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Janelle Monáe Street Food

Speaks Out Around the World


25.09.2020

can you trust a c ovid vac cine?

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INTERNATIONAL EDITION
PTEM R 25, 020 VOL. 7 _N 08

FEATURES

22 32
INFORMED CHOICE
Finding the best hospital for treatment of a
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be a confusing and daunting task. Having
the right data can make the process easier.
A Shot in World’s Best
the Dark Specialized
COVER CREDIT
Photograph by Emilija Manevska*HWW\
Everyone wants a COVID-19 Hospitals 2021
vaccine, but the talk of rushing Newsweek teamed up with
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one out is making people research firm Statista to


nervous. How to assess the risk. find the leaders for care in
For more headlines, go to six key medical fields.
NEWSWEEK.COM BY FRED GUTERL

1
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INTERNATIONAL EDITION
Hank Gilman
SEPTEMBER 25, 2020 _ VOL.175 _ NO.08
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Periscope CREATIVE

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The Oldest Female
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The Archives
“Equally at home on Broadway, on television, or conducting the
1962 Philharmonic, Bernstein’s extraordinary talents have attracted
millions of admirers,” said Newsweek. Leonard Bernstein conducted the first
televised concert at New York’s Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts to mark
the official opening of the new venue. Over a long career, he won two Tonys, 16
Grammys and seven Emmys, and the Kennedy Center Honors. This year, his
music will find new audiences through a film adaptation of his most famous
musical, West Side Story, currently scheduled for release in December.

1977
Newsweek predicted that the “politically
explosive” Bakke case “may have more
impact on equality...than any judgment
since Brown began dismantling school
segregation in 1954.” The case ultimately
XSKHOG DIɿUPDWLYH DFWLRQ DV D WRRO IRU
diversity—which was again upheld in a
2019 case against Harvard University.

1997
Newsweek remembered Mother Teresa
as a woman of contradiction: “Her
1(:6:((.$5&+,9(ʤʥ

humility was burdened by celebrity. She


raised millions for her work [for the poor]
but lived simply....She was a woman of
power in a church run by men.” In
6HSWHPEHUVKHZDVRIɿFLDOO\
canonized by the Catholic Church as
Saint Teresa of Calcutta.

4 NEWSWEEK.COM SEP T E M BER 25, 2020


Sponsored Feature

Polisan Holding -
Trusted Innovators
Turkey is well-positioned for a rapid economic rebound
following the onset of the coronavirus pandemic earlier
this year. The World Bank recently praised the
government’s handling of the pandemic, reporting that a
“swift and comprehensive” policy response has set the
stage for an earlier recovery. GDP growth is expected to
hit 6% in 2021, and several Turkish companies restarted
export operations in June, demonstrating the country’s
enduring long-term growth potential and attractive Mehmet Emin Bitlis
investment prospects. Chairman - Polisan Holding

t Polisan Holding, a family-owned It acquired a Greek Polyethylene relationships with major multinational
conglomerate with foundations Terephthalate (PET) granule plant in players in chemical industries.
dating back to the1920s, 2013, and entered into a 50-50 joint Innovation will continue to play a large
an Mehmet Emin Bitlis venture with Kansai Paint in 2016 to part in Polisan’s growth strategy, and
understands the ups and downs of form Polisan-Kansai Paint. The two the new paint factory will soon include
manufacturing and industry. Active in invested substantially to build a new a modern research and development
paint, chemicals, port operations, and paint factory in Turkey, making Polisan- center focused on cutting-edge paint
real estate, Polisan has withstood the Kansai one of the country’s largest paint manufacturing techniques. Bitlis also
test of time – and the pandemic – with manufacturers. The conglomerate now plans to develop an R&D center for
a tried-and-true strategy emphasizing employs nearly 2000 people across five Polisan’s chemical division, with the aim
partnerships, innovation, and finding subsidiaries. of introducing strategic, value-added,
new opportunities during even the “We are very well placed in the market and environmentally friendly products to
toughest economic conditions. thanks to our innovative and in-demand Turkish and export markets.
Founded by Bitlis’ grandfather, a products. The paint market bounced Having recently expanded into Morocco
textile trader, Polisan was first active in back unexpectedly after the early with an investment in construction
Malatya as a textile retailer. The family months of the pandemic, and thanks additives in 2017, Polisan Kimya, the
moved to Istanbul in 1942, as a first step to our new state of the art, industry chemical manufacturing arm of Polisan
to launching industrial manufacturing, 4.0 calibrated facilities we were able Holding, is now seeking to further grow
and started textile operations in to respond quickly; our EBITDA ratio its operations, and its exports, with new
1956. During the 1960s Polisan climbed to 24 % in the first 6 months of partnerships targeting high-potential
became the first company in Turkey to 2020,” said Bitlis. markets. Polisan Kimya also is moving
manufacture emulsion polymers, as well “I am very pleased by the fact that in to build a new chemical plant in Turkey
as formaldehyde and resins primarily decorative paints, Polisan-Kansai is one producing technical products that are
serving the wood industry. Dedicated of the top two players. With our new mainly imported at present.
paint manufacturing activities began investment and the new plant, we have “One of our biggest competitive
when Polisan Boya (Polisan Paint) was tripled our production capacity of water- advantage is the synergy we provide
established in 1985, and this subsidiary based paint. Environmentally friendly within our group of companies. We
quickly rose to become a major business water-based products now account for already have two JVs with two major
line. around 90% of our paint production. The multinational companies which has
New partnerships and international water-based road marking paint has substantially helped our growth, we
expansion have supported a strong been one of the latest examples shifting enjoy our logistic advantages through
track record of success, and in 2004 from solvent born to water born,” he lean supply chain efficiencies. We
the company formed a joint venture said. are well aware of how the world is
with Rohm and Haas, one of the world’s Operations are further supported by developing in the start-up sector,
leading polymer producers, which was Polisan’s port subsidiary, Poliport, which particularly in technology, so we’re
later acquired by Dow Chemical. Dow owns and operates Turkey’s one of the also looking into start-ups that can be
has been a dedicated Polisan business leading sole independent, strategically integrated into our business operations,”
partner for more than 40 years. well-located port terminal. Poliport said Bitlis.
The company further diversified into benefitted from nearly $30 million of
real estate development in 2006, and investment into new tanks, pipelines,
Polisan Holding went public in 2012 with and digitalization in 2018 and 2019.
an IPO on the Istanbul Stock Exchange. Poliport has long lasting successful
In Focus THE NEWS IN PICTURES

6 NEWSWEEK.COM SEp t E M bEr 25, 2020


MADERA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

“We Were Warned”


A firefighter at work as flames push towards homes on September 7 during
the Creek fire in the Cascadel Woods, which was triggered by a mini-explosion
at a gender reveal party. Meanwhile, uncontrolled fires also broke out across
several western states, including Oregon and Washington. “For over 30 years
climate change scientists warned us that these kinds of wild fires would become
more numerous and destructive,” said one resident. “We were warned.”
JOSH EDELSON
J O S H E D E LSO N/A F P/G E T T Y
8
In Focus

NEWSWEEK.COM
SEp t E M bEr 25, 2020
CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT: MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/GETTY; ANGELOS TZORTZINIS/AFP/GETTY; NATALIA FEDOSENKO/TASS/GETTY
MYTILENE, GREECE GAZA CITY, PALESTINE MINSK, BELARUS

Homeless Facing Up Faceoff


Migrants rest as they spend the night A Palestinian artist, on September Supporters of Belarus opposition
on the road near Mytilene. A fire, 8, paints a face mask on a child to leaders are blocked by soldiers
which Greek officials suspect was create awareness about ways to and military equipment during the
deliberately set, destroyed Greece’s prevent the spread of the COVID-19. March of Unity near the Palace of
largest Moria refugee camp on the A recent spike in cases in the area Independence in Minsk on September
island of Lesbos, early on September has raised concerns that a wider 6. The announcement of the Belarusian
11. Thousands of asylum seekers outbreak could be on its way. “For presidential election results sparked
on the Greek island languished on months,” reported The Washington mass protests in major cities across
roadsides after the camp burned Post, “aid agencies have warned” that the country. According to Radio Free
down. Local officials have stonewalled the transmission of the coronavirus Europe, protesters carried red-and-
Greek government efforts to “through the conflict-weary” Gaza white flags, “a symbol of the opposition
create new temporary shelters. Strip “could be calamitous.” that has been banned by authorities.”
→ ANGELOS TZORTZINIS → MOHAMMED ABED → NATALIA FEDOSENKO

NEWSWEEK.COM 9
Periscope

BRING IT ON
Shalala relishes
the combat part
of politics and is
almost gleeful about
sparring with her
Republican opponent
for the House: “This
is going to be fun!”

10 NEWSWEEK.COM
ELECTION 2020

Shalala
Unbound
The oldest female freshman ever elected to the House mocks
Trump’s latest Obamacare move, downplays the power of the Squad
and waxes nostalgic about an old foe named Rush

in an election season in which the silent” while “some members of her party peddle
progressive ideas of the Squad, Bernie Sanders the same radical socialist agenda that has ruined the
and other like-minded Democrats are being hotly countries from which many of us escaped.”
debated by both conservatives and liberals, Florida Shalala is unfazed. Instead, she heads into her first
Democrat Donna Shalala is determined to carve out re-election campaign with a surprising level of rel-
space just left of the center lane. The oldest woman ish, gleefully focused on her mission to defeat Salazar,
ever elected as a freshman to the House of Repre- whom she beat by six points in 2018, by an even big-
sentatives, Shalala, 79, is a self-described “pragmatic ger margin this time. That win two years ago flipped
progressive,” who likes to tout her ability to get along Shalala’s Miami-area district to Democratic control
with all factions of her own party as well as her work after being represented for nearly 30 years by Repub-
with colleagues across the political aisle. lican Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, who retired.
Her opponent, Republican Maria Elvira Salazar, Despite her rookie status in Congress, Shalala is
is having none of it. In a series of tweets earlier this an experienced Washington hand, having served as
year, the popular Cuban American broadcast jour- secretary of Health and Human Services under Presi-
nalist accused Shalala of not pushing dent Bill Clinton. Among the other po-
back enough against her “bro” Bernie sitions on her long resume: chancellor
$ / ( ;  : 2 1 * ʔ* ( 7 7 <

and “sisters” AOC and the Squad when BY


of the University of Wisconsin-Madi-
they were “singing communism and son, president of the University of
socialism’s praises.” Salazar also said STEVE FRIESS Miami and president of the Clinton
that Shalala has been “disturbingly @SteveFriess Foundation.

NEWSWEEK.COM 11
Periscope ELECTION 2020

Shalala talked to Newsweek about My 2018 race was tough because I got It was an absolute gift! I have the larg-
her House race, her storied career and chewed up first in the primary by the est enrollment in Obamacare of any
a massive political blunder committed Bernie people. I’m past that now. congressional district in the country
by President Donald Trump that she over 100,000 people. I don’t know
thinks made her path to a second term You won election in 2018 by whether they’re Republicans or Dem-
far smoother. The conversation has campaigning to defend the ocrats, but I know that 100,000 people
been edited for clarity and length. Affordable Care Act from in my district do not want to lose their
Republicans trying to kill it. How health insurance. And particularly
How is it different to be an did you react when the Trump now. It was the most idiotic thing to
incumbent? administration filed a brief in do! I was dumbstruck! In a good way!
Oh, it’s so much easier! I don’t have to June pushing for the Supreme
run on my resume. I can run on what Court to invalidate the ACA? What else are the big issues this
I’ve actually been able to do. Even time around?
though I’m not on the health commit- It’s mismanagement and mishandling
tees, I’ve played a leadership role on of COVID-19 not only by the president
all of the important health bills that
have been moving through Congress. “[Rush Limbaugh] called but also by our governor [Republican
Ron DeSantis]. And it’s still health
I’ve worked hard on things like child me ‘the High Priestess care coverage, because what the vi-
care and higher education issues— of Political Correctness!’ rus has revealed is the big gap in who
particularly on taking on the private
for-profit universities that are ripping That all seems so has access to affordable care. And, like
last time, it’s the governor’s failure to
off low-income people and veterans. quaint now.” extend Medicaid and our need to ex-
pand Obamacare to cover everybody
that’s left out.

