prev- lowing: inability of mothers to perform
alence Rate (CPR) their feeding roles or bring their chil-
The decrease in the number dren to feeding centers. There is inade-
of family planning users may be quate supply of food supplements or

40
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

lack of a nutrition program in some lack of teaching aids/instruction


barangays. Malnourished children are materials, teacher quality and inad-
therefore prone to illnesses and in equate parental support. Doing paid
some cases are vulnerable to early work or doing household chores can
deaths. also interfere with the studies and
affect the academic performance of
2) Education
some students. Some high school
students who are forced by circum-
a) High drop-out rate in public
stances to work and study at the
high schools
same time will have low readiness
Some students leave school for the next higher level of educa-
due to poverty, lack of interest, peer tion.
group pressure, teacher factor, lack
of parental support and poor health. d) Late entrance of children in
Others are prevented to continue Grade I
schooling by incidences of teenage Many parents are not aware of
pregnancies. Drop-outs eventually the lowering of the age requirement
increase the number of out-of- for entering Grade I from 7 to 6
school youth who are likely to be years old. Thus, there is low enroll-
involved in cases of child labor and ment participation rate among the 6
petty crimes. -year olds.
b) Classroom shortage e) Limited number of Commu-
The shortage in the number of nity Learning Centers (CLC's)
classrooms is more pronounced in Inadequate budget for Alterna-
District II than in District I. In Dis- tive Learning Systems (ALS) pre-
trict II, the classroom-student ratio vents the establishment of more
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

of 1:60 in public elementary schools CLC's. Thus, not all out-of-school


and 1:63 in high schools is below youths and adults are served. In ar-
the standard of 1:50. Despite contin- eas or barangays where there are
uous provision of additional class- existing CLC's, the facilities and
rooms this effort of government equipment are in poor physical con-
could not cope with the increasing dition.
demand for more classrooms due to
the rapid population growth rate. 3) Social Welfare
Needless to say, a crowded class-
room is not exactly an atmosphere a) Low enrollment participa-
conducive to learning. tion rate of pre-schoolers (3-5
c) Poor achievement rate in years old)
public secondary schools Lack of awareness of some par-
The poor academic perfor- ents on the importance of Early
mance of some students is due to Childhood Care and Development

41
QUEZON CITY

(ECCD), insufficiency in day care flict with the law with no court cas-
centers/pre-school facilities and es who are being accepted and
shortage of teachers/day care served at the MYH for care and pro-
workers are some of the causes tection.
of low pre-school enrollment
e) No facility for abused Indi-
rate. Also the Local SSDD is una-
viduals
ble to monitor NGO- run day
care centers to get a true picture The city has only a drop-in center
of the status of schooling of where clients are temporarily
those children who are being placed for purposes of processing
serviced by non-government cases for referral to established wel-
sectors. fare institutions.

b) Low availment of social f) No program for early detec-


welfare program among solo tion/intervention for gifted and
parents differently-abled pre-schoolers
Solo parents are not well There is no budget allocation yet
aware of their privileges under for these special children thus, this
the Solo Parent Act and hence sector of the population is not being
fail to avail of the services which adequately cared for.
they should enjoy.
g) Increased number of clients
c) Inadequate system of in crises situation
documenting incidences of
abuse Clients who lack adequate in-
come to buy medicines, pay for
There is no established data transportation, funeral services and
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

base for all incidences of abuse other needs are forced to seek assis-
against children, youth, women, tance from the city government
elderly, differently abled per- through the Social Services and De-
sons including those in the fami- velopment Department (SSDD). To
lies of OFW's. Various welfare address all their needs would mean
agencies therefore, have no firm additional strain on city resources.
basis for determining their tar-
get clientele. 4. Housing
a) Lack of affordable housing
d) Increasing clientele of
Molave Youth Home (MYH) Due to high cost of land and con-
struction materials, low affordabil-
There is marked increase in ity level of families and huge hous-
the number of cases of aban- ing backlog, the city government is
doned and/or neglected chil- unable to provide adequate afforda-
dren as well as children in con- ble housing units.

42
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

b) Rampant selling of rights c) Congested City Jail


Beneficiaries of public housing The existing City Jail has lim-
projects are forced to sell their ited space to accommodate the
rights due to their inability to sus- growing number of inmates. The
tain monthly amortization for lack sub-human condition inside the
of resources, limited access to em- jail affects the health of the pris-
ployment and basic services, and oners and jeopardizes their
lack of proper orientation on the chances of early rehabilitation
enforcement of policies. This en- and integration in the society.
courages professional squatting
thereby defeating the very pur- d) Slow response capability of
pose of the housing project. It also fire-fighting force
results in the speculative pricing
of the housing unit sold. The inadequacy of fire sub-
station facilities, fire trucks, fire
c) Syndicates prey on Communi- fighting force, poor communica-
ty Mortgage Program (CMP's) tion facilities and antiquated
beneficiaries equipment are only some of the
factors that affect response capa-
Overlapping land titles and ig-
bility during fire incidences. If no
norance of the law on the part of
interventions are put in place
potential beneficiaries make them
more damages to property and
easy prey to unscrupulous syndi-
possible loss of life will be ex-
cates.
pected.
5. Protective Services
4.2.2 Economic Development
a) Increase in crime rate
Challenges
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

This is brought about by large


population, poverty incidence, and 1. Labor and Employment
inadequacy in police force, facili-
a) Lack of economic database
ties and equipment. High crime
rates deter investors to come into Much of the available economic
the city. data are outdated and unreliable.
Worse, city level data are no long-
b) Increased number of drug er available in the "Labor Force
affected barangays Survey" and "Family Income and
There is a weak inter-agency Expenditure Survey" reports of
coordination and inadequate in- the NSO (traditional sources of
formation and education cam- labor and employment and family
paign on the fight against drug income and expenditure data).
abuse. Moreover the locally generated
data are not processed into readi-

43
QUEZON CITY

ly usable form. The business c) Increasing number of dis-


registration process in partic- placed Overseas Filipino Work-
ular is unable to capture valu- ers (OFW's)
able information from busi- The returning displaced OFWs
nesses since applications for are those whose work contracts
business permits are pro- from abroad have not been re-
cessed even if applicants sup- newed or have expired. They add
ply incomplete information/ to the country's army of job seek-
documentation in application ers.
forms. The lack of database
makes it difficult to get an ac- 2. Family Income and Expenditure
curate picture of the current
a) Great disparity in income dis-
business situation of the city
tribution
and to identify target benefi-
ciaries of interventions in lo- The city has been tagged as the
cal economic development working man's residence whose
planning. major source of income is wages /
salaries from government and pri-
b) Increasing unemploy- vate employment. Few are en-
ment rate gaged in high-income entrepre-
The increasing unemploy- neurial activities. These comprise
ment rate is brought about by mostly of Filipino-Chinese busi-
the increasing labor force par- nessmen originally from the inner
ticipation rate and continued cities of Manila and Caloocan who
in-migration. Most of the un- have later moved to newer subur-
employed come from the un- ban residences in Quezon City.
skilled, poorly-schooled and Consequently, the difference in
low income groups. Moreover,
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

the average income of the few


there is mismatch between high- income families and that of
available skills and the skills the many low income groups is
required for new and existing much too big for comfort.
jobs. Skills are not relevant to
the needs of present local and b) Unmaximized public enter-
global market and the curricu- prises
lum of most schools does not Public markets and slaughter-
address the human resource houses are fast losing customers
requirements of the market. due to the growing number of
The high unemployment rate modern air-conditioned shopping
thereby contributes to the in- malls. There is a need to evaluate
crease in poverty incidence. the city's public markets and
slaughterhouses to determine
whether they continue to serve
their purpose.

44
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

c) Big number of unregistered c) Opportunities for growth of


small-scale businesses the ICT and wellness industries
(informal sector/underground not fully utilized
economy) The city has been tagged as the
The proliferation of illegal ICT and Wellness Capital of the
vendors and the operation of the country due to availability of
underground economy provide proper infrastructure and facili-
unfair competition to registered ties (for ICT: for having the high-
business establishments. This est concentration of ICT Parks/
lessens government income from buildings, for wellness: existence
business, not to mention its ad- of modern tertiary and specialized
verse effects on the environment. hospitals, health clinics, fitness
The city has not yet developed gyms, spas, etc.). However, these
innovative/special approaches in opportunities are not maximized
monitoring, regulating and regis- due to the lack of skilled manpow-
tering the informal sector of the er and other programs/projects
economy. to boost development of these
industries.
3. Industry and Services
d) Limited assistance and incen-
tives to prospective investors
a) No significant increase in the
There is no business service
number of business establish-
center that will respond to the
ments
needs of business investors and
The growth of investments in
provide basic information on
businesses is generally sluggish.
business-related undertakings.
This may be due to the difficulty of
getting permits or the lack of busi- e) Deteriorating areas with
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

ness incentives. This often results high economic potentials for


in failure of businesses to register growth
or renew their permits. Various areas in the city with
high potentials for growth such as
b) Lack of major financial and the Balintawak area, Novaliches
business facilities area, including tourism/historical
The city has no central busi- sites and landmarks are deterio-
ness district that would attract big rating and in need of urban regen-
scale investments. At present, the eration schemes.
city is dominated by small to me-
dium scale establishments en- f) Distance from entry points
gaged mostly in the distribution of (airports & seaports)
finished products and in the pro- The city's relative distance
vision of basic personal services. from the ports of entry such as the
NAIA and the Manila South Har-
bor decreases the probability of

45
QUEZON CITY

tourists being able to visit the sure. It strains collection efficiency


city, especially if they have resulting in dirty surroundings due
very limited time to go to the uncollected volumes. Even-
around. tually, infestations from the uncol-
lected heaps endanger the health of
g) Limited programs on the community.
tourism
Programs and projects of b) Big potential for waste reduc-
the city on tourism promotion tion
are limited and are mainly fo- A study showed that the waste
cused on cultural affairs. Great- generated in the city is 48% biode-
er attention and allocation of gradable, 39% recyclable and only
additional funds is necessary to 13% residual which is ideally the
improve the tourism industry portion that should go to the dis-
in the city. posal facility. The barangays have
shown significant interest and will
4.2.3 Environmental Manage- to undertake barangay-based re-
ment Challenges duction as mandated by the RA
9003 (Ecological Solid Waste Man-
1. Solid Waste agement Act of 2000). Waste re-
duction is a source of livelihood
a) High solid waste genera- especially for the poor population.
tion Once maximum reduction is
Quezon City is estimated to achieved, less waste would go to
be producing solid waste the landfill thereby reducing the
equivalent to 0.66 kilo/person threat to the environment and the
in a day. The high generation need to provide for more disposal
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

rate is attributed not only to facilities.


the large population but also to
the high concentration of com- c) Impending closure of the
mercial and industrial estab- Payatas Controlled Facility and
lishments, many of which are absence of alternative disposal
still unregistered and unregu- site
lated small- scale businesses. The PCF is nearing full capacity
Vendors proliferating on side- and has a pending closure order
walks, marketplaces and street from DENR. The siting and devel-
intersections contribute to the opment of another facility has been
waste generation. difficult due to high cost of land
especially in QC and the refusal of
As more waste is produced, communities to accept solid waste
more is disposed at the Payatas within their vicinity. Failure to re-
Controlled Facility (PCF) thus duce waste to a significant level
threatening its premature clo- and to develop a new disposal site

46
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

will result in garbage crisis, deteri- and registration of such vehicles


oration of the environment and of and the enforcement of anti-
public health. The premature clo- pollution laws is weak.
sure of Payatas Controlled Facility
will cause displacement of commu- b) Unmonitored industrial emis-
nity members dependent on waste sions
recycling and the PCF operation for Industrial emission is not
livelihood. properly monitored also because
of weak implementation of laws
d) Unmonitored disposal of tox- and regulations. Some community
ic, hazardous and healthcare members allege that there are in-
wastes stances when business permits are
The disposal of toxic and haz- issued even without the required
ardous waste from industries and environmental compliance certifi-
healthcare wastes from hospitals, cate. Like the transport vehicles,
clinics, funeral parlors and the like industries emit gases and particles
is not properly monitored and doc- that pollute the air and threaten
umented. This is due to lack of will public health.
to strictly enforce environmental
laws and confusion among certain 3. Water Quality
government agencies regarding
their appropriate roles. Continuous a) Pollution of rivers and creeks
mixing of such type of dangerous The rivers and creeks are bio-
wastes with ordinary wastes aggra- logically dead due to pollution
vates contamination of the land mainly from untreated wastewater
and water resources leading to directly discharged to the said wa-
spread of illnesses and diseases. ter bodies. The city lacks area-wide
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

or centralized sewerage treatment


2) Air Quality facilities to process domestic
wastewater. Some households,
a) Pollution from vehicular emis- mostly informal settlers, do not
sions/ smoke belching have septic tanks for their night
Seventy percent (70%) of air waste. In addition to the
pollution is attributed to vehicular wastewater, garbage is still thrown
emissions. Running on the city to the waterways in some parts of
streets are countless vehicles the city. Heavy pollution not only
belching out smoke. Many of the exterminated aquatic life but also
vehicles are jeepneys, buses and took away the aesthetic and recre-
cars using second-hand engines ational values of the rivers and
and fuels of low quality. They pro- creeks.
liferate because of the relaxed gov-
ernment policy on the importation

47
QUEZON CITY

b) Loss of easements and nar- and open spaces is artificial in


rowing of rivers and creeks many instances. In some communi-
Rivers and creeks and the ties, areas allocated for parks and
easements along them experi- open spaces were encroached upon
ence pressure from increasing by informal and formal settlers
population and development. while in others, the open spaces
Long stretches of easements were fully utilized for schools,
and some segments of the riv- churches, housing, and other com-
ers have been lost to encroach- munity facilities. As a result, resi-
ments by both informal and dents do not have the space to sat-
formal settlers alike. The ef- isfy certain recreational needs like
fects are the drying up of cer- play and leisure and hold socio-
tain portions of the creeks and cultural interactions.
flooding in compromised areas.
It also deprives the community b) Conflicts between barangays
of the recreational use of the and homeowners on manage-
rivers and creeks. ment of Parks
In some barangays, conflict be-
c) Over-extraction of ground- tween the barangay officials and
water homeowners' associations over the
Data obtained from the Na- control and management of the
tional Water Resources Board park prevents the appropriate de-
showed evidence of deteriora- velopment and optimum use of the
tion of the aquifer due to over- park for public purposes. Either
withdrawal. The excessive wa- party has the possession and pow-
ter withdrawal results in water er to determine the park's use to
supply depletion and pollution. the detriment of the other mem-
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

The government has failed to bers of the community.


control and closely monitor the
extraction of groundwater in 5. Biodiversity
wide areas in Metro Manila in-
cluding Quezon City a) Limited biodiversity of parks
and other open spaces
4. Parks and Open Spaces Large parks and open spaces
like the La Mesa Watershed and the
a) Lack/inadequacy of parks institutional grounds of UP and
and open spaces Ateneo de Manila are habitats to
At present, 32 barangays do many species of trees, plants, birds,
not have any park at all. The amphibians, reptiles, mammals and
others may have their parks insects. Some of the tree and plant
but these are inadequate for species in La Mesa Watershed are
the needs of the community. either exotic or endangered. The
The shortage of land for parks preservation of wildlife in these

48
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

areas is made possible by the advo- pa City, and the provinces of Bulac-
cacy and involvement of some in- an, Laguna, and Cavite. The WVF
stitutions. can generate an earthquake with a
Protecting and enriching the magnitude of 7.2 that may result to
biodiversity of parks is important a very destructive ground shaking,
in enhancing the quality of the en- with intensity of VIII on the PEIS,
vironment and providing for the in Metro Manila and nearby prov-
recreational needs of the citizenry. inces.
In the VFS Atlas it showed that
b) Lack of awareness on the bio- the WVF traverses the eastern
diversity of the city and the im- boundary of Quezon City particu-
portance of wildlife conserva- larly Barangays Bagong Silangan,
tion Batasan Hills, Matandang Balara,
The lack of awareness of the cit- Pansol, Blue Ridge B, St. Ignatius,
izenry stems from the lack of prop- Libis, White Plains, Bagumbayan
er information and education cam- and Ugong Norte.
paign on the importance of main-
taining biodiversity and of wildlife b) Flooding
conservation. The danger in this The city has undulating terrain
situation is that an uninformed and and is within the catchment area of
unconcerned citizenry does not five river systems- San Juan River,
care whatever happens to the wild- Tullahan River, Marikina River,
life and their habitat. Pasig River and Meycauayan River
and their tributaries and creeks
c) Illegal logging and kaingin with a total length of almost 200
The periphery of the La Mesa km. These river systems receive
Reservoir is threatened by poach- tremendous amount of water dur-
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

ers. ing heavy rainfall and have great


potential to flood low-lying areas.
6. DRR/CCA
There is a growing and widespread c) Impacts of climate change phe-
concern for disaster risk reduction nomena such as extreme weather
and climate change adaptation and events, change in precipitation
mitigation. pattern, and temperature rise.

a) Threat posed by the presence 4.2.4 Physical Development Chal-


of the West Valley Fault (WVF) lenges
Greater Metro Manila is trav-
ersed by the West Valley Fault 1. Geography
(WVF) is approximately 100-km The location of Quezon City rel-
long and transects portions of Que- ative to the inner core of Metro
zon City, Marikina City, Pasig City, Manila has defined the pace and
Makati City Taguig City, Muntinlu- pattern of its physical develop-

