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ИННОВАЦИОННАЯ

ШКОЛА

Ю.А. Комарова, И.В. Ларионова, Р. Араванис

КНИГА
ДЛЯ УЧИТЕЛЯ
к учебнику Ю.А. Комаровой, И.В. Ларионовой,
Р. Араванис, С. Кокрейна

«АНГЛИЙСКИЙ ЯЗЫК»
БАЗОВЫЙ УРОВЕНЬ

«РУССКОЕ
СЛОВО» 11
ИННОВАЦИОННАЯ ШКОЛА

Ю.А. Комарова
И.В. Ларионова
Р. Араванис

КНИГА ДЛЯ УЧИТЕЛЯ


к учебнику Ю.А. Комаровой,
И.В. Ларионовой, Р. Араванис, С. Кокрейна
«Английский язык»
для 11 класса
общеобразовательных организаций

Базовый уровень

Соответствует Федеральному
государственному образовательному
стандарту

Москва
«Русское слово»

2015
УДК 372.016.1:811.111*11(072)
ББК 81.2Англ-9
К63

Комарова Ю.А.
К63 Книга для учителя к учебнику Ю.А. Комаровой, И.В. Ларионовой, Р. Араванис, С. Кок-
рейна «Английский язык» для 11 класса общеобразовательных организаций. Базовый
уровень / Ю.А. Комарова, И.В. Ларионова, Р. Араванис. — М.: ООО «Русское слово —
учебник»: Макмиллан, 2015. — 224 с.: ил.— (Инновационная школа).

ISBN 978-5-00092-004-6

Книга для учителя является одним из компонентов учебно-методического комплекта «Англий-


ский язык. 11 класс». Она содержит методические рекомендации по организации и проведению за-
нятий, дополнительные обучающие материалы, разрешённые для ксерокопирования, а также к ней
прилагается диск, содержащий дополнительные тесты для промежуточного и итогового контроля,
которые при необходимости могут быть адаптированы к конкретной учебной ситуации.

УДК 372.016.1:811.111*11(072)
ББК 81.2Англ-9

© Ю.А. Комарова, 2015


© И.В. Ларионова, 2015
© Р. Араванис, 2015
© ООО «Русское слово — учебник»,
ISBN 978-5-00092-004-6 Macmillan Publishers Limited, 2015
Teacher’s book contents

Student’s book contents page 4 Culture today … page 102


Introduction/Предисловие page 8
Progress check 4 page 103
Teacher’s notes & answer key
It's a weird, wonderful world page 104
What's my line? page 12
Food for thought page 112
A place to call home page 22
Learn about biology page 122
Learn about geography page 32
Culture today … page 123
Culture today … page 32
Progress check 5 page 124
Progress check 1 page 34
Vanished without a trace! page 125
Learning for life page 35
Big spender page 136
The world of science and technology page 45
Learn about science page 146
Learn about chemistry page 55
Culture today … page 147
Culture today … page 56
Progress check 6 page 148
Progress check 2 page 57
Workbook answer key page 149
Holidays with a difference! page 58
Unified state exam in English
Serious fun page 68 language practice test key page 162
Unified state exam in English
Learn about history of art page 79 language test listening
audioscript page 163
Culture today … page 80
Teacher’s resource file
Progress check 3 page 81 Progress tests page 167

Turn on, tune in page 82 Communication and writing page 179


Fun and games page 191
The world of sport ... and leisure page 92
Self-assessment checklists page 203
Learn about PE page 101 Teacher's resource file answer key page 215

3
Student's book contents
Unit Reading Grammar Vocabulary Listening

Reading for gist Present simple Appearance and Predicting


What’s my line? аnd continuous personality content
Understanding
page 8 text cohesion be used to Family, friends Listening for
Spotting key Stative verbs and relationships details
words Jobs

A place to call Predicting Past simple and Town and village Listening for
home content continuous House and home gist and specific
Reading for gist Time expressions Phrasal verbs information
page 18 and details used to and
Spotting key would
words Articles
Possessive
adjectives and
pronouns

Learn about geography page 28


Culture today ... page 30
Progress check 1 page 32

Learning for life Reading for gist Present perfect School Listening for gist
Understanding simple and collocations Expressing
page 34 continuous
text cohesion Education ideas in different
Spotting key Present perfect Phrasal verbs ways
words and past simple Synonyms
Time expressions

The world of Reading for gist Past perfect Science Predicting


science and and specific simple and Computer content
information continuous technology Listening
technology
Spotting key Comparatives Phrasal verbs for specific
page 44 words and superlatives information

Learn about chemistry page 54


Culture today ... page 56
Progress check 2 page 58

Holidays with Reading for gist Expressing Sights Listening for


a diference! and details the future Accommodation main ideas
Spotting key Time clauses Transport
page 60 words Question tags Travel
Indirect questions

Serious fun Reading for gist Reported speech Entertainment Listening for gist
and specific Reporting verbs Phrasal verbs and details
page 70 information
Spotting key
words
Learn about history of art page 80
Culture today ... page 82
Progress check 3 page 84
4
Practise your English Speaking Writing Uniied State Exam

Word formation Asking for and giving Writing an informal letter: Listening A8–A14
Sentence personal information punctuation Reading B3
transformations Expanding when informal register Grammar and
answering questions developing points vocabulary B11–B16
Silent h Writing C1

Multiple choice text Comparing pictures Writing an article: Listening A1–A7


completion Describing impressions organization and Reading A15–A21
Multiple choice paragraphing Grammar and
[t], [d], [ıd]
sentence completion layout features vocabulary A22–A28
linking words

Grammar Expressing opinion Writing an informal letter: Listening B1


transformations Inviting others to take organization Reading B3
part developing points Grammar and
giving advice vocabulary B4–B10
Intonation in question
Writing C1
tags

Word formation Suggesting ideas Writing an essay: Listening A1–A7


Sentence Expressing agreement paragraphing Reading B2
transformations forming and developing Grammar and
Final [r]
Multiple choice ideas vocabulary B4–B10
sentence completion Writing C2

Grammar Expressing opinions Writing a formal letter: Listening A8–A14


transformations politely formal register Reading B2
Multiple choice Using tentative content Reading A15–A21
sentence completion language for organization Grammar and
suggestions linking vocabulary B4–B10
Words rhyming with
coach

Word formation Asking polite questions Writing a story: Listening A8–A14


Sentence Saying yes and no narrative tenses Reading B2
transformations in polite ways creating interesting Grammar and
Multiple choice content vocabulary B11–B16
sentence completion [dʒ], [tʃ], [ʃ], [s]

5
Student's book contents
Unit Reading Grammar Vocabulary Listening

Turn on, tune in Reading for gist Media and Passive voice Listening
and details communications Causative form for gist and
page 86 specific
Understanding see, watch, look,
implied information listen, hear information
Spotting key words

The world of sport Reading for gist Sport and leisure Conditionals Listening for
… and leisure and specific come and go Conditional links key words
information Phrasal verbs like and as and specific
page 96 Spotting key words information

Learn about PE page 106


Culture today ... page 108
Progress check 4 page 110
It’s a weird, Reading for Environment Modals Listening for
wonderful world specific information Weather Third conditional gist
and details Weather idioms
page 112 Identifying the
writer’s opinion
Spotting key words

Food for thought Reading for gist Health and diet Relative clauses Predicting
and specific Food and drink Unreal past content
page 122 information Identifying
Understanding text speakers and
cohesion topics
Spotting key words Listening for
gist and details

Learn about biology page 132


Culture today ... page 134
Progress check 5 page 136
Vanished without Reading for People and crime Modal perfect Listening
a trace! specific information Crime and Infinitives and for gist and
and details mystery -ing forms details
page 138 Word building make, let, allow Spotting key
Dependent words
prepositions

Big spender Reading for gist Clothes and Countable and Listening for
Understanding text accessories uncountable details
page 148 nouns
cohesion Shopping and
money so and such
Money idioms too and enough
both… and,
neither … nor,
each, every, all,
none
Indefinite
pronouns
Learn about science page 158
Culture today ... page 160
Progress check 6 page 162
6
Practise your English Speaking Writing Uniied State Exam
Multiple choice text Practising Writing a film review: Listening А8–А14
completion communication content Reading A15–A21
Sentence strategies organization Grammar and
transformations [ɑ:], [æ] and [ʌ] language for reviews vocabulary A22–A28

Multiple choice sentence Interrupting politely Writing an article: Listening A1–A7


completion Acknowledging creating interest Reading B2
Open cloze text interruption developing ideas Grammar and
completion organization vocabulary A22–A28
Word stress

Multiple choice text Supporting opinions Writing a formal letter to Listening B1


completion Reacting to opinions a newspaper: Reading A15–A21
Sentence getting ideas Grammar and
Sentence stress
transformations linking ideas vocabulary A22–A28
Silent letters
paragraphing

Multiple choice text Expressing Writing an informal letter Listening A1–A7


completion preference of advice: Reading B3
Sentence Sentence stress making a good Grammar and
transformations impression on the vocabulary A22–A28
Multiple choice sentence reader
completion giving advice
organization

Word formation Asking for Writing a story: Listening A8–A14


Sentence clarification describing characters Reading A15–A21
transformations Expressing adding drama Grammar and
Multiple choice sentence agreement vocabulary B11–B16
completion Sentence stress

Grammar Filling pauses Writing a formal letter of Listening A8–A14


transformations Expressing interest application: Reading B3
Sentence content Grammar and
Vowels [iː] and [i]
transformations register vocabulary B4–B10
Multiple choice sentence paragraphing
completion

7
ПРЕДИСЛОВИЕ
Об особенностях УМК «Английский язык. 11 класс»
в вопросах и ответах

Для кого предназначен УМК? Из каких компонентов состоит УМК?


Настоящий учебно-методический комплект (УМК) УМК «Английский язык. 11 класс» (базовый уро-
предназначен для обучения английскому языку вень) состоит из следующих компонентов:
на базовом уровне учащихся 11 класса общеоб- • программа курса;
разовательных учреждений. УМК отвечает тре-
• рабочая программа;
бованиям Федеральных государственных образо-
вательных стандартов и соответствует базовым • учебник с аудиодиском, содержащим аудиомате-
положениям документа «Общеевропейские ком- риалы к учебнику и рабочей тетради;
петенции владения иностранным языком». • рабочая тетрадь;
Каковы основные задачи УМК? • книга для учителя с дополнительными тестами
на диске.
УМК «Английский язык. 11 класс» способствует
реализации следующих образовательных задач: Как организован учебник?
• предметных, нацеленных на дальнейшее развитие Материал учебника разделён на 12 тематических
и совершенствование коммуникативной компе- блоков, каждый из которых содержит:
тенции старшеклассников в процессе обучения • раздел Reading для развития у учащихся умений
английскому языку, позволяющей им общаться в чтении, а именно: понимания основного со-
в устной и письменной формах как с носителями держания текста, полного и точного понимания
английского языка, так и с представителями дру- информации в тексте, понимания структурно-
гих стран, использующими данный язык как сред- смысловых связей в тексте. Все представленные
ство коммуникации; предполагающей приобщение тексты для чтения написаны с учётом интересов
через изучение английского языка к ценностям современных старшеклассников. Перед чтением
национальной и мировой культуры; текста учащимся предлагаются задания, стиму-
• личностных, включающих формирование способ- лирующие интерес к теме блока (Quiz и Dive in!).
ности и готовности старшеклассников к самораз- Непосредственная работа с текстом заверша-
витию и личностному самоопределению; разви- ется рубрикой Words in context, нацеленной на
тие у них мотивации к учёбе и целенаправленной развитие у учащихся языковой догадки и на обо-
познавательной деятельности; формирование гащение лексического запаса по теме раздела.
позитивных общесоциальных и межличностных Заканчивается каждый раздел либо коммуника-
отношений в среде учащихся, а также ценностно- тивным заданием Quick chat, либо упражнением
смысловых установок, отражающих личностные на говорение, в которых учащиеся выражают
и гражданские позиции школьника, его право- личное отношение к проблематике текста;
сознание, экологическую культуру; овладение
• раздел Vocabulary для отработки лексических
учащимися способностью ставить цели и строить
навыков. Особое внимание в разделе уделяется
жизненные планы; развитие у учащихся способ-
формированию навыков словоупотребления и
ности к самостоятельному определению своей
словообразования;
гражданской идентичности, т. е. умения осозна-
вать своё общероссийское гражданство; • разделы Grammar 1 и Grammar 2 для отработки
• метапредметных, предполагающих освоение грамматических навыков. Зачастую эти разде-
старшеклассниками межпредметных понятий лы завершаются коммуникативным упражнени-
и универсальных учебных действий (коммуника- ем для закрепления грамматических навыков
тивных, регулятивных, познавательных), овладе- в личностно ориентированном речевом контек-
ние способностью их использования в познава- сте;
тельной и социальной практике; формирование • раздел Listening для развития у учащихся ауди-
самостоятельности в планировании и осущест- тивных умений. В разделе содержатся уп-
влении учебной деятельности и организации ражнения на прогнозирование содержания
учебного сотрудничества с педагогами и сверст- аудиотекста, понимание основного содержания
никами; овладение навыками и умениями учеб- прослушанного текста, понимание в прослушан-
но-исследовательской, проектной и социальной ном тексте запрашиваемой информации, полное
деятельности. понимание прослушанного текста;

8
• раздел Practise your English для обеспечения (в аудировании, говорении, чтении и письме).
дополнительной практики использования изу- Материал способствует дальнейшему развитию у
ченных лексических единиц и грамматических старшеклассников мотивации к изучению англий-
структур в речевом контексте; ского языка, развитию у них умения самостоятель-
• раздел Speaking для развития у старшеклассни- но выстраивать индивидуальную стратегию обуче-
ков умений в монологической и диалогической ния, активной работе как на уроках, так и дома.
речи в контексте реальных жизненных ситуаций. Для этих целей служат:
Работа над устной речью начинается с прослуши- • раздел Speaking database – справочник, содер-
вания речевой модели и знакомства с речевыми жащий разговорные клише, необходимые для
клише (Language chunks). Далее следует речевая развития умений в устной речи;
практика в соответствии с предложенной моде- • раздел Writing database – справочный материал
лью, а завершается раздел свободным речевым по подготовке, структурированию и выполнению
высказыванием; письменных работ в том или ином жанре;
• раздел Writing для развития у старшеклассников • раздел Grammar database – информационно-
умений в различных жанрах письменной речи. справочный материал по грамматическим темам
Раздел содержит образец письменной работы, каждого блока учебника;
упражнения на развитие отдельных навыков • раздел Irregular verbs – перечень изучаемых не-
и умений в письменной речи (Skills development), правильных глаголов в трёх основных формах;
рекомендации по составлению плана и напи-
санию собственной работы с использованием • раздел «Рекомендации по подготовке к ЕГЭ по
введённых речевых клише (Planning and writing), английскому языку», информирующий старше-
рубрику Quick check! для самоконтроля выпол- классников об алгоритмах и способах выполне-
ненного письменного задания; ния письменных заданий стандартизованного
теста ЕГЭ;
• раздел CLIL (после каждых двух блоков), направ-
ленный на обеспечение эффективного усвоения • словарь (Dictionary), содержащий алфавитный
учебного материала на основе использования перечень активных и рецептивных лексических
междисциплинарных связей с другими пред- единиц, представленных в сопровождении транс-
крипции и перевода на русский язык.
метами, изучаемыми в старшей школе. Раздел
завершается заданием, развивающим умения Как осуществляется обучение фонетике?
индивидуальной и/или групповой проектной де- Совершенствование фонетических навыков яв-
ятельности учащихся; ляется важной задачей курса. Особое внимание
• раздел кросскультурной направленности Culture в курсе уделяется отработке у учащихся артику-
today... (после каждых двух блоков) для развития ляционных и слухо-произносительных навыков.
у учащихся лингвострановедческой и социокуль- Основу фонетических упражнений составляют
турной компетенций; лексические единицы, используемые в материалах
• раздел Progress check (после каждых двух бло- тематических блоков учебника. Таким образом,
ков), материалы которого предназначены для фонетические упражнения используются в том
контроля сформированности речевых навыков и числе как дополнительный материал для отработ-
умений. ки активной лексики.
Отдельно следует отметить наличие в каждом Значимым в курсе также является овладение инто-
тематическом блоке упражнений в формате Еди- нацией как средством выразительности речи. Ре-
ного государственного экзамена, развивающих ализации этой задачи служит имитативное (вслед
навыки и умения, необходимые для успешной за записью) и самостоятельное чтение.
сдачи ЕГЭ по английскому языку. Названные Как строится обучение лексике?
упражнения обозначены значком . Перед вы- Учебник уделяет большое внимание обогащению
полнением таких упражнений целесообразно активного и рецептивного лексического запаса
обсудить с учащимися эффективные стратегии старшеклассников. Предъявление лексики осу-
выполнения экзаменационных заданий, познако- ществляется с помощью различных опор. Напри-
миться с которыми можно в разделе «Рекоменда- мер, для облегчения запоминания английских
ции по подготовке к ЕГЭ по английскому языку» слов школьникам предлагаются фотографии, ил-
в конце учебника. люстрации, аудиосопровождение и т. д. Работа с
Учебник также содержит разделы справочного иллюстративным рядом помогает учащимся само-
характера, в которых систематизирован учебный стоятельно семантизировать новые слова, а про-
материал по овладению языковыми навыками слушивание записи способствует формированию
(фонетическими, грамматическими, лексически- верного звукового образа новых слов. Более того,
ми и орфографическими) и речевыми умениями организация лексического материала такова, что

9
побуждает старшеклассников использовать раз- 1) образовательному процессу, направленному на
личные индивидуальные мнемотехнические при- совершенствование умений практического вла-
ёмы, например выстраивание смежных ассоци- дения английским языком;
аций, построение словарной тематической карты 2) тренировке старшеклассников в выполнении
и т. д. конкретных заданий ЕГЭ;
В ходе уроков новые слова отрабатываются в ус- 3) информационно-аналитическим указаниям,
ловно-коммуникативных и собственно коммуни- содержащим алгоритмы выполнения заданий
кативных упражнениях. Контроль за овладением ЕГЭ.
новой лексикой осуществляется с помощью раз- Собственно образовательный процесс совершен-
личных по своей сложности упражнений. ствования навыков практического владения анг-
Поскольку из урока в урок накапливается словарь, лийским языком может быть осуществлён в полной
необходима систематическая работа по удержа- мере на основе материалов учебника. Этому спо-
нию его в памяти, и такая работа должна быть собствуют следующие факторы: на уроках обеспе-
регулярной, системной и предельно индивидуали- чен баланс развития всех компонентов коммуника-
зированной. тивной компетенции, а именно: речевой, языковой,
социокультурной, компенсаторной, дискурсной
Как строится обучение грамматике?
и учебно-познавательной; обучение осуществля-
Одна из задач УМК – совершенствование грамма- ется с опорой на вариативную вербальную и не-
тической стороны речи старшеклассников. Орга- вербальную наглядность; в учебнике содержится
низация грамматического материала в учебнике достаточный материал для развития общеучебных
позволяет овладевать грамматикой поэтапно, умений, таких, как умение самостоятельно добы-
системно и последовательно. Важно отметить, что вать и обрабатывать информацию, обобщать, де-
весь изучаемый грамматический материал предъ- лать заключения, развивать свои тезисы, приводя
является в контексте и сопровождается пояснени- конкретные примеры и аргументы, и т. д.
ями, схемами и диаграммами, что облегчает его Тренировка старшеклассников в выполнении зада-
понимание и осмысление. ний в формате Единого государственного экзаме-
Грамматические пояснения с примерами рекомен- на осуществляется на основе материалов, сопро-
дуется давать по мере введения учебного матери- вождаемых особой маркировкой в виде значка .
ала. В консолидированном виде пояснения пред- В частности, обучаемым предлагается прочи-
ставлены в конце учебника в разделе Grammar тать/прослушать текст и выполнить задания на
reference. контроль понимания прочитанного/услышанного
Обучение грамматике предусматривает введение, по модели заданий ЕГЭ; написать письменные
тренировку и практику в общении. Обобщающее высказывания с элементами рассуждений в фор-
повторение способствует систематическому и со- мате ЕГЭ; подготовить устное высказывание с
знательному усвоению учащимися грамматичес- опорами регулятивного плана (аналогичными за-
кого материала. Используя комментарии, твор- даниям ЕГЭ) и т. д. Для дополнительной трениров-
ческие задания и проблемные вопросы, учитель ки учащихся в рабочей тетради представлен тест
побуждает учащихся к наблюдениям за языковым в формате ЕГЭ.
и речевым материалом и действиям с ним, а также Систему подготовки учащихся к сдаче ЕГЭ по анг-
к самостоятельным выводам. лийскому языку, помимо перечисленных позиций,
отличает информационный аспект, отражённый
Как происходит овладение английской речью?
в разделе «Рекомендации по подготовке к ЕГЭ по
При формировании умений в аудировании, гово- английскому языку». Раздел включает в себя:
рении, чтении и письме в целом имеет место боль-
• информацию о процедуре проведения каждой
шое разнообразие и варьирование материала
части ЕГЭ;
и речевых действий с ним. Следует подчеркнуть,
что развитие умений во всех видах речевой де- • информацию о проверяемых умениях в каждой
части ЕГЭ;
ятельности происходит взаимосвязанно и систем-
но; при этом каждый вид речевой деятельности • информацию о типах заданий ЕГЭ;
выступает не только как цель обучения, но и как • характеристики заданий каждой части ЕГЭ;
средство обучения. • рекомендации по выполнению каждой части ЕГЭ.
Каким образом осуществляется подготовка Каковы основные особенности рабочей тетра-
к ЕГЭ по английскому языку? ди?
УМК обеспечивает системную подготовку стар- В рабочей тетради предложена система упражне-
шеклассников к выполнению устных и письменных ний, обеспечивающая дополнительную отработку
заданий ЕГЭ, что реализуется благодаря: лексико-грамматического материала учебника

10
и дальнейшее развитие умений в устной и пись- • тексты всех учебных аудиозаписей;
менной речи. • Teacher’s resource file, который содержит допол-
Важнейшей особенностью рабочей тетради явля- нительные, подлежащие ксерокопированию ди-
ется её аудиосопровождение. Учащиеся получа- дактические материалы:
ют возможность выполнять задания с опорой на – тесты к каждому разделу на контроль усвоения
аудиозапись, слушать и проверять правильность лексического и грамматического материала;
выполненных заданий, отрабатывать фонетичес- – коммуникативные задания к каждому разделу,
кие навыки. нацеленные на формирование умений в гово-
Рабочая тетрадь, как и учебник, содержит 12 те- рении и/или письме;
матических блоков. Каждый тематический блок – коммуникативные грамматико- и лексико-ори-
включает в себя: ентированные задания;
• упражнения на чтение и расширение рецептив- – листы самооценки к каждому тематическому
ного словаря; блоку;
• грамматико-ориентированные упражнения; – ключи к заданиям Teacher’s resource file.
• лексико-ориентированные упражнения; К книге для учителя прилагается диск (в реко-
• задания аудитивного и письменно-речевого ха- мендациях обозначен как Editable tests CD), со-
рактера; держащий дополнительные тесты с ключами для
• задания на повторение раздела Review (после промежуточного и итогового контроля. Тесты под-
каждых двух блоков); готовлены в формате Microsoft Office Word и могут
• раздел Progress test (после каждых четырёх бло- быть легко адаптированы учителем к конкретной
ков) для контроля сформированности навыков учебной ситуации.
и умений учащихся и дополнительной трениров- Следует обратить внимание на то, что объём ма-
ки выполнения заданий в формате ЕГЭ. териала, включённого в раздел, иногда больше,
чем нужно для одного занятия. Учитель может
Помимо перечисленных регулярных структурных
сам, ориентируясь на уровень подготовки своего
компонентов, в рабочую тетрадь также включены:
класса, отбирать необходимый объём материала
• раздел Functional speaking, обеспечивающий до- и в комфортном для класса темпе отрабатывать
полнительную языковую практику путём вовле- его во время занятия.
чения старшеклассников в различные ролевые
игры. Сюжеты для ролевых игр и коммуникатив-
ные клише представлены на карточках, которые
можно отксерокопировать и раздать участникам
ролевых игр. Информацию на карточках обучае-
мые используют как опору при подготовке и про-
ведении ролевой игры. Важно иметь в виду, что,
включаясь в ролевые игры на уроках английско-
го языка, старшеклассники не только трениру-
ются в употреблении изученного материала, но
и приобретают социальный опыт межличностно-
го и межкультурного общения. Помимо прочего
участие в ролевых играх способствует подготов-
ке учащихся к устной части ЕГЭ;
• Unified state exam in English language practice
test – тест в формате ЕГЭ, предназначенный для
тренировки обучаемых в выполнении стандарти-
зованного теста.
Что представляет собой книга для учителя?
Книга для учителя является методическим сопро-
вождением учебника. В ней представлены:
• цели тематических блоков и разделов внутри
блоков;
• комментарии к каждому заданию, а также допол-
нительная культурологическая информация;
• ключи ко всем заданиям учебника и рабочей тет-
ради;

11
1 What's my line?
Themes Skills aims
People Reading
Relationships Students read a number of short texts:
Work • for gist
• for key words
Language aims • to understand text cohesion
Grammar Listening
Present simple and present continuous Students listen to short extracts for:
be used to • predicting content
Stative verbs • gist and detail
Vocabulary Speaking
Appearance and personality Students conduct a pairwork speaking activity to:
Family, friends and relationships • ask for and give personal information
Jobs • practise expanding when answering questions
Writing
Students write an informal email
in order to practise:
• informal register
• punctuation
• organizing and developing points

Reading Pages 8 and 9 Suggested answers


a lawyer
Aims of the lesson: b teacher
• to warm students up and present job vocabulary c firefighter
and some personality words (Exercises A, B & C) d postal worker
• to read for gist (Exercise D) e builder
• to understand text cohesion (Exercise E) f office worker
• to identify key words (Exercise F) g chef/cook
• to read for specific information (Exercise G) h nurse
• to guess the meaning of unknown words from i journalist
context (Exercise H)
• to talk about the ideas in the text (Quick chat)
Exercise B
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a couple of
minutes to match the adjectives with the jobs. The
adjectives can be used more than once. You might
Exercise A want to refer students to the Dictionary at the back of
their Student's Books, so that they can look up any
• This activity introduces students to the vocabulary words they do not know.
for a variety of different jobs.
• Discuss students’ ideas as a class, making sure
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a couple of they justify their choices. Accept any ideas that are
minutes to write the possible jobs the people in the
reasonable and can be justified.
pictures might do.
• Discuss students’ answers as a class, asking them
to explain their choices. Accept any jobs that sound Exercise C
reasonable. Give them the answers to the ones they • Give students a minute to decide on a job for
do not guess. their partner.
• Ask students if they think these pictures illustrate • In pairs, students tell each other their ideas, explaining
stereotypes of the people who do these jobs. their choices.

12
Reading Answers
Exercise D 1 A
• Give students about a minute to do this task. Explain 2 A
to them that skimming the text means reading it very 3 B
fast to understand gist. Ask students to skim the text 4 B
silently in order to match the teenagers with the jobs 5 B
in the photographs. Make it clear that they do not 6 C
need to read the text in detail to do this task.
• Time students. This will encourage them to be quick.
• Elicit answers and ask students to justify them by Words in context
referring back to the texts.
Exercise H
Answers • Explain the task by doing the first one together.
Highlight the clues in the text that indicate the answer.
A model maker E.g. You have to work long hours on your own … ;
B interpreter I’m quite outgoing …
C zoo-keeper
• Give students five minutes to match the rest of the
words on their own.
Exercise E • Give students a minute to compare answers in pairs.
• Read through the Steps to success box together as Then elicit answers as a class.
a class. Point out that students have just read for gist
in Exercise D, and that they are going to be filling the Answers
gaps in Exercise E. 1 dull
• Tell students to find linking expressions or other 2 It had never occurred to me
grammatical features that will help them know that the 3 occupation
chosen sentence part fits the gap both grammatically 4 translator
and because of its meaning. 5 for ages
• Elicit answers as a class. 6 careers officer
7 interpreter
Answers 8 doesn’t appeal to me
1 E
2
3
B
G
Quick chat
4 D • Encourage students to discuss the question in
5 A pairs first. Give them about a minute for this.
6 C • Elicit answers from the class.

Exercise F For extra practice, refer students to pages


• Tell students to find key words in the questions that 4 and 5 in the Workbook.
will help them know what information to look for in
the text in Exercise G.

Exercise G
• Explain the task and do the first one together. Tell
students to scan the text to find the section where
the Internet is mentioned. Tell them to read that part
of the text carefully.
• Ask them if the information in the text matches the
information in the question.
• Give students five minutes to complete the exercise
on their own.
• Ask students to compare their answers in pairs
before you check them. Remember to ask them to
justify their answers by finding the section with the
answer in the text.

13
Exercise C
Grammar 1 Page 10
• Ask students to read the headline of the job
advertisement. Encourage them to predict the
Aims of the lesson: qualities/qualifications one might need to be a
summer camp leader.
to revise:
• the forms and main uses of the present simple • Give students a minute to quickly read the text to
and continuous check if they were right. Tell them to ignore the gaps
• be used to for now.
• Give students a couple of minutes to complete the
advertisement with the verbs in the box in the present
present simple and present continuous simple or present continuous forms.
• Encourage them to read the text carefully for
• Look at the extracts from the texts. Ask students
meaning, as this will help them decide on the right
to decide which contain verbs in the present
simple and which in the present continuous. word and tense.
• Refer students to pages 164 and 165 of the • Ask students to compare their answers in pairs
Grammar reference. Read through the relevant before checking them as a class.
section together checking that they understand
the uses of the two tenses. Give extra examples Answers
if necessary.
1 Do (you) speak
• Give students a minute to match the different
2 Do (you) play
extracts to the uses of each tense in the Check
3 Do (you) make
box.
4 Are (you) looking
• Elicit answers. 5 are searching
6 don’t work
Answers 7 give
a 3 b 4 c 2 d 5 e 1 8 are taking place
9 are waiting

Exercise A
• This exercise checks that students have understood be used to
the difference between the uses of the present simple • Write the following sentences on the board:
and the present continuous. Pilots are used to flying. They are used to
• Give students a couple of minutes to do the exercise heights. They aren’t afraid.
before checking answers. • Ask students the following concept checking
questions: Do pilots fly often? (yes), Are they
Answers afraid of flying? (no), Why not? (because they
do it a lot).
1 help 4 tells
• To recap, read through the relevant section on
2 arrives 5 ’s climbing
page 164 in the Grammar reference.
3 ’re staying 6 don’t get

Exercise B Exercise D
• This exercise checks students have understood the
• Give students two minutes to put the verbs in the
meaning of be used to.
present simple or present continuous form before
checking answers. • Give students a minute to complete each sentence.
• Check answers as a class.
Answers
1 Are (you) listening Answers
2 aren’t having; are preparing 1 working
3 leaves 2 waking up
4 Do (you ever) play 3 noisy places
5 are meeting 4 danger
6 don’t work 5 speaking

14
Exercise E
• This exercise offers students the opportunity to Answers
personalize be used to. 1 bossy
• Give students a couple of minutes to complete 2 energetic/efficient
each sentence. 3 aggressive
• Students share what they’ve written with a partner. 4 well-organized
5 big-headed
• Elicit answers. Accept any grammatically correct
6 selfish
answer.
7 cheerful
Ask students to complete the exercises on 8 moody
page 6 of the Workbook.

Exercise C
Vocabulary Page 11 • Give students a minute to make negative forms of the
words using the prefixes given.
Aim of the lesson: • Elicit answers and check students understand the
words.
• to present and practise vocabulary for
• Alternatively, ask students to work in small groups.
describing personality and appearance
Give each group a dictionary to look the words up.
This will take longer, but will encourage learner
independence.
Exercise A
• Working in pairs, ask students to say which words
they know and explain the words they don’t know. Answers
• You might want to make dictionaries available to help 1 unambitious
students with the words they don’t know. 2 unattractive
• Allow three to four minutes to do the exercise. 3 inconsiderate
4 unimaginative
• Elicit answers. If students are getting answers wrong,
5 impolite
it is an indication that they haven’t understood the
6 irresponsible
words, so you might need to explain them further.
7 disorganized
Use examples to help.

Answers Exercise D
Positive Negative • This exercise checks students’ understanding of the
cheerful aggressive words in Exercise C and gives them the opportunity
creative arrogant to practise them in a meaningful way.
efficient big-headed
• Give students a couple of minutes to complete the
energetic bossy
sentences before checking answers.
reliable moody
well-organized selfish
Answers
1 inconsiderate
Exercise B 2 irresponsible
• This exercise checks students’ understanding of the 3 unattractive
words in Exercise A and gives them the opportunity 4 disorganized
to use the vocabulary in a meaningful context. 5 impolite
• Ask students to skim the two texts first to find out 6 unambitious
who Nancy and Aiden are. 7 unimaginative
• Give them a couple of minutes to complete the first
text. Tell them to read the text after each gap carefully
before deciding on the words as this will help them Exercise E
decide. • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a couple of
• Ask them to compare their answers in pairs before minutes to match the adjectives with the nouns.
checking them. • Elicit answers and check students understand the
• Follow the same procedure for the second text. words.

15
Exercise A
Answers • Explain to students that they need to circle the word
1 hair – curly, dark, fair, long, straight, thick, that describes the other person in each picture (not
thin, wavy Mina).
2 skin – dark, fair • Elicit answers and check students understand the
3 face – long, round, thin words.
4 lips – thick, thin
5 nose – long, pointed, straight, thin, turned-up
Answers
6 legs / arms – long, thick, thin
1 tired 4 upset
2 sorry 5 angry
Exercise F 3 helpful

• This activity gives students the opportunity to


personalize the new language. 02 Exercise B
• Give students a minute to think about and prepare • Explain the task and check students understand the
their descriptions alone first. Tell them to choose words in the box.
someone they would like to describe and to make
• Ask them first to predict the relationships in each
notes about their physical appearance and their picture, but do not confirm or negate any of their
character. suggestions yet.
• Ask them to work in pairs and to tell each other about • Play the CD. Students write the words for each
the person they have chosen. Then select certain picture in their notebooks.
students to tell the class.
• Check answers.
Quick chat • Alternatively, pause the CD between the extracts and
check answers before moving on to the next extract.
• Give students a few minutes to discuss the
question in pairs first before eliciting ideas
from the class. Remind them to draw on the Answers
vocabulary from the lesson. 1 mother 4 brother
2 friend 5 father
3 teacher

Extra activity
If time allows in the lesson, ask students to play 02 Exercise C
a guessing game as a small group or as a class. • Read the Steps to success box together.
One student picks a famous person that everyone • Ask students to read the questions carefully. They
should know, but they don’t tell the class/group the might be able to remember what they heard, so ask
famous person’s name. The student describes the them to tentatively answer each question.
physical appearance and character of this person. • Play the CD. Tell students to listen to the whole
The rest of the group/class has to guess who the extract before they decide on a definite answer.
person is.
• Check answers after each extract. Play the extract
a third time if students are getting an answer wrong.
Ask students to complete the exercises on
page 7 of the Workbook. Answers
1 A 2 B 3 A 4 A 5 C

Listening Page 12
Quick chat
• Give students a few minutes to discuss the
Aims of the lesson: question in pairs first before eliciting ideas
• to encourage prediction from pictures and to from the class. Remind them to draw on the
revise words describing feelings (Exercise A) vocabulary from the lesson.
• to listen for gist (Exercise B)
• to listen for details (Exercise C)
• to personalize the content of the listening texts For extra listening practice, refer students
(Quick chat) to page 9 of the Workbook, CD: folder
'Workbook', track 2

16
Audioscript Speaking Page 13
02 Exercises B & C
Aims of the lesson:
1
Mum: Oh hello, Mina. You’re back early. • to practise asking personal questions
Mina: Hi, Mum. It’s not early. Look at the time. (Exercises A, C & D)
Mum: Oh goodness, yes. It’s four o’clock • to listen to a model speaking task for specific
already and the dinner isn’t ready. information (Exercise B)
Mina: Don’t worry, Mum. I’ll give you a hand. • to practise answering personal questions
You look really exhausted. (Exercises D & E)
Mum: Yes, I haven’t stopped all day. • to present and practise ways of expanding
2 answers (Exercise E)
Boy: I’m so sorry, Mina. I’ll get you another • to make students aware of the silent h
one, I promise. (Say it right!)
Mina: You won’t find one like that again. I
bought it on holiday and you can’t get them
here in England. Haven’t you got any idea
Exercise A
where it is? • Give students a couple of minutes to read through
Boy: Not really. I showed it to my sister, the questions and to sort them into categories. Point
yesterday, because she really likes that kind of out that some of the questions cover more than one
thing. But since then I haven’t been able to find category.
it. I’m so sorry. • Check answers.
Mina: Well … never mind.
3 Answers
Mr Harmer: Are you having trouble, Mina? a 1, 3, 11
Mina: Yes, Mr Harmer. I don’t think I really b 2, 5, 7
understand what we’re supposed to do. c 8, 1
Mr Harmer: Well, this is a list of things that d 9, 11
happened before the First World War. e 10, 12
Mina: Yes, I understood that bit. f 6
Mr Harmer: Well, all you have to do is to put g 4, 2
them in order.
Mina: Oh, is that all? Sorry!
Mr Harmer: Not at all. You should ask for help 03 Exercise B
if you need it, Mina. • Tell students that they will be listening to two people
Mina: Yes, Mr Harmer. answering questions from Exercise A.
4 • Play the CD and students listen to decide which
Mina: I know, Greg, I’m sad too, and I’m really questions from Exercise A Victor and Maria answer.
going to miss him, but he was getting very old. • Check answers.
Greg: He wasn’t that old. He was only ten.
Mina: Well, ten is pretty old for them, Greg.
They’re not like humans, you know. Anyway,
Answers
Mum said we can get another one. 8, 3, 5, 11, 2, 7
Greg: Well, I don’t want another one. It would
never be like Rex.
5
Dad: What on earth is that on your arm, Mina? I
Audioscript
A di i t
don’t believe it. Sarah! Have you seen what 03 Exercises B
your daughter has been up to?
Victor: I live not far from here, actually – right
Mina: Yeah! What’s wrong, Dad, don’t you like
in the centre of the city.
the dragon? I nearly got a bird instead. Would
you have preferred that? Maria: I mostly like sweet things. You know, cakes
Dad: This isn’t funny, Mina. In fact, I’m furious. and chocolate and biscuits. My mum says I don’t
You know that thing will never come off, don’t you? eat enough fruit, and she’s probably right.
You’re going to regret that for the rest of your life. Victor: Yes, I’ve got two sisters. They’re both
Mina: Don’t worry, Dad. It isn’t a real one … look! younger than me.

17
Maria: Yes, I do. I like magazines for kids of my Answers
age, but I sometimes take a book with me on
hour honest honour hourly honestly
holiday or if we go away for the weekend.
Victor: Yes, we do. I’m very lucky. My family
have a small house by the seaside. We go there
every August for a whole month. I love it there. Audioscript
Maria: That’s Katie. She’s fantastic. We spend
lots of time together because we like a lot of the
04 Exercise G
same things. She’s a really nice person. 1 head
2 hour
3 hear
Exercise C 4 horrible
5 honest
• Explain the task and do the first item together. Give 6 have
students a minute to complete each question with a 7 honour
question word. 8 hourly
• Check answers. 9 happy
10 honestly
Answers
1 What
2 Where
3 When Grammar 2 Page 14
4 Who
5 How
6 Why Aim of the lesson:
• to introduce the distinction between stative
and dynamic uses of verbs
Exercise D
• In pairs, students take turns asking and answering
some of the questions in Exercises A and C.
stative verbs
Exercise E • Read the comic strip as a class. Ask students
• Read the Steps to success box together. What makes the dialogue a joke? (the
• Refer students to the Language chunks box for misunderstanding of the word smell).
language they can use to expand their answers to • Explain that smell is a verb that can be used
the different kind of questions. as a stative verb, but also as a dynamic verb.
• Explain the task and ask students to work in pairs. Hence the misunderstanding.
• Give students a few minutes to ask and answer the • Explain that all the sentences contain stative
questions in the box. Encourage them to expand their verbs. Give students a couple of minutes to read
answers. Don’t rush the activity. Give students the through them and to match each example with a
time to say as much as they can for each question. category.
Ask some of the questions with the whole class. • Check answers.
• To recap, read through the relevant section on
pages 164 and 165 in the Grammar reference.
Say it right! It contains a longer list of stative verbs students
can refer to when doing the exercises that follow.
Exercise F
• Explain to students that the h at the beginning of words
is sometimes silent and sometimes pronounced.
• Ask students to write down in their notebooks the Answers
words they think contain a silent h. 1, 2 – a
3, 10 – b
04 Exercise G 5, 6 – c
4, 7 – d
• Play the CD for students to listen and check.
8, 9 – e
• Students work in pairs to practise saying the words.

18
Exercise A
Answers
• This exercise checks that students understand the
difference in meaning between stative and dynamic 1 'm studying
verbs. 2 do you speak
3 don't believe
• Give students a minute to do the exercise before
4 is starting, don't want
checking answers.
5 don't need
6 is really enjoying
Answers 7 Are you coming
8 is writing
Sentences 1, 4, 6, 7
9 plays
10 Do you think
11 is working
Exercise B
• Explain the exercise and give students two minutes
to do the exercise before checking answers. Extra activity
If time allows in the lesson, ask students to write
Answers two sentences (one with the stative meaning and
one with the dynamic meaning) in their notebooks
1 ✘ I don’t want any more tea, thanks.
for each of the following verbs: think, taste, smell,
2 ✔
look and weigh.
3 ✘ Don’t you recognize me?
4 ✘ Your piano sounds awful.
5 ✔ For extra practice, refer students to page 8
6 ✘ I don’t need this anymore. You can have it. in the Workbook.
7 ✘ The radio seems to work OK now.

Practise your English Page 15


Exercise C
• Explain the exercise and do the first two dialogues Aim of the lesson:
together so that students know what they have to • to practise the grammar and vocabulary from
do. the unit in an integrated way
• Give students a couple of minutes to do the rest
before checking answers.
Exercise A
• Write the title of the text on the board. Ask students
Answers if this is what we usually say. (No. The saying is: You
1 A: This milk smells bad. can’t judge a book by it’s cover.)
B: Yes, I think it’s gone off. • Explain to students that they are going to read a text
2 A: Why are you tasting the soup? with this title. Ask students to predict what they think
B: I think it needs some more salt. the text will be about.
3 A: This material looks like wool.
• Read through the questions and give students two
B: Yes, but it doesn’t feel like wool.
minutes to scan the text for answers. Tell them to
4 A: What is making that strange noise? ignore the gaps for now and to not read the text in
B: I don’t know. detail.
5 A: Do you believe in ghosts?
• Check answers.
B: No. I think that’s nonsense.
6 A: Why are you weighing those apples?
B: I’m making a pie. Answers
1 face reading or judging character from
a person’s face
Exercise D 2 People with long heads are thought to be
careful and trustworthy.
• Explain the exercise and do the first two sentences 3 Thin lipped people are thought to be
together. inconsiderate.
• Give students two minutes to complete the exercise 4 the little square below the nose
before checking answers.

19
Exercise B
Writing Pages 16 and 17
• Read the Steps to success box together.
• Students read the text more carefully and complete
the gaps with the right form of the words in capital Aims of the lesson:
letters. Tell students to think about the words they
covered in the unit as a whole. • to warm students up and introduce them to the
topic of summer jobs (Exercise A & Quick chat)
• to analyze a letter for purpose (Exercise B)
Answers • to read a model answer letter for gist (Exercise C)
1 appearance • to analyze a model answer letter for
2 reliable organization, register and punctuation
3 ambitious (Exercises D, E, F & G)
4 irresponsible • to practise planning and writing an informal
5 perfectionists letter to a pen-friend (Exercise H)
6 inconsiderate
7 energetic
8 moody Exercise A
• Do this task together as a class.

Your voice
Answers
• This activity gives students the opportunity to
a tour guide
personalize with the topic of this section.
b shop assistant
• Allow students two minutes to prepare their talk c summer camp leader
according to the given plan. Then they work in d waiter / waitress
pairs telling each other about their best friend.
• Ask a few students to give their talk before the
whole class.
Quick chat
• Ask students to answer the questions in pairs
03 Exercise C first.
• Discuss the questions as a class. Ask students
• Tell students that in this type of exercise, the two
to draw on the vocabulary from the unit.
sentences (the original and the one they have to
write) may look different, but they will have a similar
meaning. Exercise B
• Do the first item together. Write the two sentences
• Give students a minute to read the letter to find out
on the board. Remind students that the meaning of
why the writer has written it.
the two sentences should be as similar as possible
and that the two sentences on the board are similar • Elicit the answer.
in meaning despite being written in different ways.
• Give students three to four minutes to do the rest on Answer
their own before checking answers. The writer would like some advice about getting
a summer job. He also shares some news.
Answers
1 always forgetting your
2 doesn’t appeal to Exercise C
3 ’m not used to getting • Give students a couple of minutes to read Maria’s
4 ’re spending next reply to Sven’s letter. Tell them to ignore the problems
5 Does this belong with it for now.
6 ’s used to living • Elicit the answer.
7 is a disorganized
8 do you hate
9 was an impolite Answer
10 is always leaving Yes, she did.

20
Skills development: Organization
Answers
Exercise D The camp is on the island of Sardinia. I work
• Explain that each paragraph in the letter serves about five hours a day, with an hour’s lunch
a specific function. break. We do all sorts of things, such as help
• Give students a minute to match each paragraph in the kitchen. We also organize activities for
with its function. the children.
• Check answers.

Answers
Planning and writing
A Introduction Exercise H
B Answers to Sven’s first and second questions • Read the Steps to success box together.
C Answer to Sven’s third question • Explain the writing task.
D Three questions to Sven regarding his news
• Give students a little time to make notes in their
E Conclusion
notebooks according to the Planner.
F Finishing off
• When writing their letters, remind students to use
expressions from the Language chunks box.
• Read through the Quick check! box and tell students
Register to use this as a checklist before they hand in their
letters.
Exercise E • For advice on how to write an informal letter, refer
• Read through the box containing information about students to page 184 in the Writing database.
register together as a class. • If time allows, ask students to write, or begin to write,
• Give students a few minutes to read through the their letter in class.
letter again and to say what’s wrong with it.
Ask students to complete the writing task
• Elicit the answer.
on page 9 of the Workbook.

Answer Teacher's resource file:


Paragraph A is too formal. It is supposed to be – Progress test (page 167)
an informal letter. – Communication and writing (page 179)
– Fun and games (page 191)
– Self-assessment checklist (page 203)
Exercise F
Editable tests CD: Unit 1 test
• Explain the task. Give students a couple of minutes
to rewrite the paragraph using the phrases in the box.

Answers
Thanks for your letter. It was nice to hear from
you again. Of course, I’m happy to help you
with anything you need. Just ask!

Punctuation
Exercise G
• Read through the box containing information about
punctuation together as a class.
• Give students a few minutes to read paragraph B
again and to rewrite it correctly in their notebooks.
• Monitor and offer help if needed.
• Elicit the answer by getting one or two students to
read out their paragraphs.

21
2 A place to call home
Themes Skills aims
City and countryside Reading
House and home Students predict content and read a long text for:
• gist
Language aims • key words
Grammar • details
Past simple and continuous Listening
Time expressions: when, while, during, for and Students listen to a radio programme for:
ago • gist
used to and would • key words/information
Articles
Speaking
Possessive adjectives and pronouns
Students conduct a speaking activity to:
Vocabulary • compare pictures
Town and village • express opinions and impressions
House and home (compounds and collocations) Writing
Phrasal verbs Students write an article and practise:
• organization and paragraphing
• layout features
• linking words

Reading Pages 18 and 19 Reading


Exercise B
• Tell students to read the advertisement for a
Aims of the lesson: wilderness survival camp (the short text above the
• to warm students up and motivate them to read article).
the text (Exercise A) • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a minute
to predict what they think happens at such camps.
• to encourage prediction (Exercise B)
Check students understand all the activities listed
• to read for gist (Exercise C)
here.
• to show students how to deal with multiple
• Discuss students’ ideas as a class. Don’t give
choice questions (Exercise D)
anything away as this will spoil the next activity.
• to read for key information (Exercise E)
• to guess the meaning of unknown words from Exercise C
the context (Exercise F) • Give students two minutes to read the text quickly
• to talk about the ideas in the text (Quick chat) and silently to check their predictions in Exercise B.
Tell students to ignore any unknown words for now.
• Check answers. Ask them to justify their choices.

Answers
Activities mentioned in the article:
hunting
Exercise A sports
• This activity gets students thinking about what they
can and what they can’t live without. It relates to the Exercise D
content of the Reading text. • Read through the Steps to success box together as
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a couple a class.
of minutes to discuss what they can and can’t live • Explain the task. Tell students that all they need to do
without. is locate where the answers to the questions are in
• Discuss students’ answers as a class. the text.