You, an older white woman,


entered Congress with a huge and
historically diverse freshman class.
What’s that like?
I love it! As they describe me, I’m a
freshman, but not a rookie. I get on
with all the caucuses—with the No

F RO M L EF T: S H E PA R D S H E R BE L L /CO R B I S /G E T T Y; AL E X WROB L EWS K I /G ET T Y


Labels, the Progressives, the Squad—
and I’m in the New Democrat caucus,
which puts me, I guess, in the center
left. But I get along with everybody and
they’ll tell you, I get along with them.

It’s amazing to think you’re


considered “center-left,” because
I remember in the 1990s when
Rush Limbaugh had a parody song

THEN AND NOW Back in the ’90s, Rush


Limbaugh (left) used to mock Shalala’s
liberal views. These days, opponents
try to tie her to more left-leaning
politicians, like Squad members Rashida
Tlaib, Ayanna Pressley, Ilhan Omar and
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (top right).

12 NEWSWEEK.COM SEp t E M BEr 25, 2020


That’s why I wouldn’t overread those
other elections. A candidate fits
into their district. Was I surprised
Rashida [Tlaib] won her primary? No,
because Rashida is a heck of a legisla-
tor who had state government expe-
rience. The district knows her and
knows that she’s delivered time after
time. She pays attention. She doesn’t
focus on national issues. She focuses
on issues that involve her district.

Many Democrats who flipped


seats in 2018 have gone to pains
to show their bipartisanship.
Have you?
Yes. I have co-sponsored a series of
bills with Republicans. I sponsored a
bill with [Trump acolyte and Florida
Rep.] Matt Gaetz, of all people, to le-
galize marijuana for the purposes of
research, moving it from Schedule 1
to Schedule 3 for research purposes.

How will you attack your opponent,


Maria Elvira Salazar, this time?
about what a crazy liberal you pissed off, but they do not, as a group, My opponent is a Trump supporter,
were to Eric Clapton’s “Layla.” make my job more difficult. I have to so I can hit her on that. She also, un-
He called me “the High Priestess of answer questions about them all the fortunately for her, once said, “Viva
Political Correctness!” [Laughs] That time because people in my communi- Trump!” so we’ll use that against her.
all seems so quaint now. ty consider at least a couple of them The presidential election will domi-
to be anti-Semitic, but in terms of leg- nate the conversation, and she cannot
What do you make of the rise islation, the job that we have to do, it’s run away from Trump this time. The
of progressives like those in not a problem. question is, is she going to vote for
The Squad? him? And she will say yes, and she’ll
The Squad is an invention of the press. What do people ask you about them? have to defend him, and I’ll simply
It doesn’t mean anything on the floor Again, it’s about Israel or about the say what I’ve been able to do. And
of Congress. They don’t, as a “squad,” impression that the Democratic Par- she’ll have to say what she’s been able
influence legislation. What they do is ty has gone terribly left and we just to get done, which is nothing.
give the press a lot of stuff to write had to explain to people that it hasn’t.
about. They’re attractive, they’re I mean, we nominated Joe Biden. You really seem to enjoy the
smart, they’re articulate, but it’s not combat part of politics.
like they’re a power, like if they hold Yeah, but you came pretty close to Oh, I love it! You know, I’m a polit-
out the Speaker can’t pass a bill. nominating Bernie Sanders, and ical scientist. I love this interface
this summer the headlines have between politics and policy. This is
Your opponent is trying to tie you all been about very progressive going to be fun!
to them. Is that frustrating? Democrats beating centrists and
Sometimes one of them has said long-timers. → Steve Friess is a NEWSWEEK contrib-
something about Israel that gets me It doesn’t matter. I fit into my district. utor based in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

NEWSWEEK.COM 13
Society 5.0 for a
brighter future
With Society 5.0’s goal for humans to live longer, healthier and
happier lives, advancements in healthcare, and particularly in
the area of oncology, will be of paramount importance.
One of these major societal is-
sues, and thus an important pillar
in the Society 5.0 plan, is related
the impact of Japan’s rapidly ag-
ing society on the healthcare sys-
tem. Japan has the fastest-aging
population in the world, which
brings about unprecedented chal-
lenges in healthcare. It is many
ways a double-edged sword, as
there are more elderly people re- from pharmaceuticals for cancer “Currently, there is no available
quiring care, but fewer workers to therapy to supportive care for the drug to prevent or treat Chemo-
look after them as the Japanese adverse effect of drugs. therapy Induced Peripheral Neu-
population also shrinks. This has Over the past 14 years, the To- ropathy (CIPN). Our product,
“We will contribute to lead Japan to search for novel so- kyo-based company has invest- SP-04 (PledOx), is currently on
achieving the goals of lutions, such as the incorporation ed and concentrated in just five the most advanced development
Society 5.0 by providing of AI, Big Data and robotics to as- product pipelines: Sancuso (SP- Phase III stage among develop-
sume the roles of human workers 01, for Chemotherapy Induced ing agents in the world,” explains
effective cancer in healthcare – for example using Nausea and Vomiting), Dari- Mr. Arai.
treatment” robots to ease the on-site burden naparsin (SP-02, for Peripheral “SP-05 is our exciting most recent
of healthcare and care giving. T-Cell Lymphoma), Episil (SP-03, product. It can directly act on tumor
Yoshihiro Arai, president & CEO,
With Society 5.0’s goal for for Pain-Associated Oral Muco- cells, unlike levofolinate and folinate
Solasia Pharma K.K. humans to live longer, health- sitis), PledOx (SP-04, for Che- products currently available, which
ier and happier lives, advance- motherapy Induced Peripheral need several steps of metabolism to
In its Fifth Science and Tech- ments in cancer treatment in Neuropathy) and Arfolitixorin form the final active metabolite.”
nology Basic Plan, the Japa- the area of oncology will be of (SP-05, for Increased Efficacy Driven by its high success ratio in
nese government laid out its paramount importance. Another of Fluorouracil). SP-01 and SP- development, this young, agile and
roadmap for the future of the consequence of Japan’s aging 03 have already been launched innovative bio-venture firm – the
nation, outlining its plans to demographic is increasing levels in China and Japan, while SP-04 only of its kind that can cover both
create Society 5.0, “a human- of cancer in society. Therefore, and SP-05 are at Phase III stud- Japan and China – has grown quickly
centered society that balances Japanese companies, already at ies in the US, Europe and Asia and investors and potential partners,
economic advancement with the the forefront of oncology inter- (representing Japan). SP-02, both in Japan and abroad, have taken
resolution of social problems by nationally, will be instrumental for which Solasia has exclusive note. Finding the right partners will
a system that highly integrates to the success of Society 5.0. rights worldwide, is currently be crucial for Solasia to bring its
cyberspace and physical space.” “Building a brighter future for being prepared for New Drug innovative cancer treatment drugs
Up to now industrial and social society has always been a part of Application filing in Japan and beyond Asia to the US, Europe and
revolutions have existed separate- the concept of our company, as our other Asian countries. Latin America.
ly from each other, taking place main mission is ‘Better Medicine
at different points in history. for a Brighter Tomorrow’. We will
However, under Society 5.0, the contribute to achieving the goals of
industrial/economic development Society 5.0 by providing effective
will merge with societal change, cancer treatment,” says Yoshihiro
where the latest Industry 4.0 Arai, president and CEO of bio-tech
technologies, such as Internet of firm, Solasia Pharma K.K.
Things (IoT), Big Data, artificial “Cancer has been the major cause
intelligence and robotics, will be of mortality in Japan. Everyone
deployed to improve livelihoods, wants to have a new medicine
solve environmental issues and to cure cancer, while it is actu-
reduce social inequality. ally really hard to cure. Solasia,
Drawing on the nation’s tech- therefore, would like to have the
nological prowess, Japan aims opportunity to contribute to so-
to turn Society 5.0 into a reality, ciety by focusing on development
incorporating these new tech- in the field of oncology.”
nologies at all levels of industry, Since its establishment in 2006
business and social life in order to develop innovative drugs in the
to achieve both economic devel- area of oncology for the Japanese
opment and solutions to a broad and Asian markets, Solasia has a
range of societal issues. wide range of products varying
Delivering monozukuri quality through
the spirit of co-creation
Leveraging on collaboration and co-creation, Yokohama Yushi Kogyo develops superior quality chemical and oil-based
products used across a wide range of industries, from automotive and electronics to functional foods and cosmetics.
Strong, agile and technology sav- “From Japan we have imported “Our contribution to the food
vy, Japan’s SME manufacturers foreign elements and adapted them industry is vital for us; 20% of
form the backbone of the nation’s to elements of our own culture – our business in the food industry
industrial sector, working hand- for example, Kaizen, which focuses is the processing of functional
in-hand with the larger auto and on striving to improve the lean foods. This field is booming as
electronics manufacturers like manufacturing formula that was we are more concerned about our
Toyota and Sony to export the imported from the US and is now health,” says Mr. Honda.
high-quality products for which present in all the organizational “There are foods that have in-
Japan is renowned. structures of Japanese companies.” gredients our body cannot absorb
In fact, this culture of co- Yokohama Yushi Kogyo’s eight because they are still in an insoluble
creation and co-operation has core technologies – emulsifica- state. We process water-insoluble
been fundamental to the busi- “Collaboration tion, water solubilization, oil solu- materials to soluble formulations
ness success and technological and cooperation bilization, dispersion, solubiliza- by emulsification technology. We
prowess of Japan’s SME manu- between small and tion, oil coating, powderization, also use this technology in the field
facturers. Japanese concepts large companies is and surface modification technol- of cosmetics so that the ingredients
such as Kaizen and Monozukuri, ogy – have been developed thanks are better absorbed by the skin,
core Japanese manufacturing
characteristic of Japan; to the dedication and effort of while the pharmaceutical field is
philosophies based on high- this relationship benefits its R&D department, which has also a key one for our expansion.”
quality, innovation and customer both parties to further also formed partnerships with From the perspective of tech-
satisfaction, were first extolled develop and grow” leading Japanese universities and nological development, one of Yo-
by Toyota and then incorporated research institutions in the spirit kohama Yushi Kogyo’s key advan-
by smaller firms like Yokohama Hideo Honda, President, Yokohama of co-creation. tages is the fact that it does not
Yushi Kogyo that supplied prod- Oils & Fats Industry Co., Ltd. Moving forward, the company distribute products as an ODM
ucts, parts and components for is leveraging on its R&D and in- (original design manufacturer) to
the automobile industry. novation capacities to develop larger firms, but rather produces
“Collaboration and cooperation oil and chemical-based prod- new products, with a focus on the technologies and the process-
between small and large compa- ucts to the automotive, elec- the functional food, cosmetics es behind these larger companies’
nies is characteristic of Japan, this tronics, food, cosmetics and and electronics industries, while end products. “As such we do not
relationship benefits both parties healthcare industries. also continuing to expand its core focus on the sales and marketing
to further develop and grow,” says “We absorbed, improved, traditional cleaning agents and side of the company, we invest our
Yokohama Yushi Kogyo president, and implemented the Total automotive chemical segments. know-how and energy in mid-line
Hideo Honda. Quality Control (TQC) stan- With the growth in health- processing,” adds Mr. Honda.
Established in 1929, Yoko- dards that came from the USA. conscious consumers across the “There is a co-dependent relation-
hama Yushi Kogyo started out Toyota was the pioneer in the globe, the functional food and ship in terms of distribution with
as a refiner of fish oils, before field of TQC and then SMEs beverage market is expected to these large companies because
later developing its technology took it as an example to im- grow 8.49% CAGR through 2026, wherever they decide to produce,
and applying it to the automo- prove their systems always and thus offers significant op- we will go and set up our office there
tive chemical sector. Since then, with the central mindset of portunities for Yokohama Yushi as well. In that sense, the history of
the company has continued its achieving the best quality for Kogyo as it looks to expand its in- our company is based on our ability
journey as a chemical R&D- customers and developing a ternational presence by providing to leverage the Monozukuri process
oriented manufacturer, sup- mutually beneficial relation- its technologies to larger manu- of Japan and take it with us to any
plying environmentally friendly ship,” explains Mr. Honda. facturers of end-user products. market we go to.”