49
QUEZON CITY

ment. The settlement of Que- zal. It is the prospect of Quezon


zon City has been largely asso- City becoming a new metro core
ciated with the suburbaniza- and taking within its sphere of in-
tion of Manila's population. In fluence the metro fringe areas to
temporal- spatial terms devel- the north and east that gives pro-
opment of Quezon City started found justification for the proposed
in the southwest and south new CBD on the eastern half of the
(District I and District IV) areas Great Quadrangle straddling the
directly abutting on the City of North Ave. and the East Ave. trian-
Manila. Then development gles.
crept and spread towards the
other parts (District II and Dis- 2. Topography
trict III) of the city following
more or less the construction a) Steep slopes
of metropolitan arterials con- Parts of the city along the es-
sisting of major radial and cir- carpment where steep slopes can
cumferential roads. The radials be found traverse Barangays
tend to spread growth out- Payatas, Bagong Silangan near the
wards while the circumferen- Novaliches Reservoir, Old Balara,
tials define the outer limits of Pansol, Loyola Heights, Escopa,
suburban growth. The first is Blue Ridge and St. Ignatius. With
the function of Ortigas, Aurora,
slope ranging from 16% to 35%
Quezon boulevards and Quiri-
these areas are considered non-
no Highway. The second func-
buildable because they form the
tion is performed by Araneta
Ave. (C-3), EDSA (C-4) and C.P. uplifted part of geological faults.
Garcia highway (C-5). All of They can best serve as greenbelt
zones. Unfortunately, certain sec-
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

these major thoroughfares are


national roads. From its incep- tions of the escarpment are now
tion up to quite recently the heavily built up.
development of Quezon City
has depended on the initiatives b) Soil load-bearing capacity
of the national government.
The challenge for the future of Construction of tall structures is
Quezon City, as clearly seen generally possible in most parts of
and verbalized by Mayor Bel- the city considering its soil type is
monte, is to engineer the shift that of the Novaliches Clay or ado-
of the metropolitan core to this be. This however presents an im-
city and extend the momentum portant constraint in construction
of growth to metro fringe areas due to increased excavation cost to
like San Jose del Monte in Bu- be incurred in building founda-
lacan, and Rodriguez, San tions, tunnels and basements.
Mateo and Antipolo City in Ri-

50
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

c) Drainage and flooding dated drainage systems should be


Sitting on a plateau where the addressed.
lowest elevation is at 4m above sea Debris-clogged and silted wa-
level, the city does not experience terways and drainage systems still
problems of tidal flooding. At threaten to cause flooding in many
worst, slow outflow or even back- areas of the city.
flow of drainage occurs in low lying
outfall areas (parts of Talayan, San- Being in an upstream location,
tol, La Loma) due to swollen water the city should be concerned with
levels at waterways. protecting its waterways from im-
proper dumping of garbage and
Flooding in some areas can be liquid effluents which eventually
attributed to the absence of city- flow downstream to neighboring
wide drainage master plan that cities like Manila, San Juan, Valen-
would guide local land develop- zuela and Caloocan and ultimately
ment projects such as estate and into Manila Bay. Measures are
subdivision developments. A drain- therefore called for to keep the
age master plan could aid in the lay city's waterways regularly cleared
-out, flow direction and size of cul- of debris and liquid effluents
vert to use with due consideration properly treated at source.
for the present and projected in-
flows to lower areas. The prepara- 3. Land Use Pattern
tion of a city-wide drainage master a) Proliferation of informal set-
plan should therefore be given pri- tlements
ority attention by the City Govern- To accommodate the growing
ment. population residential develop-
ments both through the creation of
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

In many parts of the city where new communities (subdivision


flooding is experienced there are projects) and densification of exist-
no outfall rights-of-way traversing ing ones through construction of
properties in lower areas. Such ab- multi-dwelling structures like
sence may be due to undeveloped townhouses, apartments, condo-
property located in the out-fall ar- miniums are being pursued contin-
ea or the failure to provide right-of uously. But with the cost of land
-way when the property was subdi- being unaffordable to many, many
vided. are turning to establishing infor-
Another cause of flooding is the mal settlements which have led to
small-sized culverts installed in old the formation of urban sprawl,
subdivisions which, through time, blighted environments and deteri-
have become silted and clogged, oration of basic services.
thus are inadequate if not com-
pletely non-functional. Rehabilita- b) Conversion of residential are-
tion and improvement of these out- as to commercial function

51
QUEZON CITY

Starting from a small act of mercial areas like the public mar-
putting up a store meant to kets are now getting blighted due
augment family income, this to loss of customers.
practice has proliferated and
created unplanned commercial d) Steady loss of industrial land
zones. Consequently, existing use
facilities and utilities originally The ban on industrial develop-
designed for a residential area ment and expansion in Metro Ma-
have become insufficient. With nila since 1983 and the establish-
narrow streets, for example, ment of several industrial parks to
being used by large commercial the north and south of the metrop-
vehicles traffic problems have olis have led to the steady aban-
worsened, on-street customer donment of the traditional indus-
parking obstructs traffic flow trial zones such as those in Novali-
and complaints from other res- ches and Ugong Norte in favor of
idents are mounting. the better planned and provisioned
industrial estates. This has led to
c) Emergence of commercial loss of industrial jobs and the for-
nodes mer industrial workers find them-
Commercial land use started selves unable to fill new jobs in the
as linear ribbons along major market for service sector skills like
thoroughfares serving residen- call center agents. What replaced
tial areas. There was only one the large manufacturing plants are
commercial node, then, Ara- sporadic small scale, informal
neta Center in Cubao. Now sev- types of processing industries in-
eral commercial nodes have terspersed with residential land
developed : SM malls in North use. In terms of physical impact,
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Triangle, Sta. Mesa, and Fair- the conversion of former industrial


view, Trinoma on North Ave- land to residential and commercial
nue, and mixed use nodes like use has changed the landscape and
Eastwood in Libis, and UP- over-all environmental quality of
Ayala Technohub on Common- these areas.
wealth Avenue. This may be e) Growing demand for institu-
attributed to the increasing tional land
competitiveness of the city as The rapid growth of population
an investment area and the has led to increased demand for
presence of top--rated univer- land for institutional use such as
sities that can make available schools at all levels, health facilities
skilled human resources. The of all types, churches, recreation
visible impact of this trend is and government services. In the
the enhanced cityscape and face of this growing demand for
improved circulation systems. institutional land, the large areas of
On the other hand, the old com- national government institutional

52
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

reserves, particularly the National city. Two (2) companies offer cellu-
Government Center (NGC) com- lar mobile phone services and
pound is being reduced due to con- three (3) firms provide paging sys-
version of 150 hectares into social- tems. Telegraph and telex services
ized housing site. Similarly, other are provided by one private and
institutional lands like the UP cam- one government firm.
pus are encroached upon by large
squatter communities. These in- b) Mail and parcel delivery, mon-
truded areas eventually become ey order, domestic and interna-
permanent settlements like Krus tional express mails and PO box
na Ligas and the BLISS sites in San leasing services are provided by
Vicente and Sikatuna thus effec- the QC Central Post Office, 10
tively diminishing the areas for in- post offices and nine (9) private
stitutional land use. postal stations.

4. Service Utilities c) Internet


Broadband services are availa-
a) Water supply ble in many public institutions and
Domestic water supply is gener- private establishments. Internet
ally adequate. However, there are service providers can be found in
informal settlements that cannot practically every nook and cranny
avail of direct connections and resi- of the city.
dents resort to buying from enter- d) Radio and television
prising suppliers or withdrawing Quezon City is the home base of
from the groundwater. 11 local TV networks and six (6)
cable television, seven (7) AM ra-
b) Power Supply dio and four (4) FM radio stations.
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Electric power supply comes


e) Print media
from only one source - Meralco. Of
All major newspapers and mag-
total consumption, over 90% is ac-
azines of national circulation are
counted for by residential connec-
available in even the remotest
tions. Coverage of households is
parts of the city.
almost total but some connections
6. Transportation
are illegal and pose fire hazards to
some communities. a) Road network
As of 2007 Quezon City had al-
5. Communication ready exceeded the national stand-
ard for primary roads of 1.0
a) Telephone services liberal- km./100 ha. and secondary roads
ized of 2.0 km/100 ha. of land area.
Under a liberalized environ- However, the newer parts of the
ment, five (5) private companies city, District II and District III, are
provide telephone services to the still below standard in the provi-
sion of primary roads. Neverthe-

53
QUEZON CITY

less, these newer areas have 800,000 passengers while Line 2


already exceeded the national only 30,000 passengers daily.
norm for secondary roads. This
Another challenge is the proper
implies that the northern part
positioning of inter-modal split
of the city was developed spo-
nodes. The provincial bus termi-
radically, that areas were de-
nals located at the Araneta Center
veloped even without the bene-
and along EDSA in the Cubao area
fit of primary access. As a re-
are well chosen because they allow
sult, the over-all road pattern
passengers to make easy transfer
exhibits a distinct contrast be-
to other modes. It is the location of
tween the southern and north-
LRT stations that leaves much to be
ern parts of the city. The older
desired.
southern part is conspicuous
for its regular grid pattern of With very few exceptions, LRT
streets; the newer northern stations seem to have been de-
part exhibits irregular street signed and located without regard
layouts where incomplete for inter-modal transfer. Alighting
loops, dead ends and disjointed passengers invariably walk great
subdivision roads predominate. distances to get bus or jeepney
connections. Jeepney and bus
b) Transport modes routes and even some street net-
Quezon City is serviced by works need to be redesigned to
all types of land-based motor effect easier interlinkages with ex-
vehicles. In terms of vehicle isting and future LRT stations.
volume, private vehicles pre-
dominate with 82%. Public util- Finally, the most common
ity (buses, jeepneys, taxis) mode of local transport that ser-
vices subdivisions and remote are-
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

comprise 14% and commercial


vehicles contribute 4%. In ad- as is the tricycle. The regulation of
dition, two (2) light rail lines tricycles has been devolved to local
traverse the city; line 2 follow- governments. In Quezon City, there
ing the ROW of Aurora Blvd. are over 24,000 tricycle units ply-
and line 3 along EDSA. ing 149 service areas. Although
tricycles are banned from using
In terms of passenger vol- major roads some are seen plying
ume, public utility modes move certain major road sections. This is
as much as 70% while private due to the fact that local road net-
vehicles carry only 30% of the works which they are allowed to
passenger traffic. This clearly use are often poorly articulated
shows a big discrepancy in ve- and cannot serve as alternative
hicle road occupancy. The two routes for tricycles.
LRT lines also differ hugely in
ridership with Line 3 carrying c) Traffic gridlock
Traffic congestion is experi-

54
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

enced in many intersections of ma- and this has made them seek
jor thoroughfares in Quezon City. greener pastures outside the city
This is due mainly to the sheer vol- or in other countries.
ume of vehicular traffic, especially
Meanwhile, even with a lean
private vehicles. Another cause of
bureaucracy the city still attains
congestion is the big number of
increased productivity courtesy of
buses that are made redundant
the competent and dedicated per-
with increasing LRT patronage but
sonnel.
which continue to ply the same
routes as the LRT lines. Other mi-
b) High number of female per-
nor causes include lack of disci-
sonnel
pline among public utility vehicle
The observed higher number of
drivers and the riding public alike
female personnel especially in the
who violate every known traffic
middle and lower management
regulation. While infrastructure
compares favorably with the na-
solutions are being put in place like
tional average. It shows that there
road widening, elevated footbridg-
are more women applicants who
es, traffic barriers and restraints,
meet the hiring criteria. It also in-
and signalized crossings, many of
dicates women empowerment,
the causes of traffic gridlock can be
particularly since the city has been
addressed by simple observance of
a pioneer in the enactment of a
rules and regulations by all road
Gender and Development (GAD)
users concerned.
Code.
4.2.6 Institutional Development
Challenges c) Absence of CODI
The non-creation of the Com-
1) Organizational Management mittee on Decorum and Investiga-
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

a) More than 30% unfilled posi- tion (CODI) which is part of the
tions Civil Service Commission's Admin-
Only key positions are filled up istrative Disciplinary Rules on Sex-
while more than 30% of the regu- ual Harassment Cases denies a pro-
lar positions are still vacant due to spective complainant a proper ven-
the delayed action on personnel ue to air or ventilate cases related
recruitment and promotion. This to sexual harassment.
action is, however, in line with the
city's program on rationalization of d) No complete profile of person-
resources. This resulted in an opti- nel
mized use of the city's funds for Personnel development thru
personnel services which is way capability building trainings is
below the 45% allowed by law. among the many programs imple-
However, a feeling of demoraliza- mented by the current administra-
tion is felt among some employees tion. However, some departments/

55
QUEZON CITY

offices fail to submit post- government.


training reports to the Person-
It is observed that each office
nel Office. This can be traced
has its own separate operating pro-
back to the inefficient monitor-
cess flow due to the absence of an
ing and tracking mechanism,
LGU Manual of Operations which
weak implementation of, and
should contain an integrated sys-
also the lack of awareness on
tems and procedures and service
the Memorandum Circular on
standards of all operating units in
Submission of Report 30 days
the LGU. The fragmented proce-
upon training completion. The
dures are open to graft and corrup-
lack of post-training reports
tion and the clients have no clear
results in inadequate basis for
guide where and how to transact
tracking and determining train-
their business more easily and effi-
ing needs. In addition, the city
ciently.
government is in need of a
complete profile and skills as-
2. Fiscal Management
sessment of personnel which
can serve as basis for person-
a) Effective and efficient fiscal
nel merit/promotion/rewards.
management
This complete personnel pro-
The city has been recognized
file can be a component of a
for its effective and efficient fiscal
comprehensive human re-
management. This recognition was
source development program
successfully earned by the city gov-
of the city.
ernment thru the dynamic partner-
ship of the city, the barangay and
e) Good leadership
the city council. This was further
Strong leadership is evident
boosted by the streamlining of the
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

with the presence of various


bureaucracy, the presence of a
awards and recognition of the
competent economic and financial
city and the chief executive.
team, the capacity building provid-
The improved governance in-
ed to LGU officials from city to ba-
novations have been recog-
rangay particularly on fiscal man-
nized by both local and foreign
agement, and by the enactment of
organizations giving the city a
the city's revenue code. Strong
better image here and abroad.
leadership is also one major factor
that inspired the Team QC to sus-
f) Separate operating process
tain the gains and achieve collec-
flow
tion targets. Improved collection
While the city takes pride
can easily provide the means to
in the able leadership of its
improve delivery of public services,
Chief Executive there are still
increases in employee benefits and
areas for improvement in the
to finance more development pro-
operating system in the city
jects. The established viability of

56
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

the city's finances has also reduced ings from investments. With an
the need for funding from outside investment code in place, the city
sources which gave the city a can better identify areas of invest-
measure of competitive advantage. ments and attract investors.

b) Emphasis on revenue raising b) Lack of public consultation on


In its early years in office, the some proposed ordinance
current administration's emphasis There is seemingly a lack of
on revenue raising and infrastruc- public consultation on some pro-
ture development was triggered in posed ordinances that involve or
part by the backlogs in services affect certain barangays. This is
provision and revenue generation related to the problem of lack of
from the previous administrations. transparency and failure to
As a result, development plans and properly inform and consult with
other international commitments concerned barangay officials and
such as the Millennium Develop- representatives. In turn, the con-
ment Goals (MDGs), the Conven- cerns of affected barangays may
tion on the Elimination of all Forms not be sufficiently addressed. The
of Discrimination Against Women challenge now is to institute addi-
(CEDAW) and the International tional mechanisms to ensure par-
Covenant on Economic, Social, and ticipation of barangay representa-
Cultural Rights (ICESCR) were not tives in the consultations; other-
immediately implemented. Too, the wise, it will be difficult for the city
needs and concerns of such sectors government to get the full support
as children and urban poor were of the barangays for future legisla-
not sufficiently addressed. This tive measures.
was manifested by the limited im-
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

provement in the quality of life of c) Slow passage of some ordi-


the constituents. nances
Some ordinances move through
3. Local Legislation the legislative much faster than
others. This can be traced to lack of
This sub-sector would have to ad-
lobby groups, the nature of pro-
dress challenges in terms of enacting
posed ordinances as well as politi-
and strengthening legislative
cal, social, economic and personnel
measures that would contribute to the
- related factors. This leads to com-
over-all development of the city.
promised public service delivery,
prolonged conflicts, and delayed
a) Absence of investment code
implementation of development
With the city's Investment Code
programs.
still pending adoption by the City
Council, there is practically no
d) Information Access to Local
guide to investment in the city or
legislation
to allocation/prioritization of earn-
Access to information on local
57
QUEZON CITY

legislation is difficult because organizations in the city.]


the legislative tracking system b) Active NGOs/POs in the CDC
is not yet fully computerized. There is now an active NGOs/
The on-going installation of POs participation in the City Devel-
computer-based systems was opment Council brought about by
temporarily hampered by the the increased awareness of their
recent fire incident. With the role as partners in governance.
increasing trend in the use of This active fusion makes for effec-
Information Communication tive coordination and consultation
Technology (ICT) in govern- relative to sectoral planning and
ment processes, the sector is programming.
challenged to facilitate data
c) Imbalance in sectoral repre-
retrieval and to institute fully
sentation to CDC
computerized systems for im-
However, there is an observed
mediate public access to and
imbalance in the pattern of sectoral
adequate dissemination of local
representation to the CDC. For ex-
legislations.
ample, the urban poor have 10 rep-
4. People's Participation resentatives while other sectors
are not represented. The failure of
a) Increased number of ac- some organizations to collaborate
credited NGO/PO with the city's initiatives deprives
The city has substantial ac- their clients like the out-of-school
complishments in the area of youth (OSY), the adults, and the
people participation and in- children of the local government
deed considers "participative services they need.
governance" as one of its key
principles. d) Not all BDCs conduct barangay
Chapter 4: DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

This principle is reflected in development planning


the increased number of ac- Another challenge is that not
credited NGOs and POs and all barangay development councils
their active participation thru (BDCs) conduct barangay develop-
information drives, increased ment planning (BDP) with active
awareness of their role as part- NGO/PO participation due mainly
ners in governance, and institu- to the inability or lack of technical
tional intervention which re- know-how of some barangays to
sulted in effective coordination undertake BDP, conflict between
and in more partners in devel- barangays and NGOs/POs and also
opment. The challenge then animosity among NGOs/POs them-
would be to sustain and en- selves. The inadequacy of the ba-
hance information dissemina- rangay development councils vis-a-
tion, institutional intervention vis active NGO/PO participation
and coordination between the spells unclear priorities for pro-
government and civil society gram implementation. 