22
• Give students about five minutes to skim the text
2
silently in order to locate and underline the information Grammar 1 Page 20
that answers each question.
• Time the students. This will encourage them to be Aims of the lesson:
quick.
to revise:
• Check answers by asking students to read out the
relevant parts of the text. • the forms and main uses of the past simple
and continuous
• time expressions in the past (when, while,
Answers during, for and ago)
1 I had heard about these camps … I was really • used to and would
looking forward to it.
2 James was going to show us how … with only
branches and leaves.
3 The water was easy to find … on the first day. past simple and past continuous
4 The rest of the week … week in the wild. • The extracts from the text contain different uses
5 I realized by the second day … everyday of the past simple and past continuous.
lives. • Ask students first to identify the past simple or
6 Would I recommend it? … only for a few days. past continuous sentences.
• Refer students to pages 165 and 166 of the
Grammar reference. Read through the relevant
Exercise E
section together, checking that they understand
• Tell students to read the sections they underlined the uses of the two tenses. Give extra examples
more carefully to choose the right answer. if necessary.
• Elicit answers. • Then give students a minute to match the
different extracts to the uses of each tense in the
Answers Check box and elicit answers.
1B 2C 3D 4C 5A 6A
Answers
a5 b3 c2 d4 e1
Words in context
Exercise F
Exercise A
• Explain the task. Tell students it is the same sort of
task they did in Unit 1. If necessary, do the first one • This exercise checks students have understood the
together. Ask them to explain their choice. difference between the uses of the past simple and
the past continuous.
• Give students five minutes to match the words with
the definitions. • Give students a minute to do the exercise before
checking answers.
• Give students a minute to compare answers in pairs.
• Elicit answers.
Answers
Answers 1 was staying; rode
2 moved
1 luxuries 5 shelter
3 was watching; heard
2 wilderness 6 grown accustomed to
4 grew up
3 creepy-crawlies 7 hunting
5 knew
4 appreciate 8 reassured
6 wasn’t living; was only staying
7 Did you know
8 were you doing; called
Quick chat
• Ask students to discuss the questions in pairs
first. Give them about a minute for this. Exercise B
• Elicit answers from the class. • Students choose between the past simple and the
past continuous forms.
• Refer students to the Check box to justify their
For extra reading practice, refer students choices.
to pages 10 and 11 in the Workbook. • Check as a class.

23
Answers Answers
1 snowed 1 use to
2 talked 2 used to
3 Did you go 3 used to
4 heard 4 use to
5 was jogging 5 would
6 was cooking
Exercise E
• This exercise focuses on common mistakes made by
students with used to and would.
time expressions in the past • Give students a few minutes to find the four mistakes
• These time expressions will not be new to and to correct them.
students at this stage. To test what they know, • Elicit answers.
write each example sentence from the ones
in the Grammar reference on page 166 on the Answers
board. Leave gaps where the time expressions
1 Jane used to live with her parents …
should go.
2 I used to live in that house.
• Ask students to guess the missing words in
3 Paul used to come over a lot …
pairs.
4 ✔
• When students have finished guessing, tell them 5 Didn’t you use to live …
to check by looking on page 166. 6 ✔
• To recap, read through the rules on page 166 of
the Grammar reference together.
Exercise F
• This exercise offers students the opportunity to use
Exercise C used to in a free activity.
• Give students a minute to complete the sentences • Put the following ideas on the board for students
with time expressions. to use: buildings, cities, countryside, education,
• Remind students that when and while are transport.
interchangeable when talking about a period of time, • To help in understanding the task, give an example:
but for a specific point in time when should be used. 100 years ago people used to walk more.
• Check answers. • Give students five minutes to do the activity in pairs.
• Elicit ideas. Accept any grammatically correct
answers.
Answers
For extra practice, refer students to
1 While/When
page 12 in the Workbook.
2 during
3 while/when
4
5
When
ago
Vocabulary Page 21
6 for
Aims of the lesson:
to present and practise:
• town and village vocabulary
used to and would • compound nouns with house and home
• Used to and would for past habits (and states) • house and home collocations
are also not new for students at this level.
• phrasal verbs relating to house and home
• To recap, read through the relevant section on
page 166 in the Grammar reference.
Exercise A
• Explain urban (of or relating to a city) and rural (of or
Exercise D relating to the countryside).
• Give students a minute to do the activity before • Check students understand the words in the box. Ask
checking answers. them to tell you which ones they don’t know. Explain/
• Highlight the form used to in negative sentences and describe/give an example of/show them a picture of
questions (use to). (or draw) the ones they don’t know.

24
2
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a couple Exercise D
of minutes to decide where they would find these • This exercise introduces students to compound
buildings or places (in urban areas, rural areas or
nouns with house and home.
both).
• Give students a minute to complete the compounds
• Elicit answers. The students might suggest something
before checking answers.
different to what is listed below. Accept any that they
• Check students understand the compounds.
can justify.

Suggested answers Answers


Urban areas: block of flats, multiplex cinema, 1 household
multi-storey car park, shopping centre/mall, 2 homeless
skyscraper, public garden or park, gym/sports 3 homemade
centre 4 homesick
Rural areas: country house, farmhouse, field 5 hometown
Both: garden, industrial area 6 housewarming
7 housewife
8 housework/homework
Exercise B
• This exercise presents words students can use to
describe towns or villages. Exercise E
• Give students a minute to read through the words • Give students a couple of minutes to complete the
and decide if they are positive, negative or both. sentences with a compound from Exercise D.
• Elicit answers. Check that students understand some • Elicit answers.
of the less common words (eg depressing, dull, lively,
pleasant). Answers
• Read the example together. Ask students to work in
1 housewarming
pairs to describe their area. Encourage them to use
2 hometown
words from Exercise A as well.
3 Homemade
• Elicit descriptions from some of the pairs.
4 homesick
5 household
Answers
Positive: exciting, green, historic, interesting, Exercise F
lively, lovely, modern, peaceful, pleasant, safe
Negative: dangerous, depressing, dull, noisy, • This activity focuses on collocations associated
with different housework. It also offers students
polluted
the opportunity to discuss and personalize the
Both: busy, quiet
new vocabulary.
• First, give students a couple of minutes to complete
Exercise C the questions with a verb from the box.
• This exercise checks students understand the • Check answers.
difference between the words house and home. • Give students a minute to complete the questionnaire
Explain to students that a house is the structure, but for themselves.
home is usually used to refer to the place and the • When they have finished, ask them to compare their
people who live there. It has the sense of being a answers in pairs.
safe and pleasant place to be. • Ask each pair who is more helpful at home.
• Give students a minute to complete the sentences
before checking answers.
Answers
1 make 7 tidy
Answers 2 do 8 do
1 home 3 load 9 clear / lay
2 house 4 do 10 water
3 home 5 take 11 do
4 home 6 do 12 walk

25
Exercise G • Explain that students need to describe the buildings
in the pictures with the words in the boxes.
• Give students a couple of minutes to choose the
• Elicit answers and check students understand the
correct option and to match the phrasal verbs
words and phrases.
with a definition.
• Check answers.
Suggested answers
Answers Casa Batll :
The outside has a rich design with lots of
1 did up (b)
decorative features. The whole building has an
2 stay in (a)
impressive design. It looks amazing.
3 throw out (e)
4 come over (d) The staircase has a rich design with a lot of
5 drop by/drop in (c) detail.
Casa Vicens:
The outside is colourful. The walls have an
impressive design with a lot of detail.
Extra activity
The roof appears to have a lot of detail, too.
If time allows in the lesson, ask students to write The building looks amazing.
their own sentence for each phrasal verb in
Exercise G. Alternatively, they could write a short
paragraph (eg a very short story, description or 05 Exercise B
recount) of about 50 words containing at least
three of the phrasal verbs from Exercise G. • Tell students to listen to the interview and note down
the parts of the building from Exercise A that are
mentioned.
• Play the interview.
Your voice • Check answers.
• This is an opportunity for students to use the
vocabulary in a free speaking activity. Give Answers
students enough time to prepare their talk The following are mentioned:
according to the given plan. the outside
• Let students speak in pairs first, then ask a few the ceilings
students to talk in front of the whole class. the roof
the staircase

For extra practice, refer students to page 13


in the Workbook. 05 Exercise C
• Read the Steps to success box together.
• Ask students to read the statements carefully and to
find any key words.
Listening Page 22 • Students might be able to remember what they have
heard, so ask them to note down any answers if they
can.
Aims of the lesson:
• to encourage prediction from pictures and to Answers
pre-teach words describing buildings (Exercise A)
1 C
• to listen for gist (Exercise B)
2 A
• to listen for specific information (Exercise C) 3 C
• to express reactions to the information in the 4 A
listening text (Quick chat) 5 A
6 C
7 B
Exercise A 8 A
• This activity revises and pre-teaches key words 9 A
required to do the Listening task in Exercise C.

26
2
Quick chat Batlló. It’s a very strange building as it is easily also
• Give students a couple of minutes to discuss the a sculpture. The decoration of the building both
questions in pairs first. inside and out reminds us of various animals (6).
• Elicit answers from students. Ask a couple of pairs The pillars on the outside look like the feet of giant
to describe a well-known building in their area. elephants and the roof looks like a completely
different animal …
DJ: … the roof looks like the backbone of a
For extra listening practice, refer students gigantic dinosaur (7). Could that be right?
to page 15 of the Workbook, CD folder: Arthur: Yes, it is! And look at the staircase inside,
'Workbook', track 3. it’s also carved so that it looks like the backbone of
a dinosaur.
DJ: Wow! It really is extraordinary.
Audioscript Arthur: I’m glad you think so.
05 Exercises B & C DJ: The Architecture Appreciation Society runs a
DJ: If you’re lucky enough to visit the beautiful city one-day Gaudí walking tour of Barcelona, doesn’t it?
of Barcelona, one of the things you cannot miss What time does it start and how much does it cost?
is its incredible architecture. It is a city fortunate Arthur: It starts at 8.00am every Friday (8).
enough to have some of the most famous Everyone meets outside the Casa Milà, an
buildings in the world. Yes, I’m talking about the apartment block also designed by Gaudí. And it’s
buildings designed by Spanish architect, Antoni free. So, it won’t cost you a thing to attend (9).
Gaudí (1). With us in the studio today to tell us DJ: That’s good to hear. So if you are ever in
about these extraordinary buildings we have Barcelona, you won’t want to miss this tour. Well,
Arthur Green, a many time visitor to Barcelona thank you, Arthur, for being with us today …
and member of The Architecture Appreciation Arthur: Thank you.
Society.
Arthur: Hello.
DJ: Arthur, what exactly is it that makes these
buildings so extraordinary? Speaking Page 23
Arthur: Well, for a start there are no others like
them in the world. The rich design on every Aims of the lesson:
square inch of the buildings both inside and out
• to listen to a model speaking task for gist
is impressive (2).
(Exercises A & B)
DJ: Do you have a favourite?
• to present and practise ways of talking about
Arthur: I have several. The Casa Vicens, which
impressions (Exercise C)
was the first building Gaudí designed and built, is
• to practise comparing pictures (Exercise D)
still extraordinary to this day. Gaudí was only 24
when he designed this beautiful building (3). • to talk about things that are important when
choosing where to live (Exercise E)
Manuel Vicens commissioned the very young and
totally inexperienced Gaudí to build a summer • to make students aware of the different
residence for his family in 1878. And Gaudí pronunciations of the -ed ending (Say it right!)
designed and built a brick building decorated with
bright, colourful tiles. This was very appropriate 06 Exercise A
as the owner, Manuel Vicens, was himself a brick
• Explain that students will be listening to someone
and tile manufacturer.
comparing two pictures.
DJ: Yes, it looks impressive. What’s it like inside?
• Read through the questions. Tell students that these
Arthur: It’s even more impressive than the are the things they could talk about when describing
outside. The ceilings are not your regular flat and comparing pictures.
ceilings (4). They are very detailed and covered in
• Play the CD for students to listen and answer
carved, painted wood. You can imagine the work
the questions.
that went into building this house.
• Check answers.
DJ: Yes! How long did it take to build?
Arthur: Five years, (5) from 1883 to 1888.
Answers
DJ: Amazing! And to think Gaudí was only 24
when he designed it … 1 a landscape
Arthur: Let me tell you about one of my other 2 They are both landscapes.
favourite Gaudí buildings. This one’s called Casa 3 the place in the first picture

27
Exercise B • Refer students to the Language chunks box for
• Ask students to look at the pictures on page 193 and language they can use to express impressions.
to judge whether or not the speaker did a good job • Give students a few minutes to do the task. Don’t
describing them. rush the activity. Encourage them to talk for about a
minute. Go round the class listening to students and
giving encouragement.
Answer
Yes. Exercise E
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
06 Exercise С minutes to talk about how important each of the
• Read the Helpful hints box together. things listed are when choosing where to live. Tell
• Explain that the Language chunks box contains them to choose the three most important.
ways of giving our impressions about a situation, like
a picture.
• Play the CD for students to listen and match the Say it right!
sentence halves.
• Check answers.
07 Exercise F
• Explain to students that the -ed ending in regular
verbs in the simple past is pronounced differently
Answers depending on the sound the verb ends in.
It looks like it could be a farm … • Play the CD for students to hear how the three
It’s a very peaceful place. example words are pronounced.
I get the impression that the first place is in a
• Play the CD for students to listen and write the words
wet country …
in the correct column.
It makes me think of the Amazon rainforest.
• Play the CD a second time for students to check.
I think it’s probably a dangerous place to visit.
• Play the CD again for students to listen and repeat.

Audioscript Answers
06 Exercises A & C [t] wished [d] discovered [ıd] decided
The first picture shows a beautiful landscape. It watched occurred wanted
looks like it could be a farm because I can see
walked moved located
some horses and what appears to be a country
house or a farmhouse. It’s a very peaceful place. checked lived visited
The second picture is also a landscape, but this
time it’s a forest or some kind of wilderness. I
get the impression that the first place is in a wet
country, like England or Ireland perhaps, because
the fields are very green. On the other hand, the Audioscript
forest in the second picture looks like it could
be tropical because there are lots of plants and
06 Exercise F
trees and it looks damp. It makes me think of the [t] wished
Amazon rainforest. It’s also beautiful, but I think it’s [d] discovered
probably a dangerous place to visit. I think I would [ıd] decided
rather visit the place in the first picture because it’s
1 watched
so quiet and beautiful and probably safer than the
2 wanted
forest would be.
3 located
4 walked
Exercise D 5 occurred
• Explain to students that they are now going to talk 6 visited
about their own pictures. Ask students to work in 7 moved
pairs. Make sure they understand that they have to 8 checked
listen to their partner and to go through the checklist 9 lived
as they are listening.

28
2
Exercise B
Grammar 2 Page 24
• This exercise practises articles and prepares students
for Exercise C.
Aims of the lesson: • Do the exercise together as a class.
to present and practise:
• articles (a/an, the, the zero article) Answers
• possessive pronouns and possessive
1 He’s sitting on a chair.
adjectives
2 It’s in a house.
3 It’s in Ireland.

articles
• Do this activity as a way of testing what Exercise C
students know and don’t know about articles. • This exercise gives free and fun practice of articles.
• Give students a minute to correct the mistakes • Explain the exercise by reading the instructions and
in the sentences. examples together.
• Check answers. • In pairs, for each sentence, students write a similar
• To recap, read through the relevant section on sequence to that in Exercise B. Give students five
page 166 in the Grammar reference. minutes to write each sequence.
• Alternatively, instead of you checking answers, • When they have finished, encourage them to read
ask students to read page 166 to check if their what other pairs have written.
answers were correct or not.

Answers possessive pronouns and possessive


1 The Nile is the longest river in the world. adjectives
2 A lot of European cities are built on a major • Give students a few seconds to read the
river. sentences and choose the correct option.
3 What is the capital of Austria? • Check answers.
4 I live in a beautiful village. • Read through the relevant section on page 166
5 I’ve lived in the same house my whole life. in the Grammar reference.
6 George is my next-door neighbour.
• Ask students to complete the gapped rules.

Exercise A
• This exercise checks students understand when we Answers
use the different articles. 1 my
• Ask students if they have ever heard of Tatami rooms. 2 mine
• Ask them to read the first sentence of the text to find a Possessive adjectives are followed by
out what they are. nouns.
• Give students a couple of minutes to read the text b Possessive pronouns are not followed by
and complete the task. nouns.
• Check answers by getting students to read the text
aloud.
• Ask students if they know of any superstitions Exercise D
(bringing good or bad luck) regarding house and • Give students a minute to choose the correct options.
home in their culture. • Check answers.

Answers Answers
1 a 6 the 1 b 2a 3a 4b 5b 6a
2 a 7 – / the
3 a 8 The
4 the 9 the
For extra practice, refer students to
5 the 10 –
page 14 in the Workbook.

29
Practise your English Page 25 Quick chat
• This activity gives students the opportunity to
Aim of the lesson: personalize with the text. Ask them to answer
the question in pairs first. Encourage them to
• to practise the grammar and vocabulary from use the ideas in the text.
the unit in an integrated way
• Discuss the questions as a class.

Exercise A
• Give students a few minutes to do the activity before Extra activity
checking answers. If time allows in the lesson, ask students to work in
• Elicit answers. Use this opportunity to explain pairs to describe their own bedroom and to talk
anything the students have not understood. about whether it complies with any of the Feng
shui rules for happiness.
Answers
1B 2D 3C 4B 5A 6B 7B 8D
9 C 10 D
Writing Page 26 and 27
Exercise B
Aims of the lesson:
• This activity encourages students to predict the
content of the text before they read it. • to warm students up and introduce them to the
language of descriptions (Exercise A & Quick
• Give students a minute to discuss the questions in
chat)
pairs first before discussing them as a class. Don’t
give anything away, as it will spoil the next exercise. • to analyze an article for ideas (Exercise B)
• to read a model article for organization and
Exercise C ways of linking ideas (Exercises C, D & E)
• This activity encourages students to read the text for • to practise planning and writing an article
gist first and so get a global understanding before (Exercises F & G)
they read it in more detail.
• Give students three minutes to read the text quickly Exercise A
and silently to answer the questions in Exercise B.
• Get students to read the descriptions and to match
• Elicit answers.
them to the pictures. Ask them to find the words in
the descriptions that helped them decide.
Answers • Tell students that a description needs specific,
Yes, the colours in your bedroom can affect precise vocabulary to make it clear.
your sleep.
Yes, the position of your bed can too. Answers
1 B (pickle shape, etc)
Exercise D 2 A (leans, Italy, etc)
3 C (ship bows, anchors, etc)
• Refer students to Steps to success box before they
start doing the exercise.
• Give students five minutes to read the text more
carefully and to complete the multiple-choice task.
Quick chat
• Check answers. • Ask students to answer the questions in pairs
first.
Answers • Discuss the questions as a class.
1 B
2 A Exercise B
3 C
4 A • Give students a couple of minutes to read the article
5 A to find out why the Sydney Opera House is the writer’s
6 D favourite building. Tell them to ignore the linking word
7 B options for the moment.
• Elicit the answer.

30
2
Planning and writing
Answer
It is his favourite building because of its original Exercise F
design and the fact that it can be seen from many • Explain the writing task.
parts of the city. • Give students a little time to come up with a building
they would like to talk about. Tell them it doesn’t
have to be a big or important building. Just a building
they like. Remind them they can choose one from
Skills development: Organization Exercise A if they want.
Exercise C • Encourage them to make notes in their notebooks
• Explain that each paragraph in the article focuses on according to the Planner.
a particular topic.
• Give students a minute to match each paragraph
Exercise G
with a topic. • Read the Helpful hints box together.
• Check answers. • When writing their articles, remind students to use
expressions from the Language chunks box.
• Read through the Quick check! box and tell students
Answers
to use this as a checklist before they hand in their
What it looks like: B articles.
Why it’s my favourite: D • For advice on how to write an article, refer students
Where it is: A to page 185 in the Writing database.
What it is/was used for: C
• If time allows, students should write, or begin to write,
their articles in class.
Linking ideas For extra writing practice, refer students to
Exercise D page 15 in the Workbook.
• Explain that when writing an article, it is not only Teacher's resource file:
important to come up with good ideas, but we need – Progress test (page 168)
to link our ideas too. – Communication and writing (page 180)
• Give students a couple of minutes to read the article – Fun and games (page 192)
again and choose the correct linking word. – Self-assessment checklist (page 204)
• Elicit answers.
Editable tests CD: Unit 2 test
Answers
1 as
2 Whether
3 Since
4 However
5 Moreover
6 Because of

Exercise E
• Explain the task. Give students a couple of minutes
to complete the sentences with linking words or
phrases from the box. Encourage them to look back
at the article for how they are used.
• Check answers.

Answers
1 Whether
2 because of
3 Because
4 since
5 as
6 However
7 Moreover

31
Learn about geography Units 1 and 2
Ecoregions of Russia Answers
1 the subtropics
Pages 28 and 29 2 the Arctic desert; because it’s located on
islands far in the north
Aims of the lesson: 3 palm trees
4 because there are other regions that are even
• to motivate students to learn about ecoregions farther north
of Russia through English 5 in the Arctic desert
• to read for gist (Exercise A) 6 because there are steep mountain ranges that
• to read for specific information (Exercise B) protect it from cold weather
• to do some research work on the cross- 7 the taiga
curriculum topic (Project) 8 the Arctic desert

Exercise A
• Ask students to read the introduction and answer the
questions. Project
• Ask students to list the ecoregions of Russia and Assign the project for homework. Make a display
write them on the board as they say them.
of students’ works and have a few students talk
• Ask students to try to describe the ecoregions using about their projects during the next class.
words they know.

Exercise B
• Give students one or two minutes to read the texts.
• Read the questions in class and ask students to find
the answers in the texts.
• Check answers as a class.

Culture today … Units 1 and 2

Traditional dwellings around Exercise A


• Ask students to read the introduction and look for
the world words that describe houses.
• After they finish, ask students for words from the
Pages 30 and 31 introduction that describe houses and write the words
on the board.
Aims of the lesson: • Ask students if there are any other words they can
• to motivate students to learn about different think of that can be used to describe a house.
types of homes and home life through English • Ask students to write a short description of their own
• to read for gist (Exercise A) house. Give them one minute to complete the task.
• to read for specific information (Exercises B & C)
• to practise key vocabulary (Exercise D) Exercise B
• to give students an opportunity to discuss what • Give students one or two minutes to read the texts, then
they’ve learned and how it relates to their own discuss the answers to the task question as a class.
personal experiences through discussion (Your • Make sure students find answers in the texts but
voice) don't read them out.

32
• Give students one minute to match the words with
Possible answers the type of houses, and then ask them to work in
The Russian izba: Wood is ideal for the Russian pairs to discuss the meaning of each word.
climate. It keeps houses and the adjacent • Elicit answers.
agricultural buildings warm in harsh winters.
Today log houses are often built in order to Answers
retain the cultural spirit of the Russian traditional The Russian izba: carvings, crown, konyok,
countryside. cattle, stove, fence, bench, red corner
The mud hut: The Masai are semi-nomadic, so The mud hut: semi-nomadic, cattle, waterproof,
their houses are temporary structures that are built fence
with whatever materials they find around them. The Mongolian ger: felt, crown, nomadic,
They are easy to build and they provide shelter. waterproof, stove
The Mongolian ger: The construction of the ger Possible explanations:
is essentially important for the nomads of Central Carvings – patterns made by cutting wood.
Asia: the ger is easy to assemble, dismantle and
Felt – thick soft cloth made from wool or fur
carry. Despite its tent-like structure, the ger is a
fibres that have been rolled and pressed flat.
comfortable dwelling to live in both during severe
Crown – an opening in the centre of the roof.
winters and hot summers. The practical features
of the ger make it a popular type of habitation Konyok – a beam on top of the roof carved in the
even in modern Mongolia. shape of a horse’s head.
Nomadic – moving from place to place rather
than staying in one place.
Exercise C Semi-nomadic relates to people who migrate
• Give students enough time to scan the texts in order seasonally and cultivate crops during periods of
to answer the questions. settlement.
• Check answers as a class. Cattle – a group of domestic animals kept by
farmers for their meat or milk.
Waterproof relates to materials that do not let
Answers water pass through them.
1 The mud hut. Because the materials are free. Stove – a piece of equipment that provides heat
2 The important parts of the interior of the for cooking and/or heating a room.
Russian izba are the stove, the 'red corner' Fence – a wooden structure that surrounds an
and the stove corner. area of land.
3 A beam in the shape of a horse’s head
Bench – a hard long seat for two or more people.
(konyok). Because it signified the animal
‘Red corner’ – a place in the izba, located
giving its life to the home.
diagonally across from the stove, where the table
4 It is a small circular building which has a frame
and benches were placed and the icons were
of wooden poles stuck together and made
hung.
waterproof with mud, drug from cattle, ash,
sticks and urine.
5 To protect the homes form the wild animals
that roam around at night outside the Your voice Exercise E
enclosure. • Ask students to form groups.
6 The tent-like structure of the ger. Because • Ask them to use the criteria listed in the exercise
such a construction is easy to assemble, while discussing an ideal house.
dismantle and carry, which is essential for
• Point out that a group can either come to an
nomads.
agreement or agree to differ.
7 Because of its practical features (central wood-
• Elicit the results from each group.
burning stove, the crown, a wooden door, etc),
the unique design and structure.

Exercise D
• Make sure students understand all the words in
the box. You might want to allow them to use the
dictionary at the back of their Student’s Books to help
them with some of the words.

33
Progress check 1
Pages 32 and 33 Exercise E
1B
Exercise A 2C
1 annoyed 3A
2 selfish 4D
3 housewarming 5B
4 homeless 6D
5 house 7B
6 bossy 8C
7 embarrassed
8 Come over Exercise F
9 stay in 1 When
10 home 2 used
3 the
Exercise B 4 do
1 Does; contain 5 make
2 look 6 tidy
3 come 7 the
4 am learning 8a
5 leaves 9 to
6 is getting 10 up
7 was doing
8 heard Exercise G
9 had; went; came 1 isn’t used to getting
10 was; lived 2 not occurred to me
3 would/used to come
Exercise C 4 use to live
1 unambitious 5 is always forgetting his
sis
2 assistant 6 job do you
on
3 irresponsible 7 are always
4 disorganized 8 flight leaves
5 attractive 9 are you doing
6 considerate
7 reliable Ask students to complete 1–2 Review on
pages 16 and 17 of the Workbook.
Exercise D
1 the
2 the
3 the
4a
5 The
6–
7a
8 The
9 the
10 the
11 the
12 –
13 the
14 a

34
3 Learning for life
Theme Skills aims
Education Reading
Students read a long text:
Language aims • for gist
Grammar • to understand text cohesion
Present perfect simple and continuous Listening
Present perfect and past simple Students listen to five short extracts:
Time expressions with perfect tenses • for gist
• to understand paraphrases
Vocabulary
Speaking
Education and learning Students conduct a pairwork speaking activity to:
Phrasal verbs • express opinions
Synonyms
• express agreement and disagreement
• invite others to take part
Writing
Students write an informal letter and practise:
• organization
• developing points

Reading Pages 34 and 35 Reading


Exercise B
• Tell students that they will be reading a text about
Aims of the lesson: a new sort of school trip. Ask them to read the title
• to warm students up and motivate them to and subtitle of the text and to predict where students
read the text (Exercise A) might be going on this school trip.
• to read each paragraph for main ideas • Explain the task and give students five minutes to
(Exercise B) read each paragraph quickly to get the main idea
• to show students how to deal with gapped and to match it with a heading. Point out that there is
texts (Exercise C) one extra heading they do not need to use.
• Tell students that if they have problems matching any
• to read to understand text cohesion (Exercise C)
of the headings, to move on to the next paragraph
• to guess the meaning of unknown words from and come back to the difficult ones once they have
the context (Exercise D) finished the rest. This will narrow down the choices
• to talk about the ideas in the text (Quick chat) and make it easier for them to do.
• Check answers.

Answers
1B 2E 3H 4G 5A 6F 7D

Exercise C
Exercise A
• Read through the Steps to success box together as a
• This activity gets students thinking about school class.
excursions. It relates to the content of the Reading • This exercise helps students apply the advice in the
text. Steps to success box.
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few minutes • Explain the task. Tell students they will need to
to discuss what the advantages and disadvantages read each missing sentence part carefully to find
of the different places would be and then to put them reference words. They will also need to read the
in order of preference. sentence parts before and after each gap in the text
• Discuss students’ answers as a class. Ask them to and do the same. Remind them to also look out for
justify the order they have chosen. questions or answers to questions. Elicit feedback.

35
• Tell students to choose the sentence part that best
fits each gap. In addition to the lexical prompts Grammar 1 Page 36
they have found tell students that the topic of each
paragraph (see Exercise B) should help limit their
Aim of the lesson:
choice and thus make it easier for them.
• If students have problems with any of the items, • to revise the forms and main uses of the present
encourage them to move on and come back to the perfect simple and continuous
difficult ones once they have finished the rest. This
will narrow down the choices and make it easier for
them to do.
• Check answers. Make sure you ask students to present perfect simple and continuous
justify their choices. • The extracts from the text contain different
uses of the present perfect simple and present
Answers perfect continuous.
A2 B8 C1 D4 E7 F6 G3 • Ask students first to decide which sentences
contain verbs in the present perfect simple and
which in the present perfect continuous.
• Refer students to page 167 of the Grammar
Words in context reference. Read through the relevant sections
Exercise D with the students, checking that they understand
the uses of the tenses. Then give students a
• Explain the task. Tell students it is the same sort
minute to match the different extracts to the uses
of task as they have done in previous units. If
of each tense in the Check box.
necessary, do the first one together. Ask students to
explain their choice, if possible. • Elicit answers.
• Give students two minutes to match the words/
phrases with the definitions. Answers
• Give students a minute to compare answers in pairs. a2 b4 c1 d5 e3
• Elicit answers.

Answers Exercise A
1 a stroll
• This exercise checks that students have understood
2 the only requirement
the difference between the uses of the present
3 far-flung
perfect simple and the present perfect continuous.
4 virtual
5 state-of-the-art • Give students a minute to do the exercise before
6 the possibilities are endless checking answers.
7 they’re history
8 quite addicted Answers
1 ’ve been waiting
Quick chat 2 haven’t finished
3 haven’t brought
• Let students discuss the questions in pairs first. 4 has been revising
Give them about a minute for this.
5 Have you met
• Elicit answers from the class and encourage a 6 hasn’t been learning
discussion.
7 ’ve been taking
8 ’ve never eaten
9 has been waiting
Extra activity 10 ’s gone
If time allows in the lesson, ask students to talk
about places they would like to visit if they had a
chance to go on excursions in cyberspace like the Exercise B
ones described in the Reading text. • This exercise checks students have understood the
difference in meaning between been and gone.
For extra reading practice, refer students to • Give students a minute to complete the exercise.
pages 18 and 19 in the Workbook. • Check answers.

36
3
Exercise A
Answers
• This exercise introduces common collocations
1 gone
2 been relating to school.
3 gone • Give students a couple of minutes to match
4 been the collocations.
5 been • Ask students to compare their answers in pairs.
6 gone • Elicit answers. Check students know what the
collocations mean.
Exercise C
• Explain the task. Tell students to read the email Answers
carefully, as this will help them decide which form do well
to put the verbs in, the present perfect simple or follow rules
continuous.
get suspended
• Give students three minutes to complete the email. get into trouble
• Check answers. work hard
lose interest
Answers pass exams
1 ’ve been doing pay attention
2 has come play truant
3 ’ve been staying show interest
4 ’ve never gone
5 has been teaching
6 ’ve become
7 hasn’t been
Exercise B
8 has had • Ask students to read the story carefully and to
9 hasn’t been watching complete it with a collocation from Exercise A.
10 has been • Give students three minutes to do the task, then
elicit answers.
• Ask students what Jim Yelland’s problem was and
Extra activity
if they agree with the opinion expressed in the last
If time allows in the lesson, do the following sentence of the story.
pairwork speaking activity. Students ask each
other about their life experiences. Eg Have you
ever done bungee jumping? Have you ever been Answers
abroad? Write the following prompts on the board 1 lost
for them to choose from: go/bungee jumping, go/ 2 paid
abroad, climb/mountain, go/diving, go/camping, 3 doing
catch/fish, swim/river, win/prize, make/cake, eat/
4 showed
caviar, break/bone, sing/in public, act/play, ride/
5 follow
horse. When they’ve finished, ask some of them
to report their findings to the class. 6 got into
7 played
8 got
Ask students to complete the exercises on
9 worked
page 20 of the Workbook.
10 passed

Vocabulary Page 37
Exercise C
Aims of the lesson: • This exercise checks that students understand more
• to present and practise: collocations and the difference between commonly
• school and education vocabulary confused words.
• phrasal verbs relating to school and education • Give students a minute to choose the correct
• synonyms related to school and education options before checking answers. Check students
understand what the words mean.

37
Answers Answers
1 state (In the UK the term public schools is 1 peers
usually used to refer to prestigious private 2 head
schools.) 3 Siblings
2 Private 4 assistants
3 Vocational
4 open
5 terms Quick chat
6 uniform • Give students a few minutes to discuss the
7 deadline questions in pairs before discussing them as a
8 classes (A lesson is the time in which you are class.
learning a subject. Eg My maths lesson this
morning was really interesting.)

Extra activity
Exercise D If time allows in the lesson, have a class
discussion. Ask students to talk about what they
• Explain the task. Give students a couple of minutes like and don’t like about school. Encourage them
to read the sentences carefully and to match each
to use words from page 37 in their discussion.
word or phrase in bold with a phrasal verb from the
You could put their ideas on the board under the
box.
headings What’s good about school / What I hate
• Check answers.
about school. They could then use the ideas to
write a composition about the topic for homework.
Answers
1 handed in
For extra practice, refer students to
2 give back
page 21 in the Workbook.
3 handed out
4 took up
5 broke up
6 got marked down
Listening Page 38

Exercise E Aims of the lesson:


• This exercise encourages students to notice • to encourage prediction from pictures
synonyms. (Exercises A & B)
• Give students a minute to make pairs of words with • to get students to notice paraphrases
similar meanings. (Exercise C)
• Elicit answers. • to listen for main ideas (Exercise D)
• to talk about their own reactions to the
information in the listening texts (Your voice)
Answers
1 adolescents – teenagers
2 age group – peers Exercise A
3 head – principal • This activity encourages prediction.
4 siblings – brothers and sisters
• Give students two minutes to discuss the pictures in
5 helper – assistant
pairs before discussing them as a class.

Exercise F Suggested answers


1 discipline problems / lack of respect
• This activity checks students understand the words
2 bad marks / teacher judging her students
from Exercise E.
3 boredom
• Give students a minute to complete the opinions 4 stress / too much homework
before checking answers.

38
3
Exercise B
• Give students a minute to read through the opinions Audioscript
A
and to match some of them to the pictures (only
three of them relate to the pictures). 08 Exercise D
• Give students a few minutes to discuss their own
opinions before discussing them as a class. Speaker 1
S
I don’t like it when children shout out answers in
Answers class. There’s a boy in my class who’s really
c
B Picture 1 annoying because every time the teacher asks a
a
C Picture 2 question, he just shouts out the answer. I suppose
q
E Picture 4 he’s just showing off, you know, but it’s really
h
annoying because other children don’t get a
a
Exercise C chance to answer. He should put up his hand like
c
everyone else.
e
• Read the Steps to success box together.
• This exercise helps students to notice paraphrasing.
Speaker 2
S
• Give students a couple of minutes to read the pairs of
sentences and to match one of each with an opinion Some classrooms are just disgusting, with
S
in Exercise B. rrubbish on the floor and all the desks covered in
• Elicit answers. graffiti and all that. I mean, they wouldn’t treat
g
ttheir homes like that, would they? You know,
Answers tthey wouldn’t just throw rubbish on their living
rroom floor or write all over their sofa – but they
Opinion A 2
Opinion B 2 ttreat school differently. I don’t know why. And
Opinion C 1 tthen kids like me and my friends, we have to sit
Opinion D 1 iin the mess that the others make. It’s not fair,
Opinion E 2 rreally, is it?
Opinion F 2
Speaker 3
S
08 Exercise D One of my favourite teachers is Mr Williams
O
• Explain the task. Remind students to listen out for because, well, he doesn’t label students. I
b
other ways of expressing what is in the opinions in mean, he doesn’t say, ‘you got 20 out of 20,
m
Exercise B. well done, but you got 15 out of 20, so you’re no
w
• Play the extracts. good.’
g He doesn’t do that. He doesn’t compare
• Check answers. You might need to play the extracts one student with another; he just wants
o
a second time. everyone to learn. You know, he isn’t always
e
giving marks for everything we do, like some
g
tteachers do. He just wants to teach and to help
Answers
us learn. I think other teachers should be more
u
Speaker 1 F
llike Mr Williams.
Speaker 2 D
Speaker 3 C
Speaker 4 A Speaker 4
S
Speaker 5 B I don’t mind doing homework so I don’t think
tteachers give us too much homework. I think we
need it, to be honest, but, you know, it has to be
n
Your voice
useful homework. Some teachers just say, do
u
• Give students a couple of minutes to discuss the pages 34, 35, 36 and 37 and that’s it. They
p
questions in pairs first. don’t seem to think, ‘What’s the point of this
d
• Elicit answers from students and encourage a homework?’ You know what I mean? And so we
h
class discussion. jjust end up doing a hundred exercises which are
all exactly the same, and there’s no point in that,
a
For extra listening practice, refer students iis there?
to page 23 of the Workbook, CD: folder
'Workbook', track 4.

39
Speaker 5 Answers
Schools don’t really need rules. We all just need
1 be in detention
to treat each other like we want to be treated. So I
2 clean the school
arrive on time for the lesson; I listen to children
when they have something to say; I don’t interrupt 3 get suspended
them when they’re speaking; I let them express 4 get marked down
their opinions; I don’t make them feel stupid or 5 speak to parents
embarrassed if they make a mistake. I do all this 6 be sent to the Head
because I want them to treat me in the same
way. I want them to arrive on time, to listen to
me, and not to interrupt me. We just need to
be considerate with each other – teachers and
09 Exercise C
children. It’s very simple, really. • Explain that students will be listening to two other
students discussing the same task as they just did
(Exercise B).
• Play the extract. Students listen and note down the
ideas they mention.
Speaking Page 39 • Elicit answers.

Aims of the lesson:


Answers
• to warm students up and to prepare them for the
1, 2, 6, 4, 5
free speaking task (Exercises A & B)
• to listen to a model speaking task for gist
(Exercise C)
• to present ways of expressing opinions, 09 Exercise D
agreeing and disagreeing and inviting others to • Tell students that the two speakers express opinions,
speak (Exercise D) agree and disagree with each other and invite their
• to talk about ways of improving the students’ partner to speak.
schools (Exercise E) • Refer students to the Language chunks box
• to make students aware of the different and give them a minute to read through the
intonation of question tags (Say it right!) expressions.
• Play the extract again. Students listen and note down
the expressions they hear.
Exercise A • Check answers.
• Explain the task and give students a couple of
minutes to order the bad things pupils do at school
from the least to the most serious. Ask students to Answers
compare their list to a partner’s. Expressing opinions
• Elicit ideas from individual students and encourage a I think …
class discussion. I believe …
If you ask me, …
Exercise B
Agreeing and disagreeing
• This activity helps students see the teacher’s role in
I’m not so sure.
encouraging good behaviour in class.
Well, yes and no.
• Give students a minute to match the ideas with I wouldn’t say so, no.
the pictures.
• Check answers. Inviting others to speak
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few What do you think?
minutes to discuss how teachers can encourage What do you reckon about … ?
pupils to behave better, using the ideas in the Wouldn’t you agree?
pictures. What’s your opinion on … ?
• Elicit feedback and encourage a short class Question tags
discussion.

40
3
Say it right!
Audioscript 10 Exercise F
09 Exercises C & D • Explain to students that the intonation of the tag
Anna: Well, it looks like he’s in detention here and in a question tag can change the meaning of the
he has to do something probably quite boring at question. If the intonation rises at the end, it is a real
break time while his friends have a rest and play. question. If it falls, it is just used to check or invite
Peter: Yes, you’re right. I think that might be someone to speak.
a good idea. You know, he won’t like that and • Play the CD for students to listen and decide whether
it will be very boring for him to stay in there what they hear are real questions or not.
while everyone else is outside. That’s a good • Play the CD a second time for students to check.
punishment, I think. It may stop him doing silly • Play the CD again for students to listen and repeat.
things again. What do you think?
Anna: Hmm. I’m not so sure. I mean, it won’t Answers
make him feel any better about school, will it? 1 checking 3 real
He’ll just hate it more and more and I believe his 2 real 4 checking
behaviour may get worse. What do you reckon
about cleaning the school? Is that a good idea?
Peter: Well, yes and no. It’s better than detention,
I suppose, because at least he’s doing something Audioscript
useful. But it depends really on what he’s done. Say it right!
This is probably a good idea if he’s caused a
mess or written graffiti or something like that. 10 Exercises F
Wouldn’t you agree? 1 You haven’t read this before, have you?
Anna: Yes, it may be a good idea sometimes, but
I’m not sure. 2 This is our classroom, isn’t it?
Peter: What’s your opinion on sending him to 3 I’m not disturbing you, am I?
the Head?
Anna: Well, that’s a good idea. He’ll be quite 4 Katie’s writing a test tomorrow, isn’t she?
frightened and I think it will make him understand
that he’s really in trouble. It’s probably enough,
isn’t it?
Peter: I wouldn’t say so, no. What if the child Grammar 2 Page 40
continues being bad? Then you need to do
something else. What about lowering his grades Aims of the lesson:
as a punishment? Hmm, I think that’s a really bad
• to illustrate the difference between uses of the
idea, don’t you?
present perfect and the past simple
Anna: Yes, that’s the worst of all the ideas. That
• to present and practise time expressions with
will just make him hate school.
perfect tenses
Peter: You’re right. If you ask me, the best idea
is to speak to his parents. What’s your opinion on
that?
Anna: Yes, I agree with you. I think that’s the best present perfect and past simple
thing for everyone. For the parents, and for • The sentences and pictures clearly illustrate
the school. the differences in meaning between the present
perfect and the past simple.
• Give students a few minutes to read the
Exercise E sentences, look at the pictures and to answer
• Read the Helpful hints box together. the concept check questions that follow.
• Read the instructions to the task together. Ask • Check answers.
students to work in pairs. • To recap, read through the relevant section on
• Remind students to discuss each idea first and page 167 in the Grammar reference.
then choose the best two. Encourage them to use
expressions from the Language chunks box. Answers
• Give students about five minutes to do the task before 1A 2B 3A 4B 5A
getting feedback from the different pairs/groups.

41
Exercise A
• This exercise checks students understand the Answers
different uses of the present perfect and past simple 1 for
tenses. 2 still
• Give students a few minutes to find and correct the 3 yet
incorrect sentences. 4 already
• Ask students to compare their answers in pairs. 5 since
• Check answers. 6 never
7 ever
8 just
Answers
1 James went to a different school before this
one …
2 Last year my class visited Berlin and Munich. For extra practice, refer students to
3 I wasn’t at school the day before yesterday … page 22 in the Workbook.
4 ✔
5 ✔
6 Alice has been in the exam for three hours.
Practise your English Page 41
Exercise B
• Explain the task and give students a couple of Aim of the lesson:
minutes to complete the exercise before checking • to practise the grammar and vocabulary from
answers. the unit in an integrated way

Answers
1 has been Exercise A
2 Did (you) enjoy
3 haven’t arrived • Tell students they will be reading an article about
4 have been learning something called ‘spaced learning’. Tell them to read
5 have (ever) had the title and say what they think ‘spaced learning’
6 have done may mean. Encourage them to predict. You can do
7 had this by giving them a minute to brainstorm ideas in
8 did (you) arrive pairs first. It doesn’t matter if they don’t guess it. The
purpose is to make them curious.
• Elicit ideas. Give students two minutes to read the
text and to find out what it refers to (the answer is in
time expressions with perfect tenses the second paragraph).
• These time expressions will not be new for
students. To test understanding, write four or
five example sentences from the Grammar Answer
reference on page 168 on the board. Leave
gaps where the time expressions should go. Spaced learning involves short bursts of
• Ask students, in pairs, to guess the missing learning that last only eight minutes. Every
words. eight minutes, the students have a break for ten
• When students have finished guessing, tell them minutes.
to check by looking on page 168.
• To recap, read through the rules on page 168 in
the Grammar reference together.
Exercise B
• Give students five minutes to read the text more
Exercise C carefully and the Steps to success box and then
• Give students a few minutes to read and complete complete the gaps using the correct form of the
the email with time expressions from the box. words in capitals.
• Check answers. • Check answers.

42
3
Exercise A
Answers • Ensure students know what these activities are
1 hasn’t finished (Amateur dramatics is another way of saying drama.
2 have been using It offers students an opportunity to act and to put on
3 have not been following a play.).
4 children • Give students a minute to choose the different
5 their activities their school offers.
6 has shown • Elicit feedback and ask them which ones they would
7 better like their school to offer.

Exercise B
Quick chat • Give students a couple of minutes to read the letter
• This activity gives students the opportunity to to find out why the writer is writing the letter.
personalize with the text. Ask them to answer • Elicit the answer.
the questions in pairs first. Encourage them to
use the ideas in the text when doing so.
• Discuss the questions as a class. Answer
He wants some advice on how to set up an
amateur dramatics club. He also shares some
Exercise C family news.
• Remind students that the two sentences may look
different, but they will have a similar meaning.
• Do the first item together. Exercise C
• Give students a few minutes to do the rest on their • Tell students that this letter is a reply to Thomas’
own before checking answers. letter in Exercise B.
• Give students a couple of minutes to read the letter
Answers and find out how many people are in the drama
club altogether.
1 to far-flung
2 finished your homework yet • Elicit the answer.
3 still in • Tell students that the notes around Thomas’ letter
are the answers in Kathy’s letter.
4 has already
5 never seen a
6 lost interest in Answer
7 been playing truant There are 17 (16 students and Kathy).
8 been paying attention
9 time Sally has been
10 got suspended for
Skills development:
Organization
Writing Page 42 and 43 Exercise D
• Read the Steps to success box together.
• Explain that Kathy answers all of Thomas’ questions.
Aims of the lesson: • Give students a few minutes to reread the two letters
• to warm students up and introduce them to the and to match each question with an answer.
topic of the letter (Exercise A) • Check answers.
• to analyze a letter for purpose (Exercise B)
• to read a model letter for ideas (Exercise C)
• to read a model letter for organization and Answers
ideas (Exercise D) Question 1 C
• to practise planning and writing an informal Question 2 A
transactional letter (Exercises E & F) Question 3 B

43
Planning and writing
Exercise E
• This activity encourages students to focus on the
purpose of a letter.
• Give students a minute to read the letter and find out
why the writer has written it.
• Eicit the answer.

Answer
Tony would like to start a school magazine and
wants some advice. He also shares some news
regarding an essay-writing contest.

Exercise F
• Give students a little time to make notes in their
notebooks according to the Planner.
• When writing their letters, remind students to use
some of the ways of giving advice from the Language
chunks in their letters.
• Read through the Quick check! box and tell students
to use this as a checklist before they hand in their
letters.
• For advice on how to write an informal letter, refer
students to page 184 in the Writing database.
• If time allows, students should write, or begin to write,
their letters in class.
For extra writing practice, refer students to
page 23 in the Workbook.

Teacher's resource file:


– Progress test (page 169)
– Communication and writing (page 181)
– Fun and games (page 193)
– Self-assessment checklist (page 205)
Editable tests CD: Unit 3 test

44
4 The world of science and technology

Theme Skills aims


Science and technology Reading
Students read a series of short texts for:
Language aims • gist
Grammar • specific information
Past perfect simple and continuous Listening
Comparatives and superlatives Students listen to six short extracts for:
Vocabulary • specific information
Science Speaking
Computer technology Students conduct a pairwork speaking activity to:
Phrasal verbs • suggest ideas
• express agreement
Writing
Students write an essay and practise:
• paragraphing
• getting ideas
• developing points

Reading Pages 44 and 45 Reading


Exercise B
Aims of the lesson: • Ask students to read the paragraph headings given
in Exercise C and to match each to a photo. Tell
• to warm students up and introduce students to students that there is one extra heading they do not
the theme of the unit (Exercise A) need to use.
• to encourage prediciton (Exercise B) • Ask students to read the title and the introductory
• to skim for gist (Exercise C) paragraph given in bold and to predict what they
• to read for specific information (Exercise D) think the text will be about. Accept any reasonable
• to guess the meaning of unknown words guesses.
from the context (Exercise E)
• to talk about the ideas in the text (Quick Answers
chat) a–B
b–C
c–A
d–E

Exercise C
Exercise A • Read through the Steps to success box together as a
class.
• This fun quiz tests how much students know about
• This exercise helps students apply the advice in the
the world of science and technology.
Steps to success box.
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a couple of
• Explain the task. Tell students they do not need to
minutes to answer the questions.
read the text in detail to do this task. They will need
• When students have finished, ask them to check
to scan it to match the subtitles with the paragraphs.
their answers on page 193.
• Elicit feedback on their results. Are they surprised Answers
by anything?
1 B
2 C
3 E
4 A

45
Extra activity Answers
• If time allows in the lesson, ask students to find 1 D 6 A
out about the names, dates and places in the 2 C 7 B
article. 3 C 8 D
• Draw the table in the Answers below on the 4 A, B 9 B
board. Scan the first text together to show 5 B
students how to find the information and to
complete the table. Write the answers for this
text in the table on the board. Words in context
• Give students five minutes to scan the rest of the
article on their own and to find the information to Exercise E
complete the table. Make sure you time them to • Explain the task. Tell students it is a similar sort of
encourage them to read fast. task to what they have done in previous units. This
• Students compare their answers in pairs. time, however, they have to scan each text to find the
• Check answers. words, as they are not highlighted.
• Give students a couple of minutes to find the two
Answers words in the first text.
Text Names Dates Places • Elicit answers.
• Give students another five minutes to find the rest of
William Buckland – 1822 – the words.
discovered dinosaur • Give students a minute to compare answers in pairs.
fossils
1 • Elicit answers.
Sir Richard Owen –
came up with name Answers
‘dinosaur’ 1842 –
1 creatures
Charles Darwin – 1859 South 2 fossil
published a book America, 3 species
2 4 evolution
called On the Origin Galapagos
of Species Islands 5 rate
6 questioned
Galileo – 1604 Pisa 7 scars
astronomer and 8 sceptical
3 physicist who came
up with the theory of
falling bodies Quick chat
Edward Jenner – 1796 – • Ask students to discuss the question in pairs
country doctor who first. Then give them about a minute to think of a
4 gave someone couple of other scientific discoveries.
the world’s first • Elicit answers from the class and encourage
vaccination a class discussion about the most important
scientific discoveries.