Yokohama Yushi Kogyo for precision cleaner products


and car chemical products
www.yof-linda.co.jp
Bridging
medicine and
engineering
As the world enters the era of to assist in extremely delicate
Society 5.0, which aims to har- surgical operations, was de-
ness the potential of the latest ployed in the world’s first
Industry 4.0 technologies to robot-assisted high-precision
create a better, healthier and supermicrosurgery.
more sustainable future for Such milestone technological
citizens across the globe, the achievements in supermicrosur-
medical industry will undoubt- gery pose major opportunities
edly play a vital role. for Japanese firm, Kono Sei- blood vessel and nerve recon- Indeed, key to Kono Seisakusho’s
The latest innovations in the sakusho, which has been meet- struction, perforator flap surgery, success in product development is
medical industry are being driv- ing the ever-changing demands breast reconstruction, hepatic what it calls “Medical-Engineering
en by elements such as Big Data, of the medical surgery sector for arterial anastomosis, transplant Collaboration”. Working hand-
IoT, nano-technology, sensor more than 50 years. surgery, liver transplantation and in-hand with medical doctors, as
digital replantation. well as other companies, to develop
“We are striving to raise recog- new technologies, Kono Seisakusho
nition of CROWNJUN as a brand will continue to serve as a bridge
that offers unparalleled quality between medicine and engineer-
products. Each of our products ing to meet the medical needs of
demonstrates the highest pos- Society 5.0.
sible value,” says Mr. Kono. “We go to great lengths to meet
More than 15 years on since it current needs and contribute to the
won the Monozukuri Grand Prize development of medical technology
for developing the world’s small-
est needle for microsurgery, Kono
Seisakusho is now seeking over-
seas approval and partner dis-
tributors to bring its high-quality,
“Made in Japan” suture needles
to operating theatres across the
globe – while continuing to de-
Kono Seisakusho’s Tsukuba plant velop ground-breaking products
that will one day be used in the
technology, ultra-precision micro- “There is still a lot of potential robot-assisted supermicrosur-
machining and advanced robotics. for growth in microsurgery and gerical procedures of the future.
And microsurgery is one area that robotic surgery,” says Kono Sei- “From a technical standpoint,
is set to experience rapid tech- sakusho’s enthusiastic president, our greatest strength is our
nological advancement over the Junichi Kono. “As this field con- ability to build the machines
coming years. Thanks to evolv- tinues to grow and have various necessary to develop highly
ing technology in microscopes needs over time, there is constant specialized medical products.
and instruments, micro-surgeons opportunity for us. And our prod- We are able to take the quality “Our greatest strength
can now carry out supermicrosur- uct development goals have in- of existing machines to the next is our ability to build the
gery by connecting vessels with creased accordingly. “ level. As such, we can go further machines necessary to
a diameter of between 0.3 and Using its state-of-the-art mi- and create devices that take our develop highly specialized
0.8 mm for the reconstruction of cro-machining technology, Kono products to the next level,” says
lymphatic flow and vascularized Seisakusho manufactures suture Mr. Kono. medical products. We
tissue transplantation. needles of the highest quality “Our product development can go further and create
With the limited precision required for supermicrosurgery. focuses on the development devices that take our
and dexterity of human hands Under its reputed CROWNJUN of particular materials, as products to the next level”
somewhat limiting performance, brand, Kono Seisakusho has well as raw materials that
deploying robots to assist with developed the smallest suture can be utilized in the medi-
Junichi Kono, President,
supermicrosurgical procedures needles in the world at 0.8 mm cal and surgical fields. For
has become a major focal point in length, as well as the accompa- example, our needles are Kono Seisakusho
for researchers. In fact, in Feb- nying micro-nylon suture thread. made of incredibly strong and
ruary, “MUSA”, a robot devel- Tried and trusted by microsur- rigid steel. Another material, in order to support the lives of as
oped by two Dutch universities gery professionals across Japan, called PTFE, is a very unique many patients as possible,” con-
these superior quality micro-su- material, which can be used cludes Mr. Kono. “That is what we
ture needles are used in a wide for making artificial artery at Kono Seisakusho believe to be
range of procedures, including and tissue implants.” our mission.”
Asahi Intecc: leading medical device innovation
A leading developer of ultra-precision wire technology for vascular treatments, Asahi Intecc continues to create
innovative medical devices trusted by doctors worldwide.
While many people would not as- ufacturer, which is why Asahi from using FFR is excellent for
sociate the production of wires Intecc’s products stand out from its cost-effectiveness and at the
with the medical industry, instru- the competition. same time decreases the rate of
ments such as guide wires, guid- “In particular, our torque MACEs (major adverse cardiac
ing catheters and balloon cath- technology can accurately con- events) per year,” explains Mr.
eters are indispensible in the field vey the feeling of the doctor’s Miyata. “Thanks to this collabo-
of catheter treatment, which is fingertip to the tip of the guide ration our products are used in a
one of the methods of treatment wire, achieving excellent oper- large number of hospitals in the
for diseases such as angina pec- ability that other companies United States; we have obtained
toris and myocardial infarctions cannot imitate,” says Mr. Miyata. recognition and at the same time,
that are caused by the heart’s As Asahi Intecc’ sterling rep- we make it easier for doctors to
blood vessels becoming clogged utation has grown worldwide, do their work.”
or narrowed by cholesterol. the Tokyo Stock Exchange listed With its target to increase
With catheter treatment of- “We have enhanced our company has expanded its col- revenues from the current 56
ten involving wire products with system of joint R&D laboration with global develop- billion yen to 100 billion yen
diameters as thin as 0.35mm, it with top doctors in ment partners. It has started (approx. $940 million), Asahi
is needless to say that medical various fields” joint development with Boston Intecc aims to develop ground-
professionals require the high- Scientific on Fractional Flow breaking new medical device
est quality, high performing and Masahiko Miyata, President & Reserve (FFR) wires. technologies incorporating AI,
high precision wire products – CEO, Asahi Intecc Using embedded sensors that GPS technologies and robot-
which is why many turn to the measure the pressure gradient of ics. Meanwhile, the company
global leading technology devel- “In recent years we have blood flow around the coronary has expanded and diversified
oped by Asahi Intecc. enhanced our system of joint artery, FFR wires determine how the industrial arm of the busi-
For almost three decades, R&D with top doctors in vari- much blood flow is being inhib- ness, with its high-quality wire
Asahi Intecc has been posi- ous fields that have ample ex- ited and the severity of a lesion products being deployed in the
tioned as a vital cog in the perience in the medical front caused by stenosis (a blockage production of automobiles, golf
medical device industry, sup- line. Thereby we are developing or narrowing of the arteries). shoes, fishing lines and air con-
plying products such as guide products in close connection “This measured index gathered ditioners, to name a few.
wires, guiding catheters and bal- to medical practice,” explains
loon catheters, as well as ultra company president and CEO,
fine stainless steel wire ropes Masahiko Miyata.
for industrial and medical use, “We are convinced that we
to clients in Japan and across can contribute to the devel-
the world. opment of medical care by
While Japan has lead the way proactively promoting col-
in many technological fields, it laboration with top doctors
has somewhat trailed behind Eu- not only in Japan but also all
rope and the US in the field of over the world by providing
medical devices. As such, Asahi innovative products.”
Intecc has gained growing at- In response to market needs,
tention from medical profession- Asahi Intecc also plans to ex-
als worldwide, and today counts pand beyond vascular treat- www.asahi-intecc.co.jp/en
Boston Scientific among its co- ment into the fields of gastro-
development partners. intestinal organs and robotics,
Such attention has been gar- where there is potential to
nered thanks to Asahi Intecc’s utilize its existing core tech-
ability to stand ahead of the nologies, while also focusing on
competition with its competitive strengthening its development
advantages stemming from its system for these new areas.
attention to high-quality, fully- Asahi Intecc possesses four
integrated production model, core technologies necessary for
advanced production knowhow wire manufacturing: wire draw-
based on its four proprietary ing technology, wire forming
core technologies, as well as technology, coating technology
its close collaboration and joint and torque technology; while its
R&D with medical professionals in-house integrated production
to develop new products. These (from procuring raw materials
excellent development capabili- to manufacturing finished prod-
ties and production technologies ucts) ensures a stable supply of
have enabled Asahi Intecc to high-quality products. This type
gain a high global market share of integrated production system
in the medical device field. is rare for a medical device man-
Merging AI technology
and human interaction
Culture has had a lot to play CEO, Taisuke Ono. “We have in Fukuoka was the first big in- proliferation of masks across
in differing perspectives on continued to develop robots un- vestor to support the company, the Western world, coupled
the concept of robots. While der the theme of ‘Solving Social which has since listed on the with a growing acceptance of
Western science fiction and Problems’ and ‘Creating a New Tokyo Stock Exchange and now AI and robotics, Mr. Ono sees
literature has created a level Platform’. By 2050, we want to counts Hitachi, NTT, and Mitsui ample opportunity for products
of fear and apprehension in change the world with conscious Group among its partners. like the C-Face Smart Mask.
the US and Europe, the rever- Most investors were initially “In a society where we are
ence for robots in Japan mainly made aware of donut robot- asked to wear a mask to avoid
stems from the popularity of ics when the new Cinnamon infections, using a mask that en-
‘Karakuri Ningyo’ – mechanized prototype was selected to be sures the flow of communication
dolls that first appeared in the deployed at several Japanese and avoids misunderstandings
17th century during the Edo airports in 2017 to support is a key opportunity. The ma-
Period. Moreover, traditional human airport staff. With the terials used are germ-free and
Shinto and Buddhist teach- capacity to deal with custom- by wearing another protective
ings in Japan say that a soul or ers, offer translation services, mask underneath it, the hygiene
spirit resides even in inanimate watch over infants, the elderly, level remains intact,” he says.
and manmade objects, which and pets, as well as offer health With a focus on reaching
could also partly explain the “We have continued to checks; today Cinnamon is not English-speaking markets
nation’s love, respect and ad- develop robots under only used at airports, but also first, donut robotics aims
miration for machines. at public facilities, corporate of- to launch the C-Face Smart
It’s no wonder then that the theme of ‘Solving fices and homes across Japan. Mask in Europe next year, fol-
Japan is leading the robot- Social Problems’ lowed by Japan at the end of
ics revolution that sets out and ‘Creating a New C-Face Smart Mask the year, with the unit expect-
to build a better society and Platform’” As is the case for many top in- ed to retail at a around $44.
economy, where AI will open up novators like donut robotics, “Eventually everyone will be
once unthinkable possibilities Taisuke Ono, CEO, donut robotics crises can bring about new op- able to buy it through Ama-
across the board, while robots portunities. In response to the zon. But essentially, at the
will take over menial and dan- coronavirus pandemic, the com- moment, we are interested
gerous jobs, deliver our food, humanoid robots. We will do our pany focused
and offer companionship and best to serve society by develop- its efforts on
care to the elderly. And sev- ing as much as possible.” developing a
eral Japanese companies, like Like Steve Job and Steve Woz- smart mask
donut robotics, are already at niak’s Apple in its early days, prototype
the forefront of creating new donut robotics was founded in called the C-
synergies between AI technol- a garage by an ambitious group Face Smart
ogy and human interaction to of engineers and designers. And Mask, which
create a better and more com- Mr. Ono hopes to follow Apple’s is designed to
fortable future. trajectory to the top by focusing make commu-
“We believe that 30 years not only on superior technology, nication and
from now all the dangerous jobs but also marketing and design. social dis-
for humans will be occupied by “Our competitive advantage tancing easier.
robots,” says donut robotics is based on the fact that apart Connecting
from being leaders on soft and with an app
hard technological expertise, easily downloaded to a user’s in selling the software rather
we focus on packaging, price, cell phone, the C-Face Smart than the masks themselves,”
PRODUCED BY design, as well as the techno- Mask can transcribe dictation, says Mr. Ono, whose ambition
THE WORLDFOLIO logical aspect,” he says. “We aim amplify the wearer’s voice, and for the future is to collabo-
Fernando Llaryora - Regional Director to have a prestigious branding translate speech into eight dif- rate with the likes of Face-
Monica Perez-Ilzarbe - Project Director image – to become the Apple ferent languages. book and Google and build
Sasha Lauture - Editorial Associate of robotics.” Of course, like robots, hygienic “a company with $1 billion
Bruno Ortiz-Cañavate: Journalist After Mr. Ono and his col- masks have historically been market capitalization” over
Islene Dávila - Editorial Analyst leagues first generated crowd- much more commonplace and the next five years.
Aulia Oktadiputri - Editorial Analyst funding to develop a prototype accepted in Japan -- that was
Marta Tato: Copy Editor for their smart robot, known as at least until the onset of the
Sara G. Cortijo - Designer Cinnamon, a venture capitalist coronavirus crisis. But with the
Building blocks of
a better world
Mitsubishi Gas Chemical is leading development of
vital chemicals, compounds and materials for the
technologies that will drive Society 5.0, as well as green
energy and carbon recycling.
fermented foods – while its high
performing resins and polymers
are used in the production of au-
tonomous vehicles, fuel-cell bat-
teries and have ample potential in
the latest aerospace technologies.
“When looking at the elements
MGC’s geothermal plant in Akita prefecture
required to tackle global issues it
comes down to the role that chem- an extensive network of overseas Under Mr. Fujii’s leadership, MGC
icals can play. Innovative trends partners and subsidiaries, with 50% has and will continue to strengthen
such as SpaceX exist thanks to of its revenue coming from abroad. the vital pillars of its growth strat-
chemical companies, from the As the company looks to increase egy while supporting Society 5.0,
raw materials to the machinery,” revenues from 650 billion yen to 1 regarding energy, communication,
explains MGC’s President & Rep- trillion yen (approx. $9.4 billion) over food and medicine, and the provi-
resentative Director, Masashi Fujii. the next decade, it plans to extend sion of chemical compounds and
“When looking at the “SpaceX is looking to launch its presence in Europe and the US, materials for the aerospace and
elements required to 40,000 satellites, which happens where it already has four factories. the automotive industries.
tackle global issues it to be a gigantic opportunity for Another focus area for MGC is “We will continue to grow until
comes down to the role us as we are able to manufacture meeting the future clean energy we look into the eyes of Elon Musk
carbon fiber composites of excel- needs of Society 5.0, while also in the race for mobility and aero-
that chemicals can play” lent heat-resistance. Aerospace developing other initiatives for a space and Tim Cook in the race for
Masashi Fujii, President, offers us opportunities such as greener planet. For example, the information and communication de-
Mitsubishi Gas Chemical the possibility of moving from 5G company’s geothermal plant in vices,” he concludes. “As I always
to 6G. Regarding the mobility do- North Japan will provide electric- say: ‘It is important to take risks in
main, we want to make smart cars ity to a “plant factory” to harvest order to make risk your friend’.”
From 5G and 6G communications (EVs and autonomous vehicles) a plants and vegetables using geo-
technologies, robotics, aerospace reality through providing materi- thermal energy, while also being a
and autonomous vehicles, to health- als that enable lighter cars, moving point for carbon recycling.
care, smart agriculture and green on hydrogen and fuel batteries.” “Regarding C02 recycling, Eu-
energy development, the role of the Indeed investment in R&D and rope is leading this field but we are
chemicals and materials science innovation forms the most vital rapidly catching up,” says Mr. Fujii.
industries in the advancement of part of the strategy for MGC.
Society 5.0 cannot be understated. There are currently around 500
Virtually all the latest products researchers working at its three
and technologies in the afore- R&D centers in Niigata, Kanaga-
mentioned fields depend on ma- wa, and Tokyo – each of which
terials and chemicals developed specialize in different areas, such
by global leaders like Mitsubishi as organic chemicals, catalysts,
Gas Chemical (MGC), which, for biotechnologies, natural-gas de-
five decades, has strived to cre- rived chemicals and polymers,
ate original technologies for the and market-driven performance
betterment of society. chemicals. MGC aims to increase
And with the company preparing investment in R&D from 5% to
to celebrate its 50th anniversary in 10% of total revenue as it looks
2021, MGC has identified four key to further pioneer advancements
pillars in its dynamic mid-term strat- in chemicals and materials science.
egy to meet the needs of Society “Up until now, R&D was mainly
5.0: energy, information/ communi- done in-house but in the immediate
cation, medical/ food, and mobility. future, we want to undertake the
MGC’s product portfolio in- task of creation with partners to
cludes basic chemicals like metha- unify efforts. We have close ties
nol, xylene, and hydrogen peroxide, with several partners worldwide,”
high-performance engineering adds Mr. Fujii.
plastics, foamed plastics and semi- With 10,000 employees around
conductor packaging materials, as the globe, in regions such as Saudi
well as life science products, such Arabia, Venezuela, Thailand, Indo-
as antibody pharmaceuticals and nesia and China, MGC already has MGC’s R&D center in Niigata
Periscope