58
VISION-REALITY GAPS
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

This chapter summarizes the differ- c) As health and wellness center in


ences between the desired end-state Asia and the Pacific
scenario as described in Chapter 3 and
the current status of development of 5.1.1 Gaps in the first role
Quezon City as presented in Chapter 4.
It also attempts to extract the causes Quezon City has maintained its
and consequences of the identified status as the green lung of Metro Ma-
gaps as a take off point for the explora- nila. No other LGU in the metropolis
tion of appropriate policy options and has as much open space as Quezon
intervention measures. (See also Ap- City does, both in absolute and rela-
pendix 1). tive terms. The city maintain is
poised to take up the challenge of
Consistent with the two components sustaining said role over the long
of the vision statement, namely, the term.
outward-looking and the inward-
looking, this chapter contains two What seems to be the gap to be
parts: 1) Gaps between the desired closed is the need to recover for the
roles of Quezon City and the current public benefit more linear open
level of attainment of those desired spaces which are illegally en-
roles, and 2) Gaps between the desired croached upon. These include legal
characteristics of the five development easements along rivers and creeks,
sectors and their current state as pic- road rights of way, and easements of
tured in the Socio Ecological Profile (In utility lines like Meralco transmis-
separate volume) and the development sion lines and MWSS aqueducts.
challenges (Chapter 4).
Moreover, the continuing reduc-
The sectoral development plans that tion of institutional open spaces such
follow beginning with chapter 6 spell as those in military camps, universi-
out the strategies and intervention ty campuses and government hospi-
measures intended to close these gaps. tals which are included in the com-
putation of the gross open space of
5.1 The Desired Roles of Quezon City Quezon City leads to the effective
As discussed in Chapter 3, there are reduction in the over-all share of
three identified roles for Quezon City open space to total land area.
Chapter 5: VISION-REALITY GAPS

in its wider context, namely:


To be able to maintain the actual
a) As the green lung of Metro Manila amount of open space and thus sus-
b) As the knowledge industry capi- tain its role as green lung of Metro
tal of the Philippines Manila, more creative approaches to

59
QUEZON CITY

urban design and more respon- the knowledge industry capital Que-
sive revisions of the existing zon- zon City must be in the forefront of
ing ordinance are clearly needed. efforts to explore new ideas, adopt
and disseminate modern tools and
5.1.2 Gaps in the second role techniques, and promote the full
With the presence within its flowering of the arts and sciences
nationwide. These latter implications
territorial jurisdiction of top uni-
versities, university-based sci- of the second desired role for Quezon
City as enumerated in Chapter 3 are
ence research and technology
incubation facilities, all national the gaps that are yet to be filled.
television and major radio net- 5.1.3 Gaps in the third role
works, movie production, record-
ing companies and related enter- Quezon City is well on its way to
tainment facilities, and the most becoming the health and wellness
number of IT parks and center in the country and in Asia and
ecozones, Quezon City can al- in the Pacific. This can be gleaned
ready lay claim to the title of be- from the growing number of interna-
ing the knowledge industry capi- tionally renowned specialty hospi-
tal of the country. tals, both government and privately
owned. In addition, health and well-
But the title should not be ness services - diagnostic, dental and
based solely on the accident of beauty clinics, rehabilitation centers,
geography. More than being a convalescent/nursing homes, health
mere site for the above-cited in- spas and fitness gyms - abound.
stitutions and facilities the city
needs to continue to establish In as much as the target clientele
strong linkages with them. On include foreign tourists, additional
one hand, these institutions must support infrastructure such as hotels,
show a sense of corporate citi- hostels, hospitels and similar forms
zenship by taking active part in of accommodation of competitive
various programs and activities quality and pricing are needed. At
and where necessary provide the moment these are still in short
guidance in their host city’s effec- supply in Quezon City.
tive governance. On the other
hand, the host city must learn to Also, an aggressive program of
Chapter 5: VISION-REALITY GAPS

utilize these institutions as part medical tourism needs to be crafted


of its intellectual capital. As host and vigorously promoted.
city, the local government, busi-
ness, and society must be among
the first to benefit from the use of 5.2 Vision-Reality Gaps in Desired
innovative processes, new prod- Sectoral Characteristics
ucts and ideas generated by the- 5.2.1 Gaps in the desired quality
se knowledge institutions. And as of the population

60
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

It is envisioned that Quezon City grown paramedics or “hilots”. Over-


residents of the future are healthy, all, maternal deaths in Quezon City,
educated and secure. ranked lower than Metro Manila for
every 100,000 live births.
1) On the state of health of the Infant mortality rate is lower in
city residents – a number of input Quezon City than in Metro Manila.
and outcome indicators are used to
determine gaps or backlogs in the The nutritional status of pre-
city’s health care delivery system. school children shows a gap of only
Outcome indicators include overall one out of 100 children is moderate-
mortality and morbidity rates, infant, ly to severely malnourished. The rate
child and maternal health and pre- for the city is lower than that for
school children’s nutrition. Input in- Metro Manila. The immediate cause
dicators include ratio of health facili- of infant malnutrition is that only 67
ties, health care programs and health out of 100 infants are breastfed up to
personnel to total population and 6 months compared to 72 in the en-
available facilities for sports and rec- tire metropolis. What makes the
reation. Quezon City mother so coy about
breastfeeding?
Mortality rate for all ages shows
a decreasing trend. The top three In terms of input indicators like
killers, Pneumonia, Cancer (all ratio of health centers to total popu-
forms) and Acute Myocardial Infarc- lation, the picture is not so bleak,
tion. except in very populous District II
where the ratio 1:57,764 exceeds the
Incidence of illness for all ages is national standard of 1:50,000. In the
likewise decreasing. The top three same district, there is an acute short-
causes of morbidity are typically age of hospital beds. Whereas there
those that affect poor vulnerable should be one bed for every 2,000
groups: (Upper and Lower) Respira- inhabitants in District II, there is one
tory Tract Infection, Skin Deseases for every 23,730 inhabitants. This
and Urinary Tract. Pulmonary Tu- imbalance implies that sheer size
bercolosis (PTB) was rank sixth in and growth of the population in this
2010, went up as number three in area of the city can overwhelm gov-
2013 and back to rank 6th in 2015. ernment efforts and resources.
Chapter 5: VISION-REALITY GAPS

The state of health of pregnant Another input indicator is the


women depends on the kind of pre- ratio of health personnel to total
and post natal care they receive. In population. Government physician
Quezon City, only nine out of 10 population ratio is way above the
pregnant women receive early pre- national standard but there is a
natal check-up. Only 3.62% (2015) of shortage of government dentists.
deliveries are attended by home- Similarly the number of government

61
QUEZON CITY

nurses is adequate. There is how- al 31 elementary and 48 secondary


ever, an acute shortage of gov- school classrooms will have to be
ernment midwives. constructed in District II.

Finally, there appears to be no Enrollment participation rate.


lack for sports and recreation This indicator is the outcome of the
facilities in Quezon City, both willingness and ability of families to
public and privately owned. send their school-age children to
school. To a lesser degree this indica-
2) How educated is the Que- tor also reflects the quality of the ex-
zon City resident? A number of isting educational services and facili-
outcome, output and input indi- ties. As of SY 2015-2016 the EPR for
cators can be used to assess the elementary and secondary schools in
current shortfalls to full attain- Quezon City were recorded at
ment of this vision descriptor. 95.43% and 85.90%, respectively.
Due to the fact that elementary
and secondary education is not Probably a more disturbing indi-
devolved to local governments cator is the enrollment participation
only indicators relevant to LGUs rate among pre-school age children.
are selected for analysis here. In SY 2015-2016 only less than one-
third ( 49.22%) of all pre-schoolers
Literacy rate. This is a catch- were enrolled in the day care cen-
all indicator of the general educa- ters, public and private. An over-
tional attainment of the popula- whelming majority of young children
tion. As of the 2010 national pop- are being deprived of organized in-
ulation census the literacy rate of struction and upbringing in their
Quezon City is 99.74%, slightly formative years.
higher than that of Metro Manila
which is 99.20%. Cohort survival rate. This indica-
tor shows how well students are able
Classroom-student ratio. This to stay in school from the first year to
is a very important indicator to the last year of a particular school
the LGU because local govern- level. In SY 2015-2016 85.59 % of
ments participate in the provi- elementary pupils who enrolled in
sion of classrooms. In Quezon Grade I six years earlier finished
Chapter 5: VISION-REALITY GAPS

City the city government contin- Grade VI. At the secondary level
ues to construct elementary and 82.32% of those who entered first
secondary school classrooms. year finished fourth year. In short,
Only District II had shortage of one in every five enrollees in elemen-
classrooms. To satisfy the stand- tary and high school levels is not able
ard classroom-student ratio on a to complete that particular school
2-shift basis of 1:50, an addition- level.

62
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Academic performance indicator. curity are health, education, food


Despite the gaps described above, and nutrition, adequate shelter, suf-
Quezon City schools performed rela- ficient income and access to clean
tively well compared to other LGUs safe drinking water and sanitation
in Metro Manila. facilities. At the level of communi-
ties, the critical factors include ser-
Promotion of culture and the arts. vices to ensure peace and order, dis-
This input indicator elevates the con- aster risk reduction, and to provide
cept of the “educated” citizen from care and protection for vulnerable
that of merely functionally literate to groups.
one who is “cultured”. But the cul-
tured individual is almost impossible Adequate shelter. An adequate
to determine with any degree of cer- shelter is one that provides protec-
tainty. Hence, only the availability of tion to the occupants from the harsh
media and opportunities for cultural climatic conditions such as: ex-
advancement of the citizens such as tremes in ambient temperatures,
museums, art galleries, heritage sites rain, typhoons, floods, and the like.
and cultural programs of which Que- Ideally, every person, family or
zon City is richly endowed will suf- household must be accommodated
fice as indicator of how “educated” in one dwelling unit. The occupants
Quezon City residents can be pre- of each dwelling unit must enjoy se-
sumed to be. cure tenure to be free from the
threat of eviction.
Scholarships galore. The city, as
well as individual councilors, sup- As of 2015, housing backlog was
ports thousands of scholars at the estimated at 218,840 units consist-
baccalaureate degree level. However, ing of doubled up and displaced
it has yet to offer graduate and post households. This represents about
graduate scholarships. 32% of all households in the city.
Add to this, about 12,000 new units
needed every year due to formation
3) How secure do QC residents
of new households.
feel in their persons and in their
property?
Sufficient income. In a society
where practically everything that
The feeling of security by individ-
Chapter 5: VISION-REALITY GAPS

one needs has to be purchased in the


uals and communities is the net ef-
market, having sufficient income is a
fect of factors that tend to strengthen
critical factor to one’s well-being and
their capacities to cope with, and fac-
security. Sufficient income is techni-
tors that reduce their vulnerability to
cally defined as an income level
natural and human made disasters.
above the poverty threshold com-
At the individual level the most im-
puted for the particular region.
portant factors that contribute to se-

63
QUEZON CITY

In the absence of Quezon City providing welfare services in the city.


data in the PSA results of the The Office of the Senior Citizens Af-
FIES, that of NCR is used which is fairs provides programs for the wel-
3.9% on poverty threshold, fare of residents above 60 years of
which is lower than the Philip- age.
pines which is 21.6%.
A final note on the desired quality
Access to safe drinking water of the city’s population: The backlogs
and sanitary toilets. As of 2015, and shortfalls identified in this sec-
not all households (98%) in Que- tion are due in large part to the huge
zon City had proper sanitation and rapidly growing population of
facilities. This is unsatisfactory Quezon City. The huge population of
for a city with claims to moderni- 2.7 million (2007) with an average
ty and boasts of world class growth rate that consistently topped
health care facilities. those of Metro Manila and the Philip-
pines for the last three decades, rep-
Police-population ratio. This is resents a heavy strain on the city’s
a very common indicator of the resources. And yet there is very little
potential status of peace and or- that the city can do to limit the size
der in any community. As of and growth of its population. For
2015, there was one police per- one, family planning services can be
sonnel for every 824 inhabitants. intensified but this addresses only
This is still a case of under- the factor of natural fertility. The fac-
provision considering the nation- tor of migration is more problemati-
al standard ratio of 1:500. The cal for as long as there are perceived
shortage has resulted in rampant opportunities for living and working
commission of crimes against in Quezon City, migrants from all
property. Worse, the jailguard- over the country will continue to
inmate ratio stood at 1:97 as flock to the city.
against the standard ratio of 1:7.
Crime solution efficiency is also One positive trend is the slowing
decreasing. Firemen-population down of the suburbanization compo-
ratio. Against the standard ratio nent of in-migration due to two fac-
of 1:2,000, that in Quezon City in tors: 1) the vacant lands of Quezon
2007 was a low 1:5,142. This im- City are close to being completely
filled and 2) inner cities of the me-
Chapter 5: VISION-REALITY GAPS

plies that each fireman has to


treble his effort to effectively tropolis are now undertaking their
protect his share of the popula- own redevelopment schemes and are
tion. becoming attractive enough for po-
tential out-migrants to opt to stay. If
City services include 3 reform- this trend of weakening suburban
atory institutions supplemented moves continues, then Quezon City
by 46 registered non- will have to contend with a smaller
government organizations stream of migrants from other parts

64
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

of the country. need to increase the share of manu-


facturing to process, if not produce
This, coupled with a more vigorous more food to ensure food security.
promotion of family planning pro-
grams will be able to moderate popu- Strong economy. The strength of
lation growth of Quezon City in the Quezon City’s economy lies in con-
long term. sumption activities. Majority of the
city’s population are workers in the
5.2.2 Gaps in the desired character national government bureaucracy
of the local economy who represent a huge consumer
market. Necessarily, the dominant
Quezon City residents desire to economic activity is Community and
have a diverse, strong and vibrant Personal Services, exemplified by
economy as the foundation for pros- government services. Of late, the
perity and sustainable growth for all. consumption driven economy is
boosted by retail trading with the
Diverse economy. The convention-
mushrooming of giant shopping
al indicator of a diverse economy is
malls and mixed use development
one in which the three sectors
schemes. Personal Services led by
(Agriculture, Industry and Services)
the entertainment industry and now
are present and contribute to total
the ICT has further added muscle to
output. In other words, a wide varie-
the local economy. What seems to be
ty of goods and services are bought
the gap is that apart from the enter-
and sold, made, distributed and con-
tainment industry, there are no sig-
sumed by and in Quezon City. `The
nificant exports of Quezon City.
current reality however is that Agri-
culture is all but gone. Large scale
Vibrant economy. With growing
manufacturing is also fading from the
new in-bound investments, minimal
scene. What remains of the Industry
business closures, presence of busi-
sector are small-scale manufacturing,
ness-incubator institutions, and a
construction and water utilities. Ser-
thriving informal sector, Quezon
vices, on the other hand, especially
city’s economy is nothing but vi-
retailing represented by the giant
brant. The big gap, as far as this de-
malls, is rapidly expanding. Diversity
scriptor is concerned however, lies
of Quezon City’s economy therefore
in the absence of a central business
is determined by the mix of activities
Chapter 5: VISION-REALITY GAPS

district that will organize and con-


within the tertiary, and to a lesser
solidate the city’s growing economic
extent, secondary sectors. The obvi-
strength.
ous implication of the existing struc-
ture of the local economy is that Que-
5.2.3 Gaps in the desired quality of
zon City is completely dependent on
the natural environment
food imports due to loss of agricul-
ture. If the primary sector cannot be A clean, green and resilient envi-
revived, at the very least there is a ronment makes for healthy local res-

65
QUEZON CITY

idents and is attractive to visi- ard for total suspended particu-


tors. The challenges or gaps be- lates (TSP) of 90 micrograms
tween the desired quality and the per cubic meter. Only the station
current state of the city’s envi- at Katipunan Avenue registers
ronment are already extensively slightly lower values.
discussed in chapter 4. These
gaps are summarized below:
Heavy motor vehicle traffic is the
main cause of air pollution in the city.
1) Clean environment. This can
Ground and surface water quality:
be experienced through proper
Due to overwithdrawal, groundwater
management of wastes, high
in some parts of the city is getting
quality of ambient air and surface
depleted. Saltwater intrusion also
and groundwater.
renders groundwater unfit for human
a) On solid waste, Quezon
consumption. Rivers and creeks have
City generates a large vol-
water qualities found to be carrying
ume daily. Although the vol-
two to four times the maximum
ume can be reduced to as
standard of 7 micrograms per liter of
low as 13% more than 60%
biological oxygen demand (BOD).
of total volume generated
This is due to indiscriminate dump-
still ends up in the disposal
ing of solid waste and direct dis-
site. This means that volume
charge of domestic sewage and in-
reduction is not yet a wide-
dustrial effluents.
spread practice among QC
residents. This results in
2) Green environment. Quezon City
heavy pressure on the
easily makes the grade in as far as
Payatas Controlled Facility
the macro indicators like percent
which has a pending closure
share of open space to total land area
order. Where to locate a new
are concerned. However, at the micro
disposal site remains a prob-
scale a total of 32 out of 140 baran-
lem for the city. Also, there is
gays do not have any park at all. Also,
no effective system to moni-
the proposed conversion of some
tor the disposal of toxic and
institutional greens to built environ-
hazardous wastes. Hence, it
ment in connection with redevelop-
is not known for certain
ment schemes threatens to reduce
whether these special
the share of open space in the future.
Chapter 5: VISION-REALITY GAPS

wastes are not being


dumped along with ordinary
domestic wastes. Pleasant environment. The moder-
ate level of biodiversity in both flora
and fauna contributes to the over-all
b) On ambient air quality, pleasantness of the city’s environ-
two monitoring stations on ment. This is threatened, however,
EDSA register values that by reported cases of poaching of
exceed the national stand-

66
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

wildlife and their habitat in the La ly in smaller sections or micro space


Mesa Watershed. of the city.

3) Resilient Environment. Looks at Well-linked pertains to efficient


resolving the adverse impacts of cli- movement of people and goods to
mate change and natural and man- and from outside as well as through
made disasters. all parts of the city.