Exercise D For extra reading practice, refer students


• Explain to students that this task is like the one they to pages 24 and 25 in the Workbook.
did in Unit 1. Tell students to read the questions and
to find key words in the questions that will help them
know what information to look for in the texts, as they
did in Unit 1. Grammar 1 Page 46
• Give students five minutes to find the information in
the article. Tell them to find the part of the text that
Aim of the lesson:
contains the information.
• Students can compare their answers in pairs before • to revise the forms and main uses of the past
checking them as a class. Remember to ask students perfect simple and continuous
to justify their answers by referring back to the text.

46
• Elicit feedback by asking some students to tell the
4
class some of the explanations they came up with.
past perfect simple and continuous
• The extracts are from the Reading text. Exercise D
• Ask students to read them and to decide which • These texts each describe a bad prediction from the
event came first in each, A or B. past about the future of two technological devices.
• Elicit answers. • Tell students to skim the texts to find out what the
• Go to pages 168 and 169 in the Grammar devices are and what the predictions about them
reference if necessary and go through the uses were. Tell them to ignore the gaps for now.
of the past perfect simple and continuous tenses • Give students a few minutes to read the texts more
with the class. carefully to complete the exercise.
• Check answers. Ask students if they are surprised
by the information in the texts.
Answers
1A 2B 3A
Answers
1 predicted
Exercise A 2 had been working
• This exercise checks that students have understood 3 had been referring
the difference between the uses of the past perfect 4 said/had said
simple, the past perfect continuous and the simple 5 had been
past. 6 did not take off
• Give students a minute to circle the correct option 7 had become
before checking answers.
For extra practice, refer students to
Answers page 26 in the Workbook.
1 had not been
2 had sent
3 sent Vocabulary Page 47
4 had developed
5 had been planning
6 had been programming Aims of the lesson:
to present and practise vocabulary relating to:
Exercise B • science
• This exercise practises time expressions commonly • computer technology
used with the past perfect. • phrasal verbs
• Give students a few minutes to complete the
sentences with the words in the box.
• Check answers.
Exercise A
• This exercise introduces lexical sets relating to the
various fields of science.
Answers
• Give students a couple of minutes to complete the
1 already 5 since spidergrams individually.
2 just 6 after
• Elicit answers. Don’t worry about explaining the
3 for 7 when
words at this stage as the next exercise provides a
4 before 8 soon
more meaningful context to help students understand
the words.
Exercise C
• This exercise offers some fun free practice of the Answers
past perfect. 1 astronomy
• Read through the instructions and example together 2 chemistry
as a class. 3 physics
• Ask students to work in pairs and to take turns 4 mathematics
asking about and coming up with any explanations 5 biology
to explain the situations in the box. 6 geology
• Give them a few minutes to do the activity.

47
Exercise B
Extra activity
• Give students a few minutes to choose the best
answers. If time allows in the lesson, ask students to write
• Elicit answers. Check students understand the words their own sentence for each phrasal verb in
in the multiple choice options. Exercise D. Alternatively, they could write a short
paragraph (eg a very short story, description,
recount, etc) of about 50 words, containing at least
Answers three of the phrasal verbs from Exercise D and at
1 A 2B 3B 4D 5C 6A least three words from the rest of the page.

For extra practice, refer students to


Exercise C page 27 in the Workbook.
• Give students a few minutes to read the text carefully
and to choose the correct option.
• Check answers. Check students understand what all
the words mean.
Listening Page 48

Aims of the lesson:


Answers • to encourage prediction from pictures
1 desktop (Exercises A, B & D)
2 portable • to listen for specific words (Exercise C)
3 mouse • to listen for detail (Exercise E)
4 screen • to talk about students’ own reactions to the
5 keyboard information in the listening texts (Quick chat)
6 emails
7 online Exercise A
8 scanner
• This activity encourages prediction from pictures.
9 printer • Encourage students to guess what the topic of
conversation will be about based on the first set of
pictures in Exercise D (mobile phones or iPhones).
Exercise D
• This exercise will help students with Exercise E. Exercise B
• Explain the task. Give students a couple of minutes • Check students know what the words and phrases
to match the phrasal verbs with their definitions. mean.
• Check answers. • Give students a minute to choose the words they
think they might hear.
• Elicit guesses, but do not confirm or negate them, as
Answers this will spoil the next activity.
1 b 2e 3a 4d 5f 6c
11 Exercise C
• Play the extract for students to check their predictions
Exercise E from Exercise B.
• This exercise offers practice for the phrasal verbs in • Elicit answers.
Exercise D.
• Give students a few minutes to complete the Answers
sentences. The words mentioned are:
• Elicit answers. mobile phone
GPS tracking device
Answers email
radio
1 log into MP3 player
2 hacked into
3 backed up
4 click on Exercise D
5 set up • Explain the task. Tell students to work in pairs to try
6 plug (it) into to guess the topic of conversation for each extract
and to come up with three words or phrases they

48
4
think they might hear in each. Give students five
minutes to do this. G
Girl: Well, even though it has an MP3 player on it,
• Elicit ideas. I can’t listen to the radio with it.
B
Boy: Oh …
12 Exercise E 2
• Read the Steps to success box together. G
Girl: Mum, have you seen my laptop?
• Tell students that they should listen carefully to each M
Mum: Yesterday when I was tidying up, I put it on
extract and then decide if the statement for each y
your desk.
conversation is true, false, or if the inofrmation is not G
Girl: Well, it’s not there now.
stated. M
Mum: Did you use it in bed last night?
• Play the extracts. G
Girl: Um … yes, I did, I think.
• Check answers. You might need to play the extracts M
Mum: Have you looked under the bed? That’s
a second time. w
where you usually leave it when you’ve used it in
• Alternatively, pause the CD to check answers after b
bed.
each extract. G
Girl: I’ll go and check. … No, it’s not there.
M
Mum: I bet I’ll find it. Here you are.
G
Girl: Was it under the bed?
Answers M
Mum: Not quite. It was under the covers.
1B 2C 3A 4B 5A 6C G
Girl: Oh, yeah. I remember now. I used it this
m
morning and left it on the bed.
Quick chat 3
• Give students a couple of minutes to discuss M
Man: That was an amazing exhibition. Which was
the question in pairs first. Encourage them to y
your favourite invention?
justify their choices. W
Woman: I really liked the underwater boat.
M
Man: Was that the one with the solar panels and
• Elicit answers from students and encourage a
s
see-through glass?
class discussion.
W
Woman: Yes, that’s right. I liked the fact that you
c
could see through it while underwater. It would be
For extra listening practice, refer students a amazing experience to have a ride in it.
an
to page 29 of the Workbook, CD: folder M
Man: Definitely!
'Workbook', track 5. W
Woman: There was another one that wasn’t as
i
impressive – the one that looked like a submarine.
M
Man: Yes, I know the one you mean. But you
Audioscript c
couldn’t see through that one.
W
Woman: No.
11 Exercise C
4
Boy: That’s an interesting device. What is it? M
Man: This looks interesting. How does it work?
Girl: It’s a mobile phone. W
Woman: Well, see these lights?
Boy: Really? But isn’t that a map on the screen? M
Man: Yes.
Girl: Yes, it’s a GPS tracking device too. In fact, it W
Woman: Well, they light up when the cyclist picks
has a lot of capabilities. I can take pictures with it, u speed or uses the brakes.
up
send emails and even surf the Internet. M
Man: What do you mean?
Boy: That’s incredible! Is there anything it can’t do? W
Woman: Well, the lights light up green when the
Girl: Well, even though it has an MP3 player on it, c
cyclist accelerates and they go red when the
I can’t listen to the radio with it. c
cyclist brakes.
Boy: Oh … M
Man: So they actually light up as the cyclist
g
goes faster?
W
Woman: Yes, they light up green.
Audioscript M
Man: Do you have to wear the jacket for it to
w
work?
12 Exercise E W
Woman: Well, yes. The lights are on the jacket.
1 I designed to be worn by cyclists as they ride.
It’s
Boy: That’s an interesting device. What is it? Y know, so that car drivers can see them better
You
Girl: It’s a mobile phone. a night?
at
Boy: Really? But isn’t that a map on the screen? M
Man: Oh, I see.
Girl: Yes, it’s a GPS tracking device too. In fact, it 5
has a lot of capabilities. I can take pictures with it, W
Woman: I think the worst invention ever is the
send emails and even surf the Internet. h
house alarm. I can’t stand it when they go off
Boy: That’s incredible! Is there anything it can’t do? b
because the owner has forgotten the code.

49
Man: Yes, there are a lot of false alarms with Answer
h
house alarms. But they’re not as bad as car
The speakers are talking about important
a
alarms.
inventions and discoveries (and which two they
W
Woman: No, you’re right. No one takes any notice
will choose as the topics for the talk).
o
of them, so how are they supposed to stop
tthieves?
Man: Yes, and they’re always going off with the
s
smallest of vibrations. You know, if a lorry or 13 Exercise B
a
another car drives past a little too quickly they go • Tell students that the two speakers express
o
off. agreement and make suggestions in various different
W
Woman: Yes, they’re too sensitive. A bit like some ways during their conversation.
p
people I know. • Refer students to the Language chunks box and give
Man: I know what you mean. them time to read through the expressions.
6 • Play the extract again. Students listen and note down
Man: I think the best invention of all time is the the expressions they hear.
p
personal computer. I mean, the things we can do • Check answers.
n
now that we couldn’t do before.
W
Woman: Yeah. It’s incredible and most people
h
have one. But I think an even more useful Answers
iinvention has been the Internet. Making suggestions
Man: Yes, the amount of information at your How about … ?
ffingertips is extraordinary. What about … ?
W
Woman: I also like those social networking sites. Expressing agreement
Man: You mean like Facebook and MySpace? I agree.
W
Woman: Yes. Alright.
Man: I actually find they’re a waste of time. You Yeah, OK.
s
spend so much time on them and for what? Perfect!
Personally, I think the best thing about the Internet
Exactly!
iis email. It’s such a convenient way to keep in touch
Absolutely!
a
and to contact people. It’s also the cheapest way.
That sounds like a good idea.
W
Woman: Yes, I suppose you’re right.

Audioscript
Speaking Page 49
13 Exercises A & B
Aims of the lesson: Boy: The pictures all show important inventions
and discoveries. The first one is the phone …
• to listen to a model speaking task for gist
Girl: Aha …
(Exercise A)
Boy: … and I think it’s a very important invention
• to present and practise ways of making
because it allows people to communicate quickly
suggestions and expressing agreement
and cheaply.
(Exercises B and C)
Girl: I agree. I can’t imagine life without one. So it
• to talk about different inventions and to
really is very important.
negotiate towards a common decision
(Exercise D) Boy: This one looks like a medical breakthrough …
Girl: Yes, and there have been some very
• to make students aware of the final [r]
(Say it right!) important medical breakthroughs.
Boy: Absolutely! Like vaccinations for instance.
Girl: Exactly! …
13 Exercise A Boy: I think we should choose a medical
• Tell students they will be listening to two people breakthrough as a topic for one of the talks.
having a conversation. Don’t tell them what the Girl: Alright. And how about an invention for the
conversation is about, as this is what they have to other talk?
listen for. Boy: Which one do you think?
• Play the extract. Girl: What about the phone?
• Elicit the answer.

50
4
Boy: Yeah, OK. That sounds like a good idea. Grammar 2 Page 50
Girl: Right. So the two talks will be on the phone
and medical breakthroughs.
Boy: Perfect! Aim of the lesson:
• to revise and practise comparatives and
superlatives
Exercise C
• Read the Helpful hints box together. Tell students
that body language and acknowledging what their
comparatives and superlatives
partner says are both important ways to be polite. • Give students a minute to read the example
• This activity provides some practice of the sentences and to answer the two concept
expressions in the Language chunks box. Read the checking questions. Ideally, these sentences
instructions and examples together. Ask students to could be written on the board for the whole
work in pairs. class to see.
• Encourage them to use expressions from the • Check answers.
Language chunks box. • Give students a minute to complete the rules by
circling the right option.
Exercise D • Check answers.
• Ask students to work in pairs. • To recap, read through the relevant section on
• Explain the task. Remind students that they have page 169 in the Grammar reference. It contains
to discuss the benefits of each discovery and/or a long list of irregular adjectives and adverbs
invention as well as decide which two the talk should that will be helpful for students to refer to when
be based on. doing the exercises.
• Encourage them to use expressions from the
Language chunks box and to practise the advice in Answers
the Helpful hints box. Compares two things: 1, 2 and 3
• Give students about five minutes to do the task Compares more than two things: 4
before getting feedback from the different pairs. Rules:
1 comparative
Say it right! 2 superlative
3 comparative
14 Exercise E 4 better than
• Tell students that the final [r] is sometimes pronounced
and sometimes not. It is pronounced when the word
that follows begins with a vowel sound and not if it is Exercise A
said in isolation or if the word that follows begins with • This exercise checks that students understand the
a consonant. form rules of comparatives and superlatives. Each
• Tell students that when the first of the two words in sentence contains commonly made mistakes with
bold in the sentences shown are said in isolation, the these structures.
final [r] is not pronounced (eg far = [fa:]). • Give students a few minutes to find and correct the
• Tell students to listen carefully to the words in bold mistakes in the sentences.
when they’re read out together to hear if the final [r] • Ask students to compare their answers in pairs.
in the first words is pronounced (ie far, more, were • Check answers.
and better).
• Play the CD. Answers
• Play the CD a second time for students to check. 1 Physics is harder than maths.
• Play the CD again for students to listen and repeat. 2 A mobile phone is more convenient than
a landline.
Answer 3 The washing machine is easier to use than
the dishwasher.
The final [r] is pronounced in all the words. 4 Old planes aren’t as fast as new ones.
5 What is the furthest/farthest you’ve ever ridden?
6 The better computers get the faster they get.
Exercise F 7 The less you know about this the better.
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a couple of 8 Of all the maths problems we had to solve, this
minutes to practise reading out the sentences paying one took the least amount of time.
special attention to the words in bold.

51
Exercise B
• Tell students that these ten sentences are all scientific
Practise your English Page 51
facts.
• Give them a few minutes to complete them with Aim of the lesson:
the right form of the word in brackets. • to practise the grammar and vocabulary from
• Check answers. Ask students if any of the facts the unit in an integrated way
surprised them.

Answers Exercise A
1 the biggest • Tell students they will be reading an article about
2 The fastest someone’s opinion of technology. Read the title
3 higher than together.
4 as hard • Ask them to read the text quickly and silently, ignoring
5 the stronger the gaps for now, to find out what the writer thinks
6 more sensitive about the devices in the pictures. Give students two
7 safer minutes for this.
8 the best • Elicit the answer.
9 more mountainous
10 the largest Answer
The writer thinks that kitchen appliances have
increased the amount of work we do in the
Exercise C kitchen and that mobile phones are a nuisance.
• This activity gives students the chance to personalize
comparatives and superlatives and to practise them
in a freer way. Exercise B
• Give students a few minutes to complete the • Give students five minutes to read the text more
sentences so that they are true for them. Point out carefully and to complete it with the correct form of
that sentences 3 and 4 require the use of the present the words in capitals. Before students start working
perfect. allow them time to revise the strategies given in the
• Check answers by monitoring to see what students Steps to success box and on page 196.
have written. • Check answers.
• When students have finished, ask them to compare
their sentences with a partner. Answers
1 discoveries 4 invasion
Answers 2 appliances 5 caller
Students’ own answers 3 effective 6 simply

Extra activity Exercise C


If time allows in the lesson, ask students to give • Remind students that the two sentences may look
their opinions about the following pairs/groups of different, but they will have a similar meaning.
items/activities. Write the prompts up on the board • Do the first item together.
and encourage them to use comparatives and • Give students a few minutes to do the rest on their
superlatives when comparing. Ask students first to own before checking answers.
discuss the items in pairs and then discuss them
as a class. Answers
the laptop computer / the desktop computer 1 is better than
the mobile phone / the landline 2 as cheap as
SMS text messaging / email 3 the more enjoyable / the better
computers / textbooks 4 been watching TV for
TV / DVDs / cinema 5 the DVD player had already
bowling / swimming / sitting in a cafe 6 the width of
going out / staying in / having friends over
going to a party / going out with a close friend
Exercise D
For extra practice, refer students to • Give students a couple of minutes to do the activity
page 28 in the Workbook. on their own before checking answers.

52
4
Answers • Ask students to read the essay and to answer the
1C 2A 3A 4B 5A two questions.
• Elicit the answer.

Your voice Answer


• This activity gives students the opportunity to The writer thinks that the disadvantages of
personalize with the topic 'Technical devices'. playing computer games are greater than the
Give them enough time to prepare their talk advantages and that young people should either
according to the given plan. Encourage them to avoid playing computer games or spend less
use the ideas in the text and the unit vocabulary. time doing so.
• Let a few students give their talk. Then encourage
a class discussion.
Skills development: Paragraphing
Exercise E
Writing Pages 52 and 53 • Tell students that organizing an essay into paragraphs
makes it easier to read and makes the ideas clearer
to the reader.
Aims of the lesson: • Ask students to decide how they would divide the
• to warm students up and introduce them to essay into five paragraphs.
the topic of the essay (Exercise A) • Elicit ideas.
• to analyze an essay topic (Exercise B) • Ask students to complete the table in their notebooks.
• Elicit answers and write them up on the board in a
• to get ideas for a topic (Exercises C & G)
table.
• to analyze a model essay for ideas and the
writer’s opinion (Exercise D)
Answers
• to analyze a model essay for paragraphing
and organization of ideas (Exercise E) Paragraphs
1 The Internet has become … others might
• to read a model essay for markers signalling
disagree.
ideas and opinions (Exercise F)
2 In my opinion … with family and friends.
• to practise planning and writing an essay 3 Others may say … to situations in a game.
(Exercises H & I) 4 I don't agree … effects computer games can
have on them.
Exercise A 5 In conclusion … type of entertainment
• Give students a minute to choose from the list the Paragraph topic Ideas
different activities they do in their free time.
• Elicit feedback. 1 Introduction 1 introduce topic

Exercise B 2 Writer's opinion 1 young people spend


too much time playing
• Give students a minute to read the essay topic. Ask computer games and
them what the topic requires them to write exactly. not exercising
2 they are not in control
Answer of their habit
Their opinion about statement and whether or not 3 Opposing opinion 1 young people need to
they agree with it. enjoy themselves
2 playing computer
Exercise C games can improve
your thinking skills
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few minutes
to brainstorm all the advantages and disadvantages 4 Reasons for 1 impossible to control
of playing computer games they can think of. disagreeing the habit
• Elicit answers and write them up on the board in a 2 people have too many
table. bad habits already
Exercise D 5 Conclusion 1 sum up
• Tell students they are going to read an essay that 2 restate opinion
answers the topic in Exercise B.

53
Exercise F Exercise I
• Tell students that it is important to signal main ideas • When writing their essays, remind students to use
and opinions in an essay and that the way to do this is some of the ways of presenting ideas from the
to use certain expressions like the ones in the model Language chunks box in their essays.
essay. It is these expressions that helped students to • Read through the Quick check! box and tell students
to use this as a checklist before they hand in their
do Exercise E.
essays.
• Give students a few minutes to reread the essay and • For advice on how to write an essay, refer students
find the expressions. to page 186 in the Writing database.
• Check answers. • If time allows, students should write, or begin to write,
their essays in class.
Answers For extra writing practice, refer students to
1 I think, I don't believe, In my opinion page 29 in the Workbook.
2 Others may say
Teacher's resource file:
3 However
– Progress test (page 170)
4 In conclusion
– Communication and writing (page 182)
5 Furthermore, What is more
– Fun and games (page 194)
– Self-assessment checklist (page 206)
Editable tests CD: Unit 4 test
Getting ideas
Exercise G
• Read the essay topic together as a class and check
students understand it.
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
minutes to discuss the points and to add more ideas
to the spidergram. Remind them to look back at the
text on page 51 for ideas. Ask them to discuss their
opinion on the topic too.
• Elicit feedback.

Answers
Advantages
Convenient
Good way to stay in touch
Disadvantages
Rude
Invasion of privacy
Expensive
Dangers
They distract us when we’re walking in the street
or driving.

Planning and writing


Exercise H
• Read the Steps to success box together. Tell students
that this is the advice the writer of the model essay
on page 52 has followed.
• Give students a little time to make notes in their
notebooks according to the Planner.

54
Learn about chemistry Units 3 and 4
Fabrics and substances Answers
1 Because the hydrogen bonds in cellulose break.
Pages 54 and 55 2 Formaldehyde is toxic and it stinks. It is used
to preserve animal matter.
3 Yes, it was. The scientist who discovered it
Aims of the lesson: was working on something else at the time.
• to motivate students to learn about fabrics and 4 Nano-Tex has created fibres that feel soft and
substances through English natural, but are strong. Scotchgard, however,
doesn’t feel nice on clothes and is therefore
• to read for gist (Exercises A & B)
used on furniture instead.
• to read for specific information (Exercise C)
5 Silicon is sprayed on the polyester fabric. It
• to do some research work on the cross-
allows the thinnest layer of silicon – a fine
curriculum topic (Project)
mist – to be applied.
6 hydrophobic = afraid of water
Exercise A 7 A swimming costume that doesn’t get wet
would allow the swimmer to glide through the
• Ask students to read the task and the words in the
water without any resistance. This would make
box. Check students understand what the terms
‘waterproof’, ‘quick dry’ and ‘no-wrinkle’ mean. Ask competitive swimmers faster.
students to use the dictionary at the back of their
Student's Books to check meaning and pronunciation
of the words in the box.
• Ask students to read the introduction and to answer
Project
the task questions using the words in the box.
• Elicit answers. Assign the project for homework. Students
will have to find out and write a definition of
Exercise B nanotechnology, and then write about its uses.
• Give students one or two minutes to read the texts. Encourage students to find pictures to show how
• Ask students to discuss the question in pairs. nanotechnology can be applied. Make a display
• Elicit answers. of students' works and have a few students talk
about their projects during the next class.
Answers
No-iron clothes are treated with a substance that
isn't toxic. If you don't need to iron your clothes,
Answers
you don't waste time and you don't need to use
electricity to power the iron. Nanotechnology refers to technology in which
very small particles are used to create things,
No-stain clothes don't need to be washed as
for example using atoms and molecules. This
often, so you don't need to use electricity for
the washing machine and you aren't putting technology can be applied to cosmetics, clothing,
detergents into the water system. food packaging, household appliances, paint and
other surface coatings, and much more.
No-clean clothes won't need to be washed at all.

Exercise С
• Ask students to scan the text to find the answers to
questions 1–4.
• For questions 5–7, ask students to discuss the issues
in pairs or small groups.
• Elicit answers.

55
Culture today … Units 3 and 4

The best standards of higher


education
Pages 56 and 57 Exercise B
• Give students one or two minutes to read the leaflet,
Aims of the lesson: then discuss the task question as a class.
• to motivate students to learn about higher
education in the US through English Extra activity
• to read for gist (Exercises A & B) It might be useful to do some vocabulary work
• to read for specific information (Exercise C) before students start scanning the text for specific
• to give students an opportunity to discuss what information. Write three pairs of words (private –
they've learned and how it relates to their own public, undergraduate – graduate, bachelor's –
personal experiences through discussion (Your master's) on the board and encourage students
voice) to work out their meaning. After discussing the
meanings as a class, read out the following
sentences (or write them on the board) for students
Exercise A to complete:
• Ask students to read the task. Explain the word 'top- You have to pay to attend a … school. (private)
notch' (= high quality) if necessary. … schools are funded by the government. (Public)
• Ask students to read the introduction. Elicit any
… students are still attending university for their first
names of top-notch universities that students know
degree. (Undergraduate)
in the UK (such as Oxford and Cambridge), as well
… students have got their first degree and are
as in other countries including their own.
studying for a more advanced degree in their field.
(Graduate)
Extra activity
After receiving his … degree with honours, he
You might want to offer students an insight into was confident of successfully completing his … .
the history of education. Tell them that the earliest (bachelor's, master's)
universities were established in the 12th and
13th centuries. Then write the courses of study
(marketing, law, business, medicine, theology,
philosopy, mathematics, astronomy, environmental
Exercise C
studies) on the board and ask students to choose • Make sure students understand that for this type of
those from the list which they think were taught at task, they do not need to read the texts in full detail
that time. Conduct a class discussion on the subject but they have to scan them to find the information
by asking the class for their opinions. Encourage in the questions. The headings will also help them
students to give reasons for their answers (it is safe locate the relevant information.
that marketing, business and environmental studies • Allow up to ten minutes for students to try to find
are more recent additions but see the note below). the answers. When most of them have finished, ask
Note: them to compare notes with a partner.
Marketing and business were very important to • Check answers and ask students to tell you where
Europeans in the 12th century, with many people they found them.
determined to increase their wealth or status
through successful trading. However, these Answers
subjects were initially studied in a formal way. The
earliest major universities, such as Oxford, Paris 1c 2b 3a 4d 5b 6c 7d
and Bologna focused mainly on the study of Latin,
Greek and law, often with a theological context.
Through their studies of the classical languages, Your voice Exercise D
interest developed in the sciences (including
astronomy and medicine), logic (as a branch of • Elicit answers from students around the class. Aim
philosophy), and geometry. to get as many students as possible to express their
opinions.

56
Progress check 2
Pages 58 and 59 Exercise F
1 A
Exercise A 2 B
1 B 3 B
2 C 4 C
3 A 5 D
4 B 6 D
5 A 7 C
6 A 8 A
7 C
Ask students to complete 3–4 Review on
8 C
pages 30 and 31 of the Workbook.
Exercise B Ask students to complete Progress test 1
1 back on pages 32 and 33 of the Workbook.
2 into
3 up
4 on
5 into
6 up
7 out
8 up

Exercise C
1 than
2 already
3 just
4 as
5 most
6 yet
7 more
8 still

Exercise D
1 went
2 have bought
3 hadn’t met
4 have we moved
5 haven’t seen
6 been tidying
7 were
8 had passed

Exercise E
1 isn’t as difficult/hard as
2 always gets marked down
3 worst computer I’ve ever
4 has been suspended
5 wasn’t paying attention
6 still doing your
7 should back up those
8 know the length of
9 having guitar lessons since
10 has never been a bigger

57
5 Holidays with a difference!
Themes Skills aims
Travel Reading
Transport Students read a number of short texts for:
• gist
Language aims • details
Grammar Listening
Future forms Students listen to a long interview for:
Time clauses • main ideas
Question tags
Speaking
Indirect questions
Students conduct a pairwork speaking activity to:
Vocabulary • express opinion politely
Sights • suggest ideas tentatively
Accommodation
Writing
Transport
Students write a formal letter and practise:
Travel
• linking
• formal register
• organization

• Read through the Steps to success box together as


Reading Pages 60 and 61 a class.
• Ask students to skim the text to work out what type of
Aims of the lesson: text it is. Give them 30 seconds to do this.
• to warm students up and introduce them to the • Elicit the answer.
theme of the unit (Exercise A)
• to exploit the context of a text (Exercises B, Answer
C & D)
2
• to scan for specific information (Exercise E)
• to guess the meaning of unknown words from
the context (Exercise F)
• to talk about the ideas in the text (Quick chat) Exercise C
• This exercise helps students to read the text quickly
for gist. Students match paragraphs of the text with
the subtitles. Remind students that there is one extra
subtitle they do not need to use.

Exercise A
Answers
• This fun quiz tests how much students know about
travel and transport. 1B 2E 3C 4A
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a couple of
minutes to answer the questions.
• When they have finished, ask them to check their
Exercise D
answers on page 183. • This exercise helps students apply the advice in the
• Elicit feedback on their results. Steps to success box.
• Tell students they do not need to read the text in
detail to do this task. They will need to scan it quickly
Reading to find the information.
Exercise B • Give students two minutes to scan the text for the
• This exercise helps students apply the advice in the information.
Steps to success box. • Elicit answers.

58
5
Answers Grammar 1 Page 62
1 In the About us section at the beginning.
2 In the Price of our tours section at the end. Aim of the lesson:
3 In the Our tours section.
to revise:
4 At the end before the Price of our tours section.
• expressing the future

Exercise E
• Before doing this task, ask students to go to page expressing the future
196 to read the information about this exam task. • Read through the section about the ways
• Explain to students that to do this task, they will need of expressing the future on page 170 of the
to read the text in detail to locate the information. Grammar reference with the class. Make sure
• Give students enough time to find the information in students are familiar with these future forms.
the text and to answer the questions. Tell them to • Then look at the extracts from the Reading text
find the part of the text that contains the information. in the Check box.
• Encourage students to compare their answers in • Ask students to read the extracts and match
pairs before you check them. Remember to ask them them with their meanings.
to justify their answers by referring back to the text. • Elicit answers.

Answers Answers
1A 2A 3C 4C 5B 6D 7D 8D a1 b2 c4 d3

Words in context Exercise A


• This exercise checks that students have understood
Exercise F the difference between the different future forms.
• Tell students this is a similar sort of task to those they • Give students a few minutes to complete the
have done in previous units. sentences with the correct form of the verb in
• Give students a few minutes to match the words/ brackets before checking answers.
phrases in the text with their definitions.
• Elicit answers. Answers
1 ’ll call
2 ’ll be
Answers 3 ’s going to save
1 spine-chilling 4 leaves
2 lurking 5 is about to leave
3 off-the-beaten-track 6 Are you flying
4 grim
5 inspired
6 tales Exercise B
7 make your way back • This exercise checks that students have understood
8 enlighten the difference between the different tenses used for
expressing the future.
• Give students a few minutes to read the sentences
Quick chat and to circle the correct options.
• This activity gives students the chance to • Check answers.
personalize using the content of the Reading text.
• Let the students discuss the question in pairs Answers
first. 1 ’ll love
• Elicit answers from the class. Ask them to explain 2 be lying
their reasons. 3 might; might
4 will be
5 have visited
For extra reading practice, refer students to 6 ’re going
pages 34 and 35 in the Workbook.

59
Exercise C
• Students should know how to do this kind of task by
Vocabulary Page 63
now, so no example should be necessary.
• Give students a few minutes to complete the Aims of the lesson:
sentences. to present and practise vocabulary relating to:
• Check answers. • sights
• accommodation
• travel and transport
Answers
1 is going to rain
2 may go camping Exercise A
3 I am going to walk
• Most of this vocabulary will not be new to students.
4 will be good
The activity is a way to check students remember.
5 are about to
• Give students a couple of minutes to think of examples
6 I’ll be flying
of each sight.
7 Shall I carry
• Ask them to share their ideas in pairs.
8 intends to travel around
• Elicit answers.

Quick chat Suggested answers


• This exercise offers some fun free practice and 1 the Acropolis in Athens
an opportunity to personalize the different future 2 Windsor Castle (the Queen’s home just
forms. outside London)
• Read through the instructions as a class. 3 Baker Street / Trafalgar Square in London
• Ask students to work in pairs and to take turns 4 The Arc de Triumph in Paris
asking about their plans and predictions for the 5 The Guggenheim Museum in New York City
future. 6 The Winter Palace in Saint Petersburg
• Give them a few minutes to do the activity.
• Elicit feedback by asking some students to tell
the class about how they see their future. Exercise B
• This activity presents vocabulary relating
to accommodation.
• Give students a few minutes to read the first
text and to complete it with words from the box.
Extra activity
• Check answers before students move on to the
If time allows in the lesson, do the following second text.
activity. Ask students to write a horoscope on • Follow the same procedure for the next two texts.
a loose piece of paper. Tell them to write
a 50-word text that predicts someone’s
horoscope for the rest of the year. They need Answers
to include the following: school marks, friends, a Hotels c Other alternatives
romance, a lucky event. 1 stay 1 tent
Eg You will do very well in your exams this year. 2 luxury 2 campsite
You will have a lot of fun with your friends., etc 3 room 3 visiting
Give them about five minutes for this. When 4 double 4 youth hostel
they have finished, fold the pieces of paper and 5 en suite 5 book
put them in a box. Students randomly pick a 6 guests 6 bed
horoscope from the box and read it. This is their b Apartments 7 rates
horoscope. 1 self-catering
2 alone
3 in
For extra practice, refer students to page 36
4 out
in the Workbook.

60
5
Exercise E
Extra activity
• This exercise introduces compound nouns relating to
If time allows in the lesson, ask students to talk travel and transport.
about the type of accommodation they have • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few minutes
stayed in and which one(s) they prefer and why. to match words to form compounds. Tell students that
Ask students to discuss the question in pairs first some of the words on the left can go with more than
and then to discuss it as a class. one noun on the right.
• Elicit answers.
Exercise C
• In order to revise these means of transport, ask
Answers
students to sort them into private and public.
• Check answers. Check students understand what bike ride, bike helmet
The underground and yacht are. bus ride, bus stop, bus tour, bus ticket
• Ask students, in pairs, to come up with more to add campsite
to the list. Give them two minutes for this. To motivate foreign country
them, make it into a competition of who can come up guided tour
with the most.
hotel room
Answers motorbike
Public private transport
taxi/cab public transport
the Underground railway station
coach train ticket, train station
ferry/ship walking tour
Private
youth hostel
bike/bicycle
motorbike
sailing boat
yacht
Exercise F
More means of transport • This exercise checks that students understand the
bus difference between commonly confused words
car relating to travel and transport.
train • Give students a couple of minutes to circle the correct
tram options, then check answers.
lorry/truck
van
etc
Answers
1 abroad
2 missed
Exercise D 3 sights; sightseeing
• This exercise introduces verbs that collocate with the 4 on; to; spending
means of transport in Exercise C. 5 on; by
• Give students a couple of minutes to do the activity. 6 set off
• Ask students to compare their answers in pairs.
• Check answers. Tell students that the verb take can
be used with all means of public transport (eg take Your voice
the bus, the Underground, the train, the tram, etc).
• This activity gives students the chance to
personalize the transport vocabulary.
Answers • Ask the students to discuss the questions in
drive – a car (a taxi/cab, a coach, a bus, a van) pairs first.
ride – a bike, a motorbike • Ask a few students to give their 2-minute talk in
catch – a taxi/cab, a bus, a train, a tram front of the class.
get on/off – a ship/ferry, a coach, a bus, a train,
the Underground
get in/out of – a taxi/cab, a car
sail – a ship, a boat, a yacht For extra practice, refer students to page 37
in the Workbook.

61
Listening Page 64 Answers
1C 2A 3B 4B 5C 6A
Aims of the lesson:
• to trigger background knowledge on the subject Quick chat
and motivate students (Exercise A) • Give students a couple of minutes to discuss the
• to encourage prediction (Exercise B) questions in pairs first.
• to listen for main ideas (Exercise C)
• Elicit answers from different students.
• to talk about students’ own reactions to the
information in the listening text (Quick chat)
For extra listening practice, refer students
to page 39 of the Workbook, CD: folder
Exercise A 'Workbook', track 6.
• To see how much students know about Australia,
give them a few minutes to answer the questions in
pairs.
Audioscript
A di i t
• Elicit answers. If students know very little, use the 15 Exercise C
answers below to tell them a little about it yourself. P
Presenter: Hello and welcome to The Trip of a
L
Lifetime on 101.2 Teen FM. If you’ve listened to the
Answers p
programme before, you’ll know that we interview
a young traveller each week about a trip they’re
1 Canberra p
planning. On today’s programme we have Megan
2 the Sydney Opera House, Ayers Rock (also D
Douglas who’s planning a trip to the Australian
known as Uluru), the Great Barrier Reef, its O
Outback. So, if anyone is interested in joining the
beaches, etc tr
trip, please call in.
3 It is a vast country so the climate is not the M
Megan: Hello.
same everywhere. Most of the country is P
Presenter: Megan, I understand you’re going on a
covered in desert so it is hot and dry. The north tr
trip Down Under.
is tropical, the southwest has a Mediterranean M
Megan: That’s right. But I’m not going to Sydney
climate and the southeast is temperate (ie with o
or the Gold Coast like most tourists. I’m going into
few extremes). th
the rugged Outback.
4 kangaroos, wallabies, koalas, crocodiles, P
Presenter: What exactly is the Outback?
snakes, etc M
Megan: Well, the Outback is the remote, rural part
o Australia – which, for the most part, means the
of
d
desert. A lot of the Outback is desert. Did you
Exercise B k
know that it’s the driest continent on Earth?
• Read the Steps to success box together. Q
Question one. What part of Australia is the
• Read through the rubric and questions together. O
Outback?
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them five minutes to P
Presenter: Really? That’s interesting. So tell us
try to guess the topic of conversation for each section a
about the places you’re going to see.
and to come up with possible questions for each group M
Megan: Well, I’ll spend most of my time in the
of options. It doesn’t matter if this is proving difficult or if K
Kimberley region.
students come up with wildly different ideas. It is the act P
Presenter: Where’s that exactly?
of predicting that is important. M
Megan: Well, it’s a large region in the northern part
• Elicit ideas. Don’t confirm or negate any of them, as o the state of Western Australia. Western Australia
of
this will spoil the Listening task that follows. is one of the states in Australia. It’s the one that
P
Perth is located in. But I won’t go to Perth on this
15 Exercise C tr – perhaps on my next trip. I’ll be in the north
trip
• Tell students that the question they have to answer fo most of my time. I’m going to Darwin, Kakadu
for
for each section is only heard on the CD. Tell them to N
National Park and Kimberley.
listen carefully to each section and then to listen out Q
Question two. Which place is Megan not going to
for the question after it. v
visit?
• Play the CD. M
Megan: The landscape there is supposed to be
• Check answers. You might need to play the extracts a
amazing. I’m told its beauty has to be seen to be
a second time. b
believed. Apparently, what makes it special are all
• Alternatively, pause the CD to check answers after th different colours. Many parts of the Outback
the
each section. a bright red. A big part of the desert is red.
are

62
5
Presenter: Really?
Megan: Yes! But it’s not all desert. In Kimberley,
Speaking Page 65
tthe landscape will be very varied. As well as desert
tthere are lakes, waterfalls, rivers and even patches Aims of the lesson:
o
of green forest! Also, many different tribes of • to listen to a model speaking task for gist
A
Aborigines live in this part of Australia and on this (Exercise A)
ttrip we could be lucky and see some of them as • to present and practise ways of expressing
w
well as some ancient Aboriginal rock art. uncertainty (Exercise B)
Q
Question three. What is special about this part • to work towards a solution to a problem
o
of Australia? (Exercise C)
Presenter: Do you think you’ll see any of the • to make students aware of the sound [ ]
m
many poisonous or dangerous animals Australia (Say it right!)
iis famous for?
Megan: Actually, yes. I hope we’ll see some 16 Exercise A
c
crocodiles, or should I say crocs – that’s what
tthey’re called in Australia. We are flying into • Tell students they will be listening to three students
Darwin before heading to Kimberley, and we’re talking. Don’t tell them what the conversation is
g
going to visit Kakadu National Park. They say it is about, as this is what they have to listen for.
v
very green, unspoilt and absolutely gorgeous. • Play the extract.
Presenter: Is that where you can see the • Elicit the answer.
c
crocodiles?
Megan: Yes, you can usually see crocs sunning Answer
tthemselves on the banks of the Alligator Rivers. How they’re going to entertain students from
Q
Question four. Where can Megan see crocodiles? another country.
Presenter: Are they crocs or alligators?
Megan: They are most definitely crocs. The rivers 16 Exercise B
a
are called Alligator Rivers because an English
explorer of the 19th century, Phillip Parker King,
e • Tell students that the speakers express uncertainty
m
mistook the crocodiles for alligators and he named in various different ways during their conversation.
t
them Alligator Rivers. • Refer students to the Language chunks box and give
Presenter: Oh, I see. So he thought they were them a minute to read through the expressions.
a
alligators, but they were in fact crocodiles. Are you • Play the extract again. Students listen and note down
a little nervous about seeing crocodiles? the expressions they hear.
Megan: Not really. We’ll be on a boat so there • Check answers.
r
really is no danger of us being attacked or • Read the Helpful hints box together.
a
anything. In fact, I’m sure they’ll just ignore us as
w sail by.
we Answers
Q
Question five. How did Alligator Rivers get their Giving opinions
n
name? Yes, I suppose you’re right.
Presenter: Any other exciting plans? I’m not sure …
Megan: Yes, we’re going on a camel safari. Maybe …
Presenter: Camels? Do they have camels Making tentative suggestions
i Australia?
in We could … , couldn’t we?
Megan: Yes, they most certainly do. There are (Perhaps) we could …
a lot of wild ones too. They were brought there It might be better to …
b the early explorers to use as transport in the
by
d
desert when they were exploring. There are a lot
o wild camels wandering in the desert now. It’s
of Audioscript
A di i t
a
amazing that anything can survive in such hot and
d conditions.
dry 16 Exercises A & B
Presenter: Yes, quite. How hot will it get? G 1: Wow, this is pretty exciting, isn’t it?
Girl
Megan: When we are there it could reach 40 G
Girl 2: Yes, it is. So what shall we do over the
d
degrees. th
three days?
Presenter: That’s hot! B
Boy: Well, it seems they all have pretty different
Q
Question six. What do we learn about the camels in
interests. I think we need to come up with a
i Australia?
in p
programme that will have something for everyone.

63
G 1: I agree.
Girl Answers
G
Girl 2: Me too.
1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8
G
Girl 1: We could combine a little sightseeing,
ffood, dancing, the sea and perhaps some
s
shopping. Exercise F
G
Girl 2: Maybe, but some of them hate shopping • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a couple of
a
and sightseeing. minutes to practise saying the words and to come up
Boy: I know, but they’ve never been here before, with two more words that rhyme with coach.
rremember? Don’t you think they should see
s
something of our city?
G
Girl 2: Yes, I suppose you’re right. We could Suggested answers
s
spend Friday doing a little shopping and some poach
s
sightseeing, couldn’t we? poke
G
Girl 1: I don’t see why not. Perhaps we could take Coke
tthem to the British Museum in the morning and hope
tthen to Soho for lunch. broke, etc
G
Girl 2: I’m not sure lunch in Soho is such a good
iidea. I think it would be boring. But if they find the
m
museum boring they can pop into some shops in
S
Soho and do some shopping. Grammar 2 Page 66
Boy: True. They’ll probably like the museum,
tthough, because there’s so much to see. Also, I
tthink a picnic lunch on the London Eye would be Aims of the lesson:
m
much better than lunch in Soho.
to revise and practise:
G
Girl 1: Yes, I suppose. It might be better to give
• time clauses
tthem the freedom to choose what they’d like to
s
see most. • question tags
G
Girl 2: Yes, but we’ve still got to make some • indirect questions
s
suggestions.
G
Girl 1: I know.
G
Girl 2: How about going down to Brighton time clauses
o
on Saturday? • Give students a minute to read the example
Boy: Yes, they’ll like that … sentences and to choose the right option. Ask
them also to answer the concept-checking
question.
Exercise C • Check answers. Highlight the fact that the verbs
• Ask students to work in pairs. in these time clauses are in a present tense
• Read the task together and check students despite referring to the future.
understand what they need to do. • To recap, you might want to read through
• Encourage them to use expressions from the the relevant section on page 171 in the
Language chunks box. Grammar reference.
• Give students at least five minutes to do the task.
• Elicit feedback from the different pairs. As a class, Answers
vote on the best proposal.
1 get
2 ve spoken
Say it right! 3 improves
4 leave
Exercise D
• Tell students that the spelling of a word is not always The sentences refer to the future.
an indication of how it is pronounced.
• Give students a minute to write down the words they
think rhyme with coach [kəʊtʃ]. Exercise A
• This exercise checks that students understand the
17 Exercise E form rules for using these time expressions.
• Play the CD for students to listen and check their • Give students a couple of minutes to complete the
answers to Exercise D. email with the right form of the verbs in the box.
• Play the CD again for students to listen and repeat. • Check answers.

64
5
Answers
indirect questions
1 get
• Give students a minute to decide which question
2 see
in each pair is an indirect question and thus
3 leave
more polite.
4 ’ll call
5 ’ll email • Elicit answers.
• To recap and to show students more examples
of indirect questions, read through the relevant
section on page 171 in the Grammar reference.
question tags
• Question tags will not be new to students at this Answers
stage of their learning. They were covered,
in a less direct way, in the Speaking and 1a 2a
pronunciation sections in Unit 3. As such, not a
lot will need to be said about them.
• To check how much students know about the Exercise D
form rules, write the following on the board. • Give students a minute to complete the questions.
You travel a lot, ____ ? Refer them to page 171 for more examples of
You’ve never been to London, ____ ? different indirect questions.
• Elicit from students what the tag should be for • Check answers.
each (don’t you; have you).
• To recap, you might want to read through Answers
the relevant section on page 171 in the 1 what kind of room you would like
Grammar reference. 2 where you’re going on your next holiday
3 if an en suite is important
Exercise B 4 you could tell me what time the tour begins
5 how much it will cost
• This activity focuses on form.
• Give students a minute to complete the question
tags before checking answers. For extra practice, refer students to
page 38 in the Workbook.
Answers
1 could you Practise your English Page 67
2 are you
3 didn’t you Aim of the lesson:
4 isn’t she
5 hasn’t he • to practise the grammar and vocabulary from
the unit in an integrated way

Exercise C
• This activity focuses on form and meaning. Exercise A
• Explain that the sentence they will need to write • Tell students they will be reading an article about
should have a question tag, but mean the same as someone’s predictions regarding means of transport.
the first one. Do the first one together to make it clear • Ask students to predict what things he will mention
what students need to do. from the pictures.
• Give students a few minutes to rewrite the sentences • Ask students to read the text quickly and silently,
with question tags. ignoring the gaps for now, to find out what the
• Elicit answers. writer’s predictions about transport are and if they
think these predictions are realistic. Give students
two minutes for this.
Answers • Elicit the answer.
1 don’t agree with me, do you
2 not going to walk all the way, are you
3 couldn’t open the door for me, could you Answer
4 drives too fast, doesn’t he The writer thinks that we will be driving cars that
5 was great, wasn’t it run on alternative energy sources and ‘smart’ cars.

65
Exercise B
• Give students five minutes to read the text more Answers
carefully and to complete the gaps with the correct The person would like to know:
form of the words in captials. which islands they will be visiting.
• Check answers. which archaeological sites they will visit.
what the dates of the cruise are.
what the special rates are.
Answers
1 have come 5 are automated
2 least 6 calculates
3 people 7 further
Skills development: Content,
4 will run organization, linking and style
Exercise C
Exercise C • Give students a few minutes to read the email to find
• Give students a couple of minutes to do the activity the information relating to the notes.
on their own before checking answers. • Elicit answers and ask students why they think the
information is in different paragraphs (the information
is unrelated so not all the questions should be in the
Answers same paragraph).
1 D 6 A
2 A 7 D Exercise D
3 B 8 D • Explain to students that the linking words in the box
4 C 9 B are missing from the email. By inserting them, it will
5 D 10 A link the paragraphs and make the email easier to
follow.
• Give students a couple of minutes to reread the email
and to complete it.
• Elicit answers.
Writing Pages 68 and 69
Answers
1 First
Aims of the lesson: 2 also
• to warm students up and introduce them to the 3 Regarding dates
topic of a formal letter/email (Exercise A) 4 Finally
• to analyze a task (Exercise B)
• to analyze a model email for content,
organization, linking and style (Exercises C, Exercise E
D & E) • Ask students why the writer has used indirect
• to criticize a bad model (Exercise F) questions to find out the information needed (to
• to practise planning and writing a formal letter/ request information in a polite and formal way).
email (Exercises G & H) • Give students a couple of minutes to find all the
indirect questions in the email.
• Elicit answers.
Exercise A
• Give students a minute to discuss this question in Answers
pairs. This will give them time to think about it before … we were wondering if you could answer a few
answering. of our queries first.
• Elicit answers. Could you please let us know which ones?
Could you also let us know which archaeological
Exercise B sites we will visit …
Could we ask if you have a cruise that week?
• Give students a couple of minutes to read the
Would you mind telling us what these rates
advertisement and the notes.
are exactly?
• Answer the question as a class.