NEWSMAKERS

Talking Points
“THIS SEA OF PEOPLE
“We lost our home. CANNOT BE STOPPED
It looks like BY MILITARY EQUIPMENT,
WATER CANNONS,
everything is PROPAGANDA
completely gone.” AND ARRESTS.”
Ŝ%HODUXVLDQRSSRVLWLRQ
—NETTIE CARROLL OF BIG DFWLYLVW0DULD.ROHVQLNRYD
CREEK, CALIFORNIA,
POP. 200, HIT BY WILDFIRE
“It just showed
me how tough
mums are, if
you can birth a
“ W E S I M P LY H AV E T O G E T
O U R A RT S S E C T O R BAC K baby, you can Maria Kolesnikova

O P E N A N D RU N N I N G. . . do anything.
You play,
W E A R E AT T H E P O I N T O F
N O R E T U R N, R EA L LY.”

—andrew lloyd webbe r
you go home “Every 24 hours, it’s pain
—it’s nothing but pain. It
and you are hurts to breathe; it hurts to
still changing sleep. It hurts to move from
side to side. It hurts to eat.”
diapers.” —jac ob blake, who wa s shot in the
back by p olice in kenosha , wisc onsin
ŜǯǢǮǢǫǞdzǦǩǩǦǞǪǯ

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UNACCEPTABLE THAT A
“I wanted to always BANNED CHEMICAL WEAPON HAS
BEEN USED AND RUSSIA MUST
play it down.” HOLD A FULL, TRANSPARENT
—president donald trump on
the coronavirus in an interview INVESTIGATION"
with bob woodward
—U
U.K.
K Secretary of State Dominic
Raab on the poisoning of Russian
opposition leader Alexei Navlany

20 NEWSWE Serena Williams SEP T E M BER 25, 2020


CONTENT FROM COUNTRY REPORTS SWITZERLAND

Switzerland: Innovating out of adversity


How does the world’s most innovative economy fight back against COVID?

Like many other nations, Switzerland was forced to shut down much of its

SHUTTERSTOCK: TRAVELLING ISLANDER


export-oriented economy during the first months of the pandemic. Yet the
wealthy Alpine nation has signalled a strong comeback over the last quarter
and a V-shaped recovery, with most of any losses this year being recouped
in 2021. How has this singular country managed to turn the tide around?
Part of it is the result of solid fiscal management that enabled the govern-
ment to quickly propose a $63-billion package to provide liquidity for com-
panies and spare the workforce during lockdown. Part of it comes from the
nation’s strong innovativeness. The World Intellectual Property Organization
has ranked Switzerland as the global leader in innovation for the 10th consec-
utive year this month, obviously with good reason. Government, institutions
and businesses have leveraged their innovative capabilities to overcome the
challenges laid by the pandemic and subsequent crisis. The heavyweight Swiss
Have the Swiss engineered a post-COVID economic toolkit?
pharmaceutical industry, for example, is making a huge contribution in the
global race for vaccines, treatments and diagnostics. Local giant Roche is about Universities are one pillar of an education system that includes some of the
to launch a novel test that detects the virus within 15 minutes but a myriad of world’s best secondary, business and hospitality management schools. Having
revolutionary life science, biotechnology and medtech players are also making maintained operations during the crisis by embracing digitalization, many of
a mark. As the president of the Swiss Biotech Association Dominik Escher these institutions are now planning for the next year, adapting courses to teach
points out, “Hundreds of small to mid-sized firms in Switzerland are doing the future leaders of a post-COVID world.
research to come up with better therapies for COVID-19 and in general.” The digitalization of the economy as a whole has clearly made a huge leap
These are supported by Switzerland’s renowned universities and research forward in 2020. Swiss banks in particular have accelerated their digital trans-
institutions working around the clock on dozens of research projects to pro- formation, enhancing the use of technologies such as artificial intelligence and
vide a deeper understanding of the virus and how to mitigate its impact. “It’s robotics to rapidly implement the government’s $44-billion liquidity scheme
for small- and medium-sized enterprises—a success other nations hope to rep-
licate. Even famous traditional industries like watchmaking have increasingly
“We aim for relevance in all our activities from
turned toward digital channels to compensate for lower bricks-and-mortar
the content of our teaching to our research,
which focuses on societies’ burning questions.” sales. As a result of this accelerating digitalisation, many of Switzerland’s tech
businesses have recorded peaks of activity, including hardware manufacturer
Kilian Stoffel, Rector, University of Neuchâtel
Logitech and banking software provider Tenemos.
Time and again Switzerland has proved that with every crisis comes op-
an exciting mix of immunological, clinical, social science, humanities and portunity. Just like it internationalized a knife that spawned a new industry
economics projects,” notes Matthias Egger, president of the Swiss National after WW2, and emerged from 2008’s financial crisis stronger and faster than
Science Foundation’s National Research Council. By collaborating with in- others, can the Swiss lead the world out of adversity again?
dustry and international partners, Swiss universities are ensuring their research To discover the answers, read or download our exclu-
has real-life, global impact—a fact evidenced by Switzerland’s record number sive full-length special report on Switzerland’s exceptional
of patents per capita every year. “We aim for relevance in all our activities from turnaround in this crisis. Access it now on Newsweek.com
the content of our teaching to our research, which focuses on societies’ burning using the QR code or visit www.newsweek.com/news-
questions,” explains the rector of the University of Neuchâtel, Kilian Stoffel. week-country-reports.

Read our exclusive full-length special on Switzerland on Newsweek.com, brought to you by:

www.country-reports.net 1
Everyone wants a c ovid-19 vac cine .
But the talk of rushing it out is making people nervous.
How to assess the risk.

by
FRED GUTERL

6 . $ 0 $ 1    ʔ* ( 7 7 <

22 NEWSWEEK.COM SEP T E M BER 25, 2020


SOWING DOUBT
Public buy-in is essential
to the success of a
vaccination campaign,
because a vaccine is only
effective when people
agree to be inoculated.
Recent election politics,
however, threaten to
undermine public trust.
T he unprecedented swiftness
with which medical science
is developing a vaccine for
COVID-19 is one of the most
inspiring stories in this historic chapter. Vaccine
candidates emerged only weeks after scientists
identified SARS-CoV-2 and sequenced its genetic
code. Universities and Big Pharma formed teams
to develop vaccine candidates in short order. But
the next two months of the presidential campaign
will complicate efforts by doctors and public health
officials in communicating, just as the threat of an
autumn wave of infections approaches.
The race for a vaccine took shape early on. By
July, Moderna, the Massachusetts drug company,
moved the vaccine candidate that it was devel-
oping with nearly $1 billion dollars from the U.S.
National Institutes of Health into phase 3 clinical
just as quickly, the search for a vaccine became trials. Phase 3 is the gold standard in medicine,
a political issue, and the sad result is that while the final leg of testing a new vaccine has to com-
the chances of an effective vaccine are rising, so plete before the Food and Drug Administration WAITING FOR A SHOT
is public distrust. decides if its benefits are sufficiently large and 7KH UDFH WR EH ɿUVW RXW ZLWK
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That’s too bad, because the medical and scien- its risks sufficiently small to justify releasing it to RQ 0RGHUQD EHJDQ SKDVH
tific task of developing a COVID-19 vaccine is not millions—perhaps billions—of otherwise healthy  FOLQLFDO WULDOV LQ -XO\ 7RS
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24 NEWSWEEK.COM SEP T E M BER 25, 2020