Hazards, Vulnerability, and Risk External links are already in place


Assessment (HVRA) Report show in all directions except for the north-
that the greatest threat and impacts west end of C-5 which is under nego-
in terms of danger to human and tiation or construction.
physical aspects are attributed to
earthquake and flood. Internal circulation is well articu-
lated in the older parts of the city
Top five to prioritize for earth- (District I and District VI). However,
quake impact are Barangays Bagum- the series of subdivision roads, all
bayan, St. Ignatius, Ugong Norte, Ba- developed separately and inde-
gong Silangan and Batasan Hills pendently in the newer parts
while Barangays Talayan, Damayang (Districts II, V and VI) are not
Lagi, Roxas, St. Peter and Dona properly connected and linked into a
Imelda are to be prioritized for flood rational municipal level circulation
impact. system.
Balanced urban form refers to a
For the years 2010-2015, Quezon
land use pattern that reflects the de-
City had a total of 5,812 reported fire
sirable combination of the built and
incidents.
unbuilt environment.
5.2.4 Gaps in the desired character
Open space. Quezon City enjoys
of the built environment
the biggest share of open land to to-
The vision of a well-linked, bal- tal land area. However, the big open
anced and attractive landscape for land mainly consists of vacant lands,
Quezon City is relatively easy to not functional open space. The latter
achieve. This is due in large measure accounts for less than 20% of total
Chapter 5: VISION-REALITY GAPS

to the initial investments in the city’s city land area. When the remaining
physical development by the national vacant lands which stood at 25% in
government during the early years of 2015 are finally built over, the bal-
its existence as the national capital ance will undoubtedly be upset if no
city. Given its original physical drastic measures to retain or recover
framework, future development of more open space are put in place.
the city merely takes the form of ad-
ditions, modifications and improve- Primacy of residential land use.
ment on the basic structure especial- Although residential use takes a
67
QUEZON CITY

huge slice of 36%, many resi- opers, resulting in hodgepodge


dents still find themselves land- patchwork without reference to an
less or unable to afford decent overall theme or concept.
dwellings in safe areas. Informal
settlements still proliferate in the 5.2.5 Gaps in desired qualities of
face of continuous subdivision local governance
developments, multi-storey con-
structions and reconstructions in From the vision of dynamic, sound
many parts of the city. and participative governance, a few
gaps can be identified as follows.
Steady loss of industrial land.
On the downside, this trend has Under the leadership of Mayor
led to loss of industrial jobs. On Herbert Bautista who is now on his
the positive end, the old industri- last 3-year term, governance in the
al sites are giving way to mixed city has undergone intensive and in-
use development projects that novative improvements. These
offer a greater mix of employ- earned for the city numerous awards
ment opportunities. Emergence and recognitions nationally and in-
of commercial nodes is rapidly ternationally.
changing the cityscape and circu-
lation systems. However, public Nevertheless, assessed against the
markets and older commercial three desired qualities, a number of
areas are also experiencing blight shortfalls in the current reality were
due to loss of customers. observed in the areas of organization
and management, fiscal manage-
Growing demand for institu- ment, legislation and people partici-
tional land on account of fast pation.
population growth. Institutional
reserves are however diminish- 1) Organizational Management
ing due to conversion mostly to
residential use to accommodate a) Under the program to ra-
the hordes of informal settlers. tionalize the size of the city’s bu-
reaucracy and thus achieve opera-
tional efficiency the city has main-
The ideal of an attractive city- tained a level of expenditures on
scape is already achieved
Chapter 5: VISION-REALITY GAPS

personal services that is way be-


through the existing urban form low the legal limit of 45%. This
defined by the series of arterial resulted in a 30% vacancy in regu-
roads (radials and circumferen- lar positions. To cope with the exi-
tials). The design of micro areas gencies of the services, over load-
however, needs to be looked into. ing and assigning multiple tasks
Currently, planning and design of among those who are there are
small areas are being pursued often resorted to. Consequently,
independently by private devel- not a few employees are getting
68
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

demoralized because they feel


they are being overloaded. c) Enhancement of computer-
ized legislative tracking system.
b) The city has yet to draft a Given the enormous volume of
comprehensive human resource legislative output for the last 60
development program, based on a years it is extremely difficult to
complete assessment of personnel retrieve needed information with-
training needs. This effort is ham- out the aid of computers. With a
pered by weak monitoring of indi- fully computerized tracking sys-
vidual performance and the fail- tem citizens can have easy access
ure by some offices or depart- to the workings of their elected
ments to make post training re- representatives. It also facilitates
ports. dissemination of information on
completed legislation as well as
c) There is no formal venue to soliciting people’s contributions
ventilate cases related to sexual to on-going debates and discus-
harassment in the absence of a sions on pending issues.
Committee on Decorum and In-
vestigation (CODI) as directed by
the Civil Service Commission. 4) People’s Participation
Quezon City prides itself in be-
d) In the absence of a Manual of ing home to the most number of
Operations for the entire city bu- civil society organizations. These
reaucracy individual offices have could form the base of participa-
had to device their own process tion by the various constituencies
flow. This often leads to confu- in different aspects of local gov-
sion among the transacting public. ernance. In the area of develop-
2) Fiscal Management ment planning, the formal venues
of participation namely, member-
a) This is the brightest feather ship in the City Development
in the cap of the Bautista Admin- Council and in its sectoral com-
istration. Its improved revenue mittees are already in place and
from intensified collection has functional. The gaps identified
been unequaled by any other city pertain to representation of
in the country. NGOs/POs in the CDC and the non
-participation of NGOs/POs in
Chapter 5: VISION-REALITY GAPS

3) Local Legislation barangay development planning.


a) Revisit implementation of
a) Unbalanced representation
new fair market value Ordinance,
of NGOs/POs is observed in the
b)Pursue the formulation of CDC. In terms of members, out of
standard rates of barangay taxes, the more than 1,000 accredited
fees etc.. thru enactment of law. NGOs/POs only 50 can be accom-
modated as members of the CDC

69
QUEZON CITY

in plenary. The non-members who are in the majority are looking for op-
portunities to participate as well. In terms of sectoral representation,
there is over-representation of the urban poor and under-or no represen-
tation of other vulnerable sectors.

b) Non-participation of NGOs/POs in some barangay development


planning can be traced to lack of knowhow on the part of some barangay
officials to conduct participatory barangay development planning. Other
reasons include the antagonistic attitude between NGOs/POs and baran-
gay officials, and the animosities between and among some NGOs/POs
themselves. 
Chapter 5: VISION-REALITY GAPS

70
SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

This Social Development Plan revolves around the overall objective of real-
izing the three-fold desired characteristic of Quezon City residents: healthy, ed-
ucated and secure. These desired outcomes are consistent with, or pursuant to
the relevant portions of the General Welfare Goals as embodied in Section 16 of
the Local Government Code, namely, 1) preservation and enrichment of culture,
2) promotion of health and safety, 3) maintenance of peace and order, and 4)
promotion of social justice. The following policies and intervention measures are
a menu of solutions to sectoral issues identified in Chapter 4 and/or to fill the
vision-reality gaps that surfaced in Chapter 5.

GOALS, STRATEGIES AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS

6.1. Goal 1 : To ensure a healthy citizenry in Quezon City

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations


 City-wide facility/  Sustain maternal and infant health care  Enact an Ordi-
desks for psycholog- programs and services nance requiring
ical counseling in-  Intensify existing nutrition programs self-employed
cluding subsidy of  Expanded MNCHN Service Delivery Net- individuals to en-
meds roll in Philhealth
work
 Household-based (as part of issu-
 Strict implementation of the Milk Code
network building ance/renewal of
EO51
using mobile smart permits require-
 Gabayan ang Batang Ina Initiative ments)
apps for early warn-
ing and community-  Human Rabies Animal Prevention and Con-  Review penal pro-
based monitoring trol Program visions for non-
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

and surveillance  HIV/AIDS/STI Prevention and Control Pro- compliance with


system for climate gram PhilHealth regis-
change sensitive and  National Immunization Program (formerly tration (check
notifiable diseases Expanded Program on Immunization) law)
 Regular water sampling test for water safe-  Proposed Ordi-
ty in coordination with LGU and Maynilad/ nance on Child-
Manila Water/ Random water sampling Friendly Public
test School Canteens

71
QUEZON CITY

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations

 Establishment  Household–based safe water storage  Proposed Ordi-


of Realtime awareness campaign covering 142 baran- nance on the
Community gays of the city Adoption of Ba-
Health Infor-  Community awareness raising on climate tang 1000 Pro-
mation Track- gender sensitive water sufficiency govern- ject
ing System ance  Proposed Ordi-
(rCHITS) Plus nance on estab-
 Urban farming/vertical gardening
 Enhanced lishing a func-
 Nutrition Program
monitoring on tional Barangay
 Information campaign on water wastage
the sale of Nutrition Council
junk foods  Enforcement of the regulation on sale of
 Proposed Ordi-
and sugary infant formulas
nance on Adoles-
drinks within  Strict implementation of the Veterinary cent Health
100 meter Code on Responsible Pet Ownership
 Passing of Ordi-
radius from  Elderly Program nance on Com-
all public and  Access to barangay sports and recreational munity-Based
private activities Blood Donors
schools
 Strict enforcement of Ordinance on stray (Ongoing: 1st
 Expansion of animals Committee Hear-
“Batang 1000 ing)
 Intensification of LGU programs to address
Project” in all  Proposed Ordi-
issues on teenage pregnancy
QC Barangays
 Values Formation to prevent pre-marital nance on 100%
 Expansion of Free Vaccination
sex
Service Deliv- for Rabies
 Seminar on HIV-AIDS awareness in
ery Network
schools
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

in all QC Ba-
rangays  “Teen Walk For Health” Program
 Include adolescent reproductive health in
the curriculum
 City-wide implementation of the Ordinance
on Barangay Health Management
 Nutrition Program Ready-to-Use Thera-
peutic Program

72
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations


 Mag-ina Telereferral  Local supplementary feeding pro-  Proposed Ordi-
System (MINTS) gram for children, elderly and people nance on the
Birth Registration with disabilities during disasters adoption & roll-
Tracking System  Incorporate mental health program in out of the refer-
( BIRTS) QC Health Department Services ence material on
 Health Facilities HIV /AIDS /STI
 Establishment of more breastfeeding
Enhancement Pro- for high school
stations and milk banks
gram students in all 46
 Establishment of  Health information and Advocacy
public high
Geriatric Ward in Campaign on PhilHealth Benefits and
Quezon City Gen- schools in QC &
its Utilization
eral Hospital appro. funds for
 Construct addi-  Strict implementation of existing the implementa-
tional health cen- MOA between LGU and PhilHealth tion thereof
ters supported by monitoring and evalua-
 Establishment of
tion
additional THQ in
other districts  Mechanism for enrolment for cover-
 Installation of com- age of Philhealth voluntary members
mon public water
supply to barangays  Monitoring of government agencies
with ISFs on private agencies enrolment and
remittance for their employees
 Dissemination of information for Phil-
health coverage for senior citizens
 Barangay based coordinated siphon-
ing of septic tank by Maynilad / Ma-
nila Water on per area basis
 Household survey on the availability
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

of sanitation infrastructure and water


demand

73
QUEZON CITY

Strategy 2 : Provide and improve health and sports infrastructure

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations


 Health Facilities En-  Mechanism for Learning and devel-  Proposed Ordi-
hancement Program opmental disability and giftedness nance for the
 Establishment of assessment establishment
Geriatric Ward in  Provision for communal toilets with of a Drug Test-
Quezon City Gen- adequate water supply and proper ing Laboratory
eral Hospital supervision from the barangay and at QCGH, NDH
community leaders and QCHD
 Construct addi-
tional health cen-  Provisions on additional supply of  Proposed City
ters city pound trucks Ordinance to
increase health
 Establishment of
budget
additional THQ in
other districts
 Installation of com-
mon public water
supply to barangays
with ISFs
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

74
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Strategy 3 : Enhance health personnel and software capability

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations


 Hiring of additional  Strengthen the referral system to  Proposed ordi-
health personnel other agencies(e.g. PMHA, and other nance requiring
and increase their government hospitals) all hospitals in
salaries  Strict enforcement of Ordinance of QC to adopt
non-skilled health personnel not to Electronic Medi-
practice birth delivery cal Records Sys-
tem
 Community-based Blood Donors
Program  Legislation on
 Training for teachers/ Support facili- continuous
Training Pro-
ties/materials for learning/ develop-
gram for Com-
ment disability
munity Health
Workers
 Proposed ordi-
nance requiring
Family Medicine
Residents of
Quezon City
General Hospi-
tal to serve for
at least three
(3) months in a
Health Center in
Quezon City
DEVELOPMENT PLAN
Chapter 6: SOCIAL

75
QUEZON CITY

Strategy 4 : Manage population growth

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Services Legislations
 Sustain current programs on family planning  Proposed re-districting of the city into 10
 Strengthen information dissemination of districts
family planning methods
 Intensify Reproductive Health Law

6.2 Goal 2 : To attain an educated citizenry

Strategy 1 : Achieve 100% literacy

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations


 Establish data for OSY  Channeling of information thru the ba-  Proposed ordi-
literacy rangay and social media on the availa- nance mandating
 Institutionalize School bility of Kinder program private schools to
Mapping for Inclusive  Intensify Family Mapping Program allocate 20% from
Education  Home visitation and student tracking their schools capac-
 Accreditation of Nego  Values Formation / Competent ity for PWDs
tech and HBCET parenthood  Ordinance requir-
(Center for Entrepr-  Intensify programs on ADM/Continuous ing all barangays
neurialship and Tech- development of ADM for mandatory sup-
nology)in TESDA and  LGU/NGO support for ALS program port for the con-
explore possibility of  Intensify ALS awareness program duct of Community
DepEd recognition as  Increase job opportunities and liveli- Mapping and other
Learning Center hood programs DepEd data gather-
 Formulate standard  Institutionalization of Home Visitation ing activity
values formation pro-  Amending Propose
gram. Ordinance requir-
ing all barangays
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

 Tutorial services to and public schools


students in the baran- to offer ALS to in-
gay level ”Talino and crease the number
Galing” program. of CLCs
 ALS Instructional mate-
rials improvement pro-
gram
 Continuous develop-
ment of ADM modules,
printing and reproduc-
tion

76
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Strategy 2: Produce the best quality educational outcomes in


basic education

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations


 Subsidize test on level of intel-  Provide incentives to all stu-  School Board Reso-
lectual/learning disability dents lution recognizing
 Parents Academy program  Adequate creative teaching the legitimate PTA
 Comprehensive public school aid / instructional materials authority
ICT Based Learning Program  Strict implementation on De-  Proposed ordi-
 Tutorial program for PWDs pED policy for teachers nance requiring all
 Scholarship special program for  Teacher capability & capacity public and city
deserving students below building training programs schools one (1)
average.  Provide comprehensive and classroom for
updated books PWDs with man-
 City-funded Scholarship grants
power complement
for Senior Highschools  Home Visitation by class ad-
per district
 Instructional Materials, tools, visers
 PPP,Resolution
equipment Improvement Pro-  Counselling and Parent
authorizing Mayor
gram- Provision of complete Teachers conference
to partner with
facilities, instructional materials  Strengthen information Com- telecommunication
and equipment for all grade munication and Educational service providers
levels (ICE) Materials to prevent
 Proposed ordi-
 Conceptualize and introduce decrease in completion rate
nance regulating
non-traditional way of teaching  Partnership with NGOs/POs/ the use of electron-
to all children (e.g. music, thera- PVOs for dental and medical ic devises inside
py, storytelling etc). missions the school premis-
 Include sign language and sensi-  Enhancement of Family/ es
tivity trainings in all curriculum Youth Welfare Services in-  Creation of school
 Conduct of supervisors’ princi- cluding inculcation of family based Anti-Drug
pals’ capability and capacity values Abuse Council and
building training programs (on  Integration in school curricu- programs
content administration and lum orientation on Juvenile  Proposed resolu-
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

strategies) Justice Welfare Act tion strictly imple-


 Standardized curriculum for  Adequate SHS tools, equip- menting the access
Parents Education ment, facilities and instruc- of students in inter-
 Intensify guidance program tional materials. net cafes during
 Conduct Training for GPTA of-  Strict enforcement of RA school hours.
ficers 10627 or “Anti-Bullying Act”  Proposed ordi-
 Develop an evaluation system to  Standardized and compre- nance providing
measure competence of public hensive reading and numera- subsidy to ALS
school teachers cy remedial program learners
 Health awareness programs

77
QUEZON CITY

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations


 Design a systematize pro-  Essential Health Care pro-  Proposed ordinance grant-
gram that would enhance gram ing subsidy for National
and motivate the reading  Referral on the Incidence Certification
capability of students. of teenage pregnancy to  Resolution to come up
 Standardized Monitoring Health Department with Standardized curricu-
and Evaluation of Feed- lum Parents Education
ing Programs in public  Create an ordinance that all
schools schools should have books
 Partnership with Mental in Braille
Health Institutions  Proposed Ordinance estab-
lishing a comprehensive
assessment and rehabilita-
tion center for children
with special needs

Strategy 3: Raise the level of cultural awareness, arts and sciences pro-
motion and encourage the pursuit of higher education

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations


 Develop and promote  City Funded scholarship  Revise Scholarship policy
historical sites, land- grants for college and gradu- for SYDP
marks, museums and ate schools  Academic excellent
art galleries.  Poor/income bracket
 Expand courses at  Proposed ordinance
QCPU amending the QCPU Char-
ter
 Create ordinance to con-
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

serve parks and shrines


 Create ordinance to allo-
cate fund for play area and
maintained by the city gov-
ernment
 Consortium of play-
grounds of adjacent baran-
gays

78
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Strategy 4 : Improve educational and cultural infrastructure