66
heir
• Give students a little time to make notes in their
5
Exercise F
• This activity offers students the opportunity to apply notebooks according to the Planner. Encourage
what they have learnt about formal emails to criticize them to write out their indirect questions requesting
a bad model email. information.
• Give students a few minutes to read it and to make
notes next to the bullet pointed ideas. Exercise H
• Elicit answers. • Read the stock phrases in the Language chunks box
that students can use in their emails/letters.
Answers • When writing their emails/letters, remind students to
Style of language – the email is too informal. use some of these expressions.
Question tags and direct questions are • Read through the Quick check! box and tell students
inappropriate in a formal letter. to use this as a checklist before they hand in their
Content – it is too brief. It doesn’t ask about the emails/letters.
special rates. • For advice on how to write a formal email/letter, refer
Organization – it is one paragraph only. students to page 188 in the Writing database.
Linking – there is hardly any. Very few linking • If time allows, students should write, or begin to write,
words are used. their emails/letters in class.
Beginning and ending – it is too informal. For extra writing practice, refer students to
page 39 in the Workbook.

Planning and writing Teacher's resource file:


– Progress test (page 171)
Exercise G – Communication and writing (page 183)
• Read the Helpful hints box together. – Fun and games (195)
• Give students a minute to read the task. Check – Self-assessment checklist (page 207)
students understand what they are required to do
and what they have to ask for. Editable tests CD: Unit 5 test

67
6 Serious fun
Themes Skills aims
Cinema Reading
Literature Students read a number of short texts for:
Entertainment • gist
The arts • specific information
Listening
Language aims Students listen to a long interview for:
Grammar • gist
Reported speech • details
Reporting verbs
Speaking
Vocabulary Students conduct a pairwork roleplay to practise:
Entertainment • polite questions
Phrasal verbs • polite ways of saying yes and no
Writing
Students write a story and practise:
• narrative tenses
• interesting content

Reading Pages 70 and 71 Kirsten Dunst is an American actress, singer,


model and director. She made her film debut
in Woody Allen's New York Stories and gained
Aims of the lesson: widespread recognition playing the role of vampire
• to warm students up and introduce them to the Claudia in Interview with the Vampire. Dunst
theme of the unit (Exercise A) achieved international fame for her portrayal of
• to read for gist (Exercises B & C) Mary Jane Watson in Spider-Man trilogy. She
• to scan the text for specific information won the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film
(Exercise D) Festival and the Saturn Award for Best Actress for
• to guess the meaning of unknown words from her performance in Melancholia in 2011.
the context (Exercise E) Marc Chagall (1887–1985) was a prominent
• to talk about the ideas in the text (Quick chat) Russian-French modernist who created works
in virtually every artistic medium, including
painting, book illustrations, stained glass, stage
sets, ceramic, tapestries and fine art prints. He
gained success in combining key elements of
Exercise A fauvism, symbolism and cubism. Some of his
masterpieces include Paris Through the Window,
• This activity tests how much students know about The Fiddler and I and the Village.
famous people in the world of art, literature and
Boris Akunin is the pen name of Grigory
entertainment.
Shalvovich Chkhartishvili, a Russian writer of
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
Georgian origin. He is best known as a writer
minutes to answer the questions about the people in
of detective and historical fiction, but he's also
the pictures.
an essayist and literary translator. Grigory
• Elicit feedback. Chkhartishvili has also written under pen names
Anatoly Brusnikin, Anna Borisova and Akunin-
Answers / Cultural notes Chkhartishvili. Under the pseudonym Boris
Walter Disney, a prominent figure within the Akunin, he has written many works of fiction,
American animation industry and throughout the mainly novels and stories in the series The
world, is regarded as a cultural icon, known for Adventures of Erast Fandorin, The Adventures of
his influence and contributions to entertainment Sister Pelagia, The Adventures of the Master.
during the 20th century. He and his brother Roy Uma2rman is a Moscow-based alternative rock
O. Disney co-founded The Walt Disney Company. band made up of the two brothers Sergei

68
6
and Vladimir Kristovski. They have been active
Words in context
since 2003, releasing their first album V Gorode Exercise E
N in 2004. On this album, the track Nochnoi • Tell students this is a similar sort of task to what they
Dozor featured as the theme tune to the original have done in previous units.
Russian cut of the film Night Watch.
• Give students a few minutes to match the words/
phrases in bold in the text with their definitions.
• Elicit answers.

Reading Answers
Exercise B 1 take a sinister turn 4 delightful
2 gripping 5 illustrations
• Ask students to look quickly at the texts. Ask them if
3 debut 6 authors
they can guess where the texts would be found (on
the back cover of books).
• Give students two minutes to read the book blurbs Quick chat
quickly and silently to find out what type of books they
are. • This activity gives students the chance to
personalize using the content of the Reading text.
• Elicit answers. Check students understand the other
• Ask the students to discuss the questions in pairs
types of books listed.
first.
• Elicit answers from the class.
Answers
1 children’s literature
For extra reading practice, refer students
2 horror
to pages 40 and 41 in the Workbook.
3 children’s picture book
4 science
5 mystery
Grammar 1 Page 72

Exercise C Aim of the lesson:


• Ask students to skim the text to match the book blurbs • to revise reported speech
and the headings. Remind students that there is one
extra heading they do not need to use.
• Check answers as a class. reported speech
• To test students’ knowledge of reported speech,
give them a minute to complete the table. They
Answers will probably have no problem doing this.
1E 2D 3F 4A 5C • Elicit answers and ask students to tell you how
the tenses change.
• To recap, read through the relevant section on
Exercise D page 172 in the Grammar reference.

• Tell students they do not need to read the text in


Answers
detail to do this task. They will need to scan it quickly
to find the information. My kids are reading
(that) he hadn’t read
• Give students enough time to read each question
and think carefully about the type of information they The tense changes from present for direct
need to find. Then students scan the text and go speech to past for reported speech.
straight to the information they need.
• Elicit answers.
Exercise A
• This exercise checks that students have understood
Answers the tense change rules.
1A 2C 3C 4A 5D 6A 7C 8B • Give students a few minutes to choose the correct
option before checking answers.

69
Answers 2
Reporter: How was the audience yesterday, Tim?
1 was writing 7 would pick Tim: They were fantastic.
T
2 had been 8 was painting
3 we had 9 couldn't read 3
4 would be 10 had eaten Reporter: Will you have any new records for us
5 if James liked 11 had been driving tthis year, Tim?
6 was going Tim: Yes, in fact we’re recording a new album at
T
tthe moment.
4
Exercise B Reporter: And are you pleased with it, Anne?
• This exercise requires students to work backwards, A
Anne: Yes. I think it will be our best album ever!
from reported speech to direct speech. 5
• To check students understand what they need to do, Reporter: Anne, I’ve heard you have some bad
do the first item as a class. n
news for us.
• Give students a couple of minutes to do the rest of A
Anne: Yes, I’m afraid so. I’m going to leave the
the exercise before checking answers. b
band next year.

Answers Exercise D
1 ‘You’ve broken my CD!’ said John. • This activity practises reporting questions.
2 ‘I saw the /this movie two years ago.’ said Anne. • To check students understand what they need to do,
3 ‘Do you like my new book?’ she asked. do the first item as a class.
4 ‘What did you see at the theatre last night?’ • Give students a few minutes to do the rest of
asked Mum. the exercise.
• Ask students to compare their answers in pairs. Then
check answers.
18 Exercise C
• Explain that students will be listening to an interview
with two singers in a band and that they will need to Answers
report what the singers say. 1 They asked her what she did in her free time.
• Play the first extract and pause for students to report 2 They asked her if she ever watched her own
what they hear. movies.
• Play the extract again for students to check. 3 They asked her who her favourite actor was.
• Follow the same procedure for each extract of 4 They asked her if Mavis was her real name.
the interview. 5 They asked her where she had gone on
holiday the previous summer/last summer.
• Check answers.
6 They asked her if she liked London.

Answers
1 Tim said they’d never played in Japan before.
Extra activity
2 Tim said the audience had been fantastic.
3 Tim said they were recording a new album at If time allows in the lesson, do a roleplay activity.
the moment. Ask students to work in pairs. One of them should
4 Anne said she thought it would be their best be the journalist and the other a famous actor
album ever. (ask students to pick one). The journalist should
5 Anne said she was going to leave the band ask the celebrity the questions in Exercise D
the following year. and the celebrity should answer them. Tell the
journalist to keep notes of the answers (brief
ones). When students have finished, they should
swap roles. At the end, or for homework if time is
Audioscript
A d short, ask students to write a short report of what
their partner answered. Eg Julia Roberts said she
18 Exercise C exercised in her free time. She said she never
1 watched her own movies., etc.
Reporter: So, Tim, welcome to Japan.
Tim: Thanks. We’ve never played here before.
T For extra practice, refer students to
page 42 in the Workbook.

70
6
Vocabulary Page 73 Answers
1 cast
Aims of the lesson: 2 part/role; costume
3 location
to present and practise:
4 plot/story
• vocabulary relating to entertainment
5 author/writer
• phrasal verbs with out
6 rehearsal

Exercise A Exercise D
• Ask students to work in pairs. They will know some
• Ask students to read the first paragraph of the text to
of these words, but make a dictionary available to
find out what it is about.
help students if necessary.
• Ask them if they have ever heard of the Razzies.
• Give students a few minutes to sort the words into
the two groups. • Give them a few minutes to read the text carefully
and to complete it with words from the box.
• Elicit answers.
• Ask students to compare their answers in pairs. Then
check answers as a class.
Answers
At the concert hall: audience, choir, composer, Answers
conductor, keyboards
At the art gallery: exhibition, landscape, 1 awards
portrait, sculptor, sculpture 2 performances
3 Actor
4 comedies
Exercise B 5 Director
6 criticized
• Again, students will know some of these words. 7 Actress
• Ask students to work in pairs. Make dictionaries 8 dramatic
available for help if needed, to help students decide
which word is the odd one out. Tell them it may relate
to meaning or it may relate to the grammar of the
word.
Quick chat
• Elicit answers. Ask students to justify their choices. • This activity gives students the chance to
personalize using the content of the text in
Exercise D.
Answers • Ask the students to decide who they would
1 credits – a list of the people involved in award Razzies to. Tell them it could be for a
making a movie or television show that is film they have seen recently, which wasn’t very
shown at the end or beginning (The other two good. Give students a few minutes to do this.
refer to the actors.) • Elicit opinions.
2 make-up – the other two are items of clothing
3 practice – a noun (The other two are verbs.)
4 composer – writes music (The other two write Exercise E
literature or books.)
• Give students a minute to work in pairs and match
5 practise – a verb (The other two are nouns.)
the phrasal verbs with their definitions. They will
6 set – refers to the place where a film or show
probably not be able to match all of them accurately.
is shot (The other two relate to the story.)
7 stage – a place (The other two are synonyms • Elicit answers. Provide the ones students do not get.
meaning character.)
8 cast – the actors in a film or play (The other Answers
two are synonyms meaning the place where a
1h 2d 3c 4a 5f 6g 7e 8b
film is shot.)

Exercise F
Exercise C • Give students a few minutes to complete the
• Give students a couple of minutes to complete the sentences with a phrasal verb from Exercise E.
sentences before checking answers. • Check answers.

71
19 Exercise B
Answers
• Read through the rubric together. Check students
1 brought out understand what they need to do.
2 turned out
• Play the interview.
3 speak out
4 carry out • Elicit answers.
5 going out
6 sold out
7 Sort out Answers
8 Look out Cathy Wilkes B
Tracey Emin E
Martin Creed A, F
Martin Boyce D
Extra activity
Mark Wallinger C
If time allows in the lesson, ask students to
work in pairs and to talk about a film they have
recently seen. Encourage them to use the words
from page 73 to talk about it. To make this clear, Exercise C
tell the class about a film you have seen recently. • Read the Steps to success box together.
When they have finished, ask some students to • In pairs, students read the questions and discuss
tell the class about the film they talked about. possible answers. They might be able to remember
Here are some ideas for you to put on the board what was said, but if they don’t, ask them to guess.
for students to use: Give them a few minutes to do this.
What is the name of the film?
• Elicit guesses. Again, don’t confirm or negate any of
Who played in it?
them, as this will spoil the Listening task that follows.
Who directed it?
What was it about?
What did you like/not like about it? 19 Exercise D
• Tell students that these are the possible answers to
the questions in Exercise C.
For extra practice, refer students to page 43
• Give students a minute to read through the answer
in the Workbook.
options. Ask them to choose the answer they think
might be correct for each question in Exercise C.
• Play the interview for students to check their answers.
Listening Page 74 • Elicit answers. Play the interview a third time if
necessary.

Aims of the lesson:


• to encourage prediction from pictures Answers
(Exercise A) 1B 2C 3C 4B 5A 6C 7B
• to listen for gist (Exercise B)
• to learn to deal with multiple choice questions
(Exercise C)
• to listen for detail (Exercise D) Quick chat
• to talk about students’ own reactions to the • This activity gives students the chance to
information in the listening text (Quick chat) personalize using the content of the Listening
text.
• Give students a couple of minutes to discuss
Exercise A the questions in pairs first.
• Tell students that all of the things/people in the • Elicit answers from different students.
pictures are mentioned in the Listening text they are Encourage a class discussion.
going to hear.
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a minute
to come up with what the connection between them
might be. For extra listening practice, refer students
• Elicit guesses. Don’t confirm or negate any of them, to page 45 of the Workbook, CD: folder
as this will spoil the Listening task that follows. 'Workbook', track 7.

72
6
Audioscript Going On and Off by Martin Creed. It was simply
a room with some lights which … er … went on
19 Exercises B & D and off!
Dave: Now, what is a work of art? A painting Dave: Right … And that won the prize?
of a portrait or a landscape would be, certainly, Mike Combes: Absolutely. Creed won 20,000
but what about the unmade bed that you got pounds (4) and was given the award by pop
out of this morning? Is that art? Or, how about a superstar Madonna.
dirty breakfast bowl? Is that a piece of art? Well, Dave: Amazing!
apparently it is. And it could even be worth 25,000 Mike Combes: Yes, so you see the prize is quite
pounds if it wins the Turner Prize for modern art an event. To be fair, though, some of the entries
next month. To explain, I have with me in the studio are quite remarkable. In 2011, the winning
Mike Combes, art critic of the Daily Bugle. So, installation was a recreation of a park by artist
Mike, just what is the Turner Prize, and is a dirty Martin Boyce called Do words have voices.
plate really art? Dave: Hmm, you mean he built a model of a park
Mike Combes: Good afternoon, Dave. Well, the in the gallery?
Turner Prize has been given every year since 1984 Mike Combes: Well, sort of. If you were to view
to British artists under the age of 50. It’s the most it, you wouldn't necessarily think it were a park.
famous modern art prize in Britain, and certainly The installation was spread across several
the one that people argue about the most. rooms, and the artist tried to show the sad nature
Dave: Arguing about art! But why? of a city park in autumn. There were metallic
Mike Combes: Well, the pieces of art in the tree-shaped objects hanging from the ceiling in
competition are usually very controversial, Dave. one room, and another room had plastic bags
(1) In fact, many people don’t think that these scattered about. There was graffiti on the walls as
pieces are art at all. well.
Dave: Like the empty breakfast bowl, for example. Dave: I see. So it represented a park that's not
Mike Combes: Exactly! And yes, it’s true that one very well taken care of?
year an entry for the prize included an unwashed Mike Combes: In a way, yes, but there were
breakfast bowl. It was part of a piece by a Scottish some lovely aspects. There were fallen leaves on
artist called Cathy Wilkes. The same piece also the floor in places, you could view scenes from
included a bit of salad, a supermarket checkout till different perspectives by looking through painted
and a toilet seat. glass, and the entire installation was beautifully
Dave: A toilet seat? And do all those things arranged. The centerpiece in one room was a
together make a piece of art, Mike? I mean, really rubbish bin – a rather stylish one, I should add.
… come on! (2) (5) But I think his intention was to show the true
Mike Combes: Well, Cathy Wilkes thinks they nature of an urban park.
do … , but not everyone agrees! And that’s why Dave: Interesting! So, Mike, have you got a
people argue so much about the Turner Prize. You favourite Turner Prize winner?
see, as you mentioned earlier, Dave, the prize is Mike Combes: Well, that’s a difficult question,
worth a lot of money and, well, many people think Dave, because there have been so many good
it’s just money for rubbish. ones over the years. I don’t think I can choose a
Dave: I see. And can you give us any other favourite. (6) But one I liked very, very much was
examples of past entries for the prize? Entries that the 2006 winner. That was a video called Sleeper
have caused trouble, I mean. and it was made by the artist Mark Wallinger and
Mike Combes: Sure … well, actually they all seem I liked it because it was so funny. (7)
to cause trouble. One of the most famous was a Dave: A video?
piece you mentioned earlier, actually. Mike Combes: Yes, there are usually a few
Dave: Oh, the unmade bed? videos every year in the competition. Anyway, in
Mike Combes: That’s right. That was a piece Sleeper, the artist dresses up as a bear …
called My Bed and it was by the English artist Dave: A bear … you mean, the animal?
Tracey Emin. She entered that for the 1999 prize. Mike Combes: That’s right. He just wears this
Dave: And was that it? Just a bed with a bear costume and he simply wanders around an
few blankets? empty museum at night dressed up as a bear.
Mike Combes: Er, yes, more or less. But you’ll be Dave: But is that really art, Mike?
pleased to hear that it didn’t win! Mike Combes: Well, I don’t know, Dave, but
Dave: Oh dear, what a shame! (3) it won one of the most famous art prizes in the
Mike Combes: But in 2001 something even better world, so I guess some people think it is!
did win. This was a piece called The Lights Dave: Mike Combes, many thanks.

73
Speaking Page 75 Answers
Polite questions
Aims of the lesson: I was wondering if …
• to introduce the roleplay task Could you tell me … ?
(Exercises A & B) Would you mind telling me … ?
• to listen to a model speaking task for gist Do you happen to know … ?
(Exercise C) Polite ways to say yes
• to present ways of politely asking questions and Of course.
saying yes or no (Exercise D) Absolutely.
• to do a roleplay speaking task (Exercise E) Certainly.
• to make students aware of the sounds [ ], Polite ways to say no
[ ], [ ] and [ ] (Say it right!) I’m afraid not.
Unfortunately, …

Exercise A
• Tell students that the cards they are going to read Audioscript
show information needed to do a roleplay activity.
• Give students two minutes to read the cards and find 20 Exercises C & D
out what the roleplay is about. A (journalist): Hello. I’m a journalist for the English
• Elicit the answer. magazine Celebrity World and I’d like to interview
one of your stars. I was wondering if you could give
me some information.
Answer
B (manager): Certainly. What would you like to
It is a roleplay between a journalist and a know?
manager to arrange an interview with a star. A: Could you tell me how much time your stars
have for an interview at the moment?
B: Absolutely. Mr Warren can give you ten minutes
Exercise B and Miss Tears can do a half-hour interview.
• Ask students to discuss who they would interview if A: I see. Can Mr Warren come to London?
they were the journalist and to say why. B: I’m afraid not. He only gives interviews over
• Elicit feedback from different students to find out the phone. But I know that Miss Tears will be in
which star is the most popular. London next week.
A: Oh, good. Does she have any special news to
20 Exercise C tell me?
• Tell students they will be listening to two students B: She does. She’s getting married to a very
acting out the roleplay. Tell them to listen to find famous film star.
out which star Student A, who plays the journalist, A: Oh, wonderful! That would be a good story for
chooses. the magazine. Could you tell me how much she
• Play the extract. charges for interviews?
B: Of course, she charges $1,500.
• Elicit the answer. Ask them if they agree with the
A: I see. Would you mind telling me what
decision.
Mr Warren charges?
B: Yes, Mr Warren charges $1,000 per interview.
Answer A: Right. And does Mr Warren have any special
Student A chooses Miss Tears. news at the moment?
B: Yes, he’s going to star in a new thriller next
year.
20 Exercise D A: Really? Do you happen to know what it’s
called?
• Tell students that during their conversation Student A
B: Unfortunately, I can’t tell you that yet.
asks her questions politely and that Student B
A: I see. Well, thank you very much for the
answers politely.
information. I think I’d like to speak to Miss Tears.
• Refer students to the Language chunks box and give Although her interview time is expensive, it’s very
them a minute to read through the expressions. convenient that she’s going to be in London next
• Play the extract again. Students listen and choose week. Also, I think our readers will be very
the expressions they hear. interested in the news of her marriage.
• Check answers.

74
6
Exercise E
• Read the Helpful hints box together. Highlight the
reporting verbs
fact that though using indirect questions is a good
• The reporting verbs say and tell are not new to
way to be polite, it isn’t necessary to make every
students, but they are commonly misused.
question an indirect one.
• Tell students they will now be taking part in a roleplay. • Write the following incorrect sentences on the
Students should be fairly clear about what they have board and ask students to say what’s wrong
to do, as it is a similar sort of roleplay to the one they with them:
heard on the CD. Mandy told that my dress suited me.
• Put students in pairs and give each individual the Tim said me to meet him in the park.
role of Student A or Student B. • Elicit correct versions from students (Mandy said
• Give students a few minutes to read and prepare that my dress suited me. Tim told me to meet
their role. him in the park.). Make it clear that the difference
• Give students five minutes to conduct their roleplay. between these two verbs is the grammar of how
Remind them to use the polite questions and they’re used.
ways of politely saying yes and no shown in the • To recap, read through the relevant section on
Language chunks box. Also, remind them not to page 173 in the Grammar reference. Read through
overdo the indirect questions. the information on other reporting verbs too.
• When they have finished, asked them to swap roles,
and do the roleplay again.
• Elicit feedback about which entertainer they all ended Exercise A
up choosing. • Give students a couple of minutes to read the
sentences and to choose the correct option.
• Check answers.
Say it right!
Exercise F Answers
• The sounds focused on in this activity are commonly 1 told 4 told
mispronounced by students. 2 asked 5 said
• Give students a couple of minutes to put the words 3 said 6 asked
in the correct column according to the underlined
sound.
Exercise B
21 Exercise G • Ask students to predict from the title what they think
• Play the CD for students to listen and check their the news story is about.
answers to Exercise F. • Give students a minute to read the news story, ignoring
• Play the CD again for students to listen and repeat. the gaps for now, to find out why the artist was sent
to prison.
• Elicit the answer.
Answers (and Audioscript)
1 cage, badge, June
2 church, match, tune Answer
3 station, bush, she
He was sent to prison for forging artwork.
4 face, bus, see

Exercise C
• This activity focuses on the meaning of various
Grammar 2 Page 76 reporting verbs.
• Give students a few minutes to read the text more
carefully and to complete it with reporting verbs from
Aim of the lesson: the box.
• to revise and practise reporting verbs • Ask students to compare answers in pairs.
• Elicit answers.

75
Exercise E
Answers • This activity focuses on form and meaning.
1 denied 5 told • Explain that first students will need to match each
2 said 6 claimed statement with a reporting verb.
3 added 7 asked • Elicit answers.
4 admitted 8 warned
• Give students a few minutes to report what the
people have said. Tell them that they will not always
need to report everything as the verbs themselves
Quick chat carry a lot of meaning. Do the first one together.
• This activity gives students the chance to • Elicit answers.
personalize using the content of the news story
in Exercise C. Answers
• Give students a couple of minutes to discuss the 1 Alex admitted (that) he had never read a book
questions in pairs first. in his life.
• Elicit answers from different students. Encourage 2 Karen complained (that) there was nothing
a class discussion. good on TV.
3 Mike suggested (that) we went to the theatre
for a change.
22 Exercise D 4 George promised he’d get tickets for the show.
• This activity also focuses on the meaning of various 5 Mandy warned us not to go to see the new
reporting verbs. James Bond film.
• Explain that students have to listen to a number 6 Angela invited me to go to the exhibition with her.
of extracts and to decide what the meaning of the
statements are, choosing from the reporting verbs in
For extra practice, refer students to
the list.
page 44 in the Workbook.
• Play each extract and elicit answers after each.

Answers
a1 b5 c6 d4 e3 f2 g7 h8
Practise your English Page 77

Aim of the lesson:


Audioscript • to practise the grammar and vocabulary from
the unit in an integrated way
22 Exercise D
1 Exercise A
Boy: OK, it was me. I broke it.
• Tell students that they will be reading a review.
2 • Ask students to read the text quickly, ignoring the
Girl: Don’t worry; I’ll do it for you. Honestly. gaps for now, to find the answers to the questions.
3 Give them two minutes for this.
Boy: No, it wasn’t me. I didn’t break it. • Elicit answers.
4
Man: This play was so awful I want my money back.
Answers
5
A play is being reviewed.
Woman: Why don’t you start learning a musical
instrument? Graham Swanky is an actor, Neil Dibble is an
actor and singer and Miriam Figg is a director.
6
Girl: Oh, please come to the ballet with me. The critic liked the play. He was impressed.
7
Boy: No! I’m not going with you to the ballet. Not Exercise B
for anything!
• Give students five minutes to read the text more
8 carefully and to complete the gaps with the correct
Man: If you don’t give me my money, I’ll go to the
form of the words in capitals.
police!
• Check answers.

76
6
Answers
Exercise A
• Give students a few minutes to come up with a story
1 rehearsals
that connects the pictures.
2 unimpressed
3 delightful • Elicit ideas.
4 musical
5 composer
Exercise B
6 director • Tell students that the story they are about to read is
based on these pictures.
• Give students a couple of minutes to read the story
Your voice to see if it is similar to theirs.
• Elicit feedback.
• Ask students to prepare a 2-minute talk on their
favourite film according to the given plan. Exercise C
• Allow a few students to give their talk in front of • Tell students that a good story needs to contain a
the whole class. Encourage a class discussion. variety of past tenses.
• Give students a couple of minutes to reread the story
Exercise C to find examples of these tenses in the story.
• Elicit the instructions for this activity from the • Elicit feedback.
students.
• Give students five minutes to do the activity on their Suggested answers
own before checking answers. 1 I was only ten … / She looked at me.
2 I was sitting by the Christmas tree …
Answers 3 My brothers had opened their presents …
4 I used to put everything in my mouth.
1 has brought out
2 me if I had
3 you sort out these books
4 you mind telling me
5 dramatic and Skills development: Organization
6 she had been reading
7 two rehearsals Exercise D
8 warned me not to touch • Explain that these are the stages of a good story.
Give students a few minutes to look back at the story
and match each paragraph with a stage.
Exercise D • Elicit answers.
• Give students a couple of minutes to do the activity
on their own before checking answers.
Answers
1E 2A 3D 4C 5B
Answers
1B 2A 3B 4D 5A 6A
Exercise E
• Explain that the time phrases in the Language chunks
box are missing from the story. By inserting them, it
Writing Pages 78 and 79 makes the story more interesting and will sequence
events and make the story easier to follow.
• Give students a couple of minutes to reread the story
Aims of the lesson: and to complete it.
• to warm students up and introduce them to • Elicit answers.
story telling (Exercises A & B)
• to analyze a model story for narrative tenses
(Exercise C) Answers
• to analyze a model story for organization and 1 a long time ago
other features of good stories (Exercises D, 2 earlier
E & F) 3 A moment later / In an instant
• to practise planning and writing a story 4 A moment later / In an instant
(Exercises G & H) 5 Just then

77
Exercise F Exercise H
• Read the Helpful hints box together. • Give students a couple of minutes to complete the
• Explain that the techniques below are ways to make Planner.
stories more enjoyable to read.
• When writing their stories, remind students to use
• Give students a couple of minutes to reread the story
some of the time phrases from the Language chunks
and to find an example of each technique.
box and some of the techniques in Exercise F.
• Elicit answers.
• Read through the Quick check! box and tell students
to use this as a checklist before they hand in their
Answers stories.
1 ‘Mum, Fiona’s eaten a light bulb!’ • For advice on how to write a story, refer students to
2 What was I doing? Well, … page 187 in the Writing database.
3 At that age, you see, I used to put everything
• If time allows, ask students to write, or begin to write,
in my mouth. Mum rushed in.
4 Not one … two! their stories in class.
5 Unfortunately, nobody noticed what I was
doing! For extra writing practice, refer students to
page 45 in the Workbook.

Teacher's resource file:


Planning and writing – Progress test (page 172)
Exercise G – Communication and writing (page 184)
– Fun and games (page 196)
• Tell students that they will be writing a story
– Self-assessment checklist (page 208)
connecting the pictures.
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few Editable tests CD:
minutes to come up with a story that connects the
pictures. – Unit 6 test
• Elicit ideas. – Midterm test

78
Learn about history of art Units 5 and 6

History of Russian art


Project
Pages 80 and 81 Assign the project for homework. Remind students
to use some of the words you have written on the
Aims of the lesson: board in their biographies where appropriate and
• to motivate students to learn about different art also to include some pictures. Make a display of
movements through English students' works and have one or two students
• to read for gist (Exercise С) read their projects aloud during the next class.
• to read for specific information (Exercise B)
• to practice writing a short biography (Project)

Exercise A
• Ask students to give you three names of Russian
artists. Ask if they know what art movements they
belong to. Direct them to the box in Exercise B if they
need help.
Exercise B
• Ask students to think of a picture they like and attribute
it to an art movement using words in the box. Write
students' responses on the board.
• Ask students if they can think of any other ways to
describe a picture's appearance and mood. Write
their responses on the board, too.
Exercise С
• Give students one or two minutes to read the texts.
• Discuss the task question as a class.

Answers
Andrei Rublev – iconography
Mikhail Larionov and Natalia Goncharova –
avant-garde
Vassily Tropinin – Classicism
Mihail Chemyakin – Nonconformist Art

Exercise D
• Give students a minute to scan the texts quickly and
silently in order to answer the questions.
• Check answers as a class.

Answers
1 details about his birthplace and early life
2 peaceful and absent of material wealth
3 Picasso, Van Gogh and Matisse
4 They both liked to push boundaries.
5 in secret and without being officially enrolled in
school
6 His owner discovered his talent.
7 for staging a controversial exhibition
8 His work was ultimately accepted after being
rejected for years.

79
Culture today … Units 5 and 6

The Man Booker Prize for Answers


Fiction 1 fiction novels
2 recognition
3 selecting judges
Pages 82 and 83 4 They can now be from any country.
5 They have felt their books were overlooked for
being in the wrong style.
Aims of the lesson: 6 They haven’t diminished its reputation.
• to motivate students to learn about books
through English
• to read for gist (Exercises A & B) Exercise E
• to read for specific information
• Give students one minute to complete the task. You
(Exercises C & D)
might want to allow them to use the dictionary at the
• to practice key vocabulary (Exercise E) back of their Student’s Books to help them with some
• to give students an opportunity to discuss what of the words.
they've learned and how it relates to their own
• Elicit answers.
personal experiences through discussion
(Your voice)
Answers
Exercise A 1 esteemed
• Ask students to read the introduction. Ask them what 2 diminish
sorts of things would be discussed during the event 3 literary
described in the introduction. 4 panel
• After they finish, ask students about different aspects 5 prestigious
of a book. Elicit responses about plot, characters, the 6 overlook
story's climax, etc.
• Ask students if there are any other words they can
think of that can be used to describe a book, i.e. Your voice Exercise F
thrilling, suspenseful, etc.
• Ask students to answer the question in the introduction • Ask students to form pairs.
task. • Ask them to use the questions in the discussion to
talk about their own ideas and personal experiences.
Exercise B
• Ask students to skim the text and answer the task
question. Aim to elicit different opinions from students.

Exercise C
• Ask students to read the text quickly again and to
place the sentence parts in the gaps.
• Check answers as a class. Ask students to explain
their answers.

Answers
A3 B1 C5 D2 E4

Exercise D
• Give students one minute to scan the texts quickly
and silently in order to answer the questions.
• Check answers as a class.

80
Progress check 3
3 (that) it had been the scariest film she’d ever seen
Pages 84 and 85 4 what films he liked
5 if/whether I had enjoyed the book
Exercise A 6 if/whether I’d ever been to Budapest
1 cathedrals
2 archeological site Exercise G
3 monument 1 I’m going to
4 palace 2 is about to
5 museum 3 know where you’re
4 if/whether I’d ever
Exercise B 5 warned my brother not
1 b 6 told me she’d
2 a 7 suggested (that) we took
3 d 8 denied stealing her
4 a 9 invited me to go with
5 b 10 admitted taking / (that) she had taken
6 a
Ask students to complete 5–6 Review on
Exercise C pages 46 and 47 of the Workbook.
1 are you
2 wasn’t he
3 have they
4 hasn’t she
5 will there
6 didn’t you
7 doesn't she
8 is it
9 isn’t it
10 could you

Exercise D
1 ’ll call; get
2 won’t start; gets
3 are you doing
4 ’ll be flying
5 ’ll have finished
6 is going to travel
7 won’t do
8 ’ll take

Exercise E
1 B
2 C
3 A
4 D
5 A
6 C
7 D
8 A
9 B
10 A
11 A
12 C

Exercise F
1 (that) she had really enjoyed the exhibition
2 if she’d see any stars there that night

81
7 Turn on, tune in
Theme Skills aims
The media and communications Reading
Students read a long text:
Language aims • for gist and details
Grammar • to understand implied information
Passive voice
Listening
Causative form
Students listen to short extracts for:
Vocabulary • gist
Media and communications • specific information
see, watch, look, listen, hear
Speaking
Students talk about pictures to:
• practise communication strategies
Writing
Students write a film review and practise:
• creating content
• organization
• language for reviews

Reading Pages 86 and 87 Answers


Connecting to the Internet: WWW; Wi-Fi;
Aims of the lesson: (indirectly) Blue Tooth
Contacting friends: Facebook; iPhone
• to warm students up and introduce them to the Finding information: Google
theme of the unit (Exercise A) Following the news: CNN; BBC
• to read for gist (Exercise B) Listening to music: iPod
• to practise detailed reading and understand Sharing photos: Flikr
implied meaning (Exercise C) Watching a film: You Tube; BBC
• to guess the meaning of unknown words from Watching a music video: MTV; You Tube
the context (Exercise D)
• to talk about the ideas in the text (Quick chat)
Reading
Exercise B
• Tell students that to do this task they will need to
read each paragraph for gist.
Background information
• Give students five minutes to read the text quickly
iPhone and iPod are both electronic devices and silently and to find the five paragraphs that
produced by Apple. The first is a phone with many match the four headings (one heading is used twice).
capabilities and the second is an MP3 player.
• Elicit answers.
Wi-Fi allows electronic devices (PC, mobile phone,
etc) to connect to the Internet in a wire free way. Answers
Blue Tooth allows electronic devices within a close Facts and figures: D
range to link up in a wireless way. Eg a mobile Finding fame: G
phone and a hands-free headset. What is YouTube?: B
What’s there?: C and E
Exercise A
• This activity tests how much students know about Exercise C
popular modern ways of communicating. • Read through the Steps to success box together as a
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few class. Tell students that some of the questions in this
minutes to match the letters and words with the uses. exercise are designed to check students understand
• Elicit feedback. implied information.

82
7
• Tell students that for multiple choice questions, they
need to scan the text to find where the information Grammar 1 Page 88
they need is located. They should then read the
relevant section in detail.
• Refer students to the advice regarding multiple choice Aim of the lesson:
questions in the Steps to success box on page 18. • to revise the passive voice
• Give students ten minutes to answer the questions.
• Elicit answers.

Answers passive voice


1C 2B 3B 4B 5D 6C 7A 8C • Students should be familiar with the passive
voice by now. However, to remind students of
the forms read through the relevant section on
Words in context page 173 in the Grammar reference, then ask
them to do the task.
Exercise D • Give students five minutes to skim the Reading
• Tell students that this is a similar sort of task to what text on pages 86 and 87 to find one example of
they have done in previous units. each type of passive construction.
• Give students a few minutes to match the words/ • Elicit answers and write them on the board.
phrases in bold in the text with their definitions. • Ask students whether they think the extract can
• Elicit answers. go into passive voice. (It cannot because the
verb is intransitive and the passive voice can
Answers only be formed with transitive verbs or verbs
1 revolution that take an object.)
2 stardom
3 any number of Answers
4 amateur 1 it’s all done by … ; Videos are uploaded …
5 subscribers 2 … fame and stardom are being changed …
6 clips 3 … soap opera series have been written …
7 downloaded 4 … more videos will be uploaded, …
8 hilarious 5 … can be viewed …

Exercise E
• Tell students that the text contains more words Exercise A
connected with the media and communications.
Give students a few minutes to scan the text once • The pairs of sentences in this exercise contain
more for these words. constructions that are often confused with the
passive.
Suggested answers • Give students a few minutes to read them and to
choose the ones that contain a passive construction.
website, the net, uploaded, internet access,
TV, broadcast, channels, soap opera series,
filmed, animations, documentaries, journalists, Answers
movies, (pop) videos, audiences, radio
1 a (had been written)
2 a and b
Quick chat 3 a (have been downloaded)
• This activity gives students the chance to 4 b (have been broadcast)
personalize using the content of the Reading 5 a (have been improved)
text. 6 a (It is believed)
• Ask students to discuss the questions in pairs
first.
• Elicit answers from the class.
Exercise B
• Explain the task by doing the first item together.
For extra reading practice, refer students • Give students a couple of minutes to do the rest of
to pages 48 and 49 in the Workbook. the exercise before checking answers.

83
Exercise A
Answers
• Before you check which words students know, ask
1 I was told this very strange story (by Robert). them first to do the task in pairs.
2 Millions of computers may be infected by
• Elicit answers. Ask students to justify their choices
the virus.
and check they know what the words mean.
3 New subscribers are going to be sent an email.
4 (The sentence cannot be changed because the Answers
verb work is intransitive. See the note on
page 173.) documentary – because this is usually seen on
5 I had been offered a job as a foreign TV or at the cinema, whereas articles and reports
correspondent. usually appear in newspapers
6 It is thought that mobile phones are bad for subscribers – used for print media, the other two
your health. / Mobile phones are thought to be for TV
bad for your health. watch – used for TV, the other two for the
Internet
articles – refers to the whole text
Exercise C
text – refers to the written word, the other two
• Explain that students will need to change most of the
both mean pictures
sentences in this text into the passive, but some of
them should not change. Tell them that the text is a editor – the other two both report news
process of how something works and that processes
often contain passive constructions. Exercise B
• Do the first three or four sentences together.
• This exercise offers practice of the words in
• Give students ten minutes to do the rest.
Exercise A.
• Ask students to compare their rewritten texts in pairs.
• Give students a few minutes to complete the
• Elicit the answer. sentences.
• Elicit answers.
Answers
My friend was sent a text message a few minutes Answers
ago. How did she receive it so quickly? The 1 documentary
service works like this: The country is divided into 2 surf
areas called cells. Each cell is served by a relay 3 articles
tower. Messages are constantly being received 4 text
and sent by these towers. Once the ‘send’ button 5 subscribers
has been pressed, the message is sent to the 6 editor
nearest relay tower. The message is transmitted 7 headlines
to the nearest switching centre. The switching 8 audience
centre checks where it will send the message.
Up in space, a satellite is waiting to relay 23 Exercise C
messages. Messages are being sent all the time.
When my friend’s message has been sent to the • This exercise checks that students know the different
satellite, it is beamed to her. types of television and radio programmes.
• Tell students they will be listening to a number of
short extracts from different television and radio
For extra practice, refer students to programmes.
page 50 in the Workbook. • Ask them to listen to each extract and decide what
kind of programme it is.
• Play the CD.
• Elicit answers.
Vocabulary Page 89
Answers
1 documentary
Aims of the lesson: 2 game show
to present and practise: 3 soap opera
• vocabulary relating to media and 4 reality show
communications 5 sitcom
• see, watch, look, listen, hear 6 chat show

84
7
Exercise E
Audioscript • Students will know some of these expressions and
will be able to guess the meaning of others, so don’t
23 Exercise C explain them until they have tried the task first.
1 • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them five
minutes to try to explain the difference between the
Presenter: This film reveals to the world for the
expressions.
first time the mysteries of the Siberian tiger – one
• Elicit answers. Ask students to justify their choices.
of the world’s most endangered animals.
2
Game show host: And now we move on to our Answers
next round, in which each contestant has ten 1 Keep in touch, which means to still see a
seconds to answer as many questions as friend, is the opposite of lose touch.
possible, and we start with you Jane … Jane, in 2 If you make a call, you phone someone. If you
which film did Sean … take a call, you receive it.
3 3 These are opposites. Download means
Tom: Alison, I … I have something dreadful to tell transferring from the Internet onto your
you. computer and uploading is the other way
Alison: What? What is it, Tom? Tell me. around.
4 If you are surfing the net, you are browsing. If
Tom: Alison, I … I’ve been … Oh, it’s so difficult to
you search it, you know exactly what it is you
find the right words.
are looking for.
4 5 An example can make this distinction clear.
Presenter: It’s now day three, and tempers are Google is a search engine. Facebook is a
beginning to get short in the celebrity house. social networking site.
In particular, Jason seems to have run out of 6 Glancing at the headlines means reading
patience with Angelina’s arrogant behaviour. them. Hitting the headlines means something
has become a news story.
5
Woman: Why don’t you try turning it the other
way? Exercise F
Man: OK, hang on … Oh, no! It’s come off!
• This exercise checks that students understand the
6 expressions in Exercise E.
Chat show host: And my next guest tonight • Give students a few minutes to correct the mistakes
really needs no introduction. He’s been one of before checking answers.
Hollywood’s top stars now for the last 15 years,
winner of no less than three Academy Awards and
star of the latest James Bond movie. Ladies and Answers
gentlemen, please welcome Mr Tom … 1 lose touch keep in touch
2 upload download
3 take make
Exercise D 4 ✔
5 search engines social networking sites
• This exercise introduces students to the different
6 glance at hit
jobs in the media.
• Ask students to match the words to make jobs, and
then compare their answers in pairs. Exercise G
• Check answers. • These words are commonly confused by students.
• Ask students to work in pairs to play a guessing • Give students a few minutes to circle the correct
game. One student describes a job and their partner option. Then elicit answers.
tries to guess it. To demonstrate the task, describe a
job and have your students guess.
Answers
1 hear 5 listens to
2 Look 6 watching
Answers 3 seen 7 seen
1e 2f 3b 4a 5d 6c 4 see

85
• Tell them they should match the forms of media in
Your voice the pictures with a speaker, but that the different
forms may be used more than once.
• Give students enough time to prepare their talk
• Play the extracts.
on television.
• Elicit answers.
• You may ask students to work in pairs this time
sharing their ideas about television according to
the given plan.
Answers
• Students should then swap roles. 1 newspapers
2 radio
• Ask one or two students to tell the rest of the
3 television
class what they told their partner.
4 radio
5 the Internet
6 magazines
Extra activity
7 mobile phone
If time allows in the lesson, do a groupwork 8 television
speaking activity. Tell students to imagine that
they have been asked to come up with a proposal
of how to improve television in their country. Tell 24 Exercise C
them to talk about what they would keep (why?), • Give students a minute to read the first question
what they would change (why?). Encourage and options.
students to keep notes. Give them at least five • Play the first extract again.
minutes to do this. Here are some ideas for you to • Elicit the answer. Play the extract again if the students
put on the board for them to use: cannot find the answer.
1 The variety of programmes (sitcoms, soap operas, • Follow the same procedure for the rest of the
films, documentaries, chat shows, news, etc) questions and extracts.
2 Adverts/Commercials
3 The quality of TV programmes
Answers
When they have finished elicit ideas from the
1B 2C 3B 4A 5C 6B 7B 8A
different pairs and encourage a class discussion
about television.
Quick chat
For extra practice, refer students to • This activity gives students the chance to
page 51 in the Workbook. personalize using the content of the Listening
texts.
• Give students a couple of minutes to discuss
the questions in pairs first.
Listening Page 90 • Elicit answers from different students.
Encourage a class discussion.

Aims of the lesson:


• to encourage prediction from pictures For extra listening practice, refer students
(Exercise A) to page 53 of the Workbook, CD: folder
• to listen for gist (Exercise B) 'Workbook', track 8.
• to listen for specific information (Exercise C)
• to talk about students’ reactions to the
information in the listening text (Quick chat)
Audioscript
24 Exercises B & C
Exercise A 1
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a couple Woman: Look at this story here, for example. I
of minutes to come up with one advantage and one mean, why do we, the public, need to read about
disadvantage of each form of media in the pictures. film stars getting divorced? You know, it’s not
exactly in the public interest, is it? It’s not really
• Elicit ideas.
news, either, is it? And these poor people, they
24 Exercise B get chased by journalists and photographers
everywhere they go just so that we can read
• Tell students that they are going to listen to eight rubbish like this. If you ask me, it’s the editors that
people talking about what they like or don’t like about are to blame.
these different forms of media.

86
7
2 great for worrying parents like us because if it’s
Young man: Do you know how many stations getting late and he’s not back home yet we can
there are in this city? Thirty! Can you believe just give him a call and find out where he is. But
it? Now, you’d think that with 30 stations we’d the problem is he seems to be addicted to it. He’s
have lots of variety. But no, all 30 play the same always talking to somebody. When he’s at home
pop music. That’s all. There are no news and it’s always ringing. It’s not the cost, although it’s
discussion channels; no classical music or jazz not cheap, I have to say. No … it’s his health I’m
channels; no comedy or drama channels. Just pop, worried about. I’ve read some frightening reports
pop, pop. It’s so boring. about what they can do to your health, like causing
3 cancer in the brain. It’s very worrying.
Woman: We don’t see much of each other
anymore, and that upsets me. My husband, you 8
see, thought it would be a great idea to treat Girl: You can’t really trust the reports you see, can
Diana to her own set for her birthday. And ever you? I mean, because all the other programmes
since then, well, she’s just up in her room staring before and after the news are so exciting and
at the box all the time. She even takes her meals sensational, they try to make the news look
upstairs and eats there instead of with us. I the same. You know, it has to be exciting and
know she prefers educational programmes like dramatic. Sometimes that seems to be more
documentaries and the news, and that’s good I important to them than simply telling the truth, and
suppose, but even so, that’s all she ever does. that’s wrong.
4
Man: When people use them considerately, they’re
wonderful. I listen to mine a lot. I think it’s a much
more reliable way to learn the news than the TV, Speaking Page 91
for example. But, you know, what I really don’t like
is when people take them to the beach or to a park
and they play them there really loudly. That annoys
Aims of the lesson:
me a lot because, well, people are forcing their • to prepare students for a picture comparison
music on everyone else and that’s just not fair, is it? task (Exercises A & B)
5 • to listen to a model speaking task for gist
Young woman: I don’t know that much about it, (Exercise C)
to be honest. I don’t have my own PC and I • to notice different ways of paraphrasing
just occasionally use one. A lot of my friends at (Exercises D & E)
university are really into it, they’ve got their own • to compare two pictures for a minute
pages on social networking sites like Facebook, (Exercise F)
and they chat online with their friends and all that. • to make students aware of the sounds [ ],
But I don’t think I’m missing out on anything, really. [ ] and [ ] (Say it right!)
I’m also a bit worried about how safe it is. Some
of my friends do quite a lot of shopping online,
you know, for CDs and books for college and
Exercise A
downloading music and that kind of thing. I’d rather • This exercise gives students ideas to use in the
not risk it, myself. You hear so much about credit picture comparison exercise that follows.
card theft and things like that, don’t you? • Ask students to work in pairs. Tell them to talk
6 about the usefulness of the various functions a
Man: Personally, I never buy them, but my wife mobile phone can have and to put them in order of
gets one every week called Celebrity Week and, importance. Allow a few minutes to do this.
frankly, I think it’s total rubbish. I mean, there are • Elicit ideas.
no interesting articles in it … ever. Not one. It just
has boring stories about the lives of TV and film Exercise B
stars. I’ve never heard of most of them. Because • Ask students to work in pairs. Tell them to answer
I don’t watch TV, you see, so it’s all meaningless the question about the pictures.
to me. Anyway, it’s cheap and she likes it. Call me • Elicit ideas.
old-fashioned, but I prefer a good book myself.
7 25 Exercise C
Woman: My son worries me because, well, he • Tell students they will be listening to a student called
seems to be on it all the time. We bought it for him Marcus talking about the two pictures in Exercise B.
a few years ago so that we could keep in touch Ask students to choose the uses of mobile phones in
with him when he’s out of the house. They’re Exercise A that Marcus mentions.