HEALTH

behind Moderna in the race to be first out with a


vaccine. But in August, as Moderna was beginning
the vast logistical operation of enrolling partici-
pants for its trial, Russia decided to authorize use
of its vaccine even though it hadn’t yet published
the results of its phase 1 and 2 trials, which are
used to gather data on toxicity and effectiveness
from a small number of close-monitored partici-
pants. Russia was releasing a vaccine that had been
tested on only 76 people.
Scientists denounced the move as “reckless,” “fool-
$ 0$1'$$1'5$'(ʝ5+2$'(6ʔ7+(:$6+,1*7213267ʔ*(77<

ish,” “unethical” and potentially “disastrous.” If the


vaccine turned out to be unsafe or ineffective, it
could undermine public trust in vaccines across the
globe, at a time when convincing people to accept
vaccination is important to containing COVID-19.
Undaunted by the example of Russia—or per-
haps emboldened by it—President Trump earlier
this month began suggesting that the U.S. might au-
thorize its own vaccine before the election on No-
vember 3. “We remain on track to deliver a vaccine
before the end of the year and maybe even before
November 1st,” he said at a news conference earli-
er this month. “We think we can
probably have it sometime during
&/2&.:,6()5207235,*+7/,8*8$1*8$1ʔ&+,1 $ 1(:66(59,&(ʔ*(77<52%<1%(&.ʔ$)3ʔ*(77<1,$,'

the month of October.” He has

part of the armamentarium


ʔ

we have against this virus. The other part is washing our hands,
keeping
p g distance and wearing
g a mask. ”
ʔ

repeated the claim. grounds. “I just hope Americans will choose to take
Pushback came from many di- the information they need from scientists and not
rections. Democratic candidates from politicians,” he said.
Joe Biden and Kamala Harris Even the pharmaceutical companies acted to
were quick to attack Trump for mixing politics and head off any politically-timed vaccine authorization.
science. “I would not trust Donald Trump and it Executives from nine drug companies, including
would have to be a credible source of information Moderna, Pfizer and AstroZeneca, pledged to apply
that talks about the efficacy and the reliability of for government authorizations only “after demon-
whatever he’s talking about,” Harris told CNN. Sci- strating safety and efficacy through a Phase 3 clinical
entists also objected. Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the study.” Two prominent NYU bioethicists, comment-
National Institute of Allergy and Infecious Diseases, ing on the sight of Big Pharma apparantly defending
said a vaccine before the end of the year was “not im- the American public from a “politically-impaired”
possible” but “unlikely.” Francis Collins, the director FDA, wrote in STAT, a health science news website,
of the NIH, told Senators at a hearing that any deci- that “hell has frozen over.”
sion to release a vaccine would be made on scientific The assurances have apparently not steadied

NEWSWEEK.COM 25
a nervous public. According to a recent CBS poll,
Americans are deeply worried about vaccine safety.
The number of U.S. voters who say they would get a
vaccine as soon as possible if one became available
at no cost dropped to 21 percent, from 32 percent in
late July. And two-thirds of voters would consider a
vaccine announced this year to have been rushed for
political rather than scientific purposes, and only 13

F ROM TO P: D EN IS C H A R LE T/A F P/G ET T Y; EVA M AR IE UZCAT EG U I /


B LO OM B ERG /GE T T Y; ST EFA NI R E YN OL D S /B LO OM BE RG /G E T T Y
percent of those would get one. As if to underscore
the risks, AstraZeneca suspended phase-3 trials of
the vaccine it has developed with Oxford University
after a patient developed symptoms of a neurologi-
cal disease (the trial has since resumed).
To help sort through all the uncertainty, we’ve
put together the latest information on COVID-19
vaccines and the most frequently asked questions.
Here’s what we know so far—about the science, not
the politics.

How certain are we that a vaccine for


COVID-19 will the forthcoming?
fewer than one in five vaccine candidates
typically survive the testing gauntlet, but at pres-
ent there are more than 100 being tested for
COVID-19. The chances that at least one of them

“We’re going to have to le arn tO lIVe wIth thIs


new reality for another year or two, and that
there’s no point waiting.”

will work is high. To date, nine vaccines are in drug hydroxychloroquine, a vaccine could turn out
phase 3 trials: Moderna’s, which uses fragments of to confer benefits that do not outweigh harmful side
the coronavirus to stimulate an immune response; effects, which means the treatment is worse than
a similar vaccine by Pfizer, Biontech and Fosun no treatment at all. Or it could simply fail to pro-
Pharma; and the AstroZeneca-Oxford vaccine, vide much protection against COVID-19. Failures, of
which uses an adenovirus to carry coronavirus course, are what the tests are designed to weed out.
genes to cells, provoking an immune response. Tri- It’s important to keep in mind how quickly
als of a vaccine called BCG, used in poor nations medical science is acting. Typically, it takes 4 or
for tuberculosis and which may protect against 5 years to develop a vaccine. It took Jonas Salk
COVID-19, are also underway. A lot can still go three years just to test the polio vaccine. That a
wrong, however. vaccine for COVID-19 may come only a year af-
Clinical trials are notoriously hard to predict. Vac- ter the virus was discovered is astonishing. Still,
cines can look good in phase 1 and 2 only to fail in there’s no telling when ongoing trials will end.
phase 3, where the sheer number of participants can Scientists first have to collect enough data to be
reveal side-effects that smaller tests missed, while confident that they know what the risks and ben-
refining effectiveness rates. As happened with the efits are. Unlike, say, cancer drugs, where patients

26 NEWSWEEK.COM
HE ALTH

can often face an early death unless something is fective, which doesn’t give iron-clad protection.
done to halt the progress of the disease, vaccines However, Dr. Larry Corey of the Fred Hutchinson
are given to millions of healthy people, which Cancer Research Center, an architect of the federal
puts a premium on safety. Moderna, for instance, government’s COVID-19 program, is hopeful that
has enrolled about 22,000 people in its trial so effectiveness will be “well north of 40 percent.”
far; the FDA requires data on 150 participants
who fall ill with COVID-19. How quickly that What happens if a weak vaccine is released?
happens depends on how prevalent the virus even a vaccine that leaves 40 or 50 percent
is in those areas where clinical trials are taking of the people who are inoculated vulnerable to
place—a trial might go more quickly in Arizona, COVID-19 is better than no vaccine at all. And it
where many people are infected, than in Maine, would help in hastening herd immunity, which
BIZZARO WORLD
“Hell has frozen over,” wrote where infection rates are lower. happens when enough people are immune to a
bioethicists in reference It also depends on how effective the vaccine is. virus to halt its spread.
to a pledge of Big Pharma A vaccine that protects 80 percent of the people The conventional wisdom is that herd immunity
executives apparently
defending the American who are inoculated would generate statistically sig- occurs when 70 percent of a population has immu-
public from a politically- nificant results more slowly, because fewer people nity, though some statistical models suggest that
compromised FDA. would get sick, than a trial that only protects half. 50 percent might be enough for COVID-19. That
Top left: the BCG vaccine
may ward off COVID-19. For COVID-19, the Food and Drug Administration doesn’t mean that a vaccine that protects 50-per-
Bottom left: trials for is aiming for 50 percent reduction in the disease, cent of those who are inoculated will be enough,
a COVID-19 vaccine which effectively means it would accept anything because not everybody will take it—fewer than half
in Florida. Below: FDA
commissioner Stephen above 30 percent. By comparison, the annual in- of Americans plan to get a COVID-19 vaccine, ac-
Hahn has made missteps. fluenza vaccines are usually about 60 percent ef- cording to an NBC poll, and one in three say they’d
outright refuse to take one, according to Gallup.
Public health officials worry that people may be
discouraged to hear that a vaccine only works half
the time and decide, why bother?
Most of the COVID-19 vaccines require two doses,
which greatly complicates the logistics of the roll-
out because you need to manufacture and distrib-
ute twice as many shots. Another unknown is how
durable these vaccines will be—how long will they
last? Chances are on the order of months or years,
but we don’t know, and we may not know until after
vaccines are released.
All this means that the discipline of wearing
masks and social distancing and keeping restau-
rants partially filled is going to continue for the
time being—probably a long time. “We should look
at vaccines as part of the armamentarium we have
against this virus,” says Dr. Alan Bernstein, a member
of Canada’s coronavirus task force. “The other part
is washing our hands, keeping distance and wearing
a mask. Certainly, if I was immunized, I would still
be doing these things.”

What’s the problem with


releasing a vaccine early?
release of a vaccine before there’s enough
data to know that the risk of harming people is

NEWSWEEK.COM 27
HEALTH

much lower than the risk of helping them would vi- from some test participants who may be receiving
olate public trust. “We can’t have a vaccine released placebo instead. If a vaccine were released in this
with great fanfare and then find out we have to pull manner before election day, it would have gone
the vaccine because it has an unacceptable risk of through phase 1 and 2 trials, which focus on safety,
side-effects, because then the trust that the pub- and at least part way through phase 3 tests—but
lic has in the medical establishment—in the FDA it would have to have done so well in phase 3 as to
and in vaccines in general—will be seriously dam- give scientists enough data to know unambiguous-
aged, perhaps permanently,” says Richard Malley, a ly that the vaccine is safe and effective.
professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. What would happen if the White House insist-
The reputations of U.S. medical institutions have ed on short-circuiting that process and releasing
already taken a hit after missteps on hydroxychlo- a vaccine without overwhelmingly positive data
roquine, mask-wearing, convalescent plasma and from phase 3 trials? I asked Dr. Corey, who has
COVID-19 tests. Another mistake on vaccines would worked with Dr. Fauci to design Operation Warp
only encourage anti-vaxxers, who in recent years Speed, the government’s COVID-19 vaccine pro-
have made it more difficult than it would other- gram. He pointed out that such a scenario would
wise be to protect people from measles, whooping require the complicity of a great many scientists
cough and other diseases. who have been collaborating on the nation’s
Early release of vaccines also complicates the vaccine initiative. “We built these trials with in-
task of studying other potential vaccines. Clinical credible scientific expertise and review. There
trials require comparing a group of people who get are hundreds of people who’ve seen the protocol.
the vaccine being tested with another group who There are many layers of the review committees.
get either a placebo or a standard vaccine. If an ef
fective vaccine is already available, it’s hard for sci-
entists to enlist people willing to risk taking only a
placebo for the sake of a new candidate that might
or might not turn out to be better.
“There’s urgency to develop a vaccine,” says Malley,
“but it doesn’t mean you should rush and by-pass
the usual criteria that have been established for
decades to get to a vaccine that may not really be
very efficacious.”

F RO M TOP : DAV I D R A M O S/GE T T Y; MA RCE L KUSC H /PI CT U R E AL L I A N CE /G ET T Y


When a vaccine comes out,
how will we know it is safe?
occasionally scientists will be ethically
compelled to end a phase 3 trial early because
data suggests that the drug, treatment or vaccine
is overwhelmingly effective, which means they
can’t in good conscience continue withholding it

“There’s urgency to develop a vaccine, but it doesn’t mean you


should rush anD by-pa ss the usual criteria that have been established
for decades to get to a vaccine that may not really be very efficacious.”

28 NEWSWEEK.COM SEp t E M bEr 25, 2020


Imagine a drug that you could take at the onset of
symptoms, or after you’d been exposed to someone
who had COVID-19, that would eliminate the risk of
being hospitalized or having long-lasting symptoms.
For many people, that might turn COVID-19 from a
terrifying disease to merely an unpleasant one.
Drug companies are working on oral or nasal
treatments similar to remdesivir, the therapeutic
that has shown some success earlier this year, which
might be particularly effective when given early. So
far drugs have shown promise in animal studies, says
Malley. Drugs are much easier to test than vaccines,
which require inoculating people and waiting for
them to get sick. With a drug, you take already sick
people, treat them and see if they improve. For this
reason, Malley thinks early-stage drug therapies
could be available in six months. “Obviously, taking
pills whenever you’re sick is not a long-term solu-
tion,” he says. “But in a way, that may be more like to
bring us relief from having to quarantine and avoid
activities than a vaccine.”

When will life return to normal?


when the coronavirus pandemic struck the
Seattle area in February, Hilary Godwin stopped
visiting her elderly parents in Oregon. The train
ride, which she used to love because she could
read and sleep and look out the window, was now
a potential virus-spreading event, and how could
PARTIAL RELIEF The clinical trial sites involve the professors of in- she justify risking her parents’ health by staying
Even a vaccine that
works, say, 40 percent
fectious disease at essentially all our universities in their guest room and eating in their kitchen?
of the time would help in throughout the country and the people who have So, like millions of other people, she decided to
hastening herd immunity. been on the front lines of taking care of people put her family life on hold, hunker down and wait
But it would still leave
60 percent of the people
with COVID.” Has talk of an early release hurt the for a vaccine.
who were inoculated vaccine effort so far? “I can answer very emphati- But as fall approaches, the prospect of having
vulnerable to COVID-19. cally that it hasn’t,” he says. to give up congregating in backyards and sidewalk
Above: A nursing home
under COVID-19 lockdown
If the worst-case scenario comes to pass and restaurants is enough to make a person consider
in Barcelona, Spain. Left: the entire executive branch of the U.S. govern- coming out of the bunker. So Godwin, dean of the
coronavirus samples in a ment—the FDA, the Centers for Disease Control, School of Public Health at the University of Wash-
research lab in Düsseldorf.
the Department of Health and Human Services— ington, drove with her husband and son for five-
are compromised by political influence from the and-a-half hours to sit in her parents’ backyard and
White House, we will have to rely on these scientists talk from six feet away.
to speak out. So far, they have. “It was the realization that it’s not just three more
months, or 10 more months. It’s really that we’re go-
Is a vaccine our only hope? ing to have learn to live with this new reality for an-
although vaccines are important for the other year or two, and that there’s no point waiting.
long-term control of the coronavirus, there’s also If I can come up with a way that may not be perfect,
the possibility that drug companies will come out but at least is relatively safe, where I can spend time
with treatments that make the disease less deadly. with them, I should do that now.”