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Legislations
 Educational facilities development pro-  Proposed ordinance establishing SPED
gram Centers
 Establishment of SPED center per district  Proposed ordinance establishing addi-
 Provision for additional classrooms tional public reading canters
 Demolition and replacement of old school  Proposed ordinance establishing addi-
buildings tional schools specifically in Dist.2,5 & 6
 Construct additional day care centers  Proposed ordinance establishing SPED
 Establishment of additional Senior High Center per congressional district
Schools  Proposed ordinance establishing com-
 Establishment of additional ALS centers prehensive assessment and rehabilita-
 Land acquisition for school site tion center for children with special
(applicable for schools with no space) needs
 Construction of 5 state of the art public
libraries
 Establish public training/ research center
per district
 Establishment of equipped and manned
by MDT SPED centers
 Public School ICT Based Learning materi-
als reproduction
 Construction of affordable student dormi-
tories
 Parks and Playground development and
Improvement Program
 Development of open spaces for parks and
playgrounds
 Establishment of playground in Day care
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

canters

79
QUEZON CITY

6.3 Goal 3 : To accord citizens a feeling of security

Strategy 1 :Effectively curb crime incidences

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations

 Creation of Anti-  Increase police force/ visibility  Propose an ordi-


Cyber Crime Office  Strengthen witness / victims pro- nance to provide fi-
 Utilization of tection programs nancial assistance to
BANTAY KRIMEN,  Inculcation of values / discipline all barangays to cov-
PNP ISERBIS APPS er miscellaneous ex-
thru values formation programs for
penses in handling
 Hiring of police the police force
criminal cases such
personnel  Institutionalization of Managing
as medical check-
 Hiring of addition- Police Operations
ups, drug test, filing
al jailguards  Police/Community Synergy fees, board and lodg-
 Construction of a  Sustain E-Projects and maximize ing for victims of vio-
perimeter fence of utilization of Social Media for an lence, transportation
new QC Jail effective crime solution to home destination,
 Land Acquisition  Crackdown on rank and file (police mental and drug re-
Program force) since some are protectors of habilitation expenses
- Identify and pushers
acquire strategi-  Elimination of assets protected by
cally located police(skills capability and values
sites for police formation for the police
and fire sub-
 Implementation of Project Double
stations
Barrel
 Hiring and deploy-
 Brgy Drug Clearing Operations/
ment of additional
Household Drug Dependent Re-
jail
visitation
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

 Involvement of the community in


preserving peace and order
 Expedite trial of petty cases of in-
mates

80
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Strategy 2 : Provide protection from fire and other disasters

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations

 Hire additional fire-  Strengthen fire safety education to  Appropriation of funds


men all sectors of the community by barangays to pur-
 Construction of addi- (Ugnayan Sa Barangay) chase their own fire
tional fire sub-  Conduct information and dissemina- truck
stations including tion on fire prevention and control  Requirefire stationstocon-
procurement of fire per barangay ductregularinspections
trucks and modern  Tap private volunteers and barangay
firefighting and res- fire aides
cue / protective
equipment

Strategy 3 : Provide social justice and protection and safety nets to the
vulnerable members of the population regardless of age and gender

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations

 Land Acquisition Pro-  Values formation and discipline in  Passing of ordinance


gram the family, schools and community providing for afforda-
- Site acquisition for  Continuous implementation of the ble or free diagnostic
the abandoned and Alternative Learning System and assessment ser-
neglected elderly  Support for the youth to involve vices to PWD with
cultural/LGBT activities from the provision for man-
 Hire additional day
city programs power and facilities
care workers
 Provision skills training, livelihood  Passing of Ordinance
 Hiring of additional and employment opportunities for additional medical
license social workers  Provision of/access to sports and benefits for senior
to designate at least 1 recreational facilities citizens
Social worker per ba-  Provisions on ensuring care for  Propose an Ordinance
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

rangay DSWD clients for the upgrading of


 Search for Child  Collaboration with inter-faith or- salaries/
Friendly Barangay ganization to strengthen spiritual compensation of gov-
resolve ernment social work-
 Development of IEC
 Strong support for the LGU for film ers.
on child protection
laws, programs and showing how bad is the result for
services one’s health, physically and mental-
 Children’s Rights CAR- ly
AVAN

81
QUEZON CITY

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations

  Organization of disaster action  Resolution mandat-


teams at workplaces, institutions, ing the barangays to
business establishments etc. establish community
 Intensify “Balik Probinsiya” Pro-
based children or-
gram
 Maximize use of social media and ganizations and ac-
capacitate barangay officials in ac- creditation of exist-
cessing programs and services for ing children organi-
the disadvantaged sectors zations
 Encourage NGOs, churches and Ba-  Propose City Ordi-
rangay to put up more DCCs and nance Mandating All
Supervised Neighborhood Play Barangays to conduct
(SNPs) an annual General
 Conduct 3 shifts/sessions to ad- Assembly of children
dress present DCC deficiency / during Children’s
shortage (2hrs per session) month in November.
 Provide continuing capability  Propose amendment
building of day care workers on the BCPC Ordi-
 Full adoption of National Early nance providing for
Learning Curriculum in existing the process of select-
day care centers ing children repre-
 Encourage barangays to continu- sentatives (10-15 yrs
ously conduct orientation on RA old) in LCPC/BCPC
7610 (Child Abuse Law) and RA based o the guide-
9344 (Juvenile Justice Welfare Act ) book on Child Partic-
to its constituents ipation in the Philip-
 Facilitate the completion of on- pines (CWC)
going construction of Bahay Aruga  Proposed ordinance
or Halfway Home enjoining all public
 Issue PWD IDs for QC residents and private hospitals
 Continue the conduct of Gender and lying-in clinics in
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Sensitivity Training and orienta- QC to register birth


tions on Magna Carta of Women deliveries with the
and other related laws local civil registry
 Increase awareness on Elderly Ben-
efits under RA 9994

82
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations

  Full implementation of the Solo  Proposed ordinance


Welfare Act (RA 8972) compelling all public
 Sessions on the Rights of the Child and private hospitals
(CRC) and lying-in clinics in
 Capacity and Capability Enhance- QC to submit timely
ment Programs accomplishment re-
 Linkage with Local Social Welfare port indicating the ff:
Office, TESDA, DEPED, City Health  No. of infants regis-
 Gather data/profile of children and tered at birth/upon
adult with disability birth
 Intensify the joint rescue operation  No. of children with
for street children delayed birth regis-
 Establishment of database for sen- tration
ior citizens  No. of reported un-
 Compliance with the Early Year Act registered children
(RA 1040) specifically the rule on  Amend existing ordi-
granting recognition to child devel- nances of the city to
opment centers/learning centers really cater in the
offering early childhood programs interest of the PWDs
 Create a city ordi-
nance allocating fund
for the social activity
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

83
QUEZON CITY

Strategy 4 : Ensure effective implementation of traffic rules and other


laws

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations

 Establishment of an  Deployment of traffic enforcers in


impounding area for strategic roads / streets, schools
apprehended vehi- and establishments
cles  Deputization of police and baran-
 Production of video gay officials and BPSOs as traffic
presentation and enforcers
pamphlets on Road  Task Force Safe Boulevard
Safety Education  Issuance of permits and clearances
 Installation of traffic on truck ban exemption, transport
signage (directional, terminals, diggings and excavations
informative & warn-  Traffic direction and control
ing signs) in places
 Apprehension of traffic violators
where needed
and collection of fines and penalties
 Painting of lane
 Investigation of traffic vehicular
markings and pedes-
accidents
trian cross walks

Strategy 5 : Provide decent and affordable housing in hazard free


location

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Projects Services Legislations


 Land Acquisition  LGUs to offer affordable housing  Ordinance and sanc-
Program schemes tions against illegal
- Continuous imple-  Enforcement of one-time availment street structures/
mentation of land of Socialized Housing Program blockade along street
acquisition for hous-  Conduct inventory of land and de- thoroughfares, for
ing (on-site and off- velopment for socialized housing ease of response dur-
site), road right-of- ing fire/emergencies
way, rip-rapping and
development of same

84
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations

 Adaptive Capacity  Harness and consolidate pub-  Allow the 20% bal-
Building of house- lic ,private and community re- anced housing re-
holds towards sources in co-implementing social- quirement for QC
livelihood and ized housing developers to be allo-
housing  Strict checking and prioritization of cated within QC
 Development of Bistekville beneficiaries  Passage of Propose
the cleared area  On-site and off-site relocation Ordinance mandating
from ISFs to pre-  private developers to
Intensify “BalikProbinsiya” Pro-
vent new entrants share their Corporate
gram
and returning re- Social Responsibili-
 Strict Enforcement of Ord. SP-1774,
locates (Construct ties (CSR) in building
S-2007 adopting a uniform 3-meter
access roads/ social housing
easement along riverbanks, creeks,
streets, concrete  Passage of the pro-
streams and esteros
pathway planted posed Housing Code
with trees, baran-  Population management in case of
of Quezon City
gay parks and oth- resettlement and climate refugees
 Creation of a special
er open area relax-  Implement Executive Order issued
body to ensure con-
ation) on Streamlining the process of per-
trol and prevention
 Upgrading of ur- mits , licenses and clearances for
of nefarious activities
ban poor commu- CMP and other Socialized Housing
of professional infor-
nities (site devel- Projects (EO No. 18, S-2016)
mal settlers and syn-
opment) to in-  Continuous provision of basic ser- dicates
clude sewerage vices for CMP and Direct Sale Pro-
 Creation of a baran-
facilities, efficient gram beneficiaries (water, electrici-
gay task force for the
and adequate solid ty, roads)
protection of open
waste disposal  Create one-stop shop process of
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

spaces in compliance
system requirements and fast track the with Ordinance No.
 Rental housing following documents needed: 1) SP-914, S-2000 and
program certified true copy of tax declara- providing mechanism
 High density hous- tion (1 day only); 2) tax clearance(3 for full mobilization
ing program days); 3) approval of subd. Plan (by of barangays from
SAU); 4) zoning certificate encroachment of ille-
 Management in-
formation System gal settle
for the city’s ISFs

85
QUEZON CITY

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations

 Construction of  Proper coordination with the LGU/  Propose an Ordi-


affordable student Barangay Officials and land owner nance declaring
dormitories on acquiring lots properties acquired
 Development of  Stricter implementation/ thru public auctions
low-cost mass prosecution of known professional as socialized housing
housing projects squatters/syndicates sites and its disposi-
for low-income tion to bona fide and
 Electrification Program for Commu-
earners actual occupants
nity Associations
 Create an Ordinance
 Impose strict sanctions on errant
for the provision of
beneficiaries
housing loan
 Waive privilege to future housing
 Allocate budget to
project
address the housing
 Conduct proper orientation prior to
program
turn-over of awarded units
 Close Coordination/Collaboration
with QC LGU for the Donation of Lot
 Decent and affordable housing pro-
ject
 Subsidize funds/budget on housing
by the local and national agencies
 Re-financing of the housing pro-
gram
 Estate Management Program
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

86
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Strategy 6 : Improve protective and social welfare infrastructures

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations

 Social Welfare Facilities 


Development Program
 - Establish additional
facilities/services for
CNSP cases

 Proposed transfer
and Construction of
New Molave Youth
Home
 Establishment of op-
erational Community
-Based Therapeutic
Rehabilitation Center
for PWDs in baran-
gays with huge num-
ber of PWDs
 Establishment of
home for the aged to
shelter all aban-
doned, neglected and
abused elderly
 Establishment of Pro-
tection Center in No-
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

valiches District Hos-


pital

87
QUEZON CITY

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Projects Services Legislations


 Expansion of Mo-
lave Youth Home
programs and ser-
vices
 Establishment of
additional Night-
minding center
 Establishment of
shelter for aban-
doned and neglect-
ed PWDs (include
in long list)
 Drug Rehabilitation
Facility Development
Program
 Expansion and im-
provement of ex-
isting TAHANAN
 Provisions for drug
rehabilitation
school
 Protective Facilities
Development Program
 Transfer of Police
Station 2 and 3
Chapter 6: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

 Construction of
additional Police
Stations/Police
Community Pre-
cincts

88
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

The mandates of local governments regarding economic development as


embodied in the General Welfare Goals of the Local Government Code are : to
enhance economic prosperity and to promote full employment (Sec. 16, RA
7160). These goals are inter-related and mutually reinforcing. Pursuing econom-
ic growth guarantees employment for everyone who is willing and able to work.
Conversely, with everybody gainfully employed and able to consume the things
he/she needs, over-all prosperity is the inevitable result.

The kind of local economy that is able to realize this twin mandate is one
that is diverse, strong, and vibrant. Each of these descriptors is translated into
success indicators as presented in chapter 3 above. In the Economic Develop-
ment Plan, the three desired characteristics of the local economy are used as
complex goals around which strategies, programs, projects and other interven-
tion measures revolve.

GOALS, STRATEGIES, AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS

7.1 Goal 1: To bring about a diverse economy that provides wide employment
and income opportunities, increases investments and uplifts the standard of
living of the city residents.

Strategy 1 :Develop further the health and wellness industry

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs / Projects Services


 Development of a Health/Medical and Wellness Integrated  Medical Tourism
Program Promotion as QC's
 Conduct of health summits and conferences One-Town, One
 Human Capital Development – trainings on various health Product OTOP
and medical services
 Development of Alternative Tourist (Health & Wellness Fa-
Chapter 7: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN

cilities) Accommodation
 Putting up of hospitels, inns, homestay accommodation and
retirement villages accredited by DOT
 Promotion of the city as Health and Wellness tourist desti-
nation
 Micro-Financing and Local Development Funds for Water Stor-
age Tank Provision to Household and for CC and DRM Re-
sistance Settlements and Service
 Private Sector Incentive Program for Developing Household
Septage and Sewerage Facilities Household
 PPP Incentive Program for CC Health Adaptation and Risk Re-
duction Capacity Building

89
QUEZON CITY

Strategy 2: Establish the city as ICT capital, i.e., as user and producer of
software

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Knowledge District  Estalishment od Strong linkages  Legislation
 Enhancement of IT Infra- with ICT businesses & govern- on the priva-
structure support facilities: ment and training schools cy of cyber-
fiber optics, wireless connec-  Provision of secure environment space users
tivity and broadband infra- for BPO workers (installation of
structure through partner- streetlights and footbridges, po-
ship with private utility lice visibility)
companies: and  BPO Trainings
 Creative industries/
knowledge-based services
(e.g. original content crea-
tion such as animation, soft-
ware development, game
development, health infor-
mation management sys-
tems and engineering de-
sign)
 Development of incubation
facilities (R&D in IT Technolo-
gy Parks)
 Development of IT/Science &
Technology Center
 Exploration of QC as wi-fi en-
abled area

Strategy 3: Promote QC as Tourist Destination and increase tourist arrivals

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Chapter 7: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Development of Amoranto  Implementation of the Tourism  Ordinance to
Stadium/Sports Complex Development Plan preserve are-
 Establishment of Convention  Development /Maintenance of as with dis-
Center Historical Site/Landmarks/ tinct character
 Development of Tourism Dis- cultural heritage
trict  Encouragement/Promotion on
 The Civic Center District establishment of Tourist Support
 Lifestyle District Facilities e.g. hotels
 Knowledge Community Dis-
trict

90
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 The Cubao Growth Center Dis-  Improvement of Sister-city tie  Ordinance to
trict ups both in the local and inter- preserve areas
 The Quezon City China Town national levels with distinct
 The La Loma District  IEC to service providers and characteristics
 The Sergeant Esguerra Avenue QC residents on instilling
District (Entertainment Boule- awareness and appreciation
vard) on value of tourism
 The Maginhawa Art and Food  Coordination with different
Hub agencies (DOT, DTI, etc.)
 Eastwood City Cyberpark  Accreditation on operation of
 Encouragement of formation of tourism-oriented facilities for
associations in the travel industry database
 Museum Development
 Establishment of a Tourism Infor-
mation Center and Tourism Info
Booth / Kiosks in vital areas
 Development of Tourism packag-
es
 Culinary/Food Fair
 Conduct of cultural exhibits, com-
petitions

Strategy 4 :Encourage development of SMART (customized, assembly type) and


clean (using innovative/improved technology) industries and support growth of
local products and services

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Services Legislations
 Manufacturing Projects  Government subsidy/  Enforcement
Chapter 7: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN

 Manufacture and operation of assistance for the private sec- of penalties


alternative energy vehicles tor product branding efforts for small pol-
with charging stations.  Marketing assistance for QC lutive busi-
(Partnership with manufac- products: Tap artists / Talent nesses e. g.
turers) Agencies to endorse products barbeque,
 Trade Fairs/Exhibits ihaw-ihaw,
junkshops,
backyard
poultry, pig-
gery, fighting
cocks etc.

91
QUEZON CITY

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Manufacture of knockdown  Ordinance to
furniture for mass housing regulate
(Partnership with furniture transport ter-
manufacturers for the fabrica- minal regard-
tion/supply of knockdown ing provision
furniture which are easily in- of clean facili-
stalled/assembled, space- ties (e.g., toi-
saver and more affordable for lets, etc.)
the city’s mass housing pro-
jects).
 Livelihood training on car-
pentry, production of knock-
down furniture
 Establishment and develop-
ment of labor-intensive and
clean industries
 Product Development & Tech-
nology enhancement
 Trade fairs / exhibits
 Renewable Energy Initiatives
as CC Adaptive and Mitigation
Project
 Design gender-fair innovative
financing mechanisms for Ur-
ban Heat Island (UHI) candi-
date barangays e.g., funds for
urban gardening, green roof-
ing, massive tree planting and
rain water harvesting projects
 Home-based Livelihood Activi-
ties for Women
Chapter 7: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN

 Training on Adaptive capacity


Enhancement for Home Life,
Food Assistance, Temporary
Shelter and Trauma Services
 Micro-financing and City De-
velopment Fund to Develop
Capacity of SMEs for Eco-
efficient Production.

92
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Formulate Programs to Assist
Enterprises to Adopt and Im-
plement Environmental Man-
agement System, Green House
Gas Reduction/Cleaner Pro-
duction and Environmental
Cost Accounting
 Micro-financing for SMEs to
Enhance Solid Waste Disposal
Facilities, Toxic Packaging Ma-
terial in Medium to High Den-
sity Barangays
 Develop Carbon Establish-
ments in Accomplishing City
Set Targets in Reducing Car-
bon Emission Towards Sus-
tainable Transportation/Green
and Energy Efficiency.
 Micro-financing and Local De-
velopment Funds for poverty
reduction and conservation in
renewable energy host com-
munities
 Private Sector Incentive pro-
gram for energy-efficiency
household labeling to promote
energy efficient equipment
that could reduce consumers’
electricity bill much as 20%
 Conduct Workshop Using IEC
on CC Adaptation and Mitiga-
Chapter 7: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN

tion for Private Business Es-


tablishments and Service Pro-
viders to include above provi-
sion in their business continui-
ty plan.
 Micro Financing and Local De-
velopment Funds for CC to
comply with RA 10055 or Phil-
ippines Technology Transfer
Act.