87
• Play the extract.
• Elicit answers and ask students if they agree with Audioscript
Marcus.
26 Exercise D
Answers 1
Picture A: play games, take photos, send texts Marcus: The girls must be … um … well, they are
Picture B: make calls, send texts or emails sisters that are the same age and they look the
same.
2
Audioscript Marcus: I think he’s a … a person that runs a
company or something like that. …
25 Exercise C 3
Marcus: In picture A, I can see two young girls Marcus: Maybe he’s talking to a … um …
using mobile phones and likewise picture B shows someone that he works with.
a man with a phone. The girls must be … um … 4
well, they are sisters that are the same age and Marcus: I guess he uses … um … I mean, I’m
they look the same. In picture B, on the other hand, sure he writes small messages and sends them
there’s a much older man. I think he’s a … a person too.
that runs a company or something like that and,
whereas the girls are having fun, he’s probably
Exercise E
using his phone for work. I can see that the girls
don’t really seem to be speaking. Perhaps they’re • Give students a few minutes to work together to
just playing and pretending to call each other. In describe the items in the pictures without using the
contrast, the man really does seem to be having a actual word.
conversation. Maybe he’s talking to a … um … • When they have finished, play a guessing game as a
someone that he works with. I think generally that class. Ask one student to describe one of the pictures
young people want phones for fun. They like to play without using the word. The rest of the class should
the games and take photos. I don’t think they guess what the thing is. You might want to use other
actually make calls very often. I think they send a objects too to extend the activity.
lot of text messages. For this man, though, I think
making calls is the most important thing. I guess Exercise F
he uses … um … I mean, I’m sure he writes small • Ask students to work in pairs. Tell each pair who is
messages and sends them too. But I don’t think he Student A and who is Student B and ask them to
takes photos or surfs the net with his phone. He turn to the relevant pages. Tell students to take turns
doesn’t have the time. talking about the photos and listening to their partner.
• Refer students to the Language chunks box for
Exercise D language they can use to express similarities and
differences.
• Read the Helpful hints box together. Tell students that
• Remind students to keep going and not worry if they
it is more important to keep going when talking than
cannot think of the exact word for something.
to find the exact word for something. It is annoying
• Give students a few minutes to do the task. Don’t rush
for the listener if a speaker keeps pausing, so it is
the activity. Encourage them to talk for about a minute
important to try to say things differently if they cannot
about their photos.
find the exact word for something.
• Explain that Marcus doesn’t always use the exact
word he is looking for. Tell students to listen and Say it right!
number the words he is looking for. 27 Exercise G
• Play the extract.
• The sounds focused on in this activity are commonly
• Elicit answers. Ask students if they can remember
mispronounced by students.
what words Marcus used in place of the ones in
• Explain to students that they will hear the words on the
Exercise D.
left on CD (ie dad, bar and cup). The students need
• If they can’t remember, play the extract again and get
to listen to the way the vowel sound is pronounced
students to note down the words Marcus uses. in each word and then choose the words in each row
they think have the same vowel sound. Tell students
Answers that the spelling of the words will not always help
colleague 3, manager 2, texting/email 4, twins 1 them decide.
• Play the CD.

88
7
• Give students a few minutes to find and correct the
Audioscript mistakes in the sentences.
• Check answers.
27 Exercise G
dad bar cup Answers
1 We’re going to have our portraits painted.
28 Exercise H 2 I’ve had my hair cut at that new hairdresser’s.
3 The police have arrested the man.
• Play the CD for students to listen and check their
4 The mechanics have done a good job on my
answers to Exercise G.
car.
• Play the CD again for students to listen and repeat. 5 I had my phone stolen in the park.
6 The roof was damaged during the storm.
Answers
dad – bad, rat
bar – father, cart Exercise B
cup – pup, monkey • Give students a couple of minutes to complete the
sentences with the causative form.
• Elicit answers.
Audioscript
28 Exercise H Answers
1 do; have; cut
dad, bad, rat, late 2 ’m having; delivered
bar, father, stamp, cart 3 have; opened
cup, mop, pup, monkey
4 has had; downloaded
5 Did; get/have; renewed
6 ’re having; repaired
Grammar 2 Page 92
Exercise C
Aim of the lesson: • Read the instructions and example sentence
together.
• to present and practise the causative form
• Give students a couple of minutes to complete the
thoughts with a causative form, using words from the
boxes.
causative form • Ask students to compare answers in pairs. Then
• The causative form will not be new to students, but elicit answers.
they may not remember it. Tell them it is usually
used when someone does something for us.
• Give them a minute to read the pairs of sentences
Answers
and to choose the one that uses a causative form. 2 have (the) costumes made
• Elicit answers and ask students what the 3 have (the) lead role played
difference in meaning is between the sentences 4 have (the) music composed
in each pair. Elicit that the causative sentences 5 have (the) crew flown
talk about someone else doing the work for the
speaker.
• To recap, read through the relevant section on Quick chat
page 173 in the Grammar reference. • This activity gives students the chance to
practise the new structure in a fun way.
Answers • Give students a few minutes to write down
1b 2b 3a 4a 5b their thoughts. Encourage them to use some
causative forms.
• Ask students to work in pairs. They should
Exercise A share their thoughts with their partners.
• This exercise focuses on the form and the meaning of • When they have finished, elicit ideas from
the causative. Tell students that it may be the wrong different students.
use of the causative that they need to look out for.

89
Exercise D
Extra activity
• Elicit the instructions for this activity from the students.
If time allows in the lesson, ask students to work • Give students five minutes to do the activity on their
in pairs to talk about what celebrities usually have own before checking answers.
done in order to ‘look the part’. Eg They usually
have their teeth fixed., etc. Tell them to come up
with at least three things they have done. Elicit
Answers
ideas from the class. 1 was invented by
2 had the Mona Lisa copied
3 has had his MP3 player
For extra practice, refer students to
4 They told us
page 52 in the Workbook.
5 It is believed that
6 had her letter
7 is a disc jockey
Practise your English Page 93 8 not lose touch with
9 has hit the headlines
Aim of the lesson: 10 (that) I didn’t see/watch
• to practise the grammar and vocabulary from
the unit in an integrated way
Writing Pages 94 and 95
Exercise A
• Ask students if they know what kind of show is shown Aims of the lesson:
in the picture. • to warm students up and introduce them to film
• If they can’t guess, tell them it is the UK version of the reviews (Exercise A)
talent show X Factor. • to analyze a model film review for content
• Discuss the questions as a class and elicit answers. (Exercises B & C)
• to analyze a model film review for organization
Exercise B and language (Exercises D, E, F & G)
• Read the Steps to success box together. • to practise planning and writing a review
• To practise reading quickly for gist, give students two (Exercises H, I & J)
minutes to read the text, ignoring the gaps for now,
and answer the question.
Exercise A
• Elicit answers.
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give students a few
minutes to put the things that contribute to a good
Answers film in order of importance.
1 An offer of £1 million recording contract as first • Elicit ideas.
prize.
2 Many serious careers are started by such shows. Exercise B
3 The shows now have website channels. • Tell students that the film review they are about to
read mentions most of the things in Exercise A.
Exercise C • Give students a couple of minutes to read the review
and choose the things that are mentioned. Then elicit
• Give students a few minutes to read the text more
feedback.
carefully to choose the best answer for each gap.
Remind them to use the advice in the Steps to
Answers
success box.
a famous cast the costumes
• Elicit answers.
the special effects the plot
the acting the musical score
Answers
1C 2B 3A 4C 5D 6C 7C
Exercise C
• Read the Helpful hints box together. Tell students
Quick chat that the review in Exercise B is far too long.
• Ask students to answer the questions in pairs first. • Give students a few minutes to reread the review
• Elicit answers from the class. Encourage a and to cross out the parts they think are irrelevant.
discussion about the pros and cons of being • Ask them to compare their ideas in pairs.
famous. • Elicit feedback. Ask students to justify their choices.

90
7
Suggested answers Suggested answers
The following parts could be cut out: 1 funny, fantastic, boring
I went last Saturday night to see it with my 2 brilliant, disappointing
friends at the local cinema. 3 exciting, difficult to follow
4 realistic, impressive
The book is the first in a series of three books
5 wonderful, boring
called His Dark Materials. They’re great books,
6 impressive, unimaginative
and I would recommend them.
Along the way she meets lots of other
characters, such as some people called the Exercise G
Gyptians and a talking bear. • Tell students that the Language chunks below
Actually, I think his performances in James appeared in the review on page 94. Give students a
Bond films are much better, especially in the minute to match them with their opposites.
latest one. • Elicit answers.

Answers
Quick chat
1B 2D 3E 4A 5C
• Ask students if they have seen The Golden
Compass and what they thought of it.
• Discuss the second question as a class too.
Planning and writing
Exercise H
Skills development: Organization • Give students a minute to think of a film they would
Exercise D like to review. Tell them it can be a film they enjoyed
• Explain to students that there is more than one way or a film they hated.
to organize a review. Tell students that both these • Ask them to work in pairs. Give students a few
ways are appropriate. minutes to tell each other about their films.
• Give students a minute to look back at the review
and to pick the plan that it is based on. Exercise I
• Elicit the answer. • Give students a couple of minutes to decide on the
plan they would like to follow. Refer them to the plans
in Exercise D. Encourage them to make notes in their
Answer
notebooks according to the Planner.
Plan A
Exercise J
• When writing their reviews, remind students to use
Language expressions from the Language chunks box and
Exercise E Exercises E and F.
• Explain that a good film review should contain words • Read through the Quick check! box and tell students
that express how the writer feels about the film. to use this as a checklist before they hand in their
• Give students a few minutes to reread the review reviews.
and to find adjectives to describe the things listed. • For advice on how to write a review, refer students to
• Elicit answers. page 189 in the Writing database.
• If time allows, ask students to write, or begin to write,
Answers their reviews in class.
1 favourite 4 sumptuous For extra writing practice, refer students to
2 star-studded 5 lovely page 53 in the Workbook.
3 exhilarating 6 intelligent
Teacher's resource file:
– Progress test (page 173)
Exercise F – Communication and writing (page 185)
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few – Fun and games (197)
minutes to come up with at least one more adjective
– Self-assessment checklist (page 209)
to add to each item on the list in Exercise E.
• Elicit ideas. Accept any that make sense. Editable tests CD: Unit 7 test

91
8 The world of sport … and leisure
Theme Skills aims
Sport and leisure Reading
Students read four short texts for:
Language aims • gist
Grammar • specific information
Conditionals Listening
Conditional links Students listen to an interview for:
like and as • key words
Vocabulary • detail and specific information
Sport nd leisure Speaking
come and go Students conduct a pairwork speaking activity
Phrasal verbs to practise:
• interrupting another speaker
• acknowledging interruption
Writing
Students write an article and practise:
• creating interest
• developing ideas
• organization

• Give students four minutes to read the texts quickly


Reading Pages 96 and 97 and silently, match each text to a heading. Remind
students of one extra heading in this type of task.
Aims of the lesson: • Elicit answers.

• to warm students up and introduce them to the


theme of the unit (Exercise A) Answers
• to read quickly for gist (Exercise B) A 4
• to read and match information (Exercises C, B 5
D & E) C 1
• to guess the meaning of unknown words from D 3
the context (Exercise F)
• to talk about the ideas in the text (Quick chat) Exercise C
• Ask students to name the four extreme sports in the
pictures. You may also ask students which of these
sports they would like to try and why.

Exercise A Answers
• The quiz tests how much students know about sport 1 Ice climbing
and leisure. 2 Extreme ironing
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few 3 Wave jumping
minutes to do the quiz. 4 Free running
• When students have finished, tell them to turn to
page 193 to check their answers. Exercise D
• Elicit feedback on the results. How well did they do? • Ask students to read the questions and to identify the
key words that will help them know what information
Reading to look for in the texts.
• Ask students to scan each text to find the key
Exercise B information. Remind them that the wording in the text
• Tell students that to do this task they will need to will not be the same as the wording in the questions.
skim each text for gist. Read through the Steps to Also let students know that one question has two
success box together as a class. answers.

92
• When they think they have found the information in
8
the text, they should compare it with the information Quick chat
in the question to see if it matches. • This activity gives students the chance to
• Give students five minutes to do the task. personalize using the content of the Reading
• Ask students to compare their answers in pairs texts.
before you check them. Remember to ask them to • Ask the students to discuss the questions in
justify their answers by finding the section with the pairs first.
answer in the text. • Elicit opinions and encourage a class
discussion.

Answers
1 A 2 A and B 3 B 4D 5A
Extra activity
If time allows in the lesson, ask students to work in
Exercise E pairs to talk about sports or extreme sports they
would do if they had the chance. Refer students to
• Follow the same procedure as Exercise D for
those sports mentioned in the text that they found
these questions.
in Exercise F. Ask students to tell the class which
sports they would do and why.
Answers
1A 2D 3C 4 C and D 5D
For extra reading practice, refer students
to pages 54 and 55 in the Workbook.

Words in context
Exercise F
• Tell students this is a similar sort of task to ones they
Grammar 1 Page 98
have done in previous units.
• Give students a few minutes to match the words/ Aim of the lesson:
phrases in the text with their definitions.
• to revise zero, first and second conditionals
• Elicit answers.

Answers zero, irst and second conditionals


1 floats
• This activity focuses on the meaning of the
2 took up
three conditional forms.
3 vertical
• Give students a couple of minutes to read the
4 obstacles
extracts for meaning and to match them with the
5 unpredictable
uses below.
6 remote
7 pressed • Elicit answers.
8 reading up • To recap, read through the relevant section on
page 174 in the Grammar reference.

Exercise G Answers
• Tell students that the text contains the names of many a1 b3 c2
sports and extreme sports. Allow a few minutes to
scan the text for these words.
Exercise A
Answers • This exercise focuses on common mistakes made by
running, jumping, acrobatics, dance, water- students when forming conditional sentences.
skiing, windsurfing, swimming, bungee jumping, • Give students a few minutes to read the items, then
hang-gliding, skydiving, rock climbing find and correct the mistakes.
• Elicit answers.

93
Exercise D
Answers
• This activity offers some fun free practice of
1 If Nikolay Davydenko wins Wimbledon, we’ll all conditionals.
be very happy.
• Read through the instructions and the example as a
2 ✔
class.
3 Rock climbing is not a dangerous sport if you
take precautions. • If students are not clear, continue the chain with
4 ✔ another couple of students to demonstrate how the
5 ✔ activity works.
6 If I won this match, I’d get a chance to play in • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
the finals. minutes to do the activity.
• You could also play this chain game around the
class. The game continues until a student can’t think
Exercise B of anything else to say.
• Explain that this is a dialogue between two friends. For extra practice, refer students to page 56
• Give students a few minutes to read it carefully and in the Workbook.
to put the verbs in the correct form.
• Elicit answers by asking students to read the
dialogue aloud. Vocabulary Page 99
• Ask students how sure Alice is she’ll win her match.
How do they know?
Aims of the lesson:
Answers to present and practise:
1 play 6 ’d be • vocabulary relating to sport and leisure
2 ’ll win 7 were • come and go
3 ’ll be 8 put • phrasal verbs
4 were 9 makes
5 ’d take 10 believed
Exercise A
• Tell students to read each description of a sport and
Exercise C to match them with the sports in the box.
• Explain that this task requires students to use the • Elicit answers.
information to make six conditional sentences. Tell • Now ask students to work in pairs to describe the
them it is the same Alice as the one in Exercise B. objects in the pictures.
• Read the example together to make it clear to • Check answers by asking students to tell the class
students what they have to do. Tell them it makes no what objects they can see in each picture.
difference where they place the if clause.
• Give students five minutes to do the rest.
Answers
• Ask students to compare their answers in pairs.
1 boxing
• Elicit answers. Ask students what advice they would
2 athletics
give Alice to make her feel better.
3 deep-sea diving
4 basketball
Answers 5 football
1 If Alice plays well, she’ll get a university 6 tennis
scholarship.
2 If she doesn’t play well, she’ll have to study
hard for university. Exercise B
3 If she had more confidence in herself, she’d • This exercise makes students pay attention to
play better. collocations and word building related to sports.
4 If she were doing better at school, she’d have
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
more time for tennis.
5 If she doesn’t do well, she doesn’t know what minutes to complete the table.
she’ll do. • Elicit answers. Point out that photographer and
6 If she had a boyfriend, she’d feel happier. photography are both stressed on the second
syllable, but photograph on the first.

94
8
Exercise E
Answers • These phrasal verbs relate to sport and leisure.
Verb Person • Give students a few minutes to match the phrasal
verbs in each sentence with a verb from the box.
play baseball baseball player
• Elicit answers.
play chess chess player
go fishing fisherman Answers
1 start
do gardening gardener
2 spend time socially
do gymnastics gymnast 3 exercise
4 come
play hockey hockey player
5 eliminate
go ice-skating ice-skater
do photography photographer Extra activity
go sailing sailor If time allows in the lesson, ask students to play
go skateboarding skateboarder a guessing game as a class or in groups. One
student should choose a sport to describe. They
do athletics athlete should not tell the class/their group the name of
play basketball basketball player the sport. They should use words from page 99
to describe the sport (similar to the descriptions in
do boxing boxer Exercise A) and the rest of the class/group should
go deep-sea diving deep-sea diver guess.

play football football player


play tennis tennis player Your voice
• This activity helps to integrate the vocabulary
'Sport and leisure' into a wider topic 'Hobbies'.
Exercise C Allow students enough time to prepare their talk
• This exercise focuses on commonly confused words according to the given plan.
relating to sport. • Let students exchange their talks in pairs first,
• Give students a couple of minutes to read the then ask a few students to give a talk before the
sentences and to choose the correct options. whole class.
• Elicit answers. Check students understand what the • Time students if necessary.
words mean.
For extra practice, refer students to
Answers page 57 in the Workbook.
1 beat; won; defeated
2 opponent
3
4
competitor
spectator
Listening Page 100
5 umpire; referee
6 draw Aims of the lesson:
• to trigger any background knowledge on the
Exercise D topic (Exercise A)
• to encourage prediction (Exercise B)
• This exercise focuses on common collocations and
• to listen for key words, specific information
expressions with go and come.
(Exercises C & D)
• Give students a couple of minutes to complete the • to talk about students’ reactions to the
gaps with the right form of go or come. Then elicit information in the listening text (Quick chat)
answers.

Answers Exercise A
1 comes 4 go • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a couple
2 came 5 go of minutes to tell each other everything they know
3 go 6 went about chess.
• Elicit ideas.

95
Exercise B
• Tell students that they are going to hear an interview Audioscript
with a young chess champion. 29 Exercises C & D
• Encourage them to predict which words or phrases
Interviewer: I’m lucky enough today to have
they think they will hear. Check that they know the
the opportunity to interview a teenage chess
meaning of the words and phrases.
champion, Dalita Zadian. Dalita, you are one of
• Elicit ideas. Don’t confirm or negate them, as this will the youngest top-rated women chess players and
spoil the next exercise. you’re only 16!
Dalita: Yes, that’s right. People are often surprised
Background information to learn that I’m 16, but I’m not the only teenage
In chess, check means moving a piece or pawn so champion you know – there are hundreds of us all
that the opposing king is under attack. Checkmate over the world. (1)
is an attack from which a king cannot escape. As Interviewer: Well, tell us how you became a
a result it means the end of the game. chess champion.
Dalita: Well, I took up chess when I was eight.
That’s when my father taught me how to play. We
29 Exercise C were still living in Armenia then. (2) Chess is a
• Play the extract for students to check their predictions very popular game in Armenia, more so than it is
in Exercise B. Tell them to note down all the words or here in the United States.
phrases they hear. Interviewer: I’ve heard that by age ten you started
• Play the extract. beating your father in the game. Is that true?
• Elicit answers. Dalita: Yes, I suppose it is. That’s also when
I started entering tournaments. We had moved to
Answers the United States when I was nine and my father
entered me in junior championship tournaments a
checkmate, competition, opponent, tournament,
year after that. (3)
chess players, draw
Interviewer: Tell us about your training regime.
Dalita: Well, I study chess for about one and a
29 Exercise D half hours a day and I also take lessons. I’m a
• Ask students to read through the statements and member of a chess club and we have practice
Steps to success box before they start listening. games every week. We also play a game of speed
• Play the interview again. Tell students to listen carefully chess two to three times a week. I really enjoy
for the information. that. (4)
Interviewer: What’s speed chess?
• Check answers. If students have not been able to
Dalita: It’s a game of chess where each player is
complete all the tasks, play the interview a third time.
given only five minutes to complete the game.
Answers A clock is used that has two small clock faces. (5)
There’s a button on top of each clock face that
1 B starts and stops each clock, like a stopwatch. If
2 A either player runs out of time before a checkmate
3 B or draw is achieved, then the player that ran out of
4 C time loses the game. I really enjoy it – it can be a
5 A
lot of fun. But I also find that thinking quickly and
6 B
rapidly evaluating the tactics that your opponent is
7 A
using helps me in my regular chess game. It also
means I get to play more games in a short period
Quick chat of time.
• This activity gives students the chance to Interviewer: So let me get this right. Each player
personalize the content of the Listening text. is given five minutes in which to complete his
game.
• Give students a couple of minutes to discuss
Dalita: Yes.
the questions in pairs first.
Interviewer: If there is a draw or checkmate within
• Elicit answers from different students. that time you have a winner and the game is over.
Encourage a class discussion. If not, then the player who runs out of time first
loses.
For extra listening practice, refer students Dalita: That’s right.
to page 59 of the Workbook, CD: folder Interviewer: Sounds stressful! (6) Dalita, tell us
'Workbook', track 9. what you enjoy about playing chess.

96
8
Dalita: I enjoy the excitement of the competition. Answers
I also enjoy meeting other chess players. (7) I think Interrupting another speaker
it’s a very social game. And I suppose people tend Sorry, … , but …
to enjoy what they’re good at. I’m good at chess May I say something?
so I enjoy it. Sorry for interrupting …
Interviewer: Thank you, Dalita. It’s been a Acknowledging interruption
pleasure talking to you. Of course.
Go ahead.

Speaking Page 101


Audioscript
30 Exercises B & C
Peter: Well, it looks like most people prefer team
Aims of the lesson: sports so I think we need to choose a holiday with
• to prepare students for the speaking task at least one team sport.
(Exercise A) Vicky: I agree. But they all have team sports.
• to listen to a model speaking task for gist Peter: Yes, you’re right. Well, let’s see …
(Exercise B) how about …
• to notice and practise different ways of Georgina: Sorry, Peter, but perhaps we should
interrupting and acknowledging interruptions look at the holiday packages first and then look at
(Exercises C & D) the preferences.
• to discuss and work towards a negotiated Peter: OK. That sounds reasonable. The first
solution (Exercise E) package includes a little bit of everything and I
• to make students aware of word stress think most people would like that. The second
(Say it right!) package …
Vicky: May I say something?
Peter: Of course!
Exercise A Vicky: Well, the third package has everything
• This exercise gets students thinking about the except extreme sports, so it would probably be the
information they will need to use in the free Speaking best one to choose.
task. Peter: Yes, but perhaps we should choose one
• Discuss the question as a class. Ask students if they with extreme sports to keep the students who
think this reflects their own class. want to try one happy and …
Georgina: Sorry for interrupting …
30 Exercise B Peter: Go ahead …
Georgina: Well, it’s just that I think Vicky’s right …
• Tell students they will be listening to three students
talking. Don’t tell them what the conversation is
about, as this is what they have to listen for. Exercise D
• Play the extract. • This activity offers students the opportunity to
• Elicit the answer. practise the language for interruptions.
• Read the Helpful hints box together. • Explain that students should work in pairs and take
• Tell students that the speakers interrupt each other turns to talk and interrupt.
and acknowledge interruptions in polite ways. • One student starts talking about a statement and
their partner interrupts after about 30 seconds to give
their opinion. Encourage students to use expressions
Answer from the Language chunks box.
They are trying to decide which holiday package • Give students about five minutes to do this exercise.
to pick.
Exercise E
• Ask students to work in pairs.
30 Exercise C • Read the task together and check students
• Refer students to the Language chunks box and give understand what they need to do.
them a minute to read through the expressions. • Encourage students to use expressions from the
• Play the extract again. Students listen and note down Language chunks box.
the expressions they hear. • Give students at least five minutes to do the task.
• Check answers. • Elicit feedback from the different pairs.

97
Say it right! Exercise A
• This exercise focuses on the form and meaning of
31 Exercise F conditional links.
• Give students a minute to decide on the syllable they • Give students a few minutes to complete the
think carries the main stress in these words. sentences before checking answers.
• Play the CD for students to listen and check
their answers. Answers
• Play the extract again for students to listen and 1 if the referee
repeat. 2 provided (that) it
3 as long as
Answers (and Audioscript) 4 if you don’t
5 won’t practise unless
1 fishing 6 opponent
6 if things don’t
2 cinema 7 opposite
3 gardening 8 tournament
4 photograph 9 skiing
5 photography 10 competitor like and as
• Like and as are often confused. Tell students that
Exercise G these words can be used in a number of different
ways, which is why they can be confusing.
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a minute
• Read through the relevant section on page 174
to practise saying the words. Tell them to say the
of the Grammar reference. Then give students
unstressed syllables quickly.
a couple of minutes to read the sentences in the
Check box and to choose the correct option.
Grammar 2 Page 102 • Elicit answers.

Answers
Aims of the lesson: 1 as 4 as
• to present and practise conditional links 2 like 5 Like
• to present students with the different meanings 3 like
of like and as

Exercise B
conditional links • Give students a few minutes to scan the text on
• Tell students that in addition to if there are many pages 96 and 97 to note all the different examples of
other conditional links used in conditional like and as.
sentences. Most of them carry more meaning • Elicit answers. Ask students how like and as is used
than if. in each case. Refer them to the uses on page 174 of
• Read through the relevant section on page 174 the Grammar reference.
in the Grammar reference together.
• Then give students a couple of minutes to read Answers
the sentences in the Check box and to choose like: A lines 2, 7, 8, 12; B lines 2, 6, 10;
the correct conditional link. D lines 4, 7, 11
• Elicit answers. as: B lines 3, 7, 13; C line 11
• Ask students to answer the concept checking
questions. Exercise C
• In each question like has a different meaning.
Answers
These different uses of like are often misused or
1 Unless misunderstood by students.
2 as long as • Give students a couple of minutes to match the
3 Provided (that) questions with the answers.
4 Suppose
• Ask students to compare answers in pairs.
5 What if
• Elicit answers.
a as long as, provided (that)
b unless Answers
c suppose, what if
1 d 2b 3c 4a

98
8
Exercise D • Ask students to compare answers in pairs.
• Give students a few minutes to find the mistakes and • Elicit answers.
to correct them.
• Ask students to compare answers in pairs. Answers
• Elicit answers. 1 like 6 if
2 unless 7 like
Answers 3 like 8 What
1 ✔ 4 would 9 will
2 That looks nice. I’ll have the same as you. 5 As 10 than
3 American football looks a bit like rugby, don’t
you think?
4 ✔ Quick chat
5 He’s very fast, like most people in the team.
• Ask students to answer the questions in pairs
6 I wish I could play like you. You’re fantastic!
first.
• Elicit answers and encourage a class
Ask students to complete the exercises on discussion.
page 58 of the Workbook.

Practise your English Page 103


Writing Pages 104 and 105
Aim of the lesson:
• to practise the grammar and vocabulary from
Aims of the lesson:
the unit in an integrated way
• to warm students up and introduce them to the
topic of the article (Exercise A)
Exercise A • to analyze a model article for ideas (Exercise B)
• Give students a couple of minutes to do the activity • to analyze a model article for interesting
on their own before checking answers. content, development of ideas and organization
(Exercises C, D, E and F)
Answer • to practise planning and writing an article
1B 2A 3C 4D 5C 6C 7A 8A (Exercises G, H and I)
9 C 10 A

Exercise B Exercise A
• Give students a few minutes to discuss the questions • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
in pairs. minutes to brainstorm all the benefits of playing team
sports they can think of.
• Elicit answers. Don’t confirm or negate their answers,
as that will spoil the next exercise. • Elicit ideas and write them up on the board.

Exercise C
Suggested answers
• Give students two minutes to read the text quickly
and silently to find the answers to the questions in You can make friends.
Exercise B. Tell students to ignore the gaps for now. It’s a good way to socialize.
It’s good for the health.
• Elicit answers.
It gets you out of the house and in the fresh air.
It encourages healthy competition.
Answers Exercise makes you more energetic.
1 Michael Phelps (USA) and Ian Thorpe (Australia)
2 He currently trains for 18 hours a week.
Exercise B
Exercise D • Tell students that the article they are about to read is
• Give students a few minutes to read the text more the answer to the question in Exercise A.
carefully to find a word that best fits each gap. Make • Give students a couple of minutes to read the article
it clear that it could be a grammar word or part of a and see if any of their ideas are mentioned.
collocation. • Elicit feedback.

99
Skills development: Making the Organization
article interesting Exercise F
Exercise C • Give students a few minutes to reread the article and
to make notes about each paragraph.
• Read the Helpful hints box together. • Elicit answers. Explain that if this task was easy to do,
• Give students a few minutes to reread the article and it is because there is clear signalling of the main ideas
to note down the features it has. Ask students to find and opinions. The article is also well organized.
examples of each in the article. • Read through the Language chunks together and tell
• Elicit feedback. students that these are ways to clearly signal ideas
and opinions.
Answers
Answers
It has all these features.
Paragraph 2 – Main idea 1: Exercise gives you
A catchy title: Team sports: why should we play? energy and makes you more active.
The use of direct or indirect questions: But can Paragraph 3 – Main idea 2: Team sports improve
playing team sports offer us any other benefits? your social skills.
The writer’s opinion: I’ve noticed … ; I think Paragraph 4 – Recapping and concluding
another important benefit … ; As far as I’m
concerned …
A personal angle: The writer has written what Planning and writing
they personally think about the topic throughout Exercise G
and the personal example in paragraph 2 adds
to this. • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
minutes to brainstorm all the benefits of having a
An example: paragraph 2 hobby they can think of.
• Elicit ideas and write them up on the board.
Exercise D
• Answer these questions as a class.
Suggested answers
You can meet people with similar interests.
You can learn a skill.
Answer It can make you more interesting and energetic.
It is written in an informal way. Examples of an It widens your interests.
informal approach are: the use of shortened It could help with schoolwork.
forms like I’m, There’s, etc, the personal angle
and the exclamation marks.
Exercise H
• Give students a couple of minutes to make notes in
their notebooks according to the Planner. Refer them
Developing ideas to Exercise F for a plan to follow if they like.
Exercise E Exercise I
• Explain that each point the writer makes in the article • When writing their articles, remind students to use
is developed using an explanation. expressions from the Language chunks box.
• Give students a minute to look back at the article and • Read through the Quick check! box and tell students to
to find the explanations the writer uses to develop use this as a checklist before they hand in their articles.
the two points. • For advice on how to write an article, refer students
• Elicit answers. Highlight the fact that there are clear to page 185 in the Writing database.
signals for these explanations with the markers What • If time allows, ask students to write, or begin to write,
I mean is … and Because … their articles in class.
For extra writing practice, refer students to
Answers page 59 in the Workbook.
1 What I mean is, they have more interests, they
Teacher's resource file:
do more and they even study more!
– Progress test (page 174)
2 Because you learn to work together with – Communication and writing (page 186)
others rather than competing against them, as – Fun and games (page 198)
a member of a team, you tend to make more – Self-assessment checklist (page 210)
friends.
Editable tests CD: Unit 8 test

100
Learn about PE Units 7 and 8

Body types and sports Answers


good training, good technique, other genetic
Pages 106 and 107 factors, passion

Exercise E
Aims of the lesson:
• This time students scan the texts in Exercises B, C
• to motivate students to learn about sport and D to answer the qestions. Allow students one or
through English two minutes to do this.
• to read for gist (Exercise B, C & D) • Elicit answers.
• to read for specific information (Exercise E)
• to do some research work on the cross-
curriculum topic (Project) Answers
1 ectomorph
2 ectomorph
Exercise A 3 ‘Fast twitch’ muscle works effectively for a
short burst of activity, for example, a sprint.
• This activity aims to motivate students to read about ‘Slow twitch’ muscle produces power for a long
body types and how they are related to sports. period, for example, long distance running.
• Ask students to work in pairs or small groups and 4 Rowers have the highest air intake of all
discus the questions. sports, 300 litres a minute.
• Elicit answers from around the class. 5 Megan Still had never rowed before she was
chosen to be trained as a rower, based on
Exercise B her body type. She went on to become a gold
• Give students one or two minutes to read the text. medal winner.
• Get students to answer the task question and explain 6 Red blood cells carry oxygen, so extra red
their choice. blood cells would provide a long distance
runner with more oxygen and, therefore, more
Exercise С stamina.
7 Good training, good technique and passion.
• Ask students to read the descriptions and then match
them to the body type(s) in exercise B.
• Ask students to justify their choices.

Project
Answers
The swimmer: mesomorph and ectomorph Assign the project for homework. Make a display
The rower: mesomorph and ectomorph of students’ works and have a few students talk
The sprinter: mesomorph about their projects during the next class.
The marathon runner: mesomorph and
ectomorph
The gymnast: ectomorph
The weightlifter: endomorph

Exercise D
• Before students read the text, get them thinking about
factors that make a person very good at a certain
sport. You might like to compile a list of students’
responses on the board.
• Ask students to read the text and answer the task
questions. Discuss how the students’ responses are
similar or different to the ones given in the text.

101
Culture today … Units 7 and 8

Exercise D
A brief history of printing • Give students one minute to complete the task. You
might want to allow them to use the dictionary at the
back of their Student’s Books to help them with some
Pages 108 and 109 of the words.
• Elicit answers.
Aims of the lesson:
• to motivate students to learn about different Answers
ways we access media through English
1 translation
• to read for gist (Exercises A & B) 2 block
• to read for specific information (Exercise C) 3 durable
• to practise key vocabulary (Exercise D) 4 cylinder
• to give students an opportunity to discuss what 5 ink
6 illustrations
they've learned and how it relates to their own
7 mass produced
personal experiences through discussion (Your
voice)

Your voice Exercise E


Exercise A • Ask students to form pairs.
• Ask students to read the introduction and think about • Ask them to use the questions in the discussion to
the question in the task as they read it. talk about their own ideas and personal experiences.
• After they finish, ask students what the advantages • Elicit feedback.
and disadvantages are concerning print media and
digital media. Use the board to make a table and
write students' responses in a suitable column.

Exercise B
• Ask students to read the text about the history of
painting and decide what fact they consider the most
significant.
• Elicit different opinions. Encourage students to give
reasons.

Exercise C
• Ask students to read the text again, quickly and
silently, and then choose the best option to complete
each sentence.
• Check answers in class.

Answers
1 c
2 a
3 b
4 b
5 a
6 c
7 a

102
Progress check 4
8 works as a
Pages 110 and 111 9 you work out for
Exercise A 10 plays football like a
1 reporter
Exercise F
2 subscribers
1 B
3 articles
2 A
4 documentary
3 D
5 watch
4 A
6 viewers
5 C
Exercise B 6 A
1 touch 7 B
2 draw Ask students to complete 7–8 Review on
3 go pages 60 and 61 of the Workbook.
4 come
Ask students to complete Progress test 2
5 files/images on pages 62 and 63 of the Workbook.
6 headlines

Exercise C
1 A
2 C
3 B
4 B
5 D
6 A
7 A
8 A
9 B
10 D

Exercise D
1 If you try hard, you might be chosen for the team. /
Unless you try hard, you won’t be chosen for the
team.
2 She gets/has her hair cut at the same hairdresser’s
as me.
3 I wonder what we would find if we could travel to
another solar system.
4 If dogs don’t get regular exercise, they become
unfit and restless.
5 The car broke down again yesterday.
6 Builders have completed the new football stadium.

Exercise E
1 as long as you come
2 had our roof fixed
3 grow unless it gets
4 It has been revealed
5 Provided that we
6 families didn’t watch
7 Suppose you won

103
9 It's a weird, wonderful world
Themes Skills aims
The environment and the weather Reading
Students read a long text for:
Language aims • the writer’s opinion
Grammar • specific information
Modals Listening
Third conditional Students listen to five short extracts for:
Vocabulary • gist
The environment Speaking
Extreme weather Students conduct a pairwork speaking activity
Weather idioms to practise:
• supporting their opinions
• reacting to opinions
Writing
Students write a formal letter to a newspaper
and practise:
• getting ideas
• linking ideas
• organization

• Elicit answers. Don’t give anything away yet, as this


Reading Pages 112 and 113 will spoil the next activity. Check students know the
words squid and crab.
Aims of the lesson: Reading
• to warm students up and introduce them to the Exercise C
unit topic (Exercise A)
• to read to understand text type (Exercise B) • Introduce the Reading text and give students three
• to activate student’s background knowledge on minutes to skim it to find which animals from the
the topic (Dive in!) pictures are mentioned. Tell students they will not
need to read the whole text to do this; the animals
• to read for detail (Exercise C)
are all mentioned in the first four paragraphs.
• to infer lexical meaning from context (Exercises
D & E) • Elicit answers.
• to personalize the content of one of the texts
(Quick chat) Answers
The colossal squid
The Yeti crab
The Dumbo octopus
Animals that look like flowers.
Exercise A
• This quiz introduces students to the bizarre world
of nature.
Exercise D
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few • Read through the Steps to success box together as
minutes to decide which bizarre fact is false. a class.
• When students have finished, tell them to turn to • Ask students to read the questions (but not the
page 193 to check their answers. options) and to find the key words that will help them
know what information to look for in the text.
• Elicit feedback. Were they surprised by the facts?
• Ask students to scan the text to find where the
Exercise B answers are and to read those parts more
• This activity encourages students to predict the carefully.
content of the Reading text. • Give students seven minutes to do the task.
• Give students a couple of minutes to decide which • Ask students to compare their answers in pairs. If
creatures they think really exist. their answers differ, tell them to try to convince their

104
partner that their answer is right. This will make sure
9
Exercise A
that they justify their choices. • This exercise also focuses on the meaning of modals.
• Elicit answers. Remember to ask them to justify them. • Give students a few minutes to read each sentence
carefully and to decide which modal cannot be used
Answers to complete it.
1B 2B 3A 4D 5A 6C 7C • Elicit answers.

Answers
Words in context 1c 2a 3b 4c 5c 6c
Exercise E
• Tell students this is a similar sort of task to ones they Exercise B
have done in previous units.
• Tell students they will be reading a text called The
• Give students a few minutes to match the words in Bloop. Ask them to predict what the text will be about.
the text with their definitions.
• Give students a minute to read the text quickly,
• Elicit answers. ignoring the modals for now, to check their
predictions.
Answers • Elicit answers.
1 fins 6 exceeds • Ask students to read the text more carefully and to
2 vast 7 bizarre choose the correct option.
3 evolve 8 tough • Elicit answers by asking students to read the text
4 distant 9 utterly aloud.
5 alien 10 beast

Answers
Quick chat 1 must
• This activity gives students the chance to 2 could
personalize the content of the Reading text. 3 could
• Ask students to discuss the questions in pairs first. 4 had to
5 may
• Elicit opinions and answers and encourage a
6 shouldn’t
class discussion.

For extra reading practice, refer students Quick chat


to pages 64 and 65 in the Workbook. • Discuss this question as a class. Ask students
to guess what they think the Bloop might be.

Grammar 1 Page 114


Exercise C
• Explain the activity and tell students they will need to
Aim of the lesson: use a modal verb in each gap and not to use more
• to revise modals than three words in total. Explain that shortened
forms count as one word.
• Give students five minutes to do the activity.
modals • Ask students to compare their answers in pairs.
• This activity focuses on the meaning of modals. • Elicit answers.
• Read through the relevant section on page 175
in the Grammar reference. Answers
• Then give students a couple of minutes to read 1 don’t need/don’t have
the extracts for meaning in the Check box and 2 can’t smoke
to match them with the explanations below. 3 should do more
• Elicit answers. 4 have to pay
5 can’t be
6 needn’t use
Answers 7 better remember
a 1, 4 b 5 c 2 d7 e3 f6 8 must be

105
check the words in the dictionary and to repeat them
Extra activity aloud.
Ask students to work in pairs. Ask them to come • Give students a minute to match the words to the
up with some suggestions or advice to give the pictures. Then elicit answers.
person who has said the following:
I would really like to be more environmentally Answers
friendly. What are some things I can do in my day-
1 heatwave 2 drought 3 flood 4 hurricane
to-day life that would help the environment?
5 tornado 6 blizzard
Encourage students to use modal verbs from
page 114 and ideas from Exercise C. Elicit ideas
from the different pairs and put them up on the Exercise D
board. For homework, students can write a letter • This exercise focuses on commonly confused words
to the imaginary person giving him/her advice. and collocations relating to weather.
• Give students a couple of minutes to read the text
carefully and to choose the correct options, then
For extra practice, refer students to page 66 elicit answers.
in the Workbook.
Answers
Vocabulary Page 115 1 freezing 2 below 3 light
5 light 6 force
4 heavy

Aim of the lesson:


Extra activity
to present and practise vocabulary relating to:
• the environment • Ask students if the weather conditions described
• the weather in this forecast are typical of winter weather
conditions where they live. If not, what kind of
weather is typical?
Exercise A • Ask students to talk about any extreme weather
• Give students a few minutes to read and match the conditions (from Exercise C) that their country
sentence halves. has experienced.
• Elicit answers.
Exercise E
Answers • Ask students to work in pairs. Tell them that each
1d 2e 3b 4c 5f 6a sentence contains a weather idiom. They need to
read each sentence carefully and try to guess what
Exercise B the idiom means. An approximate definition will do.
• This exercise checks that students have understood • Give students a few minutes to do the activity.
the words in Exercise A. • Elicit guesses.
• Give students a couple of minutes to reread the
sentences in Exercise A and to match the words in Answers
bold with a definition in Exercise B. 1 a complete surprise
• Elicit answers. 2 extremely happy
3 whatever happens
Answers 4 looks very displeased
5 a big deal about nothing
1 wildlife reserve
6 feeling rather unwell
2 endangered species
3 becoming extinct
4 environmentally friendly Your voice
5 acid rain
6 global warming • Ask students to discuss the questions in pairs first.
Encourage students to talk for two minutes each.
• Elicit answers. Ask a few students to give their
Exercise C talk in front of the whole class.
• Students will be familiar with most of these words.
Even so, they are often mispronounced, so for For extra practice, refer students to
pronunciation purposes encourage students to page 67 in the Workbook.

106
9
Listening Page 116 Quick chat
• This activity gives students the chance to
personalize using the weather vocabulary and
Aims of the lesson: the ideas from the Listening texts.
• to pre-teach key vocabulary (Exercise A) • Give students a minute to discuss the question
• to listen for gist (Exercise B) in pairs first.
• to listen for detail (Exercise C) • Elicit answers from different students.
• to talk about different weather conditions
(Quick chat)
For extra listening practice, refer students
Exercise A to page 69 of the Workbook, CD: folder
• The words in the box will all be heard in the Listening 'Workbook', track 10.
extracts.
• Ask students to work in pairs. To encourage prediction
and to check students know what the words mean,
get them to match them to the pictures. Remind them
Audioscript
that some words may go with more than one picture. 32 Exercises B & C
• Give them a few minutes to do the task. Speaker 1
• Elicit answers. Man: I was about ten kilometres from the village
and it was so deep there that the road ahead of
Answer me was totally blocked. I tried to turn around, but
1 bend, blow, gust, pouring, soaked the car slipped and hit a tree. The engine cut out
2 deep (flood), pouring, puddles, slip, soaked and then, well, there I was. I was stuck, and I had
3 bang, burn, electricity, flash no phone and I was absolutely freezing. I though
4 deep (snow), freezing, slip I was going to die there, really. Then these hunters
5 burn, scorching, shade appeared and found me there. They took me to
the village in their jeep. They saved my life, really!
32 Exercise B Speaker 2
• Read the Steps to success box. Woman: I was waiting for the bus. It was eight
• Play the extracts for students to listen and match thirty and I thought I had plenty of time to get to
each person with a picture from Exercise A. Ask work. There were a few puddles here and there,
students to note down the word/words that helped but it had actually stopped at that point and I was
them decide. They will be the same words from thinking, ‘Great, it looks like it’s going to be a nice
Exercise A. morning.’ Then all of a sudden it started pouring
• Play the extracts. down. It was really coming down in buckets, and
• Elicit answers. Alternatively, elicit answers after in the space of, I don’t know, a minute I got totally
each extract. soaked. I had to go back home and change,
and so that’s why I was the last one to get to the
Answers meeting. I should have been there an hour earlier,
so of course the boss wasn’t very pleased!
Speaker 1 – 4 (deep, slipped, freezing)
Speaker 2 – 2 (puddles, pouring, soaked) Speaker 3
Speaker 3 – 5 (burnt, shade, scorching) Man: I’ve never done that before. I usually go
Speaker 4 – 3 (bang, flash, electricity) swimming early in the morning or late in the
Speaker 5 – 1 (bending, gust, blew) afternoon because, you know, I get burnt very
easily and I usually stay in the shade. But that
32 Exercise C morning we got up late and it was our last day, so
we decided to go just for half an hour. But it was a
• Play the extracts again. Tell students to listen
stupid thing to do. I feel so silly about it, because
carefully and to match each speaker with a statement
it was midday and it was scorching hot and, well,
from Exercise B. Point out that there is one extra
my face went as red as a tomato. Honestly, for a
statement students do not need to use.
week I was too embarrassed to go out.
• Check answers. You may need to play the extracts a
third time. Speaker 4
Woman: We were just in the living room and I
Answers could see big black clouds gathering in the sky
outside, but it wasn’t actually raining. Then
1B 2C 3F 4D 5A

107
suddenly there was a huge bang and a flash of Answers
electricity and I nearly jumped out of my skin. And Fishing banned for five years
then I felt cold air coming into the room and John Fish to be protected in new marine sanctuaries
said, ‘Look! The window. It’s smashed!’ And, you
know, it’s a big window so it’s going to cost us
quite a lot to get it repaired. 33 Exercise C
Speaker 5 • Read the Helpful hints box together. Point out that
Old lady: I’ve never known anything like it. Not whenever students give an opinion, they should
here in Bumblebridge, anyway. The trees were always give a reason for it. Also, point out that
nearly bending right over, it was so strong. Anyway, reacting to what a speaking partner says shows that
I was making my way back home after church and they are listening.
suddenly this huge gust blew off my hat. Just like • Refer students to the Language chunks box and give
that! It took it right off and up into the air, and it them a minute to read through the expressions.
went so high that it got stuck in one of those very • Play the extract again. Students listen and note down
tall trees by the park. At first, I didn’t know where it the expressions they hear.
had got to, and then George said, ‘Oh look, there it • Check answers.
is … right up there.’ And then I saw where he was
pointing and I couldn’t believe it. It’s still there, now!
Answer
Supporting your opinion
That’s because …
So …
Since …
Speaking Page 117 Reacting to opinions
I see what you mean.
Aims of the lesson: I understand what you’re getting at.
• to prepare students for the model speaking
task they will hear (Exercise A)
• to listen to a model speaking task for gist Audioscript
(Exercise B) 33 Exercises B & C
• to notice and practise different ways of
Boy: I think this is a good idea, actually. That’s
supporting and reacting to opinions
because I think it will give time for the fish to live
(Exercise C)
without any dangers. If the fish are safe for a few
• to discuss and work towards a negotiated
years, their numbers will increase.
solution (Exercise D)
Girl: Well, I see what you mean, but I’m not sure I
• to make students aware of sentence stress agree with you. You see, lots of fishermen will lose
and silent letters (Say it right!) their jobs if that happens. So I think this solution
here is better. If we make some safe areas where
Exercise A fish are protected, that means fishermen can
• This exercise asks students to do the same task as continue to work in other parts of the sea. That
the one students will hear in the Exercise B model way, the fish won’t become extinct, and fishermen
Speaking task. The purpose is to make students won’t lose their jobs.
notice the difference between how they do the task Boy: Hmm, I understand what you’re getting at.
themselves, and how the students in the extract do it. But since you can’t really stop fish going in and
• Check students understand what fish farms (farms out of that protected area, I don’t think it will work.
where fish are raised for food), extinction and banned What do you think about this idea here …
mean.
• Give students a few minutes to discuss the solutions Exercise D
in pairs and to decide which ones they think are best. • Ask students to work in pairs.
• Read the task together and check students
33 Exercise B understand what they need to do.
• Tell students they will be listening to two students • Encourage them to support their opinions and react
doing the task from Exercise A. to their partner’s opinions using expressions from the
• Play the extract and ask students to listen for the two Language chunks box.
solutions the students talk about. • Give students at least five minutes to do the task.
• Elicit answers. • Elicit feedback from the different pairs.

108
9
Say it right! Exercise A
• This exercise also focuses on the meaning of third
Exercise E conditional sentences and the fact that the same
• Tell students that words that carry the most meaning concept can be expressed with different grammatical
are usually stressed more than other words when we structures.
speak. • Give students a few minutes to match the sentences
• Give students a minute to decide on the words they with the same meaning.
think are stressed the most in these sentences when
they are spoken. Tell them to say the sentences out Answer
loud as this may help them decide.
1c 2b 3a
• Elicit ideas.