NEWSWEEK.COM 29
“IT WOULD
BE BLOWN
OUT OF
THE WATER
PUBLICLY.”
dr . anthony fauci says that the White House
ld not
would t succeed
d in
i forcing the release of a
COVID-19 vaccine before election day

$0(5,&$Š6 0267 :,'(/<ʝ.12:1 WKDWZRXOGPDNHLWYHU\GLIɿFXOWIRU


expert on the coronavirus pandemic is SROLWLFVWRKDYHDQLQʀXHQFHRQZKHWKHUD
no stranger to disease crises and the vaccine is approved for use before it was
political turmoil that surrounds them. shown truly to be safe and effective. The
Fauci’s been head of the National Institute accumulation of data and the analysis of
of Allergy and Infectious Diseases since data is unbiased. An independent group
1984, through AIDS and Ebola. Now he is called a Data and Safety Monitoring
FRQWHQGLQJ ZLWK D SUHVLGHQW ZKR LV ʀLUWLQJ Board is associated with every clinical
with the idea of rushing the release of a WULDOWKDWKDV1,+ɿQJHUSULQWVRQLW$QG
COVID-19 vaccine before the election on WKHQ\RXKDYHWKHVFLHQWLɿFFRPPXQLW\
November 3. like me and Francis Collins, who’s the
In a Newsweek interview, Fauci was director of NIH. We have not been shy
characteristically frank. A presidential about being vocal concerning premature-
edict to force the approval of a COVID-19 ly doing an Emergency Use Authorization.
vaccine before election day on November
3 “will be blown out of the water publicly Q. Do you worry that the politics will
by the people who understand what give momentum to anti-vaxxers?
it takes to declare a vaccine safe and A. Oh, yes. Obviously, the statements
effective,” he says. “It would be a public that have come out of the White House
embarrassment.” Here are excerpts: about the FDA being a Deep State; the
FDA giving an emergency-use authori-
Q. Will political pressure to release a zation to hydroxychloroquine and then
vaccine early hurt the effort? withdrawing it; the president being obvi-
A. Let’s get down to the imaginary sce- ously favorably disposed to hydroxychlo-
nario where, all of a sudden, somebody roquine and me being publicly against it.
from the White House calls up the [Food All of that stuff clearly feeds into people
and Drug Administration] commissioner having an issue [with vaccines].
and says, we want this vaccine out there
QRZGRLW RU ,ŠOO ɿUH \RX ,I WKDW KDSSHQV Q. Is there any preliminary data from
GETTY

it will be so publicly blasted. It seems Moderna vaccine trial?


inconceivable. A. Nothing right now. [Moderna is] still
There are checkpoints in that process enrolling volunteers, and most of them

30 NEWSWEEK.COM SEP T E M BER 25, 2020


M E D IC I N E

have not yet even received the second


dose. By the end of September, we will
probably get a feel for where we are.

Q. You have no way of knowing how


long the trial will last?
A. If you asked me to put down my
10-cent bet on that, I would say it likely
would be November or December.

Q. What’s your 10-cent bet on how


effective the Moderna vaccine will be?
A. If you look at the phase one study,
which was only a small study of 45 peo-
ple, [the vaccine] induced neutralizing
antibodies and at a robust level, equiva-
lent to or better than what you see with
natural infection. Historically, that is a
good sign. I would guess that it’s going
to be around 70 to 75 percent effective,
but that’s purely a guess.

Q. What do you say to people who


won’t take a vaccine that only works
three-quarters of the time?
A. Any degree of protection is better
than no degree of protection.

Q. Will we still be wearing masks and


staying socially distant in 2021?
A. At a minimum, we’re going to be
doing this well into 2021. By June or
July of 2021, you may have most of the
population vaccinated. As we turn the
corner halfway through 2021, getting
into the summer and fall, I would predict
that we’re going to be approaching a cer-
tain degree of normality—not complete-
ly, because we’re still going to have some
coronavirus circulating around, but it’s
not going to be something that’s immo-
bilizing society the way it currently is.

Q. Journalist Bob Woodward says the


president intentionally understated
the severity of the pandemic in the
spring. What do you make of this?
A. While that was going on, I and my
colleagues were saying what it really
was like. I was sounding the alarm about
community spread and other things. To
the extent that people have trusted me
and listened to me, there was no doubt
that we were saying it was serious.

Q. But Trump has a bigger bully pulpit


than you do.
A. Yes, right. That’s unfortunate that that
happened.

Photog raph b y G r E G K A H N NEWSWEEK.COM 31


WORLD’S BEST SPECIALI

32 NEWSWEEK.COM SEP T E M BER 25, 2020


ZED HOSPITALS 2021
Picking the
right place for
specialized care
is one of the
most important
medical
decisions you
can make. Here
are the premiere
institutions
in three key
treatment areas.

Illustration by E L E N A B S NEWSWEEK.COM 33
IN OUR NINE DECADES, NEWSWEEK HAS COVERED ALL
aspects of health care—scientific challenges, economic disruption, the oc-
casional medical miracle and most of all, what these developments mean for
our readers. As part of that commitment, we’ve partnered with Statista Inc.,
the global market research and consumer data firm, to rank the world’s best
hospitals. Now we’re expanding that expertise by looking at specialties. In this
chapter, we rank the best hospitals in cardiology, oncology and endocrinology.
If you or a loved one needs specialized care in one of those areas, as millions
of us do, you want to know which hospitals or medical centers have state-of-
the-art facilities and the most knowledgeable, accomplished physicians. Where
will you have access to the best diagnosticians, highest level of care and most
effective treatments? Here in the magazine, we list the top 50 hospitals in each
of the specialties; the full list of 500 is online at newsweek.com/wbsh-2021.
We’re proud to offer our readers these independent, authoritative and reli-
able Newsweek/Statista rankings. Ơ Nancy Cooper, Global Editor in Chief

METHODOLOGY PHWKRGRORJ\ HDFK OLVW LQFOXGHV D Statista performed plausibility converted into a ranking score.
ranking of the 50 best global hos- checks on all data to prevent Answers were then weighted
SLWDOV ZKLOH UDQNV  WR  self-nomination. A recommenda- by the type of respondent by
The ranking features the top 200 are sorted alphabetically. tion score was calculated based SURIHVVLRQ ZLWK SULPDU\ UHFRP-
hospitals in both Oncology and The peer recommendations on the number of weighted mendations from doctors in the
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docrinology. While global top hos- ZDYHV )LUVW Newsweek and )RU WKH VHFRQG VXUYH\ SHULRG WKH KLJKHVW ZHLJKW HJ FDUGLRO-
pitals are represented in multiple Statista performed an online sur- Statista asked specialists from ogists for cardiology) and by the
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very small were excluded from Newsweek and Statista during ta/Newsweek’s “Worlds Best KRVSLWDO LQ HYHU\ PHGLFDO ɿHOG
the ranking since they were very an initial survey period from May Hospitals 2020” ranking (there based on the total weighted num-
unlikely to receive enough recom- to July 2020. The questionnaire was an overlap between both ber of recommendations and the
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on peer recommendations for respondents were free to sug- WKHVH KRVSLWDOV 7RS  7RS  H[SHUW ERDUG ZKLFK VHUYHV LQ DQ
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global survey of medical profes- recommendable. Self-recom- 7RS  7RS   7KH UDQN- WKH IXOO PHWKRGRORJ\ SOHDVH YLVLW
sionals. Based on the underlying mendations were not allowed. ing position was subsequently newsweek.com/wbsh-2021.

34 NEWSWEEK.COM SEP T E M BER 25, 2020


S P ECIA LIZ ED HOSPITA LS

ʻˀ Severance Hospital

Oncology
- Yonsei University -
Department of Oncology
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA

ʻˁ Hospital Sirio Libanes -


Centro de Oncologia
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL

ʻ˂ Universitätsklinikum
Hamburg-Eppendorf -
Zentrum für Onkologie
HAMBURG, GERMANY
ʺ MD Anderson ʺʸ The Princess Margaret ʺ˂ Universitätsklinikum
Cancer Center Cancer Centre Köln - Innere Medizin I ʼʸ A.C. Camargo
HOUSTON, TX, USA TORONTO, CANADA COLOGNE, GERMANY Cancer Center
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL
ʻ Memorial Sloan Kettering ʺʺ IEO - Istituto Europeo ʻʸ Hospital Universitari Vall
Cancer Center di Oncologia d’Hebron - Department ʼʺ Institut Curie
NEW YORK, NY, USA MILAN, ITALY of Oncology PARIS, FRANCE
BARCELONA, SPAIN
ʼ Dana-Farber ʺʻ Seoul National ʼʻ Johns Hopkins Bayview
Cancer Institute University Hospital - ʻʺ Hospital Israelita Medical Center - The
BOSTON, MA, USA SNU Cancer Hospital Albert Einstein - Sidney Kimmel
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA Centro de Oncologia e Comprehensive
ʽ Mayo Clinic - Rochester - Hematologia Einstein Cancer Center
Department of Oncology ʺʼ The Royal Marsden Família Dayan BALTIMORE, MD, USA
ROCHESTER, MN, USA Hospital - London SAO PAULO, BRAZIL
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM ʼʼ Mayo Clinic - Phoenix -
ʾ Institut Gustave Roussy ʻʻ Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology
VILLEJUIF, FRANCE ʺʽ Hospital Universitario Cancer Centre PHOENIX, AZ, USA
La Paz - Department MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA
ʿ Charité Comprehensive of Oncology ʼʽ Azienda Ospedaliera
Cancer Center MADRID, SPAIN ʻʼ Massachusetts General di Padova - Reparto di
BERLIN, GERMANY Hospital - Mass General 2QFRORJLD0HGLFDʺ
ʺʾ Fondazione IRCCS - Cancer Center PADOVA, ITALY
ˀ Asan Medical Center - Istituto Nazionale BOSTON, MA, USA
Department of Oncology dei Tumori ʼʾ Clinica Universidad de
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA MILAN, ITALY ʻʽ Universitätsklinikum Navarra - Departamento
Heidelberg - Klinik für de Oncología Médica
ˁ The Johns Hopkins ʺʿ National Cancer Hämatologie, Onkologie PAMPLONA, SPAIN
Hospital - The Sidney Center Hospital und Rheumatologie
Kimmel Comprehensive TOKYO, JAPAN HEIDELBERG, GERMANY ʼʿ The Christie
Cancer Center MANCHESTER, UNITED
BALTIMORE, MD, USA ʺˀ Cleveland Clinic ʻʾ Istituto Clinico KINGDOM
Cancer Center Humanitas - Unitá
˂ Samsung Medical CLEVELAND, OH, USA Medica ed Ematologia ʼˀ National Cancer Center
Center - Samsung MILAN, ITALY GOYANG, SOUTH KOREA
Comprehensive ʺˁ The Catholic University
Cancer Center Of Korea - Seoul ʻʿ The Mount Sinai ʼˁ Hokkaido University
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA St. Mary’s Hospital - Hospital - Department Hospital - Department
Department of Oncology of Oncology of Oncology
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA NEW YORK, NY, USA HOKKAIDO, JAPAN