93
QUEZON CITY

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Establish Business Establish-
ments Network on CC Adapta-
tion Good Practices and Com-
ply with Early Warning System
Protocols
 Enhance PPP for Establishing
Policy and Programs for New
Industry Development and
Retrofitting for the Old Indus-
try in Smart Industry and Ser-
vices.
 Private Sector Incentive Pro-
gram for Eco-transportation
and Electrical Retrofitting in
Medium to High Density Ba-
rangays

7.2 Goal 2: To develop a strong economic environment that will ensure


sustained growth

Strategy 1: Upgrade level of employability of the labor force and raise


standard of living of QC families

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services


 Advanced retraining pro-  Micro Finance Assistance & Entrepreneurship
grams on specific fields due to Training for the development of MSMEs
the changing economic and  Conduct of series of job summits, career develop-
commercial platform ment orientations to graduate students and on-the
 Establishment of a Resource -job industry training in partnership with the pri-
Chapter 7: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Center: Provides Labor Sup- vate sector


ply and Market Information  Focused product innovations
 Micro financing for hotspot  Enforcement of EO 452 (Security of vendors in the
barangays workplace) vis-a-vis livelihood program
 Casket production Livelihood  Retooling assistance for returning OFWs, migrants
project subsidized by the City and displaced workers
 Job facilitation
 Cooperative development
 Trade shows & exhibits
 Focused Skills & Livelihood Training

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COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Strategy 2: Improvement of economic database

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Services Legislations
 Improvement of business information system  Application of the CBMS – inclusion in
 Intensification of regular inspection on non- the budget and ordinance for Mayor to
renewing businesses enter into agreement to undertake the
 Profiling of employment and income situation program
of city residents  NCR cities (giving more than 30%
share to Phil. GDP) should be provided
specific data by PSA – Joint national &
NCR cities resources may be used.
Joint Council Resolution urging PSA
for NCR city level data
 Amnesty for retiring businesses

Strategy 3: Regulate operations of the informal sector

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Provision of Livelihood options  Barangay assistance in monitoring  Provision of con-
for displaced vendors of operations of informal economy ditions in the
  Further study on the informal business permit
economy in the City (including (not allowing
employment, Entrepreneurs, vendors within
online) vicinity causing
 Clearing of area of street vendors/ unjust competi-
peddlers causing obstructions to tion)
the pedestrians and vehicular traf-
fic
 Development of temporary vend-
Chapter 7: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN

ing sites and capital assistance

Strategy 4: Ensure adequate, safe food supply to all residents

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 City-wide Food Security Pro-  Strict compliance of markets with  City Resolution/
gram Towards Strengthening existing regulations to improve ordinance to
Business Continuity and Pro- conditions Freeze Food
tect Supply Prices Increase

95
QUEZON CITY

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Training on City-Wide Food  Price monitoring of basic com- During City Lev-
Security (Urban Farming and modities el Disaster Re-
Vertical Gardening in public  Strict compliance with standards sponse and Res-
schools / barangays with open on slaughterhouse operations for cue Period
vacant spaces). the Lechoneros
 Resilient Livelihood Program  Aquaponics – system that com-
(for victims of disaster) bines conventional aquaculture
 Development of City-owned with hydroponics
markets (new & existing) into  Maintenance/repair of public
a mixed-use commercial facili- markets
ty to cope with new develop-
ments
 Development of a trading cen-
ter, a “bagsakan area/food ter-
minal market
 Development of Triple A Mod-
ern and Centralized Slaughter-
house
 Establishment of a common
Slaughterhouse for La Loma
Lechoneros
 Micro-financing for sari-sari
stores cum Food Storage Pro-
gram in Hotspot Barangays
 Communication-based Early
Food Security Warning to Busi-
ness Establishments
 Develop Community-based
Awareness Raising Program
for Households and Business
Establishment Food Security
Chapter 7: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN

System

96
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

7.3 Goal 3: To develop a vibrant economic climate conducive to doing business both for
local and foreign investments .

Strategy 1: Developthe city into a globally competitive business center

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Program/Projects Services
 Establishment of a Modern and Iconic Struc-  Development / Establishment of the 5
tures (e.g. Diamond Tower, etc.) Growth Centers cited in the CLUP: CBD
 Development of a unique economic complex Knowledge Community District, Cubao
– an integrated park, learning center, com- Growth District, NGC-Batasan Area,
mercial/tourist-attracting facilities Novaliches-Lagro, Balintawak-Munoz
 Development of CBD  Installation of LED board displays of
planned development throughout the
city to make its vision, programs, pro-
jects and directions apparent to the
public.

Strategy 2: Increase new investments and retain old existing businesses and
encourage them to expand operations on site

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Program/Projects Services
 Revival of industries  Provision of incentives to encourage
 Development of e-commerce (e.g. registra- investments
tion of business licenses, development of  Investment promotions that includes
websites and networking with other agen- business information
cies)  Maintenance of strong tie-up linkages
 Water Storage Provision and Inclusion in with businesses
Business Continuity Plan
 PPP in Promoting Climate Change Resistant
Business Establishments, livelihood pro-
Chapter 7: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN

grams, housing and solid waste management


project

97
ENVIRONMENTAL
MANAGEMENT PLAN
QUEZON CITY

The environment sector seeks to create a clean, green and resilient envi-
ronment that is conducive to healthy city living and attracts not only the local
residents but also visitors from outside the city. This envisioned outcome, when
realized, ensures compliance with its General Welfare mandate of the Local Gov-
ernment Code (Sec. 16) which directs local governments to enhance the people's
rights to a balanced ecology.

GOALS, STRATEGIES, AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS

8.1 Goal 1: To create a clean environment that is conducive to healthy


urban living

Strategy 1: Reduce the volume of solid waste reaching the final disposal
site to 50% of the amount generated

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Capacity development for  Implementation of the Incen-  Integration of SWM in
barangays to implement tive Package on SWM for the the public education
proper SWM barangays system, adopting the
 Provision of Barangay In-  Mandatory compliance with provisions of RA 9512
centive Package and the provisions of RA 9003 and  Integration of popula-
awards under the Zero Bas- EO 774 (e.g., waste segrega- tion, health and envi-
ura Olympics to other tion, establishment of MRFs, ronment programs
stakeholders 50% reduction, etc.)  Sharing/clustering of
 Establishment of Waste  District monitoring of the SWM facilities for con-
Market in malls SWM practices of all stake- tiguous barangays
 Integration of the Informal holders for waste diversion
Waste Dealers into the For- documentation
mal SWM System thru the  City-wide implementation of
Junkshop Standardization waste segregation by all
Chapter 8: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

Project stakeholders (e.g., barangays,


 Expansion of the Kitchen schools, hospitals, establish-
Waste Collection Project ments, etc.)
 Retrieval and disposal of  Inventory and monitoring of
car and cellphone batteries establishments utilizing toxic
and high-tech gadget and hazardous wastes
wastes  Intensified Zero Litter Cam-
 Creation of pockets of paign
"Pook Kalinisan" areas to-  Monitoring of hospitals and
gether with the private other establishments generat-
sector to serve as models of ing healthcare wastes
cleanliness

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COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Establishment of community  Use of ecological waste  Policy on imposition of
and cluster materials recovery management practices in penalty to households
facilities (MRFs) all business establishments not segregating their
 Promotion of and support to located in the City solid waste (collected
the conduct of research and  Sustained information, funds may be used for
studies on new solid waste education, and communi- barangay environmen-
management (SWM) technolo- cation campaigns to edu- tal projects supported
gies and establishment of part- cate and increase the level by a barangay ordi-
nerships in the implementa- of awareness and partici- nance)
tion of such new technologies pation of the public in  Creation of Green
keeping the environment Fund Unit to monitor
 Partnership with the private
free of garbage and pollu- and manage the use of
sector and other agencies for
tion the city’s Green Fund
the processing of wastes at the
disposal facility  Strict implementation of all  Provide separate city
environmental laws fund for deputized
 DOST for the use of densifier
(penalty system/ environment police/
in the production of bricks
designation of bgy envi barangay
from residual plastics
police)
 Holcim for the used tire re-  Strict implementation of
trieval project and the re-
Plastic Bag Ordinance
covery of residual plastics as
alternative source of fuel in  Control proliferation of
the production of cement sidewalk vendors (by ba-
rangay with assistance
 PM for the establishment of
from the local govern-
the City MRF
ment)
 Quezon City Biodigester Facili-
 Enactment of Plastic Bag
ty in three (3) selected areas
Regulation to reduce the
(One (1) area per year)
use of plastic bags.
Chapter 8: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

 Mixed soft plastic recycling


 Requiring generators of
and conversion into school
toxic/hazardous and
chairs
healthcare wastes to:
 Management of organic waste  Implement mandatory
thru integrated composting waste segregation to
systems in twelve (12) select-
ensure proper handling
ed areas in Quezon City
of these types of wastes
 Secure the services of
accredited private con-
tractors in the collection
and disposal of their
wastes

99
QUEZON CITY

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Require subdivision de-
velopment to provide
their own composting
facilities / MRF

Strategy 2: Develop ecological solid waste disposal systems

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services


 Establishment of an envi-  Organize citizens volunteers group for project support
ronmentally- compliant in the barangay (participation of POs, HOA)
landfill for the exclusive  Special wastes collection and disposal system for bust-
use of the city ed fluorescent bulbs and spent domestic batteries
 Policy research programs
for potential investments
on modern technology &
equipment

Strategy 3: Ensure efficiency in solid waste collection

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Services
 Contracting out of collection services under terms and approaches ensuring efficiency

 Strict monitoring of the SW Contractors' compliance with the SW Cleaning, Collection,


and Disposal Services contract terms
Chapter 8: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

Strategy 4: Enhance the quality of the city's air to the levels meeting EMB
standards

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Establishment of air quali-  Strict implementation of the  Promotion of the use
ty monitoring stations requirement for the submis- of clean fuels
 Anti-Smoke Belching Pro- sion of Permit to Operate Air  Incentives for clean
ject Pollution Source and Control fuel investors and us-
 Tree Planting/Greening Installation upon renewal of ers
Project business permit

100
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Conduct of Pollution  Strict implementation of the pro-  Provision of incentives
Summit for business visions of the Clean Air Act, Re- to investments on
owners and Transport newable Energy Act, and Climate clean air technologies
Summit for transport Change Act and clean fuel busi-
groups to educate  Sustained information, education, nesses
them on different En- and communication campaigns to  Prohibit discharge of
vironmental Standards educate and increase the level of untreated water in
& Pollution Control awareness and participation of city’s drainage outlets
Methods the public in energy conservation & tributaries
 Payatas methane gas and attaining energy efficiency  Prohibit discharge of
extraction project  Issuance of Environmental Clear- untreated water in
(Partnership with Pan- ance to business establishments city’s drainage outlets
gea of Italy) who are complying with the dif- & tributaries
(Renewable) ferent environmental laws and  Enact or implement a
 City Fleet Fuel Efficien- ordinances. green building or
cy project  Implementation of City Ordinance structure
 Partnership with the No. SP 1958, S-2009 prescribing  Penalties for offend-
private sector in estab- guidelines and procedures on anti ers/non-compliance
lishing clean fuel refill- -smoke belching for motor vehi-
ing stations cles in Quezon City
 City wide tree-planting  Strict implementation of the Anti-
and more trees to be Smoke Belching Ordinance, Green
planted along major Building Ordinance and other re-
roads lated ordinances
 Acquisition of addi-  Strict monitoring and inspection
tional ambient air of business establishments that
monitoring devise that are possible sources of air pollu-
is handy and portable tants
for mobile monitoring

Strategy 5: Rehabilitate and restore rivers and creeks to the level/


condition that can support aquatic life and non-contact sports and recreation and
keep the community safe from danger and disasters
Chapter 8: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Riverways Management Program  Sustained infor-  Mandatory require-
 Sagip Batis sa QC Project mation, education, ment for big establish-
 Clean River Zones Project and communication ments to have their
 Biological Remediation of Rivers, campaigns to educate own sewage treatment
etc. and increase the level plant and recycle their
 River easement recovery and of awareness and par- wastewater
beautification ticipation of the pub-
 Establishment of Rivers/ lic in river rehabilita-
Waterways linear parks tion and preservation
 Acquisition of portable water qual-
ity meter to monitor water quality
effluent
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QUEZON CITY

Strategy 6 Control/manage the utilization of groundwater resource

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Kids Conserve Project in  Establishment of tie-up  Prohibition of further
schools with NWRB in monitoring groundwater extrac-
 Development of aquifer of groundwater extraction tion in the city
recharge schemes  Implementation of Ord.  Requiring big estab-
 Conduct IEC and capacity- No. SP-1682, S-2006 regu- lishments to have
building on simple technolo- lating the use of ground- their own sewage
gies to implement groundwa- water and close monitor- treatment plant and
ter conservation and protec- ing thereof recycle their
tion  Sustained information, wastewater
education and communi-  Creation of Water
cation campaigns to edu- Quality Monitoring
cate and increase the level Board
of awareness and partici-  Coordinated inter-
pation of the public in agency implementa-
water conservation tion of the Supreme
Court Mandamus

8.2 Goal 2: To nurture and sustain a green environment where there is an


ample and convivial space for living

Strategy 1: Develop an integrated system and hierarchy of parks and open


spaces to make Quezon City the greenest city and most disaster-resilient com-
munity in Metro Manila

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


Chapter 8: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

 Formulation of the Inte-  Maintenance and im-  Strong policy/ordinance


grated Parks and Open provement of parks on open space and parks
Spaces Plan  Promotion of the use of preservation and pro-
 Clearing, recovery and/or parks hibiting the conversion
development of open  Public education on envi- of easements, parks and
spaces, easements and ronment protection park strips for other
utility corridors into parks  Strict enforcement by the uses
and urban forests to in- City Environment Police  Ordinance requiring
crease the green areas to and the barangay- developers/builders to
25% of the city's total land deputized enforcers of replace every single tree
area ordinances on anti- affected/removed dur-
 Survey of easements, open littering and the use of ing development with 10
spaces and other potential waterways as dumping trees and replace every
green areas area planted tree that dies

102
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Plant Nursery Development
 Rationalized tree planting
projects to increase the city's
carbon sinks
 QMC Tree Tagging Project
 Establishment of bike lanes
 Urban farming project
 Comprehensive Quezon City
Greening Program
 City wide tree-planting
 Greening of public build-
ings
 Roadside planting
 Development/
Rehabilitation/
Beautification of center
islands, directional islands
and sidewalks
 Beautification of entry
points
 Comprehensive Parks Devel-
opment Program
 Development/
Rehabilitation/
Improvement of parks
 Development/
improvement of linear
parks along waterways
 Immediate implementation
Chapter 8: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

of greening projects on
identified open spaces to
prevent informal settler
families from returning
 Construction of play-
grounds in day-care centers

103
QUEZON CITY

Strategy 2 Promote and support green development in the city

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Payatas methane gas extraction pro-  Implementation of the  Provision of incen-
ject Green Building Ordi- tives to users of re-
 Formulation of Green City Indicators nance newable energy and
 Renewable Energy Efficient Program alternative fuels
 Retrofitting and installation of Light  City Fleet Fuel Effi-
Emitting Diode (LED) streetlights in ciency (use of clean/
various locations alternative fuels in
 Solar Facility in Five (5) selected all government-
Quezon City Public Schools owned vehicles)
 Quezon City Green Route Project  Mainstreaming
 Promotion on the use of alternative green development
technology such as biodigester, Re- in the Land Use Plan
fuse-Derived Fuel and Waste-to-  Require developers
Energy to come up with fu-
 Installation of solar energy panels to ture funds for retro-
be partially subsidized by the QC fitting
government
 Novaliches District Center to be so-
larized
 Study on all public buildings (e.g.,
schools, bgy halls, public hospitals,
offices) for solarisation

Strategy 3 Protect and preserve the city's wildlife, educating the public
on its richness and engaging the participation of the community, civil socie-
ty and habitat landowners and harnessing the expertise/services of the aca-
deme and scientists in conservation programs and efforts.
Chapter 8: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services


 Inventory of flora and fauna wildlife  Intensify and widen IEC on the importance
 Development of conservation part- of biodiversity
nerships with habitat landowners  Support academic/scientific studies on the
and the private sector city's
 Sustained information, education, and
communication on the city's biodiver-
sity and to increase the level of
awareness and participation of the
public in promoting and enriching
biodiversity

104
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Strategy 4 Transform and promote the city's parks as attractive public


spaces for recreation, social interaction, education, cultural and historical
promotion, and environment protection

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Completion of the QMC Mas-  Promotion of parks-  Enact ordinance re-
terplan (with Business Plan) oriented recreational ac- garding the proposed
 Formulation of a Green Lung tivities, parks-based projects of other gov-
Promotion Plan events, celebrations and ernment agencies in
activities the city’s parks
 Identify government
agency/ies responsible
for security & protection
of La Mesa Reservoir
 Strong support for sus-
tainable conservation
programs harnessing
multi-sectoral partner-
ships and capitalizing on
the tourism potentials of
parks Immediate imple-
mentation of greening
projects of identified open
spaces to prevent ISF
from returning

Strategy 5 Provide citizens, regardless of age, gender and status in life,


access to people-friendly parks

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Chapter 8: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

Programs / Projects
 Comprehensive Parks Development Program
 Acquisition of lands for parks
 Development of safe access to parks like underpasses, overpasses and walkways
 Identify open spaces for barangay/community parks

105
QUEZON CITY

Strategy 6: Actively engage participation of the community and all sectors


of the society in the care, protection and promotion of the environment based on
the concept of stewardship with respect to sharing of knowledge, capabilities
and resources