Answer (and Tapescript) Exercise B


I can ride a bike, but I can’t ride a horse. • Tell students that each sentence contains a mistake.
My mum can’t speak English, but she can speak Give students a few minutes to find and correct the
French. mistakes.
• Elicit answers.
34 Exercise F Answers
• Play the CD for students to listen and check their
1 If we had protected tigers sooner, they
answers.
wouldn’t have become so rare.
• Elicit answers. 2 The house wouldn’t have flooded if it had been
• Play the extract again for students to listen and repeat. better built.
3 I wouldn’t have crashed the car if there hadn’t
35 Exercise G been ice on the road.
• Read the rubric together. 4 We could have saved the building if we had
• Play the CD for students to listen out for which acted sooner.
letters disappear.
• Play the extract again for students to listen and repeat. Exercise C
Answer • This activity focuses on both form and meaning.
• Give students a couple of minutes to do the task
The t in must and mustn’t disappears. When before checking answers.
we speak, the words become [ ] and [ ].
Answers
1a 2c 3b 4c 5b 6a
Grammar 2 Page 118
Exercise D
Aim of the lesson:
• To do this exercise students will need to understand
• to present and practise third conditional the meaning of the first sentence as well as the
sentences conditional sentence they form.
• To ensure students understand what they need to
do, do the first one or two items together.
third conditional sentences • Give students a few minutes to do the rest.
• Before focusing on the form of third conditional • Ask students to compare answers in pairs.
sentences, it is important that students first
understand the meaning of them. To this effect, Answers
ask students to read the sentence carefully and to 1 a hole in the roof, the bedroom would not
answer the concept checking questions that follow. have flooded
• Elicit answers. 2 had been litter bins near the beach, it would
• To recap and to get students to notice the form not have got covered in rubbish
of third conditional sentences, read through 3 snow had not got so deep, I could have gone
the relevant section on page 175 in the to school
Grammar reference. 4 had not discovered fossil fuels, we would not
have created global warming
Answer 5 we had looked after the forests, they would not
1 False 2 True 3 False have burnt down

109
Quick chat Exercise C
• Give students a few minutes to read the text more
• This activity gives students the chance to
carefully and to choose the best answer for each gap.
personalize using the third conditional.
• Ask students to compare answers in pairs.
• Give students a minute to think about each
question before they discuss them in pairs. • Elicit answers.
Encourage the use of third conditional sentences.
• Elicit opinions from different students. Answers
1B 2D 3A 4D 5C 6A 7B

For extra practice, refer students to page 68


in the Workbook.
Quick chat
• Ask students to answer the questions in pairs
first.
• Elicit answers and encourage a class discussion.
Practise your English Page 119
Exercise D
Aim of the lesson: • Explain to students that they will need to complete each
• to practise the grammar and vocabulary from sentence with the right form of the word in capitals.
the unit in an integrated way • Give students a few minutes to do the activity
individually before checking answers.

Exercise A Answers
• Give students a few minutes to discuss the questions 1 endangered 6 utterly
in pairs first before discussing them as a class. 2 environmentally 7 exceed
3 global 8 distant
4 extinct 9 strength
Answers
5 evolved 10 reserves
An upside down rainbow is a real event.
Normal rainbows are made when light penetrates
raindrops and re-emerges out the other side in
the same direction, but the inverted types, that is Writing Pages 120 and 121
upside down rainbows, are caused when sunlight
bounces off ice crystals high in the atmosphere,
sending the light rays back up.
Aims of the lesson:
Raining frogs is also a real event. It has • to warm students up and introduce them to the
happened as a result of a tornado sweeping task (Exercise A)
frogs up into the air and dropping them further • to get ideas (Exercise B)
away. • to analyze a model letter for ideas
(Exercise C)
Finally, giant hailstones or balls of ice are real • to analyze a model letter for organization and
events. (Their occurrence is explained in the text.) ways of linking ideas (Exercises D & E)
• to practise planning and writing a formal letter to
a newspaper (Exercises F, G & H)
Exercise B
• Tell students they will be reading a text about one of
the freak weather conditions in the pictures. Exercise A
• Give students two minutes to read the text quickly • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few minutes
and silently to find the answers to the questions. Tell to read the article and to discuss the two questions.
them to ignore the gaps for now. • Elicit ideas.
• Elicit answers.
Exercise B
• This is a guided brainstorming task. It is designed to
Answers help guide students towards coming up with clearer
The freak weather condition is the one in the third ideas for a topic.
picture. Giant ice balls may be formed on • Tell students to note down the ideas they came up
aeroplanes. They then break off and fall to Earth. with. Tell them to think about the questions listed here
as a way to be more precise about their ideas.

110
9
• Divide the board into two sections: Why do forest
fires happen? / How can forest fires be prevented? Answers
• Elicit feedback and put the ideas students come up Joining similar ideas:
with on the board. furthermore, in addition, likewise
Joining opposing ideas:
Exercise C however, in contrast, on the contrary, on the
• Tell students that the letter they are about to read other hand
relates to the topic in Exercise A.
• Give students a couple of minutes to read the letter
to see if any of their ideas are mentioned.
• Elicit feedback. Planning and writing
Quick chat Exercise F
• Discuss the questions as a class. Encourage • Read through the task together.
students to say why they agree or disagree with • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
the writer. minutes to brainstorm ideas about what can be done
with the rubbish.
• Elicit ideas and write them up on the board. If
students do not come up with many, give them
Skills development: Organizing some ideas yourself.

the whole letter


Suggested answers
Exercise D
Reducing waste by recycling and/or consuming
• Explain to students that there is more than one way less.
to organize a letter like this. Tell students that both Treating rubbish rather than dumping it.
these ways are appropriate. Choosing another location for the waste dump.
• Give them a minute to look back at the letter and to
pick the plan that it is based on.
• Elicit the answer. Exercise G
• Give students a couple of minutes to make notes in
Answers their notebooks according to the Planner. Refer them
Plan B to Exercise D for a plan to follow if they like.

Exercise H
• When writing their letters, remind students to use
Organizing each paragraph expressions from the Language chunks box.
• Read through the Quick check! box and tell students
Exercises E to use this as a checklist before they hand in their
• Read the Helpful hints box together. Explain to letters.
students that a ‘mini plan’ of each paragraph does not • For advice on how to write a formal letter to a
need to be on paper, but they do need to have some newspaper, refer students to page 190 in the Writing
idea how they will begin a paragraph and how they will database.
develop it. • If time allows, ask students to write, or begin to write,
• Explain to students that the linking words in the box their letters in class.
connect the ideas in the letter and help organize
them within each paragraph. For extra Writing practice, refer students to
• Give students a few minutes to find some of these page 69 in the Workbook.
phrases in the letter and to notice how they are used.
• Ask students to put the words and phrases under the Teacher's resource file:
correct heading. – Progress test (page 175)
• Elicit answers. – Communication and writing (page 187)
• Refer students to the ways of expressing certainty – Fun and games (page 199)
and introducing other people’s opinions in the – Self-assessment checklist (page 211)
Language chunks box. Tell them that these
expressions can help make their ideas clear. Editable tests CD: Unit 9 test

111
10 Food for thought
Themes Skills aims
Health, food and drink Reading
Students read a long text:
Language aims • for gist and specific information
Grammar • to understand text cohesion
Relative clauses Listening
Unreal past Students listen to eight short extracts:
Vocabulary • to identify speakers and topics of conversation
Health and diet • for gist and details
Food and drink Speaking
Students conduct a pairwork speaking activity
and practise:
• asking about and expressing preference
Writing
Students write an informal letter of advice
and practise:
• giving advice
• organization

Reading Pages 122 and 123 Reading


Exercise B
• This activity encourages students to read the text for
Aims of the lesson:
gist.
• to warm students up and encourage prediction • Give students a couple of minutes to skim the text
(Exercise A) very quickly and silently to match the common beliefs
• to read for gist (Exercise B) in Exercise A with a paragraph in the text. Tell them
• to read for specific information (Exercise C) they do not need to read the whole paragraph to do
• to understand text cohesion (Exercise D) this. For most of the paragraphs, the first sentence
• to guess the meaning of unknown words from should be enough.
the context (Exercise E) • To ensure students do this quickly, time them.
• to talk about the ideas in the text (Quick chat) • Elicit answers.

Answers
a7 b5 c1 d6 e3 f4 g2

Exercise A Exercise C
• The truth about these common beliefs is revealed in • Ask students to read the article more carefully to find
the Reading text. Doing this activity will encourage whether the common beliefs in Exercise A are right
prediction and give students a motivating reason to or wrong. Give them about five minutes for this.
first read the text. • Elicit answers.
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
minutes to decide which of the common beliefs they Answers
think are true.
right: a, b, e
• Elicit feedback. Don’t give anything away, as this will wrong: c, d, f, g
spoil the next two activities.

112
10
Exercise D
• Read through the Steps to success box together as
Grammar 1 Page 124
a class.
• Ask students to read the missing sentence parts Aim of the lesson:
carefully and to find any key words that will help • to revise relative clauses
them work out which paragraphs the parts might be
missing from.
• Tell students that they should read each paragraph
relative clauses
carefully both before and after they choose a
• This activity focuses on the different uses of
sentence part to make sure the sentence part makes
relative clauses.
sense in the paragraph.
• Give students a couple of minutes to read the
• Give students seven minutes to do the task.
extracts carefully and to answer questions a to e
• Ask students to compare their answers in pairs. that follow.
• Elicit answers. • Elicit answers. Point out that with a relative
pronoun extract 2 would read:
… this is a myth that almost everyone believes.
Answers
• To recap, read through the relevant section on
1F 2B 3G 4C 5H 6E 7A
page 176 in the Grammar reference.
• Ask students to reread the extracts and decide
which sentences include defining and which
Words in context non-defining relative clauses.

Exercise E Answers
• Tell students this is a similar sort of task to ones they a 3 b 1, 2 c 3 d 2 e 1, 2
have done in previous units. 1 D 2 D 3 ND
• Give students a few minutes to match the words/
phrases in bold in the text with their definitions.
• Elicit answers. Exercise A
• This exercise also practises relative pronouns.
• Give students a couple of minutes to read each
Answers sentence carefully and to choose the correct option.
1 essential • Elicit answers.
2 adjustments
3 antioxidants Answers
4 set a limit 1 who 5 when
5 point of view 2 which 6 whose
6 associated with 3 why 7 on which
7 the set 4 where 8 of whom
8 trigger

Exercise B
• This exercise focuses on the meaning of defining
Quick chat and non-defining relative clauses.
• This activity gives students the chance to • Give students a couple of minutes to read the
personalize the content of the Reading text. sentences and to decide if the gaps should be
• Discuss the first question as a class. filled with a defining or non-defining relative clause.
• Ask the students to discuss the beliefs Remind students that defining relative clauses give
regarding the common cold in pairs first. us essential information whereas non-defining ones
• When they have finished they can check if give us extra information. So, if the gapped sentences
these beliefs are true or false on page 193. make sense as they are, they are probably non-
• Ask students if the answers surprised them. defining relative clauses.
• Elicit answers. Ask students to justify their choice.

For extra reading practice, refer students to


Answers
pages 70 and 71 in the Workbook. 1 D 2 ND 3 D 4 D 5 D 6 ND

113
Exercise C Exercise E
• Explain that the sentences in this exercise contain • This exercise offers students the opportunity to have
the information missing from the sentences in some fun with the new structure.
Exercise B. • Read the instructions and the example sentence
• Ask students to match the sentences first. together.
• Elicit answers. • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
• Give students a few minutes to rewrite the sentences minutes to come up with a quiz question for each of
using commas where necessary and omitting the the relative pronouns in the list. They can ask about
relative pronoun if it isn’t necessary. anything or anyone.
• Ask students to compare their answers in pairs. • When students have finished writing their quiz
• Elicit answers. questions, they should swap questions with another
pair. Each pair should then try to answer the quiz
questions they end up with.
Answers
a6 b2 c4 d3 e5 f1 For extra practice, refer students to
page 72 in the Workbook.
1 People who/that don’t smoke have healthier
lives.
2 My brother Ben, who you met last year, is also
coming to lunch.
Vocabulary Page 125
3 I was speaking to someone who/that was
telling me about the benefits of super foods. Aim of the lesson:
4 Is this the drink which/that contains a lot
to present and practise vocabulary relating to:
of vitamins? • health and diet
5 I’m looking for a cookbook which/that has • food and drink
vegetarian recipes.
6 Louise, whose carrot cake is excellent, made
it for me. Exercise A
• This exercise focuses on common collocations
relating to health or injuries.
Exercise D
• Give students a couple of minutes to match to
• Explain to students that to do this exercise they need make phrases.
to read the sentences carefully and decide which • Elicit answers.
sentence should be the relative clause. That is,
• Ask students if any of these things has ever happened
which is the main clause and which the non-defining
to them.
relative clause with extra information.
• Do the first one together to make it clear to students
what it is they have to do. Answers
• Give students a few minutes to do the rest. Remind 1d 2a 3b 4c 5g 6f 7e
them to use commas.
• Ask students to compare their answers in pairs. Exercise B
• Elicit answers.
• This exercise presents and practises phrasal verbs
relating to health. Check students understand some
Answers of the meanings of the phrasal verbs by giving
1 This cookbook, which has a lot of interesting examples.
recipes, is from the 19th century. • Give students a couple of minutes to complete the
2 Many people eat fast food, which is high in sentences with the right form of the phrasal verbs in
calories. the box.
3 I eat pasta, which I make myself, three times • Elicit answers.
a week.
4 Helen, who doesn’t eat anything but pizza, Answers
needs to lose weight. 1 gone off
5 On Saturdays, I go to George’s cafe, where I 2 put on
always order their iced coffee. 3 take care of
6 On Friday nights we always go to The Jumping 4 get over
Bean, which is my favourite restaurant. 5 cut down on

114
10
Exercise C Exercise E
• Explain to students the pairs of words describing • Ask students to tell each other about a recipe for
food in each sentence are opposites. a dish they can make and a tasty meal they have
• Give students a couple of minutes to read the had.
sentences and to choose the correct option. • When students have finished, ask some of them to
• Elicit answers. Check students understand the tell the rest of the class about their recipe or tasty
meaning of the words and their opposites. dish.

Answers Extra activity


1 tasty If time allows in the lesson, ask students to write
2 sweet; sour down their recipe (from Exercise E). Alternatively,
3 spicy ask them to write a recipe for a dish they can
4 still; sparkling make for homework. Tell them to also provide
5 crisp a picture for the dish that can accompany the
6 bitter recipe.
7 light
8 well-done
9 raw For extra practice, refer students to page 73
10 Salty
in the Workbook.

Exercise D
• This exercise focuses on words connected with
food preparation.
Listening Page 126
• Ask students if they have ever made a pizza or some
jelly. If they have, ask them to tell the class how they Aims of the lesson:
did it.
• to pre-teach key vocabulary (Exercise A)
• Tell students that they are going to read two recipes.
• to encourage prediction (Exercise B)
Model the word ['resəpi] for students to repeat, as it
is often mispronounced. • to listen and identify the speakers and topic of
conversation (Exercise C)
• Give students a couple of minutes to read the recipes
• to listen for detail (Exercise D)
quickly and to say if they think the recipes seem
• to talk about students’ own reactions to the
easy.
information in the listening texts (Your voice)
• Students scan the recipes for words relating to verbs
connected with food preparation, quantities and food
and write them in the table in their notebooks.
• Elicit answers and write them on the board in a Exercise A
similar table. Check students understand them. • Most of the words in the box will be heard in the
Listening extracts.
• Ask students to work in pairs. To encourage prediction
Answers and to check students know what the words mean,
Verbs Quantities Food ask them to match these words to the first four sets
connected of pictures.
with food • Give students a couple of minutes to do this. Tell
preparation them that the words can be used more than once.
slice, fry, put, 1 tablespoon pizza base, • Elicit answers and check students understand the
spread, grate, 100 grams tomato paste, words. For pronunciation purposes, you might also
sprinkle, add, 1 cup cheese, want to model the words for the students to repeat.
cut, remove, some pepper,
bake, serve, 1 packet mushrooms,
boil, pour, stir, onion, olive Suggested answers
chop, refrigerate oil, olives, 1 fattening, nutritious
basil leaves, 2 boiled, cooked, fried, nutritious, raw
jelly crystals, 3 boiled, fried, grilled
fruit 4 cooked, grilled, raw, roast

115
Exercise B
• This exercise encourages students to predict what Audioscript
they will hear from looking at the pictures.
• Ask students to work in pairs. Ask students to look 36 Exercise C
at the last four sets of pictures and to think of three 1
words or phrases they might expect to hear. Tell Woman: What are you having?
them to predict the possible topic of conversation as Man: I think I might go for one of those delicious
well. looking cakes.
• Elicit ideas. Woman: Oh, they do look nice, but they’re
probably a thousand calories each!
36 Exercise C Man: Yes, but you only live once … go on, get
• Tell students that they are going to hear the first one.
extract. As they listen they should answer the three Woman: I think I’ll go for something a bit
questions. They won’t have time to write answers, so more nutritious.
tell them to just listen. Man: Not a sandwich again.
• Play the extract. Woman: I’m also a little hungry and I don’t think
• Elicit answers. the cake will satisfy my hunger.

Answers
The speakers are in a restaurant.
Audioscript
A
They are friends.
They’re talking about what they’re going to
37 Exercise D
order. 1
Woman: What are you having?
W
Man: I think I might go for one of those delicious
M
37 Exercise D llooking cakes.
• Tell students they will need to listen carefully to each Woman: Oh, they do look nice, but they’re
W
extract and decide if the statement for each statement p
probably a thousand calories each!
is true, false or the information is not stated. Man: Yes, but you only live once … go on, get
M
• To recap students' knowledge of the strategies you o
one.
may refer them to page 194 before they start listening. Woman: I think I’ll go for something a bit more
W
n
nutritious.
• Play the extracts.
Man: Not a sandwich again.
M
• Elicit answers. Alternatively, elicit answers after each Woman: I’m also a little hungry and I don’t think
W
extract. Play the extracts again. Make sure students tthe cake will satisfy my hunger.
have covered all the eight statements. If students
have difficulty with any of them, play those extracts 2
again. Woman: Here you are, dear.
W
Man: Oh … agh … these vegetables are raw.
M
Woman: I know, dear, they’re more nutritious that
W
Answers w
way. This morning I was reading an article that
1T 2 NS 3 T 4 F 5 NS 6 F 7 F 8 T s
said that cooking vegetables destroys all the
v
vitamins they contain.
Man: Well, from now on, I’d like my vegetables
M
Quick chat b
boiled thank you very much.
Woman: Yes, dear.
W
• This activity gives students the chance to
personalize the ideas from the Listening texts. 3
• Give students two minutes to discuss the Woman 1: Have these meatballs been fried?
W
questions in pairs first. F
Fried food doesn’t agree with me, you know that.
• Elicit talks from different students. Encourage a Woman 2: I don’t know. Let me try them and I’ll
W
ttell you. Oh, they’re very greasy. I’d say, yes,
class discussion based on healthy eating.
tthey’ve been fried.
Woman 1: Oh, hang on. It says here in the menu
W
tthat they’re low-fat grilled meatballs.
For extra listening practice, refer students Woman 2: Oh, yes, I suppose they could be.
W
to page 75 of the Workbook, CD: folder Woman 1: So I can have them then.
W
'Workbook', track 11.

116
10
4 Speaking Page 127
Woman: This is a lovely restaurant, isn’t it?
W
Man: Yes, and so it should be. Have you seen the
M
p
prices on this menu? Aims of the lesson:
Woman: Um, I think I’ll have the roast beef …
W • to prepare students for the model speaking task
a
actually no, the steak tartare. That sounds nice. they will hear (Exercise A)
Man: You realize it’s raw minced meat, don’t you?
M • to listen to a model speaking task for gist
Woman: Raw?
W (Exercise B)
Man: Yes, raw … uncooked.
M • to notice different ways of asking about and
Woman: Oh, that doesn’t sound very appetizing!
W expressing preference (Exercise C)
• to discuss and work towards a negotiated
5
solution in a speaking task (Exercises D & E)
Celebrity chef: Now after you’ve spread the base
C • to make students aware of sentence stress
w
with the tomato sauce, which remember, we’ve (Say it right!)
a
added some basil to, you’ll need to add the
c
cheese. Now, you need to make sure you don’t
s
slice or cut the cheese into big pieces because Exercise A
iit won’t melt as evenly when it’s cooking in the • This exercise sets the context for the model Listening
o
oven. I think it melts better when it’s grated. extract in the next exercise.
6 • Give students a minute to brainstorm the things they
Girl: What happened to you?
G would need to consider when organizing a party.
Boy: Oh, I fell off my bike and broke my arm.
B • Elicit ideas.
Girl: That’s awful. Are you OK?
G
Boy: I am now, but you should have seen me a
B 38 Exercise B
m
month ago. I’d grazed my knees, and had bruises • Tell students they will be listening to two friends
a
all over my body. organizing a party.
Girl: Well, you look all right now. When do you
G • Play the extract and ask students to note down the
g
get the cast taken off? things in the list they talk about.
Boy: Not for another couple of weeks.
B • Elicit answers.
Girl: Can I sign it?
G
7 Answers
Receptionist: Good morning, Dr McDermott’s
R food, drink, music, cleaning up after the party,
s
surgery. plates, glasses and cutlery, the cost
Man: Hello, I’d like to make an appointment to
M
s
see the doctor tomorrow morning.
Receptionist: Of course. Is nine o’clock all right?
R 38 Exercise C
Man: Yes, that’s fine. Oh, hang on a minute, I
M • Read the Helpful hints box together and ask
c
can’t. Can we make it 11? students to read through the expressions in the
Receptionist: I’m afraid she has another
R Language chunks box.
a
appointment at that time. Will 11.30 do? • Tell students that in the conversation from Exercise B,
Man: Yes, that’ll do. Thank you.
M some of the expressions from the Language chunks
are used.
8
• Play the extract again. Students listen and note down
Doctor: What seems to be the problem?
D the expressions they hear.
Man: Well, I tripped in the street yesterday and
M
• Check answers.
m
my ankle’s been hurting.
Doctor: Can you walk on it?
D
Man: Yes, but it hurts.
M Answers
Doctor: Let’s have a look at it. Take off your shoe
D Asking about preference
a
and sock. Oh, it’s very swollen. We’d better get What would you rather have, X or Y?
a
an X-ray done. I don’t think it’s broken, but it’s Would(n’t) you rather … (than)?
p
probably sprained. Expressing preference
Man: Oh, that explains why I’m having difficulty
M I’d prefer (not) to …
w
walking. I’d rather not have …

117
• Read the rubric together. Ask students to predict the
Audioscript words they think will be stressed.
• Play the CD for students to listen and decide on the
38 Exercises B & C words that are stressed.
Girl: I think we need to arrange the food and
drinks first. What would you rather have, finger Answers (and Audioscript)
food like crisps or a proper buffet?
1 Which would you prefer, Madonna or the
Boy: I think we should have finger food. A buffet
Black Eyed Peas?
is going to cost too much and who’s going to cook
2 Do you prefer going to a wedding or to a
all the food?
dinner party?
Girl: Yes, I suppose you’re right. What about drinks?
3 I think I’d prefer finger food to a buffet.
Boy: I’d rather not have too much choice for the
4 I’d rather not have house music at the party.
same reason. I think we should have a big fruit
5 I’ve got a good recipe for fruit punch.
punch that everyone drinks.
Girl: That sounds good. I’ve got a good recipe for
that and we could make a huge bucketful of it. Are 39 Exercise G
we going to have paper cups and plates?
Boy: Yes, and plastic cutlery. That way we can • Play the extract again for students to listen and repeat.
just throw everything away afterwards and we
won’t have lots of washing-up to do. Extra activity
Girl: Sounds good. What about the music? I’d For more practice of sentence stress, ask
prefer not to have to organize that too. It’ll be too students, in pairs, to practise reading out a
much work. paragraph from the Reading text on pages 122
Boy: Yeah, and wouldn’t you rather eat and and 123. As they read ask them to focus on the
dance than be in charge of the music all night? right words to stress.
Girl: Definitely! We could hire a DJ. They’re
probably not that expensive.
Boy: Let’s make a note of that. Do you want to
call around and find out? Grammar 2 Page 128
Girl: OK. What type of music should we have?
Boy: What about house music or R and B?
Girl: I think I’d prefer to have some other kind of Aim of the lesson:
music. Some kind of rock music.
• to present and practise unreal past
Boy: Like?
Girl: Well, like …

Exercise D unreal past


• Ask students to work in pairs or small groups. • This exercise helps students understand the
• Read the task together and check students meaning of the unreal past and the time frame
understand what they need to do. referred to in each sentence.
• Encourage them to ask about their partner’s • Ask students to match the sentences to their
preferences and to express preference, using meanings first.
expressions from the Language chunks box. • Elicit answers.
• Give students at least five minutes to do the task. • Ask students to answer the questions that follow.
• Elicit feedback from the different pairs/groups. • Elicit answers. Point out that these constructions
are called unreal past because the verb may be
Exercise E in the past simple/continuous, but the sentence
does not refer to the past. It only refers to the
• Ask students to work in pairs or small groups.
past when the verb is in the past perfect.
• Give students a few minutes to discuss the
• To recap and to encourage students to notice
questions.
the form of the unreal past, read through the
• Elicit feedback from the different pairs/groups.
relevant section on page 176 in the Grammar
reference.
Say it right!
39 Exercise F Answers
• This exercise continues the work on sentence stress a2 b4 c1 d 3, 5 e 6
from the previous unit.

118
10
Exercise A Exercise D
• This exercise checks that students understand the • This activity gives students the chance to personalize
meaning and form of the unreal past. the unreal past.
• Give students a few minutes to choose the correct • Read the instruction and example sentence
option in each sentence. together.
• Give students a few minutes to come up with some
wishes or regrets about their town.
Answers
• Ask students to compare what they have written in
1 would fit pairs.
2 had
• Ask students to read out some of their wishes and to
3 could give up
say if they agree with other students’ wishes.
4 didn’t
5 started Exercise E
6 hadn’t eaten
• Ask students to work in pairs. Tell them to come up
with at least three sentences for each situation.
• Elicit sentences.
Exercise B
• To do this exercise students will need to understand
the meaning of the first sentence as well as the Suggested answers
sentence they need to write. Picture 1
• To ensure students understand what they need to I wish I had straight hair.
do, do the first one or two sentences together. If only I had more money to go shopping.
• Give students a few minutes to do the rest. I wish I had nicer clothes to wear.
I’d rather have long hair.
• Ask students to compare answers in pairs.
It’s time I went shopping.
• Elicit answers.
Picture 2
If only I didn’t have to study.
Answers I wish I had a girlfriend.
1 I’d gone to the party I’d rather be skateboarding with friends.
2 my sister wouldn’t fall over all the time It’s time I finished my homework.
3 you would stop complaining so much
4 I had told Georgia the truth For extra practice, refer students to page 74
5 I had gone to Denise’s party on Saturday in the Workbook.
6 I weren’t/wasn’t sick
7 stopped watching so much television
8 didn’t eat so much chocolate
9 started eating/ate some fruit Practise your English Page 129
10 didn’t open the window
Aim of the lesson:
• to practise the grammar and vocabulary from
Exercise C the unit in an integrated way
• This activity will help students build confidence and
be aware of common mistakes made while using
unreal past. Exercise A
• Allow students enough time to analyze each sentence • Discuss this question as a class. Ask students if they
and notice the mistake. agree that most fast food is junk food.
• Elicit answers.
Answer
Because it is highly processed, contains a lot of
Answers
salt, sugar, fat and calories and it contains very
1 I wish I knew ... few nutrients.
2 I wish you would shut up ...
3 If only Charlie could get ...
4 I'd really rather you didn't let ... Exercise B
5 It's about time you started ... • Tell students they will be reading a text about an
experiment the man in the picture conducted.

119
• Give students three minutes to read the text quickly
and silently to find the answers to the questions. Tell Writing Pages 130 and 131
them to ignore the gaps for now.
• Elicit the answer. Ask students if they have seen the
film Super Size Me. Aims of the lesson:
• to introduce students to the task and to get
Answer ideas (Exercise A)
• to analyze a model letter for ideas (Exercise B)
He wanted to prove that a diet of junk food has a
• to analyze a model letter for appropriate register
very bad effect on our health. By the end of the
month on this junk food diet he had got sick and and organization (Exercises C, D & E)
put on a lot of weight, thus proving his theory. • to practise planning and writing a letter of
advice (Exercises F & G)

Exercise C
• Give students a few minutes to read the text more Exercise A
carefully and to find a word that fits into each gap. • Ask students if they have ever read a letter to a
• Ask students to compare answers in pairs. problem page. Ask them what sorts of problems
• Elicit answers. people write in about?
• Read Mary’s letter together as a class.
Answers • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
1 B minutes to come up with some suggestions for Mary.
2 C • Elicit ideas.
3 A
4 A Exercise B
5 D
• Tell students that the letter they are about to read is
6 C
a response by Rosanne to Mary’s letter.
7 A
8 D • Give students a couple of minutes to read the letter
9 B to see if any of their suggestions are mentioned.
10 A • Elicit feedback.
• Read the Helpful hints box together. Tell students
that this advice applies to any sensitive letter they
Quick chat write whether they know the person or not. When
• Ask students to answer the questions in pairs someone has a problem it is important not to offend
first. him or her. Being too direct may come across as
• Elicit answers and encourage a class rude.
discussion based on the questions.

Exercise D Skills development:


• Give students a few minutes to do the activity on Appropriate register
their own before checking answers.
Exercise C
Answers • Give students a couple of minutes to scan the letter
1 I could stop for modal verbs. Tell them to note them down.
2 I had not told Gemma • Elicit feedback. Point out the fact that other ways of
3 you didn’t call me giving advice and making suggestions are also used
4 it isn’t tasty in the letter. It is not a good idea to use too many
modal verbs.
Exercise E
• Give students a couple of minutes to do the activity Answers
on their own before checking answers. … I think could help you.
It might be a good idea …
Answers You could try walking.
1C 2D 3B 4A 5B 6C 7A you can snack on …

120
10
Exercise D
Suggested answers
• This exercise gives students practice in using modal
Diet:
verbs to give advice in a more courteous way.
You could take a packed lunch to school.
• Explain the task and read the first example together. You could take pieces of fruit with you to eat on
• Give students a few minutes to do the task. your way to school.
• Elicit answers. Accept any that are polite and You might want to try healthy snacks like nuts
grammatically correct. and dried fruit.
You should try and eat breakfast – it’s the
healthiest meal of the day.
Suggested answers Exercise:
1 It might be a good idea to / You could eat You could go for walks or walk to school if it’s not
fewer snacks. too far.
You might like to get a bicycle.
2 It might be a good idea to / You could eat
You could take up team sports.
more fruit.
3 You could work out three times a week.
4 It might be a good idea to exercise. / People
who don’t exercise can put on weight. Exercise G
5 You could cut down on the chocolate • Refer students to the Language chunks box. It
you’re eating. contains some stock phrases they can use in letters
of advice.
• Read through the Quick check! box and tell students
to use this as a checklist before they hand in their
letters.
Organization • For advice on how to write a letter of advice, refer
students to page 191 in the Writing database.
Exercise E • If time allows, ask students to write, or begin to write,
• Tell students that even though this is an informal their letters in class.
letter, organization is still important. For extra writing practice, refer students to
• Give students a few minutes to match each paragraph page 75 in the Workbook.
with a topic.
• Elicit answers. Teacher's resource file:
– Progress test (page 176)
– Communication and writing (page 188)
Answers – Fun and games (page 200)
ending the letter with a friendly comment E – Self-assessment checklist (page 212)
saying why you’re writing A Editable tests CD: Unit 10 test
advice about diet C and D
advice about exercise B and D

Planning and writing


Exercise F
• Read through the task together.
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
minutes to come up with some suggestions for
Joaquim.
• Elicit ideas and write them up on the board. If they
don’t come up with many, give them some ideas
yourself.
• Give students a couple of minutes to make notes in
the Planner.

121
Learn about biology Units 9 and 10

The human digestive system Answers


and nutrition 1 Chewing our food breaks it down and mixes
it with saliva, which makes it soft and easy to
swallow.
Pages 132 and 133 2 The sphincter prevents food from coming back
out of the stomach.
3 They break down food into nutrients.
Aims of the lesson: 4 Because food is mixed with liquid, just as
• to motivate students to learn about biology, clothes are with water in a washing machine.
food and nutrition through English 5 During stage D in the small intestine, nutrients
• to read for gist (Exercise B) from digested food are absorbed into the body.
• to read for specific information (Exercises A, 6 To the large intestine from where it is finally
C & D) expelled.
• to do some research work on the cross-
curriculum topic (Project)
Exercise D
• This exercise focuses on a more practical side of the
Exercise A topic – food and nutrition, which should help students
• Ask students to read the introduction and find think of their food habits and some ways to make
answers to the questions. them healthier.
• Check answers as a class. • Ask students to read the warning and find answers
to the questions.
Answers • Check answers as a class.
1 so that it becomes fuel that the body can use
2 It is a long, twisting tube with muscles that Answers
starts at the mouth and finishes at the bottom.
a fats, protein, carbohydrates, dairy, fruit and
vegetables
b alcohol, too much fat, too much meat
Exercise B
• Give students one or two minutes to study the
diagram. You might refer students to the dictionary
at the end of their Sudent’s Books to check meaning
and pronunciation of the diagram terms. Project
• Students read the descriptions and match them with
the words in the box. Assign the project for homework. Make a display
• Check answers as a class. of students' works and have a few students talk
about their projects during the next class.

Answers
A oesophagus
B mouth Answers
C stomach protein: fish, chicken, beef, lentils
D small intestine dairy: milk, cheese yoghurt
E large intestine complex carbohydrates: cereal, rice, bread,
nuts, spaghetti
fats, oils and sweets: olive oil, butter, jam
Exercise С fruit: banana, watermelon, peach
• Ask students to read the text in Exericse B once vegetables: broccoli, aubergine, spinach,
again and find answers to the questions. cucumber, tomato
• Check answers as a class.

122
Culture today … Units 9 and 10

Exercise D
World’s top 7 eco-friendly
• Give students one minute to complete the task. You
countries might want to allow them to use the dictionary at the
back of their Student’s Books to help them with some
of the words.
Pages 134 and 135
• Elicit answers.
Aims of the lesson:
• to motivate students to learn about different Answers
types of energy through English 1 instrumental
• to read for gist (Exercise B) 2 grid
• to read for specific information (Exercise C) 3 legislation
• to practise key vocabulary (Exercise D) 4 adhere
• to give students an opportunity to discuss what 5 embark
they've learned and how it relates to their own 6 infrastructure
personal experiences through discussion (Your 7 upgrade
voice) 8 profound

Exercise A
Your voice Exercise E
• Ask students to look at the types of energy and make
sure they understand what each one is. • Ask students to form pairs.
• Make a chart on the board and ask students to list • Ask them to use the questions in the discussion to
advantages and disadvantages of each one. talk about their own ideas and personal experiences.
• Ask students if they know what produces each form
of energy, eg wind turbine, solar panel, etc.
Exercise B
• Give students one minute to match the headings with
the paragraphs. Remind them that there is one extra
heading they do not need to use.
• Discuss answers as a class.

Answers
A7 B3 C1 D2 E5 F8 G4

Exercise C
• Give students a minute to scan the texts quickly and
silently in order to answer the questions.
• Check answers as a class.

Answers
1 to be 100% reliant on renewable energy
2 They redesigned it in three years.
3 because the demand for power in Denmark
rises
4 the mountains and the fact that it has many
forests
5 It has saved its last remaining rainforest.
6 tourism and high biodiversity
7 to become more competitive with global
economies

123
Progress check 5

Pages 136 and 137 Exercise G


1 B
Exercise A 2 A
1 blizzard 3 B
2 heatwave 4 D
3 hurricane 5 C
4 drought 6 B
5 tornado 7 D
6 flood
Exercise H
Exercise B 1 Charlie, whose dad is a chef, is learning to
1 freezing become a pastry chef.
2 bright 2 The cake that you made for Tina’s birthday was
3 light delicious.
4 heavy 3 This brownie recipe, which I downloaded from the
5 strong Internet, is the best I’ve ever tried.
6 below 4 The flat I live in has a huge kitchen.
5 The restaurant where we went for dinner last
Exercise C night was really cheap.
1 Slice 6 If it hadn’t been so cold yesterday, we could have
2 Pour gone out.
3 spicy 7 You don’t need to recycle everything you use, but
4 raw you should at least make an effort.
5 Refrigerate 8 Television programmes should promote green
6 cup living.

Exercise D Exercise I
1 b 1 warmer, we would have
2 d 2 hadn’t rained all day,
3 e 3 hadn’t been
4 c 4 you would stop
5 f 5 rather you didn’t
6 a 6 you went to bed
7 wish I hadn’t told
Exercise E 8 I had ordered
1 where Ask students to complete 9–10 Review on
2 which pages 76 and 77 of the Workbook.
3 which
4 which
5 which
6 who
7 when
8 why
can omit: 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8
replace with that: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8

Exercise F
1 have to
2 might
3 should
4 can’t
5 can’t
6 could

124
11 Vanished without a trace!
Theme Skills aims
Crime and mystery Reading
Students read two long texts for:
Language aims • specific information
Grammar • details
Modal perfect Listening
Infinitives and -ing forms Students listen to an interview for:
make, let, allow • gist
Vocabulary • details
People and crime Speaking
Crime and mystery Students conduct a pairwork speaking activity
Word building and practise:
Dependent prepositions • asking for clarification
• expressing agreement
Writing
Students write a story and practise:
• describing characters’ reactions and feelings
• adding drama through adjectives and direct
speech

• Tell students that they will hear three stories of


Reading Pages 138 and 139 unsolved mysteries. Tell them that all three are true
stories.
Aims of the lesson: • Explain to students that as they listen they should fill
in the fact files with the information that is missing.
• to warm students up and introduce them to the
topic of the reading text (Exercise A) • Play the extracts for students to complete the fact
• to scan for specific information (Exercise B) files. You will probably need to play the extracts twice
• to read for details (Exercise C) as they are quite short and students may not get all
• to guess the meaning of unknown words from the information the first time they listen.
the context (Exercise D) • Elicit answers. Ask students if the stories surprised
• to talk about the ideas in the text (Quick chat) them.

Answers
1
Year of disappearance: 1872
Where last seen: New York
Background information
2
All three mysteries in Exercise A and both
mysteries in the Reading texts are true stories. All Year of disappearance: 1937
five mysteries until today remain unsolved. Where last seen: Lae (in Papua New Guinea)
3
Year of disappearance: 1974
Where last seen: a friend’s house in Uckfield,
39 Exercise A
Sussex
• The three mysteries students will hear about relate
thematically to the Reading texts. Don’t spend too
much time discussing them as this will be done in the
Quick chat section after the Reading.

125
Exercise C
Audioscript
A di i • Read through the Steps to success box together as a
class. Tell students that they should find the parts of
40 Exercise A the text where they get their answers from.
1 • Ask students to read the questions (but not the
In 1872 the Mary Celeste set sail from New York, options) and to find the key words that will help them
c
commanded by Captain Briggs. On board were know what information to look for in the texts.
th crew, Briggs’ family and 1,701 barrels of
the • Ask students to scan the text to find where the
a
alcohol. A few months later, the ship was found answers are and to read those parts more carefully.
fl
floating near Gibraltar, with nobody aboard. Their
• Give students seven minutes to do the task.
d
disappearance has never been explained.
• Ask students to compare their answers in pairs. Tell
2
them to try to convince their partner that their answer
In July 1937 the American pilot Amelia Earhart –
is right. This will make sure that they justify their
th first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean,
the
choices.
to off from Lae in New Guinea. It was the next
took
• Elicit answers. Remember to ask them to justify
p of her record-breaking round the world trip. A
part
these choices.
fe hours later, however, Earhart and her plane
few
h disappeared forever.
had
3 Answers
T seventh Earl of Lucan – known as Lucky
The 1D 2B 3A 4B 5C 6B 7B
L
Lord Lucan, has never been seen since the night
o November 7th, 1974. On the night that Lucan
of
d
disappeared, someone broke into Lady Lucan’s
h
house and murdered the family nanny. Later that Words in context
n
night, a nervous Lucan visited a friend’s house in
U
Uckfield, Sussex. He left early the next morning. Exercise D
L
Lucan was the police’s chief suspect for murder, • Tell students this is a similar sort of task to ones they
b despite a huge search they have never been
but have done in previous units.
a
able to find him. • Give students a few minutes to match the words/
phrases in the text with their definitions.
• Elicit answers.
Reading
Exercise B Answers
• This activity is similar to the one in Exercise A. 1 baffled
Tell students they will be reading about two more 2 examining
mysterious disappearances. 3 abandoned
• Give students four minutes to scan the texts quickly 4 add up
and silently to find the information needed to complete 5 eerie
the fact files. 6 overboard
• To ensure they do this quickly, time them. 7 investigators
• Elicit answers. 8 evidence
9 ransom

Answers
Fact file 1 Quick chat
Names: Bob Hatton, Peter Dunstable and his
brother Jim • This activity gives students the chance to
Year of disappearance: 2007 personalize the content of the Reading and
Where last seen: Airlie Beach Listening texts.
• Discuss the question as a class. Encourage a
Fact file 2
class discussion.
Name: Dan Cooper
Year of disappearance: 1972
Where last seen: on a plane somewhere over
Washington State For extra reading practice, refer students
to pages 78 and 79 in the Workbook.

126
11
Grammar 1 Page 140 Answers
1 must have broken in
Aim of the lesson: 2 might have dropped
3 should have caught
• to revise the modal perfect 4 shouldn’t have been
5 can’t have arrived
6 could/should have become
modal perfect
• This activity checks that students understand Exercise D
the meaning of different modal verbs in the past.
• This activity offers free practice of the modal perfect.
• Give students a minute to read the extracts
carefully and to match them to the meanings. • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
minutes to come up with a theory of what might have
• Elicit answers.
happened. Ask them to make notes and to come up
• To recap, read through the relevant section on with at least five assumptions, as in the example,
page 177 in the Grammar reference. based on the evidence. Remind them to use the
modal perfect.
Answers
• Elicit ideas. Do the students all agree?
a2 b3 c1
Suggested answers
Exercise A They might have taken something from the safe.
• This exercise checks that students understand the They must have got in through the window.
meaning of sentences containing modal perfect verb They might have left through the door.
forms. They can’t have been wearing gloves.
Somebody must have disturbed them.
• Give students a couple of minutes to read each
sentence carefully and to choose the correct option.
• Elicit answers. For extra practice, refer students to page 80
in the Workbook.
Answers
1b 2a 3a 4b
Vocabulary Page 141
Exercise B
• This exercise focuses on the meaning and the form of Aims of the lesson:
the modal perfect. to present and practise vocabulary relating to:
• Explain that the sentence they create should relate • people and crime
to the situation. To ensure students understand the • crime and mystery
task, do the first one together.
• Give students a few minutes to do the rest.
Exercise A
• Elicit answers.
• To check students know the words in the box, give
Answers them a minute to match them with the definitions.
1 It must have rained. • Elicit answers.
2 It may have been my friend. • Some of these words are often mispronounced
3 Your brother should have studied more. by students. Model the words for the students to
4 It can’t be thunder. repeat.

Exercise C Answers
• This exercise also focuses on the meaning and the 1 victim
form of the modal perfect. But this time the students 2 jury
have to decide which modal verb to use. 3 judge
4 witness
• Do the first item together.
5 detective
• Give students a few minutes to do the rest. 6 suspect
• Ask students to compare their answers in pairs. 7 lawyer
• Elicit answers.

127
41 Exercise B Exercise C
• This exercise provides a meaningful context for the • Ask students which words in the box they think they
words in Exercise A. know and explain the words they don’t know.
• Play the extracts for students to listen and write down • Alternatively, you might want to make a dictionary
one of the people from Exercise A. available to help students with the words they don’t
• Elicit answers. know.
• For pronunciation purposes, model the words for the
students to repeat.
Answers
• Tell students they are going to read a description of
1 witness an episode of a TV series. Ask students to read it
2 suspect
quickly, ignoring the gaps, to find out what kind of
3 judge
series it is.
4 detective
5 victim • Give them a few minutes to read the text more
6 lawyer carefully and to complete the gaps.
7 jury • Elicit answers.

Answers
Audioscript
A di i 1 committed
2 evidence
41 Exercise B 3 cover-up
1 4 weapon
I’I’m sure he had blond hair, but I couldn’t see his 5 clue
eyes. Anyway, I saw him smash the car window
e 6 motive
and take out a handbag. Then he ran away. It was
a 7 alibi
a blue car, and the registration number is … 8 culprit
2
I tell you it wasn’t me. You’ve got the wrong guy.
I was with friends all that night.
3
Exercise D
And for such a serious offence, I must give a
A • Check students understand the words in the box.
serious punishment. You will serve two years in
s Explain to them that they are all nouns.
prison.
p • Ask students to work in pairs to write the adjective
4 and adverb forms of the nouns. You might want to
Good morning, sir. My name’s Police Inspector
G give them a dictionary to help them.
Finley and this is Constable Dixon. We’d like to
F • Elicit answers and write them on the board in a
speak to you if we may about an incident we’re
s similar table.
investigating.
in
5
When we came back to the house, well, our hearts
W Answers
sank. The place was upside down. All the
s
Noun Adjective Adverb
cupboards had been emptied and the back room
c
window was smashed. I knew immediately we’d
w crime criminal criminally
been broken into.
b dishonesty dishonest dishonestly
6 guilt guilty guiltily
Ladies and gentlemen, I have given you all the
L innocence innocent innocently
evidence and I think you’ll see that it is clear that
e law legal legally
my client, Mr Huxley, is completely innocent.
m mystery mysterious mysteriously
I hope you’ll make the right decision.
7
Well, I don’t know. The judge said we’ve got until
W
tomorrow to decide, but I’m not sure what to think.
to Exercise E
It seems from the evidence that he’s guilty, but he • Give students a few minutes to complete the
just
ju doesn’t look like a criminal. D’you know what sentences with the correct form of the words in
I mean? capitals.
• Check answers.

128
11
Exercise A
Answers • Some of the crimes in the picture appear in the
1 illegally interview, so it is important that students know what
2 guiltily they are.
3 innocent • Ask students to work in pairs to match the crimes to
4 dishonest
the picture.
5 criminal
• Elicit answers. For pronunciation purposes, you
6 mysteriously
might also want to model the words for the students
to repeat.
Exercise F
• This exercise focuses on crime words with dependent
Answers
prepositions, which students often confuse.
• Give students a couple of minutes to match the A arson
sentence halves. B vandalism
C burglary
• Check answers. Tell students that these words
should be stored together with their prepositions in D shoplifting
their notebooks as they are always used together. E pickpocketing
F robbery

Answers
1b 2d 3c 4e 5a 42 Exercise B
• Tell students they will be listening to someone talking
Your voice about crimes that have gone wrong and that some of
the crimes from Exercise A will be mentioned.
• Ask students to discuss the questions in • Play the interview for students to note down the crimes
pairs first. Encourage them to use words from they hear.
page 141.
• Check answers.
• Elicit talks from the students.

Answers
Extra activity burglary
robbery
If time allows in the lesson, ask students to
arson
write their own sentences for the words and
prepositions in Exercise F. Alternatively, they
could write a short paragraph (eg a very short
story, description, recount, etc) of about 50
42 Exercise C
words, containing at least three of the words from • Read the Steps to success box together.
Exercise F and at least three words from the rest • Ask students to read the questions carefully and to
of the page. find key words (in the questions, not in the options).
This will help them know what to listen out for and
For extra practice, refer students to page 81 when to listen more carefully. They may be able to
in the Workbook. recall what they heard, so tell them to mark the option
they think might be right.
• Play the interview again and students listen carefully
to answer the questions.
Listening Page 142 • Elicit answers.

Aims of the lesson: Answers


• to warm students up and to pre-teach key 1B 2C 3A 4A 5A 6B 7B
vocabulary (Exercise A)
• to listen for gist (Exercise B)
• to listen for specific information (Exercise C)
• to talk about students’ own reactions to the
Exercise D
information in the listening texts (Quick chat) • Ask students why the other options are not correct.
Play the interview again if necessary.