T H E F U L L L I S T I S AVA I L A B L E AT 1 ( :6: ( ( . &2 0ʔ :% 6 + ʝ


S PE CI A L I Z E D H O S P I T A L S

ʼ˂ Cancer Research
Ariake Hospital
TOKYO, JAPAN

ʽʸ Istituto Nazionale
Tumori di Napoli -

Cardiology
Fondazione G. Pascale
NAPLES, ITALY

ʽʺ Keio University Hospital


- Cancer Center
TOKYO, JAPAN

ʽʻ The University of Tokyo


Hospital - Department
of Hematology
and Oncology
TOKYO, JAPAN
ʺ Cleveland Clinic - Miller ˂ Universitätsklinikum ʺˀ University of Michigan
ʽʼ Universitätsklinikum Family Heart, Vascular Heidelberg - Krehl Klinik Hospitals - Michigan
Essen - Das & Thoracic Institute (Innere Medizin III) Medicine - Frankel
Westdeutsche CLEVELAND, OH, USA HEIDELBERG, GERMANY Cardiovascular Center
Tumorzentrum ANN ARBOR, MI, USA
ESSEN, GERMANY ʻ Mayo Clinic - Rochester ʺʸ Royal Brompton Hospital
- Department of LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM ʺˁ Universitätsspital
ʽʽ Hôpital Universitaire Cardiovascular Zürich - Universitäres
Pitié Salpêtrière - Centre Medicine ʺʺ Hospital Universitario Herzzentrum Zürich
Intégré de Cancérologie ROCHESTER, MN, USA La Paz - Department ZÜRICH, SWITZERLAND
PARIS, FRANCE of Cardiology
ʼ Brigham And Women’s MADRID, SPAIN ʺ˂ Herz- und
ʽʾ Hospital Universitario Hospital - Heart & Diabeteszentrum NRW
ʺʻGH2FWXEUH6HUYLFLR Vascular Center ʺʻ Hôpital Universitaire - Klinik für Allgemeine
de Oncología Médica BOSTON, MA, USA Pitié Salpêtrière - und Interventionelle
MADRID, SPAIN Department of Kardiologie
ʽ Massachusetts General Cardiology BAD OEYNHAUSEN, GERMANY
ʽʿ Addenbrooke’s - Hospital - Corrigan PARIS, FRANCE
Department of Oncology Minehan Heart Center ʻʸ Duke University
CAMBRIDGE, UNITED BOSTON, MA, USA ʺʼ National Cerebral and Hospital - Department
KINGDOM Cardiovascular Center of Cardiology
ʾ Mount Sinai Heart SUITA, JAPAN DURHAM, NC, USA
ʽˀ National Cancer at The Mount
Center Hospital East Sinai Hospital ʺʽ NYU Langone ʻʺ &KDULW«&HQWUXPʺʺ
KASHIWA, JAPAN NEW YORK, NY, USA Hospitals - Cardiology für Herz-, Kreislauf-
and Heart Surgery und Gefäßmedizin
ʽˁ Fundación Instituto ʿ The Johns Hopkins NEW YORK, NY, USA BERLIN, GERMANY
Valenciano de Oncología Hospital - Heart and
VALENCIA, SPAIN Vascular Institute ʺʾ Hospital of the ʻʻ Centro Cardiologico
BALTIMORE, MD, USA University of Monzino
ʽ˂ Grande Ospedale Pennsylvania - MILAN, ITALY
Metropolitano ˀ Cedars-Sinai Medical Penn Presbyterian -
Niguarda - Department Center - Smidt Primary Cardiology ʻʼ Instituto do
of Hematology Heart Institute PHILADELPHIA, PA, USA Coração (InCor)
and Oncology LOS ANGELES, CA, USA SAO PAULO, BRAZIL
MILAN, ITALY ʺʿ Helios Kliniken -
ˁ NewYork-Presbyterian Herzzentrum Leipzig ʻʽ The Prince Charles
ʾʸ Shizuoka Cancer Center Heart LEIPZIG, GERMANY Hospital - Heart
NAGAIZUMI, JAPAN NEW YORK, NY, USA and Lung Clinic
BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA

36 NEWSWEEK.COM T H E F U L L L I S T I S AVA I L A B L E AT 1 ( :6: ( ( . & 2 0ʔ : % 6 + ʝ


ʻʾ Ospedale San ʼʸ Policlinico San Donato - ʼʾ Karolinska
Raffaele - Gruppo San Gruppo San Donato - Universitetssjukhuset
Donato - Department Department of Cardiology - Department of
of Cardiology MILAN, ITALY Cardiology
MILAN, ITALY SOLNA, SWEDEN
ʼʺ Inselspital Bern -
ʻʿ Deutsches Herzzentrum Universitätsklinik ʼʿ Asan Medical ʽʸ Hospital Sirio
Berlin - Klinik für Innere für Kardiologie Center - Department Libanes - Department
Medizin – Kardiologie BERN, SWITZERLAND of Cardiology of Cardiology
BERLIN, GERMANY SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA SAO PAULO, BRAZIL
ʼʻ Hôpital Européen
ʻˀ Policlinico Sant’Orsola- Georges Pompidou - ʼˀ Baylor St. Luke’s ʽʺ Medizinische
Malpighi - Department Department of Medical Center - Texas Hochschule Hannover -
of Cardiology Cardiology Heart Institute Klinik für Kardiologie
BOLOGNA, ITALY PARIS, FRANCE HOUSTON, TX, USA und Angiologie
HANOVER, GERMANY
ʻˁ Stanford Health Care - ʼʼ Hospital General ʼˁ Hospital Clínic de
General Cardiology Universitario Gregorio Barcelona - Cardiology ʽʻ Johns Hopkins
STANFORD, CA, USA Marañón - Department and Cardiovascular Bayview Medical
of Cardiology Institute Center - Heart and
ʻ˂ University of Chicago MADRID, SPAIN BARCELONA, SPAIN Vascular Institute
Medical Center - Heart BALTIMORE, MD, USA
& Vascular Center ʼʽ Hospital Israelita Albert ʼ˂ Herzzentrum der
CHICAGO, IL, USA Einstein - Department Universitätsmedizin ʽʼ Instituto Dante
of Cardiology Dresden Pazzanese de Cardiologia
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL DRESDEN, GERMANY SAO PAULO, BRAZIL

ʽʽ Sheba Medical
Center - Olga & Lev
Leviev Heart Center
RAMAT GAN, ISRAEL

ʽʾ Monash Medical
Centre - Clayton -
MonashHeart
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

ʽʿ Ronald Reagan UCLA


Medical Center -
Cardiovascular Center
LOS ANGELES, CA, USA

ʽˀ Herzzentrum der
6 ( % $67 , $ 1  . $8 / , 7 = . , ʔ 6 & , ( 1 & (  3 + 272  / , % 5 $ 5<ʔ* ( 7 7 <

Universitätsmedizin
Göttingen
GÖTTINGEN, GERMANY

ʽˁ Northwestern Memorial
Hospital - Department
of Cardiology
CHICAGO, IL, USA

ʽ˂ Mayo Clinic - Phoenix -


Department of Cardiology
PHOENIX, AZ, USA

ʾʸ Sakakibara Heart Institute


TOKYO, JAPAN

NEWSWEEK.COM 37
S PE CI A L I Z E D H O S P I T A L S

Endocrinology
ʺ Mayo Clinic - Rochester - ˁ The Catholic University Of ʺʾ Beth Israel ʻʻ Hospital of the
Division of Endocrinology, Korea - Seoul St. Mary’s Deaconess Medical University of
Diabetes, Metabolism, Hospital - Depaxrtment Center - Division of Pennsylvania -
& Nutrition of Endocrinology Endocrinology, Diabetes Penn Presbyterian -
ROCHESTER, MN, USA & Metabolism and Metabolism Endocrinology, Diabetes,
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA BOSTON, MA, USA and Metabolism
ʻ Cleveland Clinic - PHILADELPHIA, PA, USA
Endocrinology & ˂ Charité - ʺʿ Hospital Universitari
Metabolism Institute Universitätsmedizin Vall d’Hebron - Servicio ʻʼ Queen Elizabeth
CLEVELAND, OH, USA Berlin - Medizinische de Endocrinología Hospital Birmingham -
Klinik für Endokrinologie y Nutrición Diabetes Centre
ʼ Massachusetts und Stoffwechselmedizin BARCELONA, SPAIN BIRMINGHAM, UK
General Hospital - BERLIN, GERMANY
Endocrinology Division ʺˀ Samsung Medical ʻʽ The University of Tokyo
BOSTON, MA, USA ʺʸ Brigham And Women’s Center - Department Hospital - Department
Hospital - Division of of Endocrinology and of Nephrology and
ʽ Asan Medical Endocrinology, Diabetes Metabolism Medicine Endocrinology
Center - Department and Hypertension SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA TOKYO, JAPAN
of Endocrinology BOSTON, MA, USA
and Metabolism ʺˁ Mayo Clinic - Phoenix ʻʾ Toronto General -
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA ʺʺ Seoul National University - Endocrinology University Health
Hospital - Department Department Network - Endocrinology
ʾ The Johns Hopkins of Endocrinology PHOENIX, AZ, USA Clinics
Hospital - Johns and Metabolism TORONTO, CANADA
Hopkins Comprehensive SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA ʺ˂ Cedars-Sinai Medical
Diabetes Center Center - Diabetes Center ʻʿ Hospital Universitario
BALTIMORE, MD, USA ʺʻ New York-Presbyterian LOS ANGELES, CA, USA La Paz - Servicio de
Hospital-Columbia and Endocrinología
ʿ Ospedale San Raffaele Cornell - Naomi Berrie ʻʸ Addenbrooke’s - MADRID, SPAIN
- Gruppo San Donato - Diabetes Center Wolfson Diabetes and
Endocrinologia NEW YORK, NY, USA Endocrine Clinic ʻˀ Mount Sinai Hospital
MILAN, ITALY CAMBRIDGE, UK - Sinai Centre for
ʺʼ Hôpital Universitaire Diabetes (LSCD)
ˀ Severance Hospital Pitié Salpêtrière - ʻʺ University of Michigan TORONTO, CANADA
- Yonsei University - Service de Diabétologie Hospitals - Michigan
Division of Endocrinology PARIS, FRANCE Medicine - Division ʻˁ Policlinico Sant’Orsola-
and Metabolism of Metabolism, Malpighi - Ambulatori
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA ʺʽ Herz- und Endocrinology & di Endocrinologia
Diabeteszentrum NRW Diabetes (MEND) BOLOGNA, ITALY
BAD OEYNHAUSEN, GERMANY ANN ARBOR, MI, USA

38 NEWSWEEK.COM SEP T E M BER 25, 2020


ʼʾ KyungHee University
Medical Center -
Department of
Endocrinology and
Metabolism
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA

ʼʿ Presidio Ospedaliero ʽʼ Hospital General


Molinette - Universitario Gregorio
Endocrinologia, Marañón - Servicio de
Diabetologia e Endocrinología y Nutrición
Metabolismo MADRID, SPAIN
TURIN, ITALY
ʽʽ The Mount Sinai
ʼˀ Hospital Sirio Libanes Hospital - Endocrinology
- Centro de Diabetes Department
do Sírio-Libanês NEW YORK, NY, USA
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL
ʽʾ King’s College Hospital -
ʼˁ Ronald Reagan UCLA Endocrinology &
Medical Center - Gonda Diabetes Services
Diabetes Center LONDON, UK
LOS ANGELES, CA, USA
ʽʿ Emory University Hospital
ʼ˂ Policlinico Universitario - Endocrinology services
A. Gemelli - at Emory Clinic ‘A’
Endocrinologia e ATLANTA, GA, USA
Diabetologia
ROME, ITALY ʽˀ University of Washington
Medical Center -
ʽʸ Hospital Clínic de Endocrine Care Center
Barcelona - Clínic SEATTLE, WA, USA
de Enfermedades
Digestivas y ʽˁ Lenox Hill Hospital -
Metabólicas Division of Endocrinology
BARCELONA, SPAIN & Metabolism
NEW YORK, NY, USA
ʽʺ NYU Langone Hospitals -
Division of Endocrinology, ʽ˂ Guy’s Hospital - Diabetes
Diabetes and Metabolism and endocrinology service
NEW YORK, NY, USA LONDON, UK

ʻ˂ UCSF Medical Center - ʼʻ Hôpital Lyon Sud ʽʻ Universitätsklinikum ʾʸ +RVSLWDO8QLYHUVLWDULRʺʻ


6 ( % $67 , $ 1  . $8 / , 7 = . , ʔ 6 & , ( 1 & (  3 + 272  / , % 5 $ 5<ʔ* ( 7 7 <

UCSF Endocrinology (HCL) - Service Tübingen - Innere de Octubre - Servicio de


Clinic at Parnassus d’Endocrinologie- Medizin IV Endocrinología y Nutrición
SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA Diabète-Nutrition TÜBINGEN, GERMANY MADRID, SPAIN
PIERRE BENITE, FRANCE
ʼʸ Royal Melbourne
Hospital - Parkville - ʼʼ Diabetes Klinik Bad
Endocrinology service Mergentheim ƹ STATISTA publishes worldwide established
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA BAD MERGENTHEIM, rankings and company listings with high-profile
GERMANY media partners. This research and analysis service
ʼʺ Ospedale Pediatrico is based on the success of Statista.com. The
Bambino Gesù di ʼʽ Vancouver General leading data and business intelligence portal
Roma - L’Unità Hospital - Gordon provides statistics, business relevant data and
Operativa Complessa and Leslie Diamond various market and consumer studies/surveys.
di Endocrinologia Health Care Centre
ROME, ITALY VANCOUVER, CANADA

T H E F U L L L I S T I S AVA I L A B L E AT 1 ( :6: ( ( . &2 0ʔ :% 6 + ʝ


Culture HIGH, LOW + EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

UN CH A RT ED

MouthwateringStreet
FoodsAround theWorld
A lot has changed in the last six months—from the way we work to the way we eat. Outdoor
dining has become the norm while indoor seating remains restricted in most areas as the
world continues to battle COVID-19. But another dining alternative—street food—requires no
seating at all and is a great socially distant way to dine out. From the more recognizable (like
elotes, Mexican street corn) to the less well-known (Socca, a French cross between flatbread
and pancake), these tidbits available from food trucks and carts will enliven your sense of
E Y E E M /G E T T Y

adventure even though widespread travel might be off the table for the time being.