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services


 Agreements between HOA’s and  Environment conservation services and pro-
barangays for the maintenance grams
and management of parks in the  Services sustaining multi-partite agreements on
community major parks
 Adopt-a-Park Project engaged  Intensive public information and education in
with the community and private environment protection, preservation and con-
sector servation
 Support academic/scientific stud-  Memorandum of Agreement between home-
ies on the city’s flora and fauna owners associations & barangay (rules & regu-
and other environment-related lation)
issues/concerns  Conduct of dialogue to settle issues related to
the community’s general welfare
 Identify monitoring group responsible for pos-
sible parks/open spaces in barangays
 Implementation/Awareness of the present res-
olution/ordinance regarding the use of vacant
lot/parks

8.3 Goal 3: To build a resilient city.


Strategy 1: Strengthen measures and institutionalize policies and mecha-
nisms for disaster risk reduction and climate change mitigation and adapta-
tion.
Chapter 8: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Renewable Energy Efficient Pro-  Implement programs,  Ordinance on the
gram projects and activities conduct of infra-
 Development of solar energy pan- under the QCDRRMP structure audit on
els to be partially subsidized by 2014 – 2020 public and private
the QC government infrastructure
 Novaliches District Center to be
solarized

106
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Exploring the use of simple  Regular updating of in-  Climate change
wastewater treatment technologies house DRRM database and gender-
at community level and inventories, includ- sensitive sanita-
 Built-in water management to pre- ing partner and key tion and disposal
vent the depletion of ground water stakeholders databases management to
sources by preventing degradation  Full implementation of prevent ground-
of watershed the QC Shelter Plan water and fresh-
 Provision of waterway banks with  Strict implementation of water contamina-
grouted riprap / retaining wall mandatory easement tion
 Greening the buffer zone of the (3meters) from the  Amend existing
West Valley Fault Line (5meters) creekside rules and regula-
on both sides  Continuous implementa- tions regarding
 Housing and Resettlement Pro- tion of project “Sagip building permits
grams for ISFs Batis” of EPWMD  Enact laws on
 Relocation of ISFs located along the  Regular desilting of wa- policy incentives
fault line terways or deterrents to
 Resettlement of ISFs  Enforce and monitor the enforce zoning
 Allocate sizeable budget for the septage and sewerage ordinances partic-
relocation of informal settlers along program ularly in hazard
waterways and other danger areas  Continuous promotion prone areas
to include transport expenses, etc. of ecotown establish-  Formulation of
 Construct MRBs for informal set- ment initiative by QCG policy on Urban
tlers (tenement housing) in key biodiversity areas Environmental
 Recovery of easements  Establish IEC for city and Natural Re-
 Removal of illegal structures/ en- Climate Change Stake- sources Account-
croachments holders and IMS for ing
 Retrofitting and repair of buildings green environment,
Chapter 8: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

 Conduct of training on infrastruc- clean air and water,


ture audit ground water, rivers and
 Acquisition of infrastructure audit creeks
equipment  Climate Change and
 Identify and implement risk trans- Gender Sensitive public
fers mechanisms through disaster safety risk sanitation
risk financing and insurance at disposal management
community level  Scope of GHG emission
 Development of indicators for in-  Formulate workshops
clusive and child friendly disaster on Renewable Energy
risk management and CCA System and scope GHG
emission

107
QUEZON CITY

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Develop innovative financing pro-  Develop GHG protocol 
gram for environmentalist sustain- scope including scope 1,
able transportation to air pollution 2, 3 emissions to identify
and GHG emissions feasible projects to
 Conduct gender impact analyses to achieve emission reduc-
identify gender-specific adaptation tion goal
options to flood, increase in tem-  City wide campaign on
perature and other climate change CCA
related disasters along the frame-  Completion and imple-
work of ecosystem and environ- mentation of the LCCAP
mental stability  Enforce and monitor the
 Develop knowledge and capacity implementation of clean
for integrated ecosystem based air act and green city
management on local and commu- program
nity levels  Strict implementation
 Updating of DRRM Plan on the National Building
 Generate latest and updated maps Code
of hazard areas including water-
ways
 Updating of hazards, vulnerability
and risk assessment

Strategy 2: Increase/strengthen capacities of local communities to anticipate,


cope with and recover from the negative impacts of disasters brought about by nat-
ural and man-made hazards.
Chapter 8: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Acquisition of low frequency radios  Conduct IEC on the resi-
powered by solar dents living in danger
 Acquisition of water quality moni- areas
toring measuring water quality  Adopt disaster risk re-
effluent during extreme weather duction along danger
situation areas
 Develop, institutionalize and test  Conduct seminars on
early warning systems especially at disaster preparedness
the community level and risk management

108
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Procurement of equipment for early  IEC for disaster prepared-
warning system facilities ness
 Development of criteria for stand-  Conduct of drills
ardizing early warning systems (earthquake, flood and fire)
 Procurement of updated orthopho-  Continuous training on
to map from NAMRIA CBDRRM
 Establish mechanism for supporting  Strict utilization of BDRRM
business continuity planning for fund
local economies  Increasing level of aware-
ness on DRRM in the com-
munity
 Pre-deployment of relief
goods to strategic areas
 Awareness raising of direct
and indirect stakeholders
regarding food security
 Children training on water
and food conservation dur-
ing temporary shelter situa-
tion

Strategy 3 Increase awareness and instill preparedness to avoid loss of life


and damage to social, economic and environment assets before, during and after
emergencies and disasters.

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Chapter 8: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Project on developing protection  Conduct of drills (Formulate  Formulate and
strategy of organic, toxic, hazardous coordination mechanisms and lobby for the
and other hospital and business es- guidelines for partnership passage on
tablishments’ waste during extreme arrangements forced evacua-
weather events  Identification of schools/ tions
 Identify and acquire safe, open areas churches for temporary evac-
for permanent evacuation areas uation centers
 Construction of dedicated evacuation  Establish MOA with the pri-
centers vate sectors (hospitals, drug
stores, supermarkets and con-
struction supply owners)

109
QUEZON CITY

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services Legislations


 Development of early and long term
recovery plans for immediate restora-
tion of lifelines and local government
facilities and services, as well as busi-
ness and local economy
 Resilient Livelihood Program
 Conduct of livelihood-oriented activi-
ties and/or income generating activi-
ties for potential internally displaced
population
Chapter 8: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

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LAND USE / INFRASTRUCTURE
DEVELOPMENT PLAN
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

The outputs and outcomes of the Land Use/Infrastructure Development Plan


are the most visible results of public intervention toward achieving the desired pat-
tern of physical development of the city. Apart from the attractive cityscape that a
well- conceived and well-executed physical development plan seeks to achieve, this
sectoral plan is also important in that it provides the basis for the realization and
enjoyment of the goals of the other sectors. Because it undergirds the development
of all other sectors, it can be said that this sector complies with all the provisions of
the General Welfare Goals in the Local Government Code (Sec. 16).
Accordingly, the realization of the desired outcome of a well-linked, bal-
anced, and attractive city fully complies with the mandates of a premier city like
Quezon City.

GOALS, STRATEGIES, AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS

9.1 Goal 1: To attain a well-linked city


Strategy 1 : Formulate a Road Framework Master Plan to serve as reference
for all parties on alignment of proposed main roads to be developed

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects
 Road network development program
 Acquisition of road rights-of-way
 Construction of road extension / inter-connection
 Improvement and maintenance of existing roads
 Develop Inventory System of Roads Prone to Flooding to Provide Structural Chapter 9: LANDUSE / INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PLAN
Measures for Seamless Transportation

Strategy 2: Design innovative schemes in acquiring road right-of-way and


auxiliary land spaces for various transport infrastructure projects

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects
 Land readjustment schemes
 Land-swapping negotiations

Strategy 3: : Rationalize public utility vehicle routing to minimize trip trans-


fers and to shorten walking distances between transfers

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects
 Route planning for public utility vehicles

111
QUEZON CITY

Strategy 4 Introduce more efficient modes of transport in certain routes


based on the proposed land use

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects
 Study available mass transit system potential for adoption
 Identify routes requiring introduction of mass transit system
 Establishment of local mass transit system (e.g. monorail, tram, etc.)

Strategy 5: Improve public transport system giving due attention to physi-


cal and institutional requirements for safety, convenience and comfort of pedes-
trians and commuters

POLICY INTERVENTIONS

Programs/ Projects Services


 Provision of infrastructure support facilities in commercial  Safeguarding of street
areas, e.g. roads, footbridges, sidewalks, signages, etc. furniture and lightings
 Provision of a Modern Grand Central Station (Bus and Rail by barangay and resi-
Terminals interlink) dents
 Installation of additional communication, CCTV, and other
public safety facilities
 Provision of additional parking areas and loading and un-
loading zones
 City-wide House Numbering
 Establishment of modern Traffic Management Systems
 Provision of public transport commuters facilities in strate-
Chapter 9: LANDUSE / INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

gic areas
 Develop program for climate-proofing energy and
transport systems infrastructures

Strategy 6: Minimize short distance vehicle trips by promoting pedestrianiza-


tion through improved sidewalks, bicycle lanes and walkways.

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Legislations
 Development of pedestrian walkways, promenades,
bike lanes, construction of pedestrian over pass

Strategy 7 : Ensure well-placed telecommunication Facilities

112
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

9.2 Goal 2: To achieve a balanced land use distribution

Strategy 1 : Develop a hierarchy of business centers

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects
 Development of a CBD and other growth centers
 Improvement of public spaces along existing and emerging commercial spaces
 Establishment of Trading Centers/ bagsakan
 Redevelopment of the Cloverleaf area
 Formulation of master redevelopment plan for growth centers, transitional areas and
special development areas
 Formulate Workshops for QCG to inspect, facilitate and issuance of construction per-
mits in building smart industry, infrastructures and its services following the City Green
Building Code

Strategy 2: Promote dispersed concentration of urban development in self-


contained communities

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects
 Develop community accessible commercial centers, tertiary and vocations schools,
health and medical facilities, sports and recreation centers

Chapter 9: LANDUSE / INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Strategy 3: : Ensure adequate space for urban expansion

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects
 Adoption of multi-storey designs for housing to generate more open spaces
 Update inventory of open spaces for planning and other purposes

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QUEZON CITY

Strategy 4 Enhance executive-legislative cooperation, coordination to fa-


cilitate enactment and enforcement of legislative measures affecting land use
and zoning.

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Legislations
 Enforcement of PD 957 (Rule I Minimum Design Standards) and BP 220 (Rule II Mini-
mum Design Standards for Economic and Socialized Housing Projects)
 Strict compliance of R.A. 7279, Sec. 18 on Balanced Socialized Housing
 Enforcement of laws concerning vendors and sidewalk
 Designation of strategic sites for signages and billboards
 Strict enforcement of Building Code particularly on height and setback limits/
ventilation
 Strict implementation of BP 344 (Minimum requirements for accessibility)
 Improve traffic management plan
 Strict implementation of Sanitary Code and Clean Water Act on waste disposal
 Coordination between the city and utilities concessionaires
 Amended Zoning Ordinance
 Comprehensive Land Use Plan
 Mainstream CCAM and DRR in the 2011-2025 CLUP and CDP
 Creating Special Land Use Category and Zone in Protecting La Mesa Reservoir, green
spaces and parks towards CC
 Monitoring and Evaluation Program for periodic development and land use per
barangay

9.3 Goal 3: To provide city inhabitants efficient services and facilities and
make the city an attractive place to visit, live, play, work, and do business
Chapter 9: LANDUSE / INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

in.

Strategy 1: Develop efficient drainage and sewerage systems to make the city
safe and disaster-resilient

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects
 Formulation of the city's Drainage and Sewerage Master Plan in coordination with
other LGUs
 Formulation of the city's Flood Control Program
 Drainage improvement program including replacement of existing old and undersized
drainage pipes
 Installation of garbage screen facilities along water ways
 Construction of grouted rip-rap, retaining wall and other erosion control structures
along identified stretches of rivers, drainage, creeks and canals
 Structural flexibility including the strategic use of valves during emergency by laying
pipes that can be moved and changed to accommodate various households

114
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Strategy 2 : Recover and improve the city's natural waterways and utility easements
and develop these into linear/forest parks

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects
 Riverbank/creek side improvement program
 Sagip Batis
 Waterways bank protection/structures development

Strategy 3: Strengthen coordination with water and power companies toward


improving their facilities and service delivery systems

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects
 Synchronize planning and programming of government and utility companies
 Strict enforcement of Electricity Anti-Pilferage Act
 Strict implementation of NWRB resolution for prohibiting renewal of permits to operate
deep wells
 Strict enforcement of the Water Code prohibiting garbage dumping in easement or rivers
and creeks
 Promote rain water harvesting schemes

Strategy 4: : Adopt schemes that will provide depressed communities ade-


quate access to water, electricity, and other facilities.

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Chapter 9: LANDUSE / INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Programs/ Projects
 Built-in structural measures along waterways to prevent flooding and introduce water
harvesting schemes to the city stakeholders

Strategy 5: : Provide infrastructure support to different development sectors

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Legislations
Land Use / Infrastructure Sector  Enforcement of PD 957 (Rule 1
 Construction of by-pass roads Minimum Design Standards)
 Eastern side of QC (Katipunan Ave) to connect and BP 220 (Rule II Minimum
Litex Road, IBP Batasan, Capitol Hills Drive to C-5 Design Standards for Economic
in Pansol and Socialized Housing Pro-
 11th Avenue (Damayang Lagi) to Dona Imelda jects).

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QUEZON CITY

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Legislations
 Mapayapa Village (Sampaguita Ave) to Visayas Ave-  Monitor compliance of R.A.
nue 7279, Sec. 18 on Balanced So-
 Construction of road continuity cialized Housing
 Mindanao Avenue in Fairview to Forest Hills to Qui-  Enforcement of law concerning
rino Highway vendors on sidewalks
 Mindanao Avenue in Fairview to Ascension Road to  Provision/designation/control
Quirino Highway of vending sites
 Katipunan Avenue (Gen. Luis to Susano Road)  Limit business and personali-
 Visayas Avenue (Tandang Sora to Republic Avenue) ties name signages
 Republic Avenue (Luzon to Mindanao Avenue)  Strict enforcement of the Build-
 Improvement of developed existing road net- ing Code particularly on height
works and setback limits/ventilation
 Acquisition of road right-of-way  Strict implementation of BP
 Improvement of existing sidewalks 344 (Minimum requirements
 Installation of additional street furniture and light- for accessibility)
ings and replacement of defective lights  Adopt universal design con-
 Installation of additional communication, CCTV and cepts for Persons With Disabil-
other public safety facilities ity facilities
 Provision of additional parking areas, loading and  Strengthen rules to regulate
unloading zones tricycle operation
 Establishment of sewage treatment plant Im-  Update Zoning Ordinance
provement of existing drainage/sewer system  Implement traffic management
 Identification and development of more parks and plan
open spaces including linear parks along all creeks  Strict implementation of the
within the city Sanitary Code and Clean Water
 Construction of civic action center for disaster re- Act on waste disposal
Chapter 9: LANDUSE / INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

sponse /maintenance of peace & order  Proper coordination between


 Construction of convention center / multi-purpose the city and utilities conces-
center sionaires
 Integration of DRRM and CCAP and upgrading of  Synchronize planning and pro-
digital database gramming of government and
 Periodic monitoring and evaluation of urban mor- utility companies
phology types of barangays  Strict enforcement of Electrici-
ty Anti-Pilferage Act
Social Sector Support  Implement ordinance on sus-
 Health Infrastructure Projects tainable groundwater utiliza-
 Expansion of existing 53 health centers to include tion (SP 1682, S-06)
lying-in facilities  Strict implementation of
 Establishment of "teen" health quarters in Districts NWRB resolution for prohibit-
I, II and III ing renewal of permits to oper-
 Creation of a wellness clinic at the Legislative wing ate deep wells
at 2nd floor QC Hall

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COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Legislations
 Construction of 4 additional health centers in Dis-  Strict enforcement of the Wa-
trict II ter Code regarding garbage
 Household-based Network Building Using Mobile dumping in easements or riv-
Smart Apps for Early Warning and Community- ers and creeks
based Monitoring and Surveillance System for CC-  Promote rain water harvesting
sensitive Diseases  Barangay residents to be
 Establishment of new public cemetery and/or tapped in safeguarding street
Crematorium/Columbarium at Bagbag Cemetery furniture and lightings
 Establishment and maintenance of communal public  Strict implementation of anti-
toilets in areas without sanitary toilet facilities littering and enforcement of
 Installation of permanent sanitary toilet facilities in penalties upon violators
areas with security of land tenure and temporary  Update inventory of open spac-
facilities in communities without secure tenure es for planning & other purpos-
 Establishment of Water Analysis Facility es
 Establishment of botika ng barangay in all QC ba-  Strict enforcement of policy on
rangays preservation of open spaces
 Educational, Cultural and Sports Infrastructure Pro- Proposed ordinance to require
jects utility companies to secure
 Establishment of literacy/resource centers in all barangay clearance prior to the
barangays
conduct of diggings and instal-
 Construction of 194 new classrooms in 31 elemen-
lation activities.
tary schools and 221 classrooms in 18 high schools
 Land acquisition for 5 elementary schools and 5
high schools in District II
 Installation of markers in historically significant
sites
Chapter 9: LANDUSE / INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

 Improvement of QC Performing Arts Studio at Amo-


ranto Stadium
 Development of Museum and Services at Quezon
Memorial Circle
 Development of Shrines/Historical Sites and Inter-
pretation Centers
 Development of community sports facilities
 Redevelopment of Amoranto Sports Complex Devel-
opment of Sports Center in District II
 Establishment of Physical Fitness Gym & Recrea-
tional Area
 Establishment of an Athletic Dormitory at the pro-
posed Belarmino Sports Complex
 Housing Projects
 Construction of Medium Rise Buildings (MRB's) for
mass housing