129
Quick chat Paul: Me neither, but some criminals don’t seem to
• Give students a minute to discuss the questions think it’s so important. Take, for example, the bank
in pairs first. robber who handed over a note to the bank clerk
• Elicit answers from different pairs. Encourage a asking for $250,000.
class discussion about crime and punishment. Radio presenter: Why did he use a note? Was he
wearing a mask or did he have a strange accent?
Paul: No, he wasn’t wearing a mask, and he had a
perfectly ordinary local accent. The reason is that
For extra listening practice, refer students he actually had a sore throat and couldn’t speak at
to page 83 of the Workbook, CD: folder the time, so he had to write his demands! (3)
'Workbook', track 12. Radio presenter: I see. So what happened?
Paul: She read the note and handed over the
money, but it didn’t take long for the police to catch
Audioscript
A up with the thief.
Radio presenter: Why not?
41 Exercise B Paul: Because he’d written his note on the back of
R
Radio presenter: Now, I’m sure you’ll agree with one of his own cheques, which of course had his
m
me that crime’s no laughing matter, but name all over it. (4)
n
nevertheless, over the years there have been Radio presenter: Wow, that really is stupid!
s
some crimes that are simply so stupid that you Paul: Isn’t it? The police must have been amazed!
h
have to laugh. And in most cases, the criminals are These days, of course, there are high tech ways to
s
so foolish that it usually doesn’t take long for the get yourself caught.
p
police to catch up with them. Paul Simms, our legal Radio presenter: Are you talking about the
internet, Paul?
c
correspondent, has been looking into some of the
Paul: That’s right, Jane. Last year in California, for
b
best cases of bungled crimes. Paul.
instance, two teenagers were found guilty of arson.
Paul: Thanks, Jane. Yes, as you said, there have
P
Radio presenter: What had they been doing?
b
been some remarkably stupid criminals over the
Paul: Well, they’d set fire to cars, school buses,
y
years. One of my favourites is actually quite a
stores and even a bowling alley. (5)
re
recent case of a Manchester man, David Davies,
Radio presenter: Goodness, and what’s the
w
who got stuck in a chimney while trying to burgle a internet got to do with it?
s
supermarket. Paul: Well, these stupid boys thought what they’d
Radio presenter: How on earth did that happen?
R done was so clever, that they wanted to tell the
Paul: Well, Davies claimed that he had fallen down
P world. So they boasted about their crimes
th
the chimney after a night out with friends. on MySpace. (6)
Radio presenter: And how did he explain being
R Radio presenter: Sorry, Paul. What’s MySpace?
o
on the roof? Paul: Oh, MySpace is a social networking site. It’s
Paul: Ah, well, that’s exactly what the judge asked
P a website where people can meet other people,
h
him, and he couldn’t give an answer. (1) write about themselves, invite friends to comment
Radio presenter: So how did he get out of
R and that kind of thing.
th
the chimney? Radio presenter: Oh, I see. And they wrote about
Paul: Well, he was stuck there all night and
P their crimes, did they?
e
eventually, early the next morning, a van driver Paul: That’s right, Jane. And they even put
w
who worked there heard him crying for help. (2) In up photos of the fires they’d started. But they
th
the end firefighters had to knock the chimney down shouldn’t have been so proud of themselves,
in order to rescue him. because when the police saw the photos, they
Radio presenter: Quite a lucky escape, then?
R weren’t impressed.
Paul: Well, yes and no. As soon as he was
P Radio presenter: How silly! And how did the
re
rescued, he was arrested, so he can’t have been police know to look in MySpace?
v
very happy! Well, Davies was pretty dumb, but Paul: Well, they got a phone call.
th
there are even dumber criminals out there. Radio presenter: A tip-off, you mean? (7)
Radio presenter: For example?
R Paul: That’s right, Jane, and the police found
Paul: Well, if you’d committed a crime, you’d try to
P all the evidence they needed, right there on the
k
keep your personal details a secret, wouldn’t you? internet. The boys were arrested soon afterwards.
Radio presenter: Yes, I guess I would. I mean,
R Radio presenter: Amazing. Well, thanks Paul for
I wouldn’t give out my address and telephone that look into the not-so-clever mind of the criminal.
n
number. And coming up next …

130
11
Speaking Page 143
Audioscript
A
Aims of the lesson: 43 Exercises B & C
• to prepare students for the model speaking G
Girl: I think the story starts here. She’s picking up
task they will hear (Exercise A) a dress and, you know, she’s thinking of stealing it.
• to listen to a model speaking task for gist Boy: Aha. I think you’re right. And in the next
B
(Exercise B) p
picture she’s at the till.
• to notice different ways of asking for Girl: I’m sorry, could you explain what till means?
G
clarification and expressing agreement Boy: Oh, I mean the place where you pay.
B
(Exercise C) Girl: Oh, I see. Well, actually, I don’t think she
G
• to make up a story and tell it to the class g
goes to the, what did you call it?
(Exercise D) Boy: The till.
B
• to make students aware of contrastive G
Girl: Yes, the till, because she doesn’t buy
sentence stress (Say it right!) a
anything.
B
Boy: Hmm. That’s true.
G
Girl: So, she doesn’t go to the till, she goes to the
Exercise A c
cubicle and puts the dress on.
• This exercise sets the context for the model Listening B
Boy: Sorry, I’m not sure what you mean.
extract in the next exercise and gives the students the G
Girl: I mean, she goes to the changing room
opportunity to tell a story. a changes.
and
• Give students five minutes to put four of the pictures in B
Boy: Oh yes, you’re right. And then she goes to
order and to come up with a story that would explain th door with the carrier bag in her hand.
the
them. G
Girl: Sorry, could you say that again, please.
• Elicit stories from the different pairs. B
Boy: She goes to the door with the bag.
G
Girl: Oh yes, of course, and then she gets caught.
43 Exercise B B
Boy: Exactly.
• Tell students they will be listening to two students
doing the exact same task.
Exercise D
• Play the extract. Students listen to hear if the story is
similar to theirs and which picture the students left out. • Ask students to work in pairs.
• Elicit feedback. • Read the task together and check students
understand what they need to do. Check they also
know what the pictures depict (a broken window,
Answers
a bus/train ticket, a pair of broken glasses, muddy
The students left out picture D. footprints, a lighter).
• Encourage students to ask for clarification if they
43 Exercise C need to, using expressions from the Language
• Read the Helpful hints box together and ask students chunks box.
to read through the expressions in the Language • Give students at least five minutes to do the task.
chunks box for different ways to ask for clarification. • Elicit stories from the different pairs around the class.
• Tell students that the speakers use some of the Ask students to vote on the best story.
expressions in the Language chunks box.
• Play the extract again. Students listen and note down Say it right!
the expressions they hear.
• Check answers. Exercise E
• This exercise makes students aware of contrastive
Answers sentence stress.
Asking for clarification • Read the explanation together. Ask students to guess
Could you explain what … means? the words they think will be stressed most in the two
I’m not sure what you mean. sentences. Ask them to justify their choices.
Could you say that again, please?
Expressing agreement 44 Exercise F
Aha … • Play the CD for students to listen and check their
I think you’re right. guesses.
Hmm. That’s true. • Play the extract again for students to listen and
Exactly. repeat.

131
Exercise B
Answers (and Audioscript) • Tell students they will be reading a story. Ask them to
I don’t like crime stories, but I love mysteries. predict what they think it will be about from the title.
It wasn’t a ghost. It was just a trick. • Give students a minute to quickly read the text to
check their predictions.
• Ask students to read the text more carefully and to
Exercise G choose the correct options.
• Read the instructions and examples in the speech • Elicit answers.
bubbles together. Ask students which words they
think should be stressed in these examples (elicit
France and Italy). Answers
• Give students a few minutes to practise the dialogues. 1 to stop
Tell them to swap roles once they have practised all 2 to take
of them. 3 to get
4 to lock
5 to buy
6 seeing
Grammar 2 Page 144 7 driving
8 to smash
9 doing
Aims of the lesson:
to revise:
• infinitives and -ing forms
Quick chat
• make, let and allow • Discuss the question as a class.

ininitives and -ing forms


29 Exercise C
• Write the following sentences on the board: • Give students a couple of minutes to do the activity.
The suspect admitted to steal the diamond. • Check answers.
The police plan interviewing all the witnesses.
• Tell students there is a mistake in each of them. Answer
Elicit the correct form of each sentence (The
1 to persuade
suspect admitted stealing the diamond. The
2 stealing
police plan to interview all the witnesses.). 3 to wear
• Explain to students that some verbs are 4 to buy
followed by the full infinitive, some by an -ing 5 looking
form and some by both.
• To recap and to show students a long list of
verbs and the patterns that follow them, read
through the relevant section on page 177 in the make, let and allow
Grammar reference. • Write the following sentences on the board:
My parents made me come / to come home early.
I was made come / to come home early.
Exercise A My parents won’t let me stay / to stay out late.
• This exercise focuses on the difference in meaning My parents won’t allow me stay / to stay out late.
between verbs that can be followed by both patterns, • Ask students to pick the correct option in each.
but with a difference in meaning. Explain that in the passive, make is followed by
• Give students a few minutes to choose the correct a different verb pattern, the full infinitive.
sentence. Tell students to refer to page 177 if they • To recap, read through the relevant section on
need to. page 178 in the Grammar reference.
• Check answers.

Answers Exercise D
1b 2a 3a 4a • To help you explain this exercise, do the first item
together.

132
• Give students a few minutes to do the rest.
11
• Elicit answers and write them up on the board. Practise your English Page 145

Aim of the lesson:


Answers
• to practise the grammar and vocabulary from
1 My parents won’t let me go out tonight. the unit in an integrated way
2 They don’t allow dogs to enter the park.
3 Miss Pringle made me do my essay again.
4 Do they let you eat in here? Background information
The article on this page is based on true events.
The term Bennington Triangle was coined by the
author Joseph A Citro during a radio broadcast in
45 Exercise E 1992 to denote an area of south-western Vermont
• Tell students they will hear four short extracts. After in the United States, where a number of people
each, they should complete a sentence with the word went missing between 1920 and 1950.
in brackets so that it’s true according to what they
have heard. Remind students to use no more than
three words. Exercise A
• Play the first extract. Give students a minute to • Tell students they will be reading an article about two
strange events.
complete the sentence.
• Give students two minutes to read the text quickly
• Elicit the correct answer.
and silently to find out what happened. Tell them to
• Play the rest of the extracts. ignore the gaps for now.
• Elicit answers. • Elicit the answer.

Answers Answers
1 remember to meet Two people, James Tetford and Paula Weldon,
2 let us go mysteriously disappeared without a trace near
3 made me tidy Bennington, a small village in Vermont, USA.
4 let dogs go

Exercise B
• Give students a few minutes to read the text more
carefully and to complete it with the right form of the
Audioscript words in capital letters.
• Elicit answers.
45 Exercise E
1 Oh, I’m sorry. Were we supposed to meet this
morning? I forgot.
Answer
2 No, children. You can’t go out tonight. 1 settlement
3 Mike, tidy your room or I won’t let you watch TV. 2 disappearances
4 I’m sorry miss, but dogs can’t go into the zoo. 3 investigators
4 mysterious
5 carefully
6 evidence

Extra activity Quick chat


If time allows in the lesson, ask students to write • Ask students to answer the question in pairs first.
sentences, using these verbs: make, let, hate, • Elicit answers and encourage a class discussion
stop and remember. When they’ve finished, ask about the disappearances.
them to compare their sentences with a partner.

Exercise C
For extra practice, refer students to page 82 • Give students a few minutes to do the activity on their
in the Workbook. own before checking answers.

133
Exercise C
Answers • Tell students that to make a story more lively and
1 behaved criminally interesting you can talk about the character’s feelings.
2 agreed to help One way to do that is to describe how their emotions
3 made him pay are expressed physically.
4 allow me to go • Give students a couple of minutes to skim the
5 must have been story to find and note down the physical feelings
6 can’t have been described.
7 forgot to do • Elicit feedback.
8 remembers meeting me
Answers
Exercise D I must have gone very pale …
• Give students a couple of minutes to do the activity … made my stomach feel strange.
on their own before checking answers. … I still get a shiver down my spine.
I felt uncomfortable …

Answers Exercise D
1A 2A 3C 4D 5C 6C • This exercise checks that students understand the
expressions used to describe physical feelings.
• Give students a couple of minutes to match the
situations with the physical feelings.
Writing Pages 146 and 147 • Elicit answers.

Suggested answers
Aims of the lesson: 1 My body froze.
• to introduce students to the task and to get 2 I felt a chill down my back.
ideas (Exercise A) 3 My heart sank.
• to analyze a model story for organization 4 My stomach turned.
(Exercise B)
• to analyze a model story for ways of describing
characters’ reactions and feelings (Exercises C Quick chat
& D) • Ask students to answer the question in pairs first.
• to show students ways of adding drama • Elicit feedback.
through adjectives and direct speech
(Exercises E, F, G & H)
• to practise planning and writing a story
(Exercises I & J)
Skills development: Adjectives
Exercise E
Exercise A • Explain to students that a story becomes more vivid
and hence more memorable if dramatic adjectives
• Read the Writing task together.
are used.
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
• Give students a minute to match the adjectives.
minutes to come up with an idea for a story.
• Check answers.
• Elicit ideas.
Answers
Exercise B
1b 2d 3a 4c 5f 6e
• Tell students that the story they are about to read is
called My mysterious experience.
• Give students a few minutes to read and order the
Exercise F
paragraphs of the story. • To practise the adjectives, ask students to write
• Elicit answers. Ask students if they liked the story. five sentences using the dramatic adjectives from
Exercise E.
• Give students a few minutes to write their sentences.
Answers • Ask students to compare what they have written in
C, D, B, A pairs.
• Ask students to read out a sentence each.

134
11
• When writing their stories, remind students that they ey
Direct speech may use expressions from the Language chunks box.
Exercise G • For advice on how to write a story, refer students to
• Read the Helpful hints box together. page 187 in the Writing database.
• Give students a couple of minutes to scan the story • If time allows, ask students to write, or begin to write,
for three examples of direct speech. their stories in class.
• Elicit feedback. For extra writing practice, refer students to
page 83 in the Workbook.
Answers Teacher's resource file:
Anne asked, ‘Are you OK, Maude?’ – Progress test (page 177)
I said, ‘I’m sorry. Do I know you?’ – Communication and writing (page 189)
The woman … answered, ‘I remember teaching – Fun and games (page 201)
you.’ – Self-assessment checklist (page 213)
Editable tests CD: Unit 11 test
Exercise H
• To practise the punctuation of direct speech, ask
students to read the paragraph, then to copy and and
punctuate it.
• Give students a few minutes for this.
• Ask students to compare what they have done in
pairs.
• To check students have done the task correctly, ask
them to come up and write the paragraph on the
board.

Suggested answers
I thought I was alone. But suddenly a voice from
the next room whispered, ‘What are you doing,
Mark?’ It sounded familiar, but strange at the
same time. ‘Is it my stupid brother playing games
again?’ I thought. ‘Is that you, John?’ I called.
As there was no answer, I walked angrily into
the next room. ‘Stop playing games!’ I said as I
walked in. But to my amazement, the room was
empty!

Planning and writing


Exercise I
• Read through the task together.
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
minutes to brainstorm ideas for a story, using the
ideas in the mind map to help them. Encourage them
to make notes.
• Elicit ideas from the different pairs.
Exercise J
• Give students a few minutes to makes notes in the
notebook according to the Planner.
• Read through the Quick check! box and tell students
to use this as a checklist before they hand in their
stories.

135
12 Big spender
Theme Skills aims
Shopping, money and clothes Reading
Students read a long text:
Language aims • for gist
Grammar • to understand text cohesion
Countable and uncountable nouns Listening
Expressing quantity Students listen to eight extracts:
so and such • for details
so many and so much
Speaking
too and enough
Students conduct two pairwork speaking activities
both … and, neither … nor, each, every, all, none
and practise:
Indefinite pronouns
• filling pauses
Vocabulary • expressing interest
Clothes and accessories
Writing
Shopping and money
Students write a formal letter of application and
Money idioms
practise:
• content
• register
• paragraphing

Reading Pages 148 and 149 Reading


Exercise B
• Ask students to predict from the title and pictures what
Aims of the lesson: they think the article will be about. Elicit shopping or
spending money.
• to warm students up and introduce them to the • Before students read the text carefully, allow three
topic of the unit (Exercise A) minutes to skim it and see what they can find out
• to skim for gist (Exercise B) about each person in the pictures. Time them to
• to read to understand text cohesion encourage speed reading.
(Exercise C) • Elicit feedback.
• to guess the meaning of unknown words from
the context (Exercise E) Suggested answers
• to talk about the ideas in the text (Quick chat) Paula: She is 16 and spends at least six hours a
week shopping. She is a fashion victim.
Max: He is 18 and goes shopping every day.
Most of his shopping is done online.
Kathy: She is 15 and sensible with money. She
doesn’t like shopping or spending too much
money. She thinks it’s a trap and it leads to debt.
Exercise A
• The aim of the quiz is to see how much students Exercise C
know about shopping and vocabulary relating to it. • Ask students to read the text more carefully now to
As such, don’t pre-teach any of the vocabulary. Let replace the missing sentence parts. Tell them that
students attempt the quiz first. they should read each paragraph carefully before
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few they choose a sentence part and again carefully after
minutes to do the quiz and to check their results on they have chosen a sentence part to make sure it
page 193. makes sense in the paragraph.
• Elicit feedback on the results. Take this opportunity • Give students seven minutes to do the task.
to check students understand the words relating to • Ask students to compare their answers in pairs.
money and shopping. • Elicit answers.

136
12
Answers Grammar 1 Page 150
1H 2A 3G 4B 5D 6C 7E
Aim of the lesson:
to revise:
Words in context • countable and uncountable nouns
Exercise D • so / such and so many / so much
• Ask students to scan the text to find all the words/ • too and enough
phrases first.
• Give students a few minutes to read the parts of the
text containing the words or phrases carefully and to countable and uncountable nouns
match them with their definitions. Inform them that • This activity checks that students understand
not all of the words/phrases are in text order. the different types of nouns.
• Elicit answers. • Give students a minute to read the extracts
carefully and to match the nouns in bold to the
Answers types of nouns they are.
1a 6a • Elicit answers.
2b 7a • Ask students to choose the best option to
3b 8a complete the rules regarding determiners used
4a 9a with countable and uncountable nouns.
5a 10 a
• To recap, read through the relevant section on
page 178 in the Grammar reference.
Exercise E
• To practise some of the words/phrases from Answers
Exercise D, give students a couple of minutes to 1b 2a 3c
complete the sentences. 1 many; much; negative
• Elicit answers. 2 a lot of

Answers
1 bargains Exercise A
2 keep up • To practise using countable and uncountable nouns,
3 debt give students a couple of minutes to read each
4 Window-shopping sentence carefully and to choose the correct option.
5 retail therapy • Elicit answers.

Quick chat Answers


1 furniture 4 pairs of jeans
• This activity gives students the chance to
2 much 5 a lot of
personalize the content of the Reading text.
3 goods 6 a few
• Ask students to discuss the question in pairs first
before discussing it as a class. Encourage a class
discussion.
so / such and so many / so much
• Give students a minute to read the extracts
Extra activity carefully and to complete the rules.
Have a class discussion on teenage consumerism. • Elicit answers.
Discuss the following questions: • To recap, read through the relevant section on
1 Who do you identify with more: Paula, Kathy or page 178 in the Grammar reference.
Max?
2 Do you agree with Kathy? Is shopping a trap? Answers
Should we be building fewer malls and more a so + adjective
parks? b such + noun
c so much + uncountable noun
For extra reading practice, refer students d so many + countable noun
to pages 84 and 85 in the Workbook.

137
Exercise B
• This exercise focuses on common mistakes made
Vocabulary Page 151
with determiners and so and such for emphasis.
• Give students a few minutes to find the mistakes in Aim of the lesson:
the sentences. to present and practise vocabulary relating to:
• Elicit answers and write the correct sentences on • clothes and accessories
the board. • shopping and money

Answers
1 This top is so nice that I think I’ll buy two!
Exercise A
2 There was so much traffic that it took two • To check students know the clothes and accessories
hours to get to work! in the box, give them a few minutes to match them
3 These jeans are so expensive that Mum will with the picture.
never agree to buy them. • Elicit answers.
4 I’ve never seen so many books before!
5 This is such a nice car. Is it new? Answers
6 Some actors have so much money they don’t 1 earrings
know what to do with it! 2 necklace
3 sweater
4 denim jacket
5 bracelet
too and enough 6 belt
• Too and enough are often misunderstood and 7 leggings
misused by students. 8 high heels
• Give students a minute to read the sentences 9 nosering
carefully and to match them with their meanings. 10 ring
• Elicit answers. 11 scarf
• To recap, read through the relevant section on 12 waterproof jacket
page 179 in the Grammar reference. 13 tracksuit
14 trainers

Answers Exercise B
a 1, 3 b 2 • This exercise focuses on easily confused words
relating to clothes.
• Give students a couple of minutes to choose the
Exercise C correct option in each sentence.
• To check students have really understood how to use • Elicit answers. Check students know what the other
too, enough, so and such, they are practised here all words mean too.
together.
• Give students a few minutes to do the exercise before Answers
checking answers. 1 fit; size
2 suits
Answers 3 do up
1 enough 4 so 4 tight
2 such 5 too 5 loose; taken in
3 too 6 so 6 taken up
7 try it on

Extra activity Exercise C


If time allows in the lesson, ask students to create • This exercise focuses on lexical sets relating to
their own sentences with too, enough, so and shopping.
such. • Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few
minutes to come up with three things you can buy in
each shop.
For extra practice, refer students to page 86 • Elicit answers from the different pairs and write them
in the Workbook. up on the board.

138
12
Answers Your voice
1 Claire’s Accessories: jewellery, belts, bags, • Ask students to discuss the questions in pairs.
scarves, etc Encourage them to use words from page 151.
2 Selfridges Department Store: clothes, shoes, • Ask a few students to give their talks in front of
electronic devices, books, etc the whole class
3 Witfield’s Newsagent’s: newspapers,
magazines, chocolates, books, pens and
stationery, etc For extra practice, refer students to page
4 Virgin MegaStore: CDs, DVDs, concert tickets, 87 in the Workbook.
gadgets, blank CDs, etc
5 Sainsbury’s Supermarket: food, drinks, sweets,
household cleaning products, pet food, etc
Listening Page 152

Exercise D Aims of the lesson:


• To check students know the words and phrases in the • to warm students up and trigger background
box, give them a minute to complete the exercise. knowledge on the topics raised in the extracts
• Elicit answers. (Exercise A)
• to predict from the questions (Exercise B)
• Receipt [rɪ'siːt] is usually mispronounced by students.
• to listen for details (Exercise C)
Model it for the students to repeat. Point out the
• to talk about students' own reactions to the
silent p.
information in one of the listening extracts
(Quick chat)
Answers
1 receipt; take it back Exercise A
2 buy
3 cash desk • The statements relate to the content of the Listening
4 brand extracts.
5 logo • To trigger background knowledge and thus to make
6 product the listening experience a little easier for the students,
ask them to discuss how far they agree or disagree
with the statements in pairs. Give them a few minutes
Exercise E for this.
• Give students a few minutes to read and match the • Elicit feedback.
sentence halves.
• Check answers. Exercise B
• Then ask students to match the idioms in bold with • This exercise makes students read the questions
their meanings. carefully. This is important, as it will make students
more aware of the content of each extract before they
listen.
Answers
• Give students a few minutes to read the questions
1 b 2d 3a 4e 5c and to match each with a picture.
1 be ripped off • Elicit answers.
2 be made of money • Read the Steps to success box together.
3 be loaded
4 has more money than sense Answer
5 be broke
1A 2G 3E 4F 5B 6C 7H 8D

Extra activity 46 Exercise C


If time allows in the lesson, ask students to scan • Tell students they will hear each extract twice. Remind
the Reading text on pages 148 and 149 for one them to follow the advice in the Steps to success box.
more money idiom. Ask them if they can work out • Play the extracts.
what it means. • Elicit answers after each extract.
(It is Money doesn’t grow on trees at the end of
the last paragraph. It means money is not easy to Answers
come by.) 1A 2C 3C 4B 5B 6A 7C 8A

139
Quick chat 4
• Give students a minute to discuss the My favourite outfit is my Indian skirt and top I
questions in pairs first. bought last summer. I feel really comfortable
• Elicit students’ opinions. Ask them to say why wearing it and it looks really good on me, I think.
they would or wouldn’t buy anything online. I love the bright colours and the light material.
My mum tells me I look like a hippie when I wear
it. She’s always complaining about my taste
For extra listening practice, refer students in clothes. She says that I need to dress more
to page 89 of the Workbook, CD: folder smartly otherwise people will never take me
'Workbook', track 13. seriously. But I don’t feel comfortable in formal
clothing or high heels. I need to wear casual
clothes and flat shoes to be comfortable. And, to
Audioscript be honest, I don’t care what people think.
5
46 Exercise C Sales assistant: Can I help you, sir?
1 Young man: Yes, I’m looking for some trousers.
People often ask me about my hairdo and why I Sales assistant: Formal or casual?
would spend so long trying to achieve it. The Young man: I don’t know.
funny thing is that part of the beauty of the emo Sales assistant: Well, where will you be wearing
hairstyle is just how easy it is to achieve. It’s true them?
that there are a few common elements, but each Young man: To work.
emo hairstyle is completely individualized, which Sales assistant: What’s the dress code at
means you can’t go wrong. A true emo hairstyle your work?
comes from how the creator is feeling at that Young man: Well, some people wear suits and
moment. That’s why you need to design your own others trousers and shirts.
emo hairstyle and not have it done for you. At any Sales assistant: Well, shall we look at our smart
rate, why pay a fortune to have it styled when you casual range?
can create something unique yourself? Young man: OK.
2 Sales assistant: What size are you?
Boy 1: My hair’s really boring, don’t you think? Young man: I don’t know. My girlfriend usually
Boy 2: Why don’t you dye it? buys my clothes.
Boy 1: That’s exactly what I was thinking, but I’m Sales assistant: Well, let me measure your waist.
not sure what colour to have it done. You’re a size 42. I have something in that size in
Boy 2: I think your hair would look good dark. The these.
darker the colour the better. It’s more expressive, Young man: Oh, I like them. They’re very smart.
don’t you think? 6
Boy 1: Yeah, but dark hair expresses a dark My favourite place to shop is the Internet. I buy
feeling, which I don’t have at the moment. I was all my books, music and tickets online. I haven’t
thinking of something brighter. tried buying anything else online, at least not yet,
Boy 2: What about blond? but I find it a lot easier to shop online than to go
Boy 1: No, it’s too common. to a shop to buy things. I’m pretty busy and, to
Boy 2: Blue or maybe even violet! be honest, I don’t really enjoy shopping, at least I
Boy 1: Yeah … didn’t before I could do it online. The books I buy
3 are delivered straight to my door. The music I
Mum: Is that a new pair of jeans? download onto my computer and MP3 player and
Fiona: Um. Yes. Why? the tickets I print as e-tickets. It’s great!
Mum: Darling, you have a wardrobe full of jeans. 7
Why buy yet another pair? Most people aim at some point in their life to buy
Fiona: These are pencil leg ones. I didn’t have their own home. But few people have the money
pencil leg jeans. to pay for it outright so they will need to get
Mum: Sweetheart, fashion changes very quickly. themselves a loan. Most banks won’t lend you the
If you keep trying to keep up, it will end up costing full amount so you will need to save for a deposit.
you a fortune. Your deposit should be at least 10% of the value
Fiona: What do you care what I do with my of the house. This is not a small amount and it
money? might take you years to save. My advice is start
Mum: Because I’m the one who gives it to you saving as soon as you start working. By the time
and I don’t expect you to waste it on things you you’re 30, you should have saved enough for your
don’t need. It doesn’t grow on trees, you know. deposit.

140
12
8
47 Exercise C
Woman: Is that your new flat screen TV? • Read the Helpful hints box together and ask students
Man: Yes, do you like it? to read through the expressions in the Language
Woman: Wow, it’s huge! chunks box. Tell them that the expressions for
Man: I know, but the picture’s really sharp. Here, hesitating are good for buying time while they are
have a look. thinking of what to say.
Woman: Yes, it’s great. That must have set you • Tell students that the people in the extracts use some
back a bit. of the expressions in the Language chunks box during
Man: It cost me £3,000. their conversations.
Woman: £3,000 for a TV? That’s a lot, isn’t it? • Play the extract again. Students listen and note down
Man: Well, it is a 50-inch screen and it’s got all the expressions they hear.
these features … • Check answers.
Woman: How did you pay for it on your meagre
salary? Answers
Man: I put it on my credit card.
Hesitating Expressing interest
Woman: Not again, Robert!
Umm … Really?
Let me think … That sounds great.
Let’s see … I know what you mean …
Speaking Page 153 Wow!
Why’s that?
That’s interesting!
Aims of the lesson:
• to prepare students for the speaking task they
will do in Exercise E (Exercise A) Audioscript
• to listen to a model speaking task for gist
(Exercise B) 47 Exercises B & C
• to notice and practise different ways of filling
pauses and expressing interest (Exercises C Dialogue 1
and D) Mandy: What would you spend it on?
• to take part in two pairwork speaking activities Tom: Umm, I think I would probably buy myself a
(Exercises E and F) house … or rather an apartment by the sea. I’d
• to make students aware of the sounds [i:] like one with a view of the sea. What about you?
and [i] (Say it right!) Mandy: Let me think. I don’t know if I’d buy a
house. I’d like to travel, though. So I’d probably
buy a round-the-world ticket.
Exercise A Tom: Really? Where would you like to go?
• This exercise sets the context for the model extract Mandy: Well, let’s see … definitely to The States.
in the next exercise and prepares students for the Possibly to Canada and South America too.
Speaking task in Exercise E. Where else? Let me think … Oh, I know, New
Zealand, Australia, India, Greece, Italy and then
• Give students a few minutes to write down a list of
perhaps back here.
things they would spend their winnings on.
Tom: That sounds great! I’m not sure what else I’d
• Don’t elicit feedback as this will spoil Exercise E.
do with it. I think I’d just like to know I’ve got it. You
know, in case I need it at some point.
47 Exercise B
Mandy: Yes, I know what you mean.
• Tell students they will hear two dialogues with
people talking about what they would do with the Dialogue 2
money. Peter: What would I do with all that money?
• Play the extract. Students listen and note down what Let’s see …
each person would spend their money on. Louise: I know what I’d do …
• Elicit answers. Peter: What’s that?
Louise: Well, I’d give it all away to charity.
Answers Peter: Really? Why’s that?
1 (Tom) would buy a house or apartment. Louise: Well, I don’t really need the money and I
2 (Mandy) would buy a round-the-world ticket. think I’d feel guilty having it.
3 (Louise) would give it to charity. Peter: That’s interesting! What sort of charity
4 (Peter) would buy a Porsche or a Ferrari. would you give it all to?

141
• Play the CD for students to listen and circle the
Louise: I think I’d like to give it to an animal number they hear.
shelter. You know for all the stray dogs and cats.
• Play the extract again for students to listen and
Peter: Wow! I don’t think I’d be so generous. I’d
repeat.
definitely like to keep the money.
Louise: So what would you do with it?
Peter: Umm … I think I’d buy myself a Porsche or Answers (and Audioscript)
a Ferrari …
Louise: Oh dear … 1 sixty
2 fifty
3 thirteen
4 nineteen
Exercise D
5 forty
• To practise the different ways to express interest, ask
students to react to the statements. Tell them to take
into consideration how surprising the statement is.
• Elicit answers. Accept any that make sense.
49 Exercise H
• In these extracts, the numbers are not heard in
isolation.
Answers • Play the CD for students to listen and note down the
1 Why’s that? numbers they hear. Ask them to write the digits, not
2 Really? the words.
3 I can understand that … • Elicit answers. Play the extracts again if need be.
4 Why’s that?
5 Wow!
Answers
1 50
Exercise E 2 16
• Ask students to work in pairs or small groups. 3 1918
• Read the task together and check students 4 30
understand what they need to do. 5 18–80
• Encourage them to use expressions from the
Language chunks box.
• Give students a few minutes to do the task.
• Elicit feedback by asking some students to tell the
class what they would do with the money. Audioscript
Exercise F
49 Exercise H
• Ask students first to rate how important the things in 1 I spent 50 pounds on this dress.
the list are for a happy life. 2 That’ll be 16 euros, please.
• Ask students to work in pairs or small groups. Tell 3 Mr Brown was born in 1918.
them to come up with a common ranking that they 4 Man: How old are you?
can both agree on. Encourage them to give reasons Woman: I’ll be 30 next week.
for their opinions. 5 Our cruises are for 18–80 year olds.
• Encourage them to use expressions from the
Language chunks box.
• Give students at least five minutes to do the task.
• Elicit feedback by asking the different pairs to tell the
class their ranking order. Grammar 2 Page 154

Say it right!
Aim of the lesson:
48 Exercise G to revise:
• This exercise makes students aware of the sounds • both … and, neither … nor, each, every, all,
[i:] and [i]. It is the confusion between these two none
sounds that often leads to misunderstandings with • indefinite pronouns
numbers.

142
12
both … and, neither … nor, each, every, indeinite pronouns
all, none • Give students a minute to copy and complete the
• To see how much students already know about table. They should have no problem doing this.
these items, give them a minute to do the activity. • Check answers and write them up on the board
• Elicit answers. in a similar table.
• To recap, read through the relevant section on • To recap and to see the indefinite pronouns
page 179 in the Grammar reference. used in sentences, read through the relevant
section on page 179 in the Grammar reference.
Answers
1c 2b 3a 4d 5e
Answers
someone/ no one everyone anyone
Exercise A somebody nobody everybody anybody
• Give students a few minutes to complete the somewhere nowhere everywhere anywhere
sentences with the words from the box.
• Check answers. something nothing everything anything

Answers
1 None 4 Every
2 Neither; nor 5 all Exercise C
3 Both; and 6 Each
• This exercise focuses on easily confused pronouns.
• Give students a couple of minutes to read the
Exercise B sentences carefully and to choose the correct option.
• This exercise offers some free practice of all the items. • Elicit answers.
• Read the rubric and example sentences together.
• Ask students to work in pairs. Give them a few minutes Answers
to find relationships between the words in the second
item. 1 anybody
• Elicit answers. Accept any logical answers. 2 anywhere
3 anything
• Give students a few minutes to do the same with the
rest of the exercise. 4 Someone
5 nothing
• Elicit answers. Accept any logical answers.
6 Everyone
Suggested answers
2
Neither love nor friendship relate to money. Background information
Currency, money, dollars and cash all relate In Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom,
to money. Boxing Day, 26th December, is known as a
All these things are important in life. shopping holiday, and a time when stores have
3 sales, often with dramatic price reductions.
All these items are furniture.
Both chair and sofa are for sitting on.
Both desk and bookshelf can be found in a study.
Each one is important in a house. Exercise D
4 • Ask students which day Boxing Day is. Elicit the
Every word in this group is an animal. 26th December.
Neither a horse nor a sheep can fly. • Ask them to read the text quickly, ignoring the gaps
Both a bee and a fly are insects. for now, to find out what happens on that day.
5 • Elicit answers.
A DVD player, a dishwasher, a television and a
• Ask students to read the text more carefully and to
washing machine are all household appliances.
complete the gaps with an indefinite pronoun.
Both films and music can entertain you.
Neither films nor music are appliances. • Elicit answers. Ask students if they have heard about
these sales.

143
Answers Quick chat
1 everyone/everybody • Ask students to answer the questions in pairs
2 everything first.
3 Everyone/Everybody • Elicit answers from different students.
4 everything
5 everyone/everybody
6 somewhere Exercise C
7 anything
8 something • Give students a few minutes to do the activity on their
own before checking answers.

For extra practice, refer students to page 88 Answers


in the Workbook.
1 too expensive
2 made of money
3 so happy that she
Practise your English Page 155 4 hair is amazing

Aims of the lesson: Exercise D


• to practise the grammar and vocabulary from • Give students a couple of minutes to do the activity
the unit in an integrated way on their own before checking answers.

Answers
Exercise A 1 C 6 C
• Give students two minutes to read the text quickly 2 C 7 A
and silently to find out what eBay is and what was 3 A 8 C
first sold on the site. Tell them to ignore the gaps for 4 D 9 A
now. 5 D 10 A
• Elicit answers. Check students know what a laser
pointer is (A small laser that is designed to highlight
something of interest from a distance by projecting
a small red light onto it. It is usually used for
presentations.).
Writing Pages 156 and 157

Answer Aims of the lesson:


eBay is an online auction and shopping website. • to warm students up and introduce them to the
The first thing ever sold on the site was a broken topic of the letter (Exercise A)
laser pointer. • to analyze a task (Exercise B)
• to analyze a model for features of formal letters
(Exercise C)
Exercise B • to notice formal versus informal language
• Give students a few minutes to read the text (Exercise D)
more carefully and to complete the gaps with the • to analyze a formal letter of application for
grammatical forms of the words given in capital content and organization (Exercises E & F)
letters. • to practise planning and writing a formal letter
• Ask students to compare answers in pairs. of application (Exercises G & H)
• Elicit answers.

Answers Exercise A
1 wants • Discuss the questions as a class. Encourage students
2 your to talk about the type of summer job they would like to
3 first have.
4 was broken
5 largest
Exercise B
6 has been • Give students a minute to read the advertisement
7 more and to answer the questions.
• Elicit answers.

144
Exercise F
Answer • Explain that a formal letter of application should be
1 a job in a cafe well organized so that the letter is easy to read. This
2 formal because you need to write to someone is another way to make a good impression.
you don’t know • Give students a couple of minutes to complete the
3 all the information asked for in the bullet points table.
• Elicit feedback. Explain that this is one way to
Exercise C organize it, but not the only way (see Exercise G).
Point out that the opening and closing and the first
• The checklist contains a list of features typical of
and fourth paragraphs can be included in any letter
formal letters of application. Go through the list
of application for a job.
together, explaining to students that these are all
important in a letter of application.
• Give students a few minutes to read the letter to see Answers
if all these features are included. Paragraph 1: the reason for writing
• Elicit the answer. Paragraph 2: his current situation, level of English
and why he would like the job (all the necessary
information from the bullet points)
Answer
Paragraph 3: request for further information
All the features in the checklist are included.
Paragraph 4: ends letter and says he is available
for interview

Skills development: Style, content Planning and writing


and organization
Exercise G
Exercise D • Read through the task together. Check students
• The aim of this exercise is to make students aware understand what the necessary information is that
of the formal and informal ways of saying the same they must include in their letter.
thing in a letter. • Give students a few minutes to makes notes in their
• Explain to students that the formal phrases 1–8 in notebooks according to the Planner.
the Language chunks box have the same meaning • Point out the difference between this plan and
as the informal phrases in a–h, however the register the one in Exercise F. It doesn’t matter which one
is different. The formal phrases are much more polite they use, but clear organization and progression is
than the informal phrases. important.
• Give students a couple of minutes to match the formal
phrases to the informal phrases. Exercise H
• Check answers. • Read through the Quick check! box and tell students
to use this as a checklist before they hand in their
letters.
Answers • When writing their letters of application, remind
1c 2h 3e 4g 5d 6f 7b 8a students to use expressions from the Language
chunks box.
• For advice on how to write a formal letter of application,
Exercise E refer students to page 192 in the Writing database.
• Read the Helpful hints box together. • If time allows, ask students to write, or begin to write,
• Explain to students that the information in the their letters in class.
bullet points in the advertisement is the necessary
For extra writing practice, refer students to
information that must be included in the letter.
page 89 in the Workbook.
• Give students a minute to read through the
letter again to find and note down the necessary Teacher's resource file:
information. All of the information can be found in the – Progress test (page 178)
second paragraph. – Communication and writing (page 190)
• Elicit feedback and ask students if what the writer – Fun and games (page 202)
has said about himself is positive (Yes, it is.). – Self-assessment checklist (page 214)
Tell them that this is one way to make a good
impression. Editable tests CD: Unit 12 test, Final test

145
Learn about science Units 11 and 12

Finding clues Answers


1 ninhydrin, iodine, argon laser
2 by inputting them into a computer database
Pages 158 and 159 3 because both are unique to every individual
4 There is controversy because it means your
privacy is being violated.
Aims of the lesson:
• to motivate students to learn about science
through English
• to warm students up and introduce them to
the topic of the reading text (Exercises A & B) Project
• to read for gist (Exercise С) If time allows you may opt for doing the project
• to read for specific information (Exercise D) in class. Otherwise, assign it for homework.
• to do some research work on the cross- Students will have to read the suggested
curriculum topic (Project) description of a crime scene and then make a
list of the ways to get clues. Discuss students'
suggestions as a class.
Exercise A
• Ask students to form pairs.
• Ask students to answer the question using the key
words. Suggested answers
• Have a class discussion of possible answers to the Check for fingerprints on the door handle and the
question. window.
Test the blood for DNA fingerprinting.
Check the imprint of the lips on the glass.
Exercise B Check the glass for saliva that can be tested.
• This exercise introduces students to the reading text. Get an imprint of the high heel.
Ask students to work in pairs again and answer the Check the stain to see what substance(s) is/are
quesitons. Encourage students to express their own in it.
views. Check the safe for fingerprints.
• Elicit answers but do not provide any comments at Test the hair for a DNA profile.
this stage as this will spoil the next activity.

Answers
a so as not to leave fingerprints
b DNA testing
c teeth/dental imprint
d yes

Exercise С
• Ask student to skim the text for general understanding.
• Discuss as a class if students' guesses about the
answers in Exercise B were correct or not.

Exercise D
• Ask students to read the text more carefully and find
answers to the questions.
• Elicit answers from different students.

146
Culture today … Units 11 and 12

Exercise D
Tackling youth violence
• Give students one minute to scan the texts again in
in the UK order to answer the questions.
• Check answers as a class.
Pages 160 and 161
Answers
Aims of the lesson: 1 money and for fun
2 It gives users the opportunity to make choices
• to motivate students to learn about youth they can apply to real-life situations.
violence through English 3 It gives the person who's building it a sense of
• to read for gist (Exercises A & B) direction and purpose.
• to read for specific information (Exercises C & D) 4 because teens asked for it and in order to
• to practise key vocabulary (Exercise E) learn more about youth crime
• to give students an opportunity to discuss what 5 clean out rubbish bins and tend to public
they've learned and how it relates to their own gardens
personal experiences through discussion (Your 6 rates of repeat offenders are low and it has
voice) attracted national attention

Exercise A Exercise E
• Ask students to read the introduction and look for
examples of youth crime. • Give students one minute to complete the task. You
might want to allow them to use the dictionary at the
• After they finish, ask students what examples they back of their Student's Books to help them with some
found in the text. Ask them what other types of youth of the words.
crime they can think of.
• Elicit answers.
• Ask students what initiatives are listed in the
introduction and ask some questions to make sure
they understand them. Answers
• Give students one or two minutes to write a short 1 launched
paragraph about one of the initiatives. 2 addiction
3 sense
Answers 4 track
5 lend
Harmful behaviours mentioned in the text: 6 rehabilitation
physical fighting, bullying
Other possible violent acts: firearm attack, sexual
assault, robbery, etc
Your voice Exercise F
• Ask students to form pairs.
Exercise B
• Ask them to use the questions in the discussion to
• Ask students to skim the text ignoring the gaps.
talk about their own ideas and personal experiences.
• Have a class discussion of the task question.
Encourage students to give reasons for their opinion.

Exercise C
• Ask students to read the text once again and to place
the sentence parts in the text.
• Discuss the answers as a class and ask students to
explain their answers.