40 NEWSWEEK.COM SEp t E M bEr 25, 2020


TIDAL TREATS
At floating markets,
such as this one in
Indonesia, patrons
can buy prepared
food for on-the-go
eating, as well as
fresh produce.

Photog raph b y S U r A N t O r I A D I NEWSWEEK.COM 41


Culture
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Street Food: Mouth-Watering


Recipes for Quick Bites and Mobile
Snacks from Around the World
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42 NEWSWEEK.COM
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W
Culture

MUSIC people that’s seeing what’s happen-


ing and they’re like, ‘You know what?

TheWarandTreaty We’re not going to stand for this.’”


Blount-Trotter, who originally

LookforHealing
hails from Maryland, started a
career in R&B in the 1990s. She was
influenced by singers such as Are-
The husband-and-wife duo’s new record Hearts Town tha Franklin, Mahalia Jackson and
RɼHUV KRSH LQ KDUG WLPHV Anita Baker growing up, but it was
a church performance by her singer
brother that convinced her to pursue
music. “I said, ‘I want to make peo-
a lot of the war and treaty’s Records) and so does their message ple feel like that.’” She recorded an
music is about trying to turn of healing amidst despair. album for Polydor Records and was
suffering into hope. In 2019, for “When we put out Healing Tide,” featured in the Whoopi Goldberg
instance, the Nashville-based duo Trotter told Newsweek, “we were movie Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit
of Michael Trotter Jr. and Tanya all asking ourselves: who’s the next with future star Lauryn Hill.
Blount-Trotter were among the great healer? Who’s the next Mother Trotter grew up in Cleveland and
marchers with late Congressman Teresa, Gandhi or Dr. King? And we Washington, D.C., spending time as a
John Lewis over the Edmund Pettus said: ‘What if it’s us?’ Not meaning child in homeless shelters. He found
Bridge in Selma, Alabama. The The War and Treaty, but what if it’s refuge in the music of Ray Charles,
event was to commemorate the everybody? What if we are all now Johnny Cash and Harry Belafonte,
54th anniversary of the day Lewis responsible for each other’s heal- but it wasn’t until he served in the
and other peaceful civil rights pro- ing? But when Hearts Town came Army during the Iraq War that he
testors were beaten savagely on the around, it moved the conversation discovered his calling. After his com-
bridge by police. to: ‘Do you believe in that healing? manding officer was killed by an IED,
The couple were asked Or are we seeing more Trotter was asked to write and per-
for an impromptu song. c y n i c s l a te l y, m o r e form songs to honor his unit’s fallen.
They froze for a moment, BY
people who are apt to “There was death around me,” he
stuck for something that believe that we’ll never recalls. “And the soldiers—no matter
would fit the occasion. DAVID CHIU heal or change?’” The how tough we are—their thought
A fellow musician sug- @newbeats new album’s title refers of ‘I’m next’ is always there. And my
gested the gospel stan- to an ideal place where thing was: ‘What can I do that will
dard “This Little Light of Mine.” the sense of community and accep- say that you’re not next?’ So I would
“We got unstuck quickly,” Trot- tance the duo see in their diverse write hope. I took what I was doing
ter recalls with a laugh. “You can’t fan base is a way of life. serious enough to say, ‘ There’s a
script those moments, and we were The themes of pain and healing mission here,’ and I was challenged
so proud to honor [Lewis], to talk are addressed in such tracks as the and charged by my battle buddies to
with him.” reflective title song and the anthe- keep it going.”
Beginning with their 2017 EP mic “ Take Me In.” The lush and
Down to the River and their album bluesy “Lonely in My Grief ” (“I don’t
Healing Tide a year later, The War hate your skin, but you hate mine”)
and Treaty have developed a fol-
lowing for their mix of Americana,
particularly resonates following
the police killings of George Floyd “There was something
gospel, rhythm and blues and pop and Breonna Taylor. “If we look at happeningthatweboth
as well as the duo’s powerful singing. what’s happening in the world right weretryingtodeny,andit
That eclectic blend continues on
their new record Hearts Town (due
now, it’s a cry that you’re hearing
from the minority community,” wascreatingthiskindof
out on September 25 on Rounder says Blount-Trotter. “Now you have tug of war, this friction.”
44 NEWSWEEK.COM SEP T E M BER 25, 2020
After returning from his service
and launching a career in music,
Trotter met Tanya Blount at a fes-
tival where both were performing.
She says after seeing him play “I ran
across the field in four-inch heels.
I was like: ‘Who is this guy? I have
to know who he is.’ We exchanged
numbers. He lost my phone number,
but I found his number and called
him.” Trotter says, “I saw the most
beautiful woman in the entire uni-
verse I had ever seen. I initially and
immediately thought, ‘There’s no
way she belongs in my life.’ I felt she
was out of my league.”
She later invited Trotter to collab-
orate on a project with her and her
brother. As it turned out, her brother
missed some rehearsals. “I was so glad
he could not make these rehearsals,”
Trotter says, “because it gave me an
opportunity to work some things out
with Tanya vocally together. There
was a chemistry.” And it wasn’t just
music. “There was something hap-
pening that we both were trying to
deny, and it was creating this kind of
tug of war, this friction.”
The couple married in 2011, and
formed The War and Treaty three
years later. (The band’s name comes
from an argument about what to call
themselves.) Since then they have
toured steadily and shared stages
with artists such as Jason Isbell, who
guests on Hearts Town, Al Green and
Brandi Carlile. Earlier this year, the
couple performed at the Grammys.
The new album’s lead-off sin-
gle, “Five More Minutes,” is a joyous
number that recalls classic 1970s Al
Green.“Five More Minutes,” though,
SENDING A was actually born out of a dark time
MESSAGE
Tanya Blount-Trotter in 2017, when Trotter was contem-
and Michael Trotter plating suicide—an incident that
Jr.’s new album involved the intervention of his wife
is intended as an
antidote to cynicism and the police in Michigan, where
and hopelessness. the couple were living at the time.

Photog raph b y D A V I D M C C L I S T E R NEWSWEEK.COM 45


Culture

EYE TO EYE Right: The War and Treaty


perform at the 2019 Americana Honors &
Awards at Nashville, Tennessee’s Ryman
Auditorium. Below: A refreshment break.

“Tanya got down right between my


legs on her knees and grabbed me by
my face,” Trotter remembers, “and
said: ‘I know you have a time frame
to end your life today. I can see it all
over your face. But if you would just
give me five more minutes to love
you, I promise I’ll give you a reason
to change your mind.’ The pleading
and the begging was replacing that
sorrow and anxiety. I could tell you
now, I’m still living in those five
minutes. I was being reminded that
‘In the midst of your pain, hurt and
sorrow, you still got five more min-
utes left, and I’m gonna love the hell
out of you.’”
Not that the time since then has
all been easy. The couple were set to
tour with John Legend this year but
that has now been moved to 2021
Suggested Listening

F RO M TOP : ASO N K E M PI N/AM E R I CA NA M US I C ASS O CI AT I ON /G E T T Y; C OU RT ESY O F WAR AN D T R EAT Y ( 3 )


due to the pandemic.
They’ve also been very deeply
affected by the Black Lives Matter Down to the River
movement and the ensuing civil 2017, Strong World
unrest and backlash. Trotter says, Entertainment
This seven-song
“There are many days where we are EP introduces the
not hopeful—we are surrounded Trotters’ powerhouse
and engulfed in hopelessness. But vocals and affinity
we’re never hopeless at the same for old-time Americana and R&B.
time. It is a perfect design by the Highlights include the swampy title
song,a fusion of blues and gospel,
universe. If I’m feeling down and and the ballad “Til the Morning.”
weak, Tanya is feeling up and strong. say, ‘I could see myself in this, and
And when she’s feeling down and they learn something from it.’”
weak, I’m up and strong.” “My hope is that the question we Healing Tide
2018, Strong World
With its imp ending rele ase, all have gets answered,” adds Trot-
Entertainment
Hearts Town seems poised to be the ter. “‘Is there anybody out there Produced by Buddy
duo’s breakout album, but more that feels the way I feel?’ I hope that Miller, the couple’s
importantly, it’s meant to be a salve people when they hear our album, first full-length
for those who are feeling broken- they hear the question answered: album sounds more
hearted right now. Blount-Trotter ‘Yes, there’s a band who believes in dynamic and expansive. Standouts
include the energetic title track and
says, “I hope that they hear every this. We believe in the human race, and the rootsy “Here Is Where the
song and they find themselves in we believe our Hearts Town and we Loving Is At” (a duet with legendary
these songs and they can go back and believe in you.’” singer Emmylou Harris).

46 NeWSWeeK.COm Sep t e m ber 25, 2020


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Culture

P A R T ING SHOT

Janelle Monáe
in a year where it seems like every facet of life is going through How did Antebellum come to you?
a massive shift, musician and actor Janelle Monáe is front and center as I needed to take a bath, and I was like,
a voice for that change, especially in her new film Antebellum, available on-de- “Okay, let me read the script.” I found
mand on major cable and digital platforms September 18. “I want this to be a myself in the tub for about three hours.
real look at the burden that Black women carry every single day to deconstruct There were so many turns in the script;
systemic racism and to deconstruct white supremacy.” Monáe plays Veronica just when I thought I knew what kind
Henley, a successful writer trapped in a terrifying reality mirroring America’s RIɿOPLWZDVJRLQJWREHLWPRUSKHG
original sin: slavery. “One of the things that this film says is that the past is not into something else.
even the past.” While Monáe is best known as a Grammy-nominated music
star, she hit the ground running with her first two films: Hidden Figures and ,QZKDWZD\VGR\RXWKLQNWKHɿOP
Moonlight, winner of on an Oscar for Best Picture. She says she’s grateful those UHʀHFWVWKHFXUUHQWPRPHQW"
films were her debut.
debut “They
They had a very specific perspective around the Black It mirrors a lot of the themes we are
experience and about broadening who we can be as a people.” After Antebellum, dealing with today—systemic racism,
“community and being a good citizen is what I’m focused on next,” says Monáe. racial injustice, micro-aggressions,
white supremacy and the burden that
Black women have to carry. We’re in
the middle of a revolution. We’re in
“We’re
e in the the middle of a reckoning. There’s
never a wrong time to continue the
PLGGGOHRID conversation around what it means to
UHYR
ROXWLRQ be a Black woman living in America.
We’re
e in the +RZGR\RXWKLQNWKHɿOPVKRZV
PLGGGOH RID why it’s important to remove
UHFNR
RQLQJŤ V\PEROVRIWKH&RQIHGHUDF\"
These statues represent pain for the
%ODFNFRPPXQLW\7KHʀDJUHSUHVHQWV
pain, torture. It represents horror. We
have to confront them, we have to sit
in the discomfort because real change
requires an upsetting, a rerouting, a
real honest look at ourselves.

'R\RXDSSURDFKDUROHVLPLODUWR
how you approach new music?
It depends. Sometimes I just write
songs for therapy and I don’t share
DAN I E L L E L E V I T T

them with anybody. When I’m working


RQDɿOP,ŠPZLWKDSURGXFWLRQZHŠUH
all trying to tell a story and do what’s
EHVWIRUWKHɿOP—H. Alan Scott

48 SEP T E M BER 25, 2020

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