117
QUEZON CITY

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Legislations
 Private Sector Housing Program
 New near-city Community Housing Development
 Resettlement Sites Development (in-city and off-city
relocation)
 Tie-up projects with Gawad Kalinga and Habitat For
Humanity and other NGOs and private-initiated
housing projects
 Protective and Social Welfare Infrastructure Pro-
jects:
 Expansion of Drug Abuse Rehabilitation Center
(TAHANAN)
 Establishment of new City Jail
 Repair and improvement of police and fire stations
 Drainage Improvement
 Riverbank/creekside improvement
 Sagip Batis
 Provision of periodic Food Storage Facilities in
Schools, Evacuation Centers and Near vacant Spaces
Usually Assigned as Evacuation Center During
Emergencies
 Land acquisition/construction of 23 fire stations
 Construction of 68 additional day care centers
 Halfway Home for children in need of special pro-
tection
 Drop-in Center for rescued youth clients
 Community based therapeutic rehabilitation center
Chapter 9: LANDUSE / INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

for PWDs
 Healing/Crisis Center for women
 Home for Elderly & Hospice
 IEC Program on City Gender-sensitive Climate In-
duced Disaster Risk

Economic Sector Support Infrastructure


 Putting up of hospitels, inns, pension houses and
other lodging facilities for the health and wellness
visitors including health spas, specialty clinics, etc.
 Museum development
 Modern tourism accommodation facilities e.g., inter-
national standard 5- star hotel
 Banawe Project — Development of welcome arches,
bilingual signages, and installation of Chinese sign-
ages, lampposts, building facades
 Intensify linkages with private sector in the mainte-
nance of sidewalks

118
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Legislations
 Development of board and lodging facilities for students
 Provision of infrastructure support facilities in commer-
cial areas, e.g. roads, footbridges, sidewalks, signages, etc.
 Provision of a Modern Grand Central Station (Bus Termi-
nal and Rail interlink)
 Putting up of a sports complex / upgrading of Amoranto
Sports Complex Putting up of a Convention Center
 Development of IT /Science & Technology Center
 Construction of a modern, centralized slaughterhouse
 Establishment of Trading Center / Bagsakan
 Redevelopment of the Cloverleaf area and declared
vending sites
 Establish Canned Food Storage Facility at Barangay
Level
 Route Planning for Food Delivery for Private and
Public Utility Vehicles

Environmental Sector Support Infrastructure


 Expansion of the waste-to-energy facility in the Payatas
Sanitary Landfill
 Establishment of STPs thru the private concessionaires
 Installation of air monitoring stations in strategic loca-
tions
 Construction of a QMC multipurpose hall to serve as li-
brary, exhibit area, and learning activity center for chil-
dren to learn and increase awareness on the environ-
Chapter 9: LANDUSE / INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

ment
 Identification of feasible projects to rehabilitate and im-
prove critical infrastructures vulnerable to CC risk
 Establishing low-carbon barangays by identifying feasi-
ble projects through barangay stakeholders to achieve
GHG emission benchmarking within allocated time frame
 Built-in through structural measures the control of
Payatas Dumpsite in preventing leaching, flooding, drain-
age and methane gas extraction
 Integrated Management Plan of extreme weather prone
open and green spaces, parks, groundwater aquifer, riv-
ers and creeks of the City
 CC resistant Payatas Dumpsite Control Project: Payatas
Control Dump Facility
 Built-House for Disposal Sanitation Infrastructure to Sup-
port 33% of Households Demanded Sanitation Facilities
per Barangay

119
INSTITUTIONAL
QUEZON CITY
DEVELOPMENT PLAN
To pursue dynamic, sound and participative governance would contribute
to the city's effort in building a Quality Community. This development outcome
will lead to the realization of relevant General Welfare provisions in Sec. 16 of the
Local Government Code, namely; 1) improvement of public morals and 2) preser-
vation of the comfort and convenience of the city's inhabitants.

GOALS, STRATEGIES, AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS

10.1 Goal 1 : To maintain dynamic city governance

On policy and decision-makers

Strategy 1 : Formulate/Implement ELA

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Services
 Monitoring of the implementation of ELA

Strategy 2: Operationalize consultation/dialogue with constituents

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Services
 Multi-sectoral congress  Conduct of regular dialogues/
consultations and meetings with
stakeholders

Strategy 3: Settle boundary disputes between barangays


Chapter 10: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Legislations
 Pursuance of a more active resolution of  Enactment of ordinance fixing settled
barangay boundary disputes by the Joint barangay boundaries
Legislative-Executive Committee on Baran-
gay Boundary Disputes

120
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

On workforce
Strategy 1 : Increase productivity and efficiency
POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Services
 Formulation of a comprehensive HRD Plan  Alignment of needs of organization
 Implementation of performance productiv- and employees
ity measure (SPMS)  Giving of equal opportunity to both
 Pursue recognition/awards system men and women employees
 Formulate/implement the Code of Ethics  Conduct of performance audit
 Establishment of Committee on Decorum  Use of merit and competency based
and Investigation (CODI) on standard for hiring and promotion
 Skills and knowledge development  Conduct of trainings and seminars
(Capability Development)
 Innovation Laboratory – Human Resource
Development
 Rationalization Program
 Strategic Planning for Managers and Legis-
lators
On systems and procedures
Strategy 1 : Continuously improve/simplify systems and procedures
POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Services
 Business One Stop Shop (BOSS)  Conduct of systems audit
 Provide on-line computer based infor-  Improvement of sex-disaggregated
mation data bank
 Geographic Information System (GIS)
 Development of Quality Mgt. Systems  Mainstreaming of monitoring func-
(certifiable to ISO) tion inside the bureaucracy
 e-Financial  Tracking and follow up of constitu-
ents' inquiries
 Enforcement of the Citizens Charter
Chapter 10: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

On Tools
Strategy 1 : Use of modern technology
POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Services
 Enhancement of communication system  Accessibility of services thru the in-
 Supply and equipment management plan ternet
 Information System and Strategic Plan  Upgrading and maintenance of offices
(ISSP) and ICT equipment
 Computerization, networking and web-page  Information services thru quad-
service media
 E-Barangay Information System (e-BIS)

121
QUEZON CITY

On infrastructure
Strategy 1 : Improve accessibility of offices
POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Services
 Office deployment plan
Strategy 2: Promote a more conducive working environment

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Services
 Construction/Improvement of government  Monitoring of physical status and
buildings/offices, facilities condition of administrative buildings
 Construction of QC Central Records Build- and facilities
ing
 NGO/PO Center
 Retrofitting of QC Hall Main Building
 Construction/Improvement of barangay
halls
 Land banking/acquisition

10.2.1 Goal 2a: To sustain sound fiscal management


On revenue generation
Strategy 1 : Broaden tax base

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Legislations
Services
Projects
 Establish-  Improvement of sex-disaggregated database  Passage of ordinance
Chapter 10: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

ment of data  GIS imposing the better-


bank  Tax collection enforcement ment levy
 Capability  Tax mapping operations  Passage of ordinance
building  Strict enforcement of existing laws and reg- of standardized rates
ulations in processing baran-
 Address tax delinquents gay clearance and per-
 Identification of new source of additional mits
revenues 
 Auction sale of delinquent real property
 Conduct of tax literacy and information
campaign
 Close monitoring of income against expendi-
tures
 Engaging various stakeholders in various
consultative process/public hearing
 Capability building on fiscal management
including barangay.
122
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

On resource allocation
Strategy 1 : Give priority to areas of great economic potentials or which will
spur growth, areas with pronounced needs or inadequate services and areas that
benefit the greater majority
POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Services
 Planning and budgeting seminar  Rationalize budget allocation i.e., De-
velopment of socially oriented pro-
gram

On fiscal management
Strategy 1 : Formulate/implement LDIP
POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Services
 Monitoring of the LDIP implementation

10.2.2 Goal 2b: To ensure sound local legislation


Strategy 1 : Enjoin City Council to exercise consultation and participation in
their legislative function

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Services
 Capacity development on new laws/  Engaging various stakeholders in
legislative measures consultative process/public hearing
 Ensuring availability of relevant ordi-
nances or resolutions in support of
social, economic development and
Chapter 10: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

environmental management
 Codification/computerization of leg-
islative measures
 Enhancement and updating of moni-
toring / tracking system on legisla-
tions enacted vis-a-vis implemented

123
QUEZON CITY

10.3 Goal 3: To ensure a participative governance


Strategy 1: Expand collective participation in the city decision process.
POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Services
 Information Education Cam-  Conduct of regular assembly/consultation among
paign the accredited NGOs/POs
 Capability building program  Continuous updating of existing organizations in-
cluding non-accredited ones
 Encouragement of stakeholders to participate in
city programs and activities
 Encouragement of the participation of sectoral
committees in the CDC
 Campaign for accreditation
Strategy 2: Exercise transparency and participation process to gain
consensus
POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Services Legislations
 Publication of newsletters  Ensuring transparent ac- 
 Establishment of infor- creditation process
mation centers  Maintenance of public as-
 Full disclosure program sistance desk
 Availability/accessibility of
information materials
 Broadening of feedback and
feedforward information
channels and systems
 Revisit Ordinance 2008-
211 re Strengthening the
systems of participation in
local governance between
the city government and its
constituents
Chapter 10: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Strategy 3: Strengthen the linkages between the city government, the ba-
rangays and the local communities

POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Services
 Capability development program for  Mapping of services vis-a-vis service pro-
barangay and NGO’s/PO’s viders
 Establishment of NGO/PO center
 Barangay Comprehensive Develop-
ment P

124
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

Strategy 4: Replicate best practices


POLICY INTERVENTIONS
Programs/ Projects Services
 Giving of reward/award to baran-  Documentation/popularization of best
gays/community with great achieve- practices and provision of incentives/
ment or contribution to city develop- awards
ment 

Chapter 10: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

125
PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
QUEZON CITY

This Comprehensive Develop- 11.1.1 Structuring Proposed Projects


ment Plan of Quezon City is in full
compliance with the mandate of Projects are the basic inputs to the
the City Development Council to 3-year Local Development Investment
initiate the preparation of a "multi- Program (LDIP) from which annual
sectoral development plan". It is components to be included in the An-
also a multi-year plan: long- term, nual Investment Program (AIP) will be
medium-term and annual. (Sec106- culled out. The long list of projects by
108, RA 7160). As such, this CDP is the five sectors in this CDP needs to be
a rich source of programs and pro- further sifted and structured so that
jects, services and regulatory only those projects that are "owned"
measures which future city admin- by the city shall be included in the
istrations can use to steer the city LDIP. As earlier indicated, the LDIP
towards the desired state as articu- process shall be undertaken after the
lated in the vision statement. CDC will have been reconstituted fol-
lowing the swearing in of the new set
In the preparation of this CDP of local officials. This is to ensure that
enormous amounts of effort and the new administration will have a
time were expended by the differ- sense of ownership of the plan and
ent sectors and stakeholders. A thus feel compelled to implement it.
considerable portion of inputs was
spent on generating and analyzing Prior to the LDIP process the fol-
the planning data base. This is nec- lowing preparatory activities were un-
essary because the integrity and dertakenby each sectoral committee.
reliability of the data base depend
on the validity and responsiveness 1`. Sifting projects according to
of the proposed actions and policy ownership. It must be noted that the
interventions. lists of projects in this CDP represent
what the sectoral committees have de-
11.1 Preparatory Activities termined to be necessary to address
the issues and fill the gaps that
A number of preparatory activ- emerged in their respective data analy-
ities were undertaken by the sec- sis. Some of the projects identified are
toral TWGs at the CPDO to lay the the responsibility of the national gov-
Chapter 11: PLAN IMPLEMENTATION

groundwork for the conduct of ernment; others properly belong to the


transition workshops after the May individual barangays. Still other pro-
2010 elections. These preparatory jects could be assumed by non-
activities are grouped around the government sectors. These should now
three types of policy interventions, be classified and distributed to the dif-
namely: ferent agencies and sectors concerned.
1) programs/projects; Only those for which the city is respon-
2) non-projects or services; and, sible shall be collected as inputs to the
3) proposed legislations. LDIP process.

126
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

2. Prioritizing projects
within each sector. Not all projects ibility-Complementarity (CCC) Ma-
listed by each sector, even if all of trix, the Project-Resource Impact Ma-
these are owned by the city, may be trix, or the Urgency Test may be used.
submitted to the CDC for inclusion in
the LDIP. Because of the large num- For easy reference, the criteria
ber of projects from all the sectors for determining the levels of urgency
combined, it may be necessary for the of projects are listed in the Table
CDC Secretariat to limit the number 11.1.
of projects to be submitted by each
sector. When this happens, each of 3. Preparation of project briefs.
the sectors should select projects
which they deem to be urgent. For Before submitting their priority
this purpose, tools for short-listing projects for consideration in the LDIP
projects such as the Conflict- Compat- process, each of the sectors or its pro-
ponent/s should prepare a project
Table 11.1 Criteria for Project Ranking
brief for every proposed project. The
Level of
Urgency
Criteria project brief shouldhave the follow-
 Cannot be reasonably postponed ing contents:
Urgent  Would remedy conditions dangerous
to public health, safety and welfare
 Needed to maintain critically needed a. Name and type of project
programs
 Needed to meet emergency situa-
b. Activity components
tions c. Estimated cost of resource inputs
 Required to complete or make usable per activity component
Essential a major public improvement
 Required to maintain minimum
d. Justification for the project
standards as part of on-going pro- e. Target beneficiaries
grams
 Desirable self-liquidating projects f. Target outputs or success indica-
 External funding is available tors
 Should be carried out to meet clearly g. Possible risks or external factors
Necessary identified and anticipated needs
 Needed to replace obsolete or unsat- h. Expected private sector response
isfactory facilities
 Repair or maintenance projects to
prolong life of existing facilities 11.1.2 Structuring Non-Projects
 Needed for expansion of existing
Chapter 11: PLAN IMPLEMENTATION

Desirable projects The long list of non-projects


 Designed to initiate new programs
considered appropriate for a pro- or services which the different sec-
gressive community
tors deemed as necessary to carry out
 Nice to have, but can be postponed
Acceptable without detriment to present opera- the identified policy interventions
tions if budget cuts are necessary
have to be further processed as well.
 Recommended for postponement or
Deferrable elimination from immediate consid- The first thing to do is to check
eration in the current LDIP whether the identified service can be
 Questionable in terms of over-all
needs, adequate planning or proper upgraded to a project.
timing.

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QUEZON CITY

1. Upgrading non-projects to  Summarize the results into the fol-


projects. lowing format as in Table 11.2:
An activity that is listed as a non
The results of this process should
-project can be changed into a pro-
provide inputs, first, to the Budget Of-
ject if it satisfies the following cri-
fice as an aid to determining the level
teria:
of increases in the MOOE of individual
 There is a definite output to be offices. This should put to an end the
produced. practice of giving uniform fixed-rate
 There is a sense of urgency to escalation of the MOOE component of
produce the output. the local budget. Secondly, the results
 The activity is not likely to be should provide a basis for the HRMO to
repeated within the next 3 years. design intra-and inter-office / depart-
ment capability building programs.
If upgrade is possible, the new
project should be added to the list 11.1.3 Structuring Needed Legisla-
of projects to be considered for in- tions
clusion in the LDIP. On the other
hand, if upgrade is not possible, the Finally, the list of needed regulatory
activity should be retained as non-- measures identified by the different
project and further analyzed as sectors should find its way into the leg-
follows: islative agenda of the Sangguni-
angPanlungsod.
 Break the service or non-project
into its specific activity or task
Pending completion of the comput-
components.
 Identify the office or department
erized Legislative Tracking System it
responsible for carrying out the was not possible for the different sec-
service as part of its functions. tors to determine whether the legisla-
 Match the needed tasks with the tion ideas they identified are already
capacity of the responsible office existent or still non-existent. It is now
or department. incumbent upon the legislative staff
 Suggest appropriate actions as through the office of the SP Secretary
needed. to collect and probe the suggested leg-
islations listed in the
Chapter 11: PLAN IMPLEMENTATION

Table 11.2 Template for Farming Out of Non-Projects


CDP. The suggested
Service/
Activity or Depart-
Gaps in Capaci- logical framework
Non- ty of Responsi- Recommend- for analyzing each
Task Com- ment/ Office
Project ble Dept./ ed Action
Proposed
ponents Responsible
Office proposed legislation
is as follows:

Jurisdiction. Ascer-
tain whether the
proposed legislation
128
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PLAN | 2017—2020

is within the LGU's pre-


scribed powers. Those found to be menting body? Can these short-
outside the LGU's powers to enact comings be corrected by another
should be submitted to the Con- legislation or will an executive is-
gressmen who are regular mem- suance suffice?
bers of the CDC for them to file the
necessary bill in Congress. In addi- For easy reference, summarize
tion, the proposed legislation may Table 11.3 Template for Processing Needed
be lobbied before identified advo- Local Legislation
cates in the Senate.
Title of Status Subject SP Com-
Possible
Proposed Classifi- mittee for
Existence. Among the proposals Legislation New Amendment cation Referral
Sponsor
that fall within the LGU's pre-
scribed powers, determine wheth-
er there are any existing SP out-
the results in tabular form as shown
puts that are of the same or similar
in Table 11.3 below.
subject as the proposed one. If
none, simply propose enactment of
11.2 LDIP Process
a new legislation. If already exist-
ent, inquire into whether it is still The results of the project struc-
sound in construction. turing preparatory activities set the
stage for the preparation of the 3-
Soundness of construction. If con- year LDIP by the reconstituted CDC.
struction is defective, propose The resulting List of Prioritized Pro-
amendment or repeal or total re- jects is presented in Table 10.4.
placement. If still sound in con-
struction, probe into its implemen- 11.3 ELA Process
tation.
The LDIP, added to the results of
Implementation. If the legislation the preparatory structuring of legisla-
is of sound construction and is im- tive proposals, will become an input
plemented properly, what is obvi- to the preparation of the next 3-year
ously needed is to monitor the out- Executive- Legislative Agenda (ELA).
Chapter 11: PLAN IMPLEMENTATION

come and impact on the affected


population. On the other hand, if 11.4 CDP Legitimization
the implementation is encounter-
QC CDP and Local Development
ing problems, the questions to be
Investment Program (LDIP) 2017-
considered are: what seem to be
2020 was approved by the City De-
the causes of such difficulties? Is it velopment Council during its session
due to deficiencies of the imple- on CDC Regular Meeting held 20th of
July, 2017 

129