Answers
A5 B7 C1 D4 E2 F3

147
Progress check 6

Pages 162 and 163 Exercise F


1 can’t have seen
Exercise A 2 doesn’t let me wear
1 have arrived 3 bag was so heavy
2 to be 4 are too short
3 to go 5 Neither the colour nor
4 much 6 isn’t anything we can
5 such a 7 doesn’t remember borrowing
6 too 8 shirt doesn’t fit
7 nor
Exercise G
8 both
9 Everyone 1 B
10 anything 2 A
3 D
Exercise B 4 C
1 witnesses 5 B
2 brand 6 A
3 sense 7 A
4 logo 8 C
5 motive 9 B
6 clues 10 D
7 products Ask students to complete 11–12 Review on
8 alibi pages 90–91 of the Workbook.
Exercise C Ask students to complete Progress test 3
1 of on pages 92 and 93 of the Workbook.
2 on
3 for
4 up
5 in
6 with
7 off
8 back

Exercise D
1 innocently
2 receipt
3 criminal
4 loaded
5 accessories
6 dishonesty
7 broke
8 illegal

Exercise E
1 second line – it they
2 third line – short enough too short
3 sixth line – writing to write
4 seventh line – much a lot of
5 eighth line – is are
6 ninth line – a few few
7 tenth line – have been was
8 twelfth line – hearing to hear

148
Workbook answer key

5 don’t always translate Exercise 3


Unit 1 6 is always completing; is 1 inefficient/disorganized
Reading trying 2 arrogant/big-headed
7 do teenagers usually leave 3 considerate
Exercise 1 8 isn’t starting 4 unattractive
1 C 2 A or D 3 D or A
Exercise 3 5 irresponsible
4 B or C 5 C or B 6 D 7 B
1 … is sometimes … 6 creative
8 C 9 B 10 D 11 B
2 … work … 7 unambitious
12 A or D 13 D or A 14 A or D
15 D or A 3 Is she watching … she’s 8 impolite
sleeping
Exercise 2 Exercise 4
4 … usually earns …
1E 2C 3G 4B 5D 6A 5 … keeps … 1 turned-up
2 dark
Exercise 3 Exercise 4 3 fair
1 valuable 1 isn’t used to working 4 straight
2 modest 2 is used to entering 5 thin
3 volunteer 3 is used to walking 6 thick
4 curious 4 isn’t used to seeing 7 round
5 prospects 5 is used to speaking
6 colleague 6 am not used to eating Grammar 2
7 adventurous 7 are used to waking up Exercise 1
8 competitive 8 isn’t used to living
1a 2b 3a 4a 5b
Exercise 4 Vocabulary Exercise 2
1 valuable Exercise 1 1 doesn’t appear
2 adventurous 1 reliable 2 weighs
3 prospects 2 cheerful 3 isn’t appearing
4 competitive 3 bossy 4 is tasting
5 volunteer 4 arrogant 5 looks
6 curious 5 aggressive 6 feel
7 colleague 6 moody
7 don’t think
8 modest 7 creative
8 Are (you) weighing
8 energetic
Grammar 1 9 are (you) looking
9 selfish
Exercise 1 10 tastes
10 well-organized
1 ’m meeting 11 big-headed 11 am not thinking
2 doesn’t come up 12 efficient 12 is (the doctor) feeling
3 reads Exercise 3
Exercise 2
4 leaves 1 prefers working in an office
5 is putting 1 ambitious; unambitious
2 attractive; unattractive 2 bicycle belongs to Emma
6 don’t earn
3 considerate; inconsiderate 3 isn’t enjoying his summer job
7 is preparing
4 efficient; inefficient 4 includes three free meals
8 don’t like
5 imaginative; unimaginative 5 am tasting
Exercise 2 6 polite; impolite 6 doesn’t look like
1 work 7 responsible; irresponsible
2 is training 8 organized; disorganized Listening
3 take place 9 reliable; unreliable Exercise 1
4 is getting 10 selfish; unselfish 1C 2A 3B 4C 5A

149
Writing Exercise 4 Grammar 2
Exercise 1 1 didn’t use to Exercise 1
1 b 2a 3c 2 both options are correct 1 a; the
3 use to 2 –; a; the
Exercise 2 4 used to 3 –; an
1 Hеllo 5 both options are correct 4 a; the; –
2 It was great 5 the; an
3 hope I can help
Vocabulary
6 a; the; –
4 I'm happy to hear Exercise 1
7 –; the
5 Best wishes 1 urban
8 the; the
2 block of flats
3 garden Exercise 2
Unit 2 4 public park 1 a
5 fields 2 –
Reading
6 shopping centre 3 –/the
Exercise 1 7 multiplex cinema 4 –
1C 2D 3D 4D 5C 6C 8 sports centre 5 a
Exercise 2 9 industrial area 6 the
10 country/countryside 7 the
1 attic
11 farmhouse 8 a
2 Dormitories
12 skyscrapers 9 the
3 Chores
Exercise 2 10 –
4 blanket
11 the
5 Hamlets 1 busy, dangerous, exciting,
12 the
6 lodging lively, noisy, polluted
7 cozy 2 depressing, dull Exercise 3
8 Vacant 3 exciting, lively, noisy 1b 2c 3b 4c 5a 6c
4 green, lovely, peaceful, 7c 8b
Grammar 1 pleasant, quiet, safe
5 dangerous, depressing Listening
Exercise 1
6 historic, interesting Exercise 1
1 lived
Exercise 3 A2 B1 C2 D3 E1
2 was doing; was waiting
3 went 1 home Writing
4 spent 2 household Exercise 1
5 often visited 3 housewarming 1 Whether
6 was still doing; decided 4 home 2 Since; Moreover
7 didn’t come; was raining; was 5 home/house 3 because of
leaking 6 homeless 4 however, as/because
8 was staying; always 7 homemade 5 As/Because
forgot 8 hometown
9 housewife; housework Correct order: 3, 5, 1, 2, 4
Exercise 2
10 homesick
1 started; was hanging
2 was; arrived; was doing; was Exercise 4 1–2 Review
washing up 1 Clear; load
Exercise 1
3 finished; moved 2 walk; take
1А 2D 3C 4B 5B 6B
4 were waiting; stayed 3 do; do
7 A 8 B 9 C 10 D 11 B
5 was making; called 4 in; over
12 A
6 were working; collapsed 5 out
6 water Exercise 2
Exercise 3 7 does; make, do 1 their
1a 2b 3a 4a 5a 8 Drop; up 2 to stay

150
3 wasn't/was not 3 hasn’t passed; has been Grammar 2
4 better having Exercise 1
5 our 4 has submitted
1 has been
6 was working 5 Have (you) been paying
2 have had
7 thought attention
3 got
6 has been handing out; has
4 have been
joined
Unit 3 5 gave
Exercise 3 6 haven’t had
Reading 1 have known Sally 7 started
Exercise 1 2 has been going to 8 didn’t teach
1F 2A 3D 4B 5E 6C 3 have never learnt 9 have sneaked
7H 4 has been learning 10 has seen
5 school grades have Exercise 2
Exercise 2 improved
a attend 1 since; So far
Exercise 4 2 already; still
b encourage
c experts 1b 2a 3b 4a 5a 3 so far; just
d graduate 4 ever; just
Vocabulary
e behave 5 still; never
Exercise 1 6 yet; for
f breakdown
1 doing well
g handout/photocopy Exercise 3
2 get suspended
h relate 1 have been watching
3 lose interest
i put into practice 2 has played truant
4 shown interest
j aspect 3 had
5 play truant
Exercise 3 6 worked hard 4 haven’t heard
7 got into trouble 5 has left
1 aspect
8 follow rules 6 has been raining
2 put into practice
7 went
3 encourages/encouraged Exercise 2 8 I’ve learnt
4 expert 1 give back
5 graduated Listening
2 get marked down
6 attending 3 hand out Exercise 1
7 breakdown 4 hand in 1D 2C 3A 4E
8 relates 5 take up Writing
9 handout 6 break up
10 behaving Exercise 1
Exercise 3 1 true
Grammar 1 1 vocational 2 false
Exercise 1 2 classes 3 false
1 been seeing 3 state 4 true
2 visited; been 4 private 5 false
3 made; found 5 terms 6 false
4 been meeting up; have really 6 education
improved 7 uniform
5 sat 8 deadlines
Unit 4
6 started; been feeling 9 open Reading
Exercise 2 Exercise 4 Exercise 1
1 has been trying; hasn’t 1 head; principal 1B 2D 3C 4B 5C 6A
worked out 2 age group; peers 7 D 8 B 9 A or D 10 D or A
2 has been preparing; have 3 adolescents; teenagers 11 C 12 C or D 13 D or C
been doing 4 siblings; brothers and sisters 14 A

151
Exercise 2 2 planet 4 The online news is quicker to
A4 B3 C5 D1 3 plants read than newspapers.
4 cells 5 The TV was the worst
Exercise 3 invention ever made.
5 animals
1 streamlined 6 earthquake; rocks; stones 6 Isaac Newton was not as
2 advancement/advances 7 length great a scientist as Albert
3 material 8 height Einstein.
4 reduced 9 space 7 Does a squid have larger
5 Flexibility 10 numbers; amounts eyes than an ostrich?
6 reverse 11 volume 8 The flatter a country is, the
7 diameter 12 stars; solar system greater the risk of floods.
8 increasing
Exercise 2 Exercise 2
Grammar 1 1c 2b 3b 4b 5b 6d 1 as heavy as
Exercise 1 7 b 8 b 9 a 10 e 11 f 2 are more expensive than
1 had been typing in 12 a 3 runs faster than
2 had bought Exercise 3 4 is the hardest rock
3 had hacked into 5 is less mountainous than
1 litres
4 had happened 6 aren’t as many people
2 breakthrough
5 Had (her screen) 7 the most difficult subject
3 research
disappeared 4 invention 8 more faithful animal than
6 had given 5 liquid Exercise 3
7 had been working 6 height 1 more hard harder
8 had run out
Exercise 4 2 best better
9 had been
1 desktop 3 good well
10 had given
2 laptop 4 more far farther
11 hadn’t broken
12 had saved 3 portable 5 the difficult the more difficult
4 mouse 6 clean as as clean as
Exercise 2 7 the less boring the least
5 keyboard
1 hadn’t measured; didn’t fit 6 screen boring
2 developed; was 7 documents 8 The best you revise the more
3 had set up; closed 8 emails well The more you revise, the
4 typed up; (had) finished 9 online better
5 had been trying; realized 10 printer Listening
6 had been planning; read;
appeared; had saved up Exercise 5 Exercise 1
7 was; discovered 1 hack into 1a F
8 proposed; (had) believed 2 backed up 1b T
3 log into 2a F
Exercise 3
4 Click on 2 b NS
1 already 5 set up
2 before 3a T
3 just Grammar 2 3b T
4 when Exercise 1 4a F
5 for 1 Is Michael Phelps a better 4b T
6 As soon as swimmer than Ian Thorpe?
7 since
Writing
2 Laptop computers are more
1 A
8 when practical than desktop
computers. Exercise 2
Vocabulary
3 An MP3 player is the most a In my opinion
Exercise 1 economical way to store b Another example / in addition
1 liquids; gasses; chemicals music. to this

152
c That said 4 occupation Exercise 2
d It's true ... but / I don't agree 5 irresponsible 1 is about to leave
e To conclude 6 creativity 2 Shall
Exercise 4 3 will
3–4 Review 4 doesn’t fall
1 Does this laptop belong
5 might be going
2 is used to working
Exercise 1 6 intends to study
3 Are you coming to
1 education 7 will
4 doesn’t taste nice
2 teenagers 8 will be staying
5 had been studying for
3 punishment
6 the best game I have Exercise 3
4 really
7 works much harder than 1 are planning
5 worthwhile/worthy
8 been in detention since 2 am going to study
6 performance
7 behaviour 3 will do
8 improvements Unit 5 4 will have learnt
9 natural 5 will have graduated
Reading 6 will be travelling
Exercise 2
Exercise 1 7 will have crossed
1 has been learning German 8 will be moving
1B 2E 3A 4C
since 9 will have visited
2 computer was the best Exercise 2 10 will have to
invention
1C 2B 3C 4D 5C 6D Vocabulary
3 hacked into the
7A 8D
4 had left the laboratory Exercise 1
5 are younger than / are less Exercise 3 1 accommodation
old than 1 untouched 2 five star
6 been paying attention 2 come across 3 self-catering
7 got marked down 3 nomadic 4 out
8 met (when we were) at 4 tailor-made 5 double
5 game reserve 6 en suite
Progress test 1 6 tribe 7 breakfast
Exercise 4 8 rates
Exercise 1
1 tribe 9 campsites
1C 2A 3C 4A 5A 6D
2 untouched 10 youth hostels
7 C 8 D 9 D 10 C
3 nomadic Exercise 2
Exercise 2
4 tailor-made 1 foreign country
1 the 5 game reserve 2 abroad
2 his/easy
6 come across 3 sightseeing
3 saying
Grammar 1 4 sights
4 had
5 better 5 cathedral
Exercise 1
6 asked 6 monument
1 is going to be / will be
7 less 7 ancient ruins
2 will pick up
8 since 3 am having; are going Exercise 3
9 job 4 will you visit / are you going 1 off; by
10 up to visit 2 ferry
Exercise 3 5 will take / are going to take 3 on
1 successful 6 is leaving / leaves 4 on; to
2 impressive 7 will drive 5 setting off
3 possibilities 8 am going to jump 6 missed

153
7 rode Writing g show
8 into Exercise 1 h admission
Exercise 4 1 F; begin Dear Mr Mazower Grammar 1
1 bike helmet 2 T
Exercise 1
2 campsite 3 F; use indirect questions
1a 2b 3b 4a 5a
3 walking tour 4 T
6a 7a
4 youth hostel 5 T
5 public transport 6 F; You need to say why Exercise 2
6 guided tour you’re writing in your first 1 My husband asked me/us
paragraph. where I/we wanted to go on
Grammar 2
7 T New Year’s Eve.
Exercise 1 2 Martha said (that) the
Exercise 2
1 get; ’ll buy costumes for the play
2 will find; arrive Suggested answers: wouldn’t be ready until the
3 won’t contact; find Could you tell me how I’ll be following week.
4 ’re going; leave travelling? 3 ‘ Did you enjoy tonight’s
5 don’t start I wonder if you could tell me performance?’ asked Maddy.
6 have reached what we’ll see on the guided 4 Thomas asked if he had to
tour of Perugia. be in the school play.
Exercise 2
Can you tell me which 5 ‘ I’m going to write my play
1 aren’t you restaurant in Perugia we’ll be with a very complicated plot,’
2 will it having dinner in? said Anthony.
3 could you I wonder whether you could tell
4 didn’t she Exercise 3
me what the special discounts
5 don't you are for early bookings. 1 that
6 are you 2 been
3 how/why
Exercise 3
Unit 6 4 had
1a 2c 3b 4b 5a 6c 5 his
Exercise 4 Reading 6 was
1 Could you tell me which bus Exercise 1 7 gone
goes into the town centre? 8 if/whether
1A 2C 3A 4B 5C 6B
2 I wonder if/whether there is a 7A 8D Vocabulary
ferry every hour.
3 Can you tell me what time Exercise 2 Exercise 1
the next train arrives? 1 upcoming 1 landscape
4 Do you know how long the 2 affordable 2 conductor
journey takes? 3 collection 3 sculptor
5 to know what that building is 4 participate 4 composer
called. 5 show 5 exhibition
6 I wonder if you could tell me 6 admission 6 audience
how expensive it will be. 7 priceless 7 portrait
7 Do you know if/whether a 8 discount 8 keyboards
tour guide will meet us at the
airport? Exercise 3 Exercise 2
8 buying the tickets for us, a participate 1 credits
please? b upcoming 2 part
c discount 3 stage
Listening
d affordable 4 rehearsal
Exercise 1 e priceless 5 location
1C 2C 3A 4B 5C 6A f collection 6 outfit

154
7 conductor’s 8 My brother advised me not to Exercise 2
8 choir miss the last train home that 1 New facts about the elections
9 cast night. are being published every day.
10 role Listening 2 The finals of the Eurovision
Song Contest in May will
Exercise 3 Exercise 1 be watched by audiences
1 actress 1C 2B 3A 4C 5B 6A worldwide.
2 awards 3 The documentary was filmed
3 performances Writing
over a period of two years on
4 dramatic Exercise 1 the Galapagos Islands.
5 criticized 1B 2E 3C 4A 5D 4 The foreign correspondent
6 nominated was advised by the editor to
get out of Liberia.
Exercise 4 5–6 Review 5 This magazine is subscribed
1 bring out to by ten thousand readers
2 going out Exercise 1
every month.
3 turned out 1B 2C 3D 4C 5B 6C 6 Very large files shouldn’t
4 carry out 7 B 8 A 9 A 10 C 11 A be downloaded onto this
5 sold out 12 C computer.
6 sorted out Exercise 2 7 The report in yesterday’s
7 speak out 1d 2a 3c 4a 5b 6d Globe is believed (by many
8 Look out 7 d 8 b 9 c 10 c people) to be misleading.
8 A whole new series of this
Grammar 2 soap opera is going to be
Exercise 1 Unit 7 filmed in Hawaii.
1 told Reading Exercise 3
2 threatened to 1 Our TV hasn’t worked for a
Exercise 1
3 told us few days now.
1D 2B 3B 4A 5A 6D
4 warned 2 The editor of The Daily Globe
5 denied that Exercise 2 is being given a special
6 asked me 1 link up award tonight.
7 told 2 access 3 Sally was sent an unusual
8 claimed 3 in the loop email by a company selling
4 posted degrees.
Exercise 2
5 broadcast 4 Any new subscribers to the
1 Marvin suggested that I/we magazine should be sent
6 egocentric
hang the painting in the living their first magazine free.
7 status
room. 5 Were the company websites
8 profile
2 Miriam denied losing my improved last year?
9 minority
book. 6 Text messages are
10 phenomenon
3 Tom complained that the film transmitted to mobile phones
was really awful. Exercise 3 through a switching centre.
4 Jonty promised to be waiting 1 status
for me/us outside the Vocabulary
2 broadcast
cinema. 3 posted Exercise 1
5 Mum added that Dad wasn’t 4 access 1 report
going to let me go to the 5 phenomenon 2 surfing
concert. 6 minority 3 viewers
6 I asked what time the 4 correspondent
exhibition closed. Grammar 1 5 images
7 Mum told me (that) I couldn’t Exercise 1 6 Reality shows
wear that dress to the party. 1a 2b 3b 4b 5a 7 headline

155
8 sound engineer 4 I will have my portrait painted 5 would feel; was/were
9 game show by my best friend. 6 goes; involves
10 sitcom 5 My dad wants to have his 7 had; would do
new suit made. 8 will give; don’t stop
Exercise 2
6 We are going to have all
1 chat show host Exercise 3
our furniture collected by a
2 make-up artist removal company. 1 it rains
3 film critic 2 wins, it/they will
4 web designer Listening 3 if we went diving
5 foreign correspondent Exercise 1 4 were you, I would
Exercise 3 1C 2B 3C 4A 5C 5 there is boxing
1 touch Writing Vocabulary
2 networking Exercise 1 Exercise 1
3 keep
1b 2 a 3 c 4e 5d 1 ring
4 touch
2 track
5 surf
6 downloaded Unit 8 3 wetsuit
4 oxygen tank
7 file(s) Reading 5 flippers
8 make
Exercise 1 6 hoop
9 hit
1 B 2 A or B 3 B or A 7 net
Exercise 4 4 B or C 5 C or B 6 B 7 C 8 racket
1 hear 8 C or D 9 D or C 10 A or D 9 pitch
2 seen 11 D or A 12 D 13 B 10 court
3 listening Exercise 2 11 opponent
4 watch A5 B2 C1 D4 12 umpire
5 looked
Exercise 3 Exercise 2
6 heard
7 watch 1 relieve – c 1 Fishermen
8 Look 2 participants – f 2 gymnastics
3 speed up – d 3 gardener
Grammar 2 4 reduce – b 4 photographer
Exercise 1 5 balance – h 5 competitors
1a 2a 3b 4a 5a 6 sweat – g 6 skating
7 martial art – e 7 referees
Exercise 2
8 tone – a 8 spectators
1 is having; cut off
2 had; written Grammar 1 Exercise 3
3 have; designed Exercise 1 1 beat
4 have (already) had; installed 1 could 2 come
5 have; made 2 need to 3 defeated
6 did; have; taken 3 keeps up 4 beat
7 had; composed 4 competes 5 go
8 have been having; painted 5 will go 6 came
6 was 7 draw
Exercise 3 7 continue 8 gone
1 Our neighbours had their 8 won’t
house broken into last night. Exercise 4
2 My parents want to have Exercise 2 1 work out
their house redecorated. 1 beats; will win 2 turn up
3 After the storm, we had 2 played; would think 3 take up
all the broken windows 3 Does hurt; punch 4 hang out
replaced. 4 will be; doesn’t stop 5 knock out

156
Grammar 2 9 fastest Grammar 1
Exercise 1 10 people Exercise 1
1 What if Exercise 2 1b 2a 3a 4b 5b 6b
2 Unless 1 documentary 7b
3 As long as 2 teenagers Exercise 2
4 provided that 3 correspondent 1 must
5 Suppose 4 pressure 2 should
6 unless 5 viewers 3 might not
Exercise 2 6 exception 4 could
7 unpredictable 5 need to
1 as
8 athletics 6 can
2 like
9 difficulties
3 like Exercise 3
10 controversial
4 as 1 must be
5 like 2 can’t get
6 as Progress test 2 3 should have
7 like 4 Can I help
8 as Exercise 1
5 need to take
1b 2b 3a 4c 5a 6d
Exercise 3 6 do you have to bring
7 b 8 c 9 d 10 b 11 d
1 like 7 can/might/could drop
12 c 13 b 14 c 15 b 16 b
2 unless 8 need/should/have to be
Exercise 2 9 can show
3 like
4 like 1c 2c 3b 4b 5c 6b 10 need to wear
5 as 7 a 8 b 9 c 10 d 11 d
Vocabulary
12 b 13 a 14 c 15 c 16 a
6 will Exercise 1
7 provided
1 global warming
Listening Unit 9 2 endangered species
Exercise 1 Reading 3 become extinct
Exercise 1 4 environmentally friendly
1 F 2 T 3 NS 4 F 5 F 6 T
7 F 8 NS 5 wildlife reserves
1C 2A 3C 4C 5D 6A
6 freezing temperatures
Writing Exercise 2 7 acid rain
Exercise 1 1 expanse Exercise 2
1 First of all 2 without a trace
1 blizzard
2 Another great thing 3 coast
2 heavy
3 For example 4 currents
3 heatwave
4 In my opinion 5 tectonic plates
4 floods
6 thick fog
5 drought
7 buoyancy 6 below
7–8 Review 8 compass 7 tornado; gale-force
Exercise 1 9 align 8 light; hurricane
10 occurrences 9 flash; pouring
1 revolutionized
2 easier Exercise 3 10 scorching; shade
3 stolen 1 currents Exercise 3
4 came up 2 expanse 1 a bolt from the blue
5 are being bought 3 thick fog 2 a storm in a teacup
6 is growing 4 buoyancy 3 a face like thunder
7 waiting 5 compass 4 a bit under the weather
8 their 6 without a trace 5 come rain or shine

157
Grammar 2 Writing 4 ✔
Exercise 1 Exercise 1 5 The man who told me to
1b 2a 3c 4e 5g take a lot of vitamins is a
1 a True 1 b True
6f 7d nutritionist.
2 a True 2 b False
6 ✔
3 a True 3 b False
7 ✔
4 a True 4 b False Unit 10 8 The people who you met last
5 a True 5 b False
Reading year on holiday are coming
Exercise 2 for dinner tonight.
Exercise 1
1 hadn’t caught; would never Exercise 3
have known 1B 2D 3G 4C 5F 6A
7E 1 B, D
2 will become; don’t stop
3 wouldn’t have got; had Exercise 2 2 C, D
started 3 C
1 fibre
4 had saved; wouldn’t have 4 A, C
2 serve
5 hadn’t created; would have 5 B, D
3 pulses; proteins
disappeared 4 natural preservative Exercise 4
6 wouldn’t have destroyed; 5 humid 1 in which we eat at summer
hadn’t come 6 abundant camp is big enough for 100
Exercise 3 7 refined people
1 Maggie wouldn’t have fallen 8 chopsticks 2 that I went to served dreadful
asleep if she hadn’t gone to 9 fair share food at lunchtime
bed late the night before. a chopsticks 3 who prepared the food for
2 The dodo bird wouldn’t have b humid the party did a fantastic job
become extinct if Portuguese c fair share 4 whose recipes I’ve tried, is a
sailors hadn’t discovered d pulses famous cookery book writer
Mauritius. e natural preservative 5 to whom I have written three
3 If it hadn’t rained heavily, f serve times, has never replied to
our trip wouldn’t have been g refined my letters
cancelled. h proteins Vocabulary
4 If Carl hadn’t gone on a trip i abundant
to the Amazon, he wouldn’t Exercise 1
j fibre
have got malaria from a 1 got a black eye
mosquito bite. Grammar 1 2 got; bruise
5 If the Jones family hadn’t Exercise 1 3 cut yourself
missed their train, they would 1 where 4 sprained; ankle
have got to the airport on 2 whose 5 bone; broken; have; cast
time. 3 when 6 graze; knees
6 If Karin hadn’t been feeling 4 which/that 7 pulled; muscle
under the weather, she would 5 which/that
have gone to work. Exercise 2
6 whom
7 If the car hadn’t had chains 1 getting over
7 who
on the tyres, it would have 2 put on
8 which
slipped. 3 cut down on
8 If the government hadn’t Exercise 2 4 taking care of
banned hunting of the blue 1 ✔ 5 gone off
whale, it would have become 2 The cafe where I meet my
extinct. Exercise 3
friends, is usually crowded
on Saturday. 1 spicy; milder
Listening
3 The boy whose leg got 2 sour; sweet
Exercise 1 3 sparkling
broken on the skiing trip, will
1D 2A 3B 4C 5E be off school for six weeks. 4 heavy

158
5 Raw; cooked 4a T 4 observe
6 rare 4b T 5 fuming
5 a NS 6 dominant
Exercise 4
5b F 7 sly
1 grams
8 nick
2 bitter Writing 9 tag
3 tablespoons Exercise 1 10 accompany
4 Cut/Chop Because after breaking her leg
5 Put Exercise 3
in a skiing accident last year,
6 Add her leg hurts when she does 1 delinquent
7 Boil sports. 2 suspicious
8 Pour 3 accompany
Exercise 2
9 Stir 4 nick
you could stop doing the 5 dominant
10 add
sports …
11 Pour Grammar 1
You might try doing …
12 refrigerate
you could help your body … Exercise 1
13 Slice
You might try eating a …. 1 can’t have
14 Cut/Chop
2 shouldn’t have
15 grate
3 could have
Grammar 2
9–10 Review 4 must have
Exercise 1 Exercise 1 5 might have
1 might be healthier than 6 ought to have
1B 2C 3C 4A 5C 6B
2 wish I hadn’t thrown 7 can’t have
7 C 8 B 9 A 10 B
3 rather you didn’t leave 8 could have
Exercise 2 4 cut down on meat Exercise 2
1 wouldn’t put / hadn’t put 5 If you hadn’t taken/had
1 must have stolen it
2 hadn’t sat 6 can’t be a
2 should have told the police
3 will pass 7 the person who has got
3 might have made the/that
4 was/were 8 become extinct (forever)
noise
5 wouldn’t end Exercise 2 4 can’t have found their prime
6 went suspect yet
1 stayed
7 told 5 ought to have closed it
2 those
8 had bought 6 could have become a top chef
3 hadn't left
Exercise 3 4 had started Exercise 3
1 my cake had risen when 5 falling
1 might/may/could have
2 you would stop 6 didn't want entered
3 rather you made 7 be prepared 2 can’t have been
4 only I hadn’t put 8 wasn't 3 must have broken
5 time I got/was getting over 9 their 4 must have made
6 rather you left 5 may/might have heard
7 wish I ate Unit 11 6 ought to/should have asked
Listening Reading 7 could have been
8 should not have allowed
Exercise 1 Exercise 1
9 can’t have felt
1a F 1D 2C 3C 4B 5C 10 must have wanted
1 b NS 6C
Vocabulary
2a T Exercise 2
2b F 1 criminal record Exercise 1
3a T 2 delinquent 1 jury
3b T 3 suspicious 2 judge

159
3 alibi; committed; suspect Exercise 3 Grammar 1
4 lawyer; detective 1 allow my client to Exercise 1
5 witness; clue 2 was made to pay 1 Those jeans look
6 evidence; culprit; motive 3 won’t let me stay 2 don’t carry much ready cash
7 victim; weapon 4 made me do it 3 a few/some new clothes
8 cover-up 5 don’t let anyone enter 4 how much dog’s hair
Exercise 2 6 will allow you to go 5 a lot more money
1 pickpocketing Listening 6 The news is starting
2 arson 7 didn’t do any window-
Exercise 1
shopping, spent a lot of
3 shoplifting 1C 2B 3C 4A 5B money
4 robbery
Writing 8 some chocolate, I won’t take
5 vandalism
much
6 burglary Exercise 1
1 was waiting Exercise 2
Exercise 3
2 had agreed 1 so much
1 mysterious 2 so many
3 were going
2 Criminal 3 so much
4 had told
3 dishonest 4 so
5 seemed to be
4 illegally 5 such
6 ran
5 innocence 6 such
7 looked helplessly
6 guilt 7 so many
8 should
Exercise 4 9 had looked / was looking 8 such
1 blame (her) for 10 as fast as Exercise 3
2 sentenced to 1 You’re walking too fast.
3 get away with I can’t keep up.
4 accused of
Unit 12
2 I didn’t bring enough water.
5 charging (you) with Reading I’m thirsty now.
3 This car is too expensive.
Grammar 2 Exercise 1
I can’t afford it / I can’t afford
Exercise 1 1G 2A 3B 4F 5C 6D to buy it.
1 to buy Exercise 2 4 Carl isn’t tall enough to
2 committing; to have 1 plastic become a policeman.
3 trying 2 ready cash 5 I spent too much money on
4 finding 3 disorder my computer and now I’m
5 watch; break broke.
4 symptoms
6 being 5 insanity 6 This news is too good to be
7 to discover 6 financial ruin true. I don’t believe it.
8 seeing 7 consumer society Exercise 4
8 life-threatening 1B 2D 3B 4D 5A
Exercise 2
9 purchases 6B
1 seeing 10 customer
2 to fill Vocabulary
3 raining / to rain (both options Exercise 3
Exercise 1
correct) 1 plastic; ready cash
2 symptoms 1 belt
4 shaking
3 disorder 2 bracelet, earrings, necklace,
5 to inform
nosering, ring
6 to be 4 consumer society
3 scarf
7 working / to work (both 5 insanity
4 high heels
options correct) 6 financial ruin
5 trainers
8 to invite 7 customer
6 denim jacket

160
7 waterproof jacket 5 anything 4 endangering
8 leggings 6 Everything 5 protection
9 sweater 7 nothing 6 mysterious
8 Everyone/Everybody 7 simply
Exercise 2
9 anything 8 consumption
1 suit
10 anybody 9 reuse
2 fit
10 difference
3 size Listening
4 try (it) on Exercise 1 Exercise 4
5 good 1C 2C 3A 4B 5C 1 had better wear
6 do (it) up 2 had a face like thunder
7 take (it) up Writing 3 would not have got through
8 loose Exercise 1 4 where you broke your leg
9 taken in 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 5 wish we hadn’t bought
10 tight 6 allow you to work
11 buy 11–12 Review 7 is too expensive
12 receipt Exercise 1 8 must have been a
13 take (it) back
1 criminals The bumper crossword
Exercise 3 2 investigation Clues across Clues down
1 brand 3 unbelievable 2 self catering 1 web
2 product 4 guilty 4 set up 2 station
3 logos 5 reality 6 beast 3 award
4 receipt 6 evidence 7 cast 4 solid
8 faithfully 5 portable
5 cash desks 7 scientists
11 dramatic 8 fossil
6 newsagent’s 8 truly
12 media 9 carry out
7 accessories 9 Scary 15 unambitious 10
1 register
Exercise 4 Exercise 2 17 opponent 13
1 turned up
1 be loaded 1d 2b 3d 4c 5b 6a 18 grim 14
1 drought
7 d 8 b 9 d 10 c 21 irresponsible 16
1 aggressive
2 aren’t made of money
23 peers 19
1 museum
3 am broke
26 stroll 20
2 homesick
4 have more money than Progress test 3 27 occupation 22
2 roof
sense 30 innocent 24
2 laundry
Exercise 1
5 been ripped off 31 hoop 25
2 youth hostel
1C 2C 3B 4D 5B 6D
Grammar 2 7 C 8 C 9 C 10 A 32 skyscraper 28
2 household
33 arson 29
2 take up
Exercise 1 Exercise 2 35 whether 34
3 headlines
1B 2C 3C 4B 5D 6D 1 such 36 make up artist 38
3 truant
7C 8A 2 put 37 detention 40
4 checkmate
Exercise 2 3 enough 39 athletics 41
4 logo
4 which 42 en suite 44
4 bitter
1 Both 43 knock out 47
4 microscope
2 All 5 junk
45 alibi 49
4 essential
3 Neither; nor 6 which
46 get marked 51
5 ransom
4 all 7 have down
5 every/each 8 to 48 graze
6 None 9 have 50 bargain
10 which/that 51 reporter
Exercise 3 52 accessory
1 Nobody Exercise 3
53 shower
2 something 1 environmental 54 sparkling
3 anything 2 pollution 55 motive
4 somewhere 3 extinction 56 environmentally

161
Unified state exam in English
language practice test key

Раздел 1. Аудирование Раздел 3. Грамматика и лексика


B1 B4–B10

A B C D E F B4 asmuchas*
B5 passing
5 3 7 2 4 1
B6 inwhich
A1–A7 B7 hadbeenstealing
A1 2 B8 tohelp
A2 2 B9 waswritten
A3 1 B10 hadn'tslept
A4 3 B11–B16
A5 1
B11 cultural
A6 3
B12 delivery
A7 2
B13 celebrations
A8–A14 B14 fearless
A8 3 B15 graceful
A9 1 B16 prominently
A10 2 A22–A28
A11 3
A22 2
A12 2
A23 4
A13 1
A24 3
A14 2
A25 2
A26 1
Раздел 2. Чтение A27 2
A28 3
B2

A B C D E F G
3 6 8 5 4 1 7

B3
A B C D E F
6 5 7 4 2 1
A15–A21
A15 3
A16 1
A17 2
A18 4
A19 2
A20 2
A21 4
* Написание
Н ответов (б
(без пробелов и знаков
препинания) соответствует требованиям к заполнению
бланка ответов №1 ЕГЭ по английскому языку

162
Unified state exam in English language test
listening audioscript

got in the windows. Sometimes dreaming about what


CD folder 'Workbook_Unified we want is almost as good as having it, right?
State Exam_Listening Test' Speaker D
I'm a video game junkie. I'm always rushing out to the
Раздел 1. Аудирование electronics shop to try out the latest game just after its
Сейчас Вы будете выполнять задания по release. It can be tricky, because every other kid in the
аудированию. Каждый текст прозвучит 2 раза. neighbourhood is there as well, and there are only a
После двух прослушиваний у Вас будет время few gaming consoles. The thing is, I've played so many
для выполнения и проверки заданий. Все паузы games and I only want to buy the best ones. This means
включены в аудиозапись. Остановка и повторное you've got to test it out first. You don't want to spend
воспроизведение аудиозаписи не предусмотрены. 50 pounds for something that's going to bore you!

Задание В1 Speaker E
I like shopping just as much as my friends do, but we've
Вы услышите шесть высказываний. Установите got different ideas about it. They're always searching
соответствие между высказываниями каждого for the latest trends in fashion, or the coolest pair of
говорящего A–F и утверждениями, данными sunglasses, or a great new bag. Call me strange, but
в списке 1–7. Используйте каждое утвержде- I love the clothes I've already got. I've got a pair of
ние, обозначенное соответствующей цифрой, shades, so why buy more? I've had my bag for two
только один раз. В задании есть одно лишнее years…it works just fine! I prefer to save my money for
утверждение. Вы услышите запись дважды. buying any other thing, whether it be books, music or
Занесите свои ответы в таблицу. У Вас есть even electronics.
20 секунд, чтобы ознакомиться с заданием.
Speaker F
Everyone in my school is obsessed with brand labels. I
Now we are ready to start. don't have a problem with that, really. You can spend as
much money on clothes as you like. But wearing brand
Speaker A
labels is not my preference. I prefer wearing items that
I love shopping for bargains. However, what I like doing express individuality, you know, something that makes
is going to shops where they have great clothes on you stand out from the crowd and represents who you
sale. This is different from shopping at places where are. I know some kids think I'm a bit weird, but at least
the only thing on offer is cheap clothes. I find that these I don't look the same as everyone else!
shops are not a wise option. The last two times I bought
clothes from this type of shop, buttons came off after You have 15 seconds to complete the task.
two weeks and a zipper broke almost immediately. The [Pause 15 seconds]
lesson is: cheaper doesn't always mean better! Now you will hear the texts again. [Repeat]
Speaker B This is the end of the task. You now have 15
seconds to check your answers.
When I go shopping, I prefer to go with my mates, but
[Pause 15 seconds]
occasionally I go with my mum and sister just so I have
something to do. I enjoy it because my mum often buys
me a fair amount of clothes. But they like to go to every Задания A1–A7
single shop and spend half an hour looking at things. It
can get rather boring. I try to find a place to play video Вы услышите диалог. Определите, какие из
games for a while. But I know what I want when I shop, приведённых утверждений А1–А7 соответс-
and I like to just get it and go. твуют содержанию текста (1 – True), какие не
соответствуют (2 – False) и о чём в тексте не
Speaker C сказано, то есть на основании текста нельзя
I'm rather careful about how I spend my money. I don't дать ни положительный, ни отрицательный от-
have a lot to throw around like some of my other friends. вет (3 – Not stated). Обведите номер выбранно-
My parents have a tight grip on their wallets! That's го Вами варианта ответа. Вы услышите запись
fine, though. I find other ways to enjoy a shopping дважды. У Вас есть 20 секунд, чтобы ознако-
experience without throwing away pounds. I love миться с заданиями.
passing by a high-end boutique to see what they've

163
Now we are ready to start. This is the end of the task. You now have
Jennie: Thanks for coming to work on the project 15 seconds to check your answers.
tonight, Frank. I want to make some progress [Pause 15 seconds]
on it, as I've got some other things to study
for this week. Задания А8–А14
Frank: Sure, Jennie. I'm glad to get started as
well. This is a good night to do it, as I'm not Вы услышите интервью. В заданиях А8–А14
practising for football. обведите цифру 1, 2 или 3, соответствующую
Jennie: Good. So, I've got some suggestions for выбранному Вами варианту ответа. Вы услы-
ideas to include for the project. Do you want шите запись дважды. У Вас есть 50 секунд,
to hear them? чтобы ознакомиться с заданиями.
Frank: Of course. I haven't thought about it much, to
be honest, so I'm open to anything.
Jennie: Well, since healthy eating is more than Now we are ready to start.
just watching calories, I thought we should Presenter: Hello listeners and welcome to our
focus on certain basic foods that are high in programme, 'Book Chat'. Today we have
nutrients and healthy all round. non-fiction author John Nichols. Thank
Frank: Oh, ok. You mean like whole grains, legumes, you for joining us, Mr Nichols.
fruit and vegetables, and brown rice? John: I'm glad to be here. Please, call me John.
Jennie: Exactly. Because you have to do more than Presenter: So tell us, John, what inspired you to write
just avoid junk food. I thought it was be a your latest book?
good idea to encourage students to get John: Well, my latest book, as you know, is on
these types of food in their houses, and to the Hermitage Museum. I've always been
the greatest extent possible. fascinated with this museum ever since I
Frank: That's a good idea. I think it's worthwhile to visited it ten years ago. Of course, it has
reduce the amount of meat in our diets. Beef, such as rich, world-renowned collection,
chicken and other types of meat are OK and even the building is a work of art. But
every once in a while, but not for every meal. as I'm an historian by trade, it was really
People should only eat meat maybe once a the museum's fascinating history that led
week. me to write this book.
Jennie: I see what you mean about eating less meat, Presenter: Does your book deal with this aspect
but only once a week? That seems like it only?
might be difficult to do. I know for me, it's not John: You could say it forms the structure
satisfying to eat vegetables all the time. Any of the book. I begin by digging deep
other ideas? into the history of its creation and its
Frank: OK, well we could promote eating lean meat. founder, Catherine the Great. She put
So, instead of eating red meat, people could such an enormous effort into creating
focus on eating chicken and fish. this museum and acquiring its initial
Jennie: I like that idea better. And how about oils and possessions. Naturally, there were many
fats like butter and margarine? other people after her that contributed to
Frank: I've read margarine is bad for you, as it's very the museum's greatness. I do discuss the
processed. I think butter might be better, but specific collections as I move through the
only if you use it sparingly. My mum uses museum's historical timeline.
olive oil a lot, and I think it's the best. Presenter: Is there a particular collection that really
Jennie: That sounds good. I have a suggestion for stood out to you?
sweets. As well as reducing the amount of John: The museum has such a wide variety of
sugar you eat, I think we should promote artwork that it's difficult to choose just
eating fruit for dessert or even a bit of dark one. The museum's very first collection
chocolate. I've read good things about that. consisted of Dutch and Flemish painters,
Frank: I agree. Well, I think we've got a lot of such as Rembrandt and Rubens. The
good ideas, so let's begin organising the early collection also contained some
presentation… pieces by Renaissance painters such as
Raphael. During Alexander I of Russia's
You have 15 seconds to complete the task.
reign, he added ancient Greek artefacts
[Pause 15 seconds]
to the museum that were found within the
Now you will hear the texts again. [Repeat] Russian Empire's territory. As I'm quite

164
fond of that time in history, this was most fascinating entrance to the museum is
delightful to see. adorned with these large granite statues
Presenter: Where have the museum's collections acquired from Finland. The statues
originated from? appear to be holding up the roof in front of
John: Oh, from many different places. Some of the entrance. It's quite a sight.
them were purchased from art merchants, Presenter: One final question…is there any particular
especially in the beginning. As time when piece of history that you found to be most
on, private collectors began to sell their interesting?
holdings to the museum. Catherine the John: You know, the museum has lived a long
Great acquired some 4,000 paintings life. It has lived through Russia's transition
alone for display. Other items came from from empire to the Soviet Union to Russia
the palaces of Russian tsars, and some today, and many interesting things have
were transferred from other museums in happened along the way. The second
Russia. World War had a particular compelling
Presenter: I'm assuming that the Hermitage displays impact on the museum. In preparation
more that just paintings, correct? for the war, two entire trains full of the
John: Oh yes. Going back to Catherine, she museum's artwork were sent off to be
collected thousands upon thousands preserved. It was wise of the officials to
of books, drawings, gemstones, coins do so, as the museum was actually struck
and medals. In fact, the ever-expanding during the war.
collection of the Hermitage was the Presenter: I urge listeners to pick up your book and
reason Catherine had more buildings read more about it. We're out of time for
added to the museum. In later years, an today, but thank you very much for coming
Egyptian collection was added, which to speak to us, John.
consisted of stone tablets, burial caskets John: You're welcome!
and a mummy.
You have 15 seconds to complete the task.
Presenter: You mentioned in the beginning that the
museum itself is a work of art. Tell us [Pause 15 seconds]
about that. Now you will hear the text again. [Repeat]
John: Well, the museum complex consists This is the end of the task. You now have
of buildings that have all been built in 15 seconds to check your answers.
the neoclassical style of architecture, [Pause 15 seconds]
all brightly and exquisitely painted. The
interiors included elaborate galleries This is the end of the Listening test.
and hallways that would amaze a visitor Время, отведённое на выполнение заданий,
even if the museum were empty! A most истекло.

165
h e r’s
Teac e fi l e
o ur c
res

166
Progress test Unit 1

Vocabulary Grammar
A Choose the best answer. C Circle the correct option.
1 Working in a bank sounds like a(n) job. 1 These biscuits smell / are smelling wonderful!
I’d like to do something more exciting. 2 It’s not as easy as it is seeming / seems.
A creative B dull C annoying D anxious
3 Right now, I am thinking / think about all the work
2 Isn’t that Robert? I haven’t seen him ! I have to do!
A for ages B since ages C ages ago D ages
4 Do you speak / Are you speaking any other
3 Nancy is so . She’s happy one minute languages?
and miserable the next!
5 At the moment, I learn / I’m learning how to drive.
A selfish B cheerful C moody D aggressive
6 My flight leaves / is leaving at 6 o’clock.
4 Only a(n) person would think so highly of
himself. /6
A arrogant B bossy C aggressive D efficient
5 Stop being so ! I hate being told what to do.
A selfish B aggressive C bossy D efficient D Complete the second sentence so that
it has the same meaning as the first
6 My hair has always been , but I straighten it.
sentence. Use the word in brackets.
A curly B thick C straight D fair
7 People with lips have a generous nature. 1 I think there may be a problem. (appears)
A slim B thin C skinny D pointed There a problem.
8 I am very . You can count on me to get 2 I think the whole thing is great.
the work done. (sounds)
A energetic B reliable C cheerful D bossy The whole thing to me.
3 Do you have any plans for the weekend? (are)
/8 What at the weekend?
4 Is that your book? (belong)
B Complete the sentences with words from Does you?
the box in the correct form. 5 I’ve never lived in a city and I don’t like them.
(used)
attractive • considerate • imaginative I in a city and I don’t
organized • polite • responsible like them.

1 I think Sheila is a very artist. All her /5


works are the same.
2 Nina is so . She really hurt my
feelings.
3 When you ask for something say, ‘please’, or you
will sound .
4 I think shaved heads look really .
5 Look at that mess! You are the most
person I know. Total: / 25
6 Letting your ten-year-old sister go into town on her
own is really !

/6

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167
Progress test Unit 2

Vocabulary Grammar
A Circle the correct option. C Complete the sentences with the past simple
or past continuous.
1 If you’ve all finished, I’d like to clear / tidy the table.
2 On Saturday, I did / made the laundry, the ironing 1 While I (stay) with Nancy, I
and all the household shopping. (realize) how important it is to have
3 After cleaning up, we threw up / out five bags of your own bedroom.
things we didn’t need anymore. 2 When I (am) a child, I
4 What time will you be house / home? (play) with the little boy next door.
5 My hometown / housewarming is a small dot on 3 I (do) the washing-up when the
the map. doorbell (ring).
6 Being away so long made me feel really 4 I (not live) in the village, but I
homeless / homesick.
(visit) it every summer.
/6 5 Who (you/speak) to when I
(call) earlier?
B Complete the sentences with words from /5
the box. There are three extra words.

busy • depressing • field D Find and correct the mistakes in these


sentences.
impressive • industrial • luxury
peaceful • pleasant • wilderness 1 Didn’t you used to live in Ufa?

1 I don’t like this place. I find it really dull and 2 Most people would live in rural areas, but now they
. I would much rather live in a lively, live in the urban areas.
exciting town.
2 Big cities are usually very crowded 3 Heather is a friend of your, isn’t she?
and .
3 I love that building. The design makes 4 I had a really relaxing time while my visit to Lake
it really beautiful to look at. Baikal.
4 My hairdryer is a(n) I cannot live
without. 5 Amazon rainforest is a huge place!
5 Because this is a(n) area with lots of
factories, it is very polluted.
6 I went to school that we saw earlier.
6 We spent two weeks camping in the .
It was an opportunity to connect with the natural
world. 7 My country is beautiful place.

/6 8 Have you ever been to the Italy?

/8

Total: / 25

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168 This sheet may be photocopied and used within the class.
Progress test Unit 3

Vocabulary Grammar
A Choose the correct answer. C Circle the correct option.
1 Have you handed your essay yet? 1 I’ve tried / been trying to finish this assignment,
A in B back C up D on but haven’t managed / been managing yet.
2 Mr Hill gave us our tests this morning. 2 We’ve just / already got back from a school trip to
A in B on C back D out a farm.
3 Do you go to a school or a private school? 3 Have you ever been / gone to Cambridge?
A government B public C primary D state 4 Georgina’s been having / had a lot of exams to
take.
4 After I finish school, I’d like to do a(n)
5 We’ve been waiting since / for early this morning.
course, so that I learn a useful skill.
6 What time have you got / did you get here?
A occupational B vocational C state D public
5 I’ve been attending evening to learn how /6
to use a computer.
A assignments B subjects C classes D lessons D Complete the second sentence so that
6 Do you have to wear a to school? it has the same meaning as the first
A costume B suit C clothes D uniform sentence. Use the word in brackets.
7 is another word for young teenager. 1 I finished my homework hours ago. (already)
A Adolescent B Sibling C Peer D Principle I my homework.
8 I got into trouble at school and I was sent to the 2 I got here at 4.00 and it’s now 6.00 and she’s still
office. not here? (have)
A assistant’s B principal’s C helper’s D teacher’s I for her for two hours.
/8 3 I moved here when I was two years old. (have)
I I was two years old.
4 I’ve spent a whole month on this assignment.
B Complete the sentences with words from
the box in the correct form. There are three (working)
extra words. I on this assignment all
month.
do • follow • get • get into • lose 5 This is the most fun I’ve ever had. (never)
pass • pay • show • work I so much fun in my life.

/5
1 I’m happy with my grades. I’m well.
2 In spring, it’s hard to attention in class.
3 Samantha’s progress is good. She’s
interest and is an active member of the class.
4 Paul did something stupid and
suspended.
5 I’m not one to rules, but I think this is
important.
6 If you hard, you should get the grades Total: / 25
you want.

/6

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This sheet may be photocopied and used within the class.
169
Progress test Unit 4

Vocabulary Grammar
A Circle the correct option. C Circle the correct option.
1 Scientists have found fossil / species remains of 1 Mathematicians worked / had been working
a dwarf dinosaur. for years on this problem before solving it.
2 The movement / rate at which something 2 They had looked / been looking for life on
moves is called speed. other planets when they discovered a new
3 Do you have a tabletop / desktop computer solar system.
or a laptop? 3 The technician had arrived / had been
4 My screen / keyboard has frozen again! I think arriving at the lab before anyone else.
I need to restart the computer. 4 Pam said she saw / had seen a strange man
5 If you study chemistry / astronomy you learn lurking outside just before she heard the scream.
a lot about the solar system. 5 More than 30 years have gone by since the first
6 The width / wide of this paper is exactly 21 cm. astronauts landed / had landed on the Moon.
7 Who invented / discovered the Internet?
/5
8 Electronic machines / gadgets like mobile
phones and MP3 players have become
extremely fashionable. D Complete the sentences with words from
the box in the correct form.
/8
bad • good • hard
impressive • interest • useful
B Complete the sentences with a phrasal
verb from the box in the correct form.
1 That was by far maths test we’ve
back up • click on • hack into ever taken. I think I’ve failed.
log into • plug into • set up 2 The more you practise the you’ll get.
3 I think physics is much than maths,
1 Two 14-year-old boys once the which I find rather boring.
Pentagon’s computers in the USA. 4 This film wasn’t as I thought it would
2 Have you seen the website I’ve ? be. In fact, I rather enjoyed it.
3 If you the speakers this 5 I have found this mobile phone than
the one I had before. There’s so much you can do
port, you’ll be able to hear your music better.
with it.
4 this link and it will take you to a
6 I’d say place I’ve ever been to is the
free online dictionary. Amazon rainforest. You have to see it to believe it!
5 If you don’t your files, you risk
losing them. /6
6 I can’t the site because I’ve
forgotten my password.

/6

Total: / 25

170 © LLC ‘Rousskoye Slovo – Uchebnik’, Macmillan Publishers Limited, 2015.


This sheet may be photocopied and used within the class.
Progress test Unit 5

Vocabulary Grammar
A Complete the sentences with words from C Circle the correct option.
the box. There are three extra words.
1 Where will you be living / will you live five
campsite • guests • in years from now?
out • palace • rates 2 I think you will have loved / are going to love
Prague. It’s gorgeous!
ruins • stay • tent
3 I think it will be raining / is about to rain. Look at
those clouds!
1 Athens and Rome are two cities with many ancient
. 4 You’re afraid of flying, aren’t / are you?
2 Where are you planning to when 5 I’m leaving / I will leave this weekend.
you’re in town? 6 The film is starting / starts in five minutes.
3 All the hotel were evacuated when 7 I’ll call you as soon as I get / will there.
the fire alarm sounded.
4 I love staying in youth hostels when I travel. They /7
have the cheapest .
5 We found a well-run near the beach. D Complete the second sentence so that
It was a great place to stay. it has the same meaning as the first
6 Let’s eat tonight. I can’t be bothered sentence. Use the word in brackets.
to cook. 1 I will be travelling to five different countries this
year. (travelled)
/6
By the end of this year,
to five different countries.
B Circle the correct option. 2 Do you have any plans for the summer? (are)
1 Can you ride / drive a motorbike? Where this summer?
2 We got on / caught a cab and shared the fare. 3 I don’t think you like this hotel. (do)
3 All in all I’ve visited 15 foreign / abroad countries. You don’t you?
4 If we don’t hurry, we’ll lose / miss our train. 4 What time will you be arriving? (what)
5 Can you believe they came all this way on / by Do you know arriving?
foot? 5 What time do we leave? (wonder)
6 On our trip / travel to Karelia, we met a lot of I leave.
really interesting people.
7 Don’t take the main road, you’ll get stuck in a /5
traffic line / jam.

/7

Total: / 25

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This sheet may be photocopied and used within the class.
171
Progress test Unit 6

Vocabulary Grammar
A Choose the best answer. C Complete the sentences using reported
speech.
1 The in the book were delightful.
A illustrations C performances 1 ‘What do you enjoy doing in your free time?’
B authors D outfits They asked .
2 The couldn’t stop laughing from start to 2 ‘Have you ever been to Brazil?’
finish. They loved the film! They asked .
A choir B cast C audience D director 3 ‘I wouldn’t want to be in your shoes.’
3 The Kiss is my favourite Rodin . It’s She said .
made of white marble. 4 ‘We’ve been touring all year.’
A sculptor B sculpture C portrait D painting They told .
4 The film included an all-star . 5 ‘Who do you think will win the best actress award?’
She asked .
A cast B actor C director D credit
6 ‘I will have finished by tomorrow.’
5 On the tour you visit the where the
She told .
Harry Potter movies were filmed.
A rehearsals B cast C sets D locations /6
6 The Razzies are given to the worst films
and actors every year.
D Rewrite each sentence using reported
A exhibitions C performances speech and the word in brackets.
B awards D audiences
7 The film is in 19th century England. 1 ‘You really should say nothing.’ (advised)
A set B cast C staged D rehearsed He .
8 John Williams is a famous of film scores. 2 ‘I absolutely will not do it!’ (refused)
He has written music for many blockbuster films like She .
Star Wars, Harry Potter and Superman. 3 ‘I wouldn’t go if I were you.’ (warned)
A musician B artist C sculptor D composer He (her) .
4 ‘Why don’t we go to the theatre?’ (suggested)
/8 She .
5 ‘I won’t call again.’ (promised)
B Match to make sentences. He .
1 The famous author, Stephen King, has brought 6 ‘I killed him!’ (admitted)
2 I heard Frank Smith, the actor, is going She .
3 I didn’t like it at first, but the play turned
/6
4 I wonder how much they get paid to carry
5 Angelina Jolie speaks
a out such dangerous stunts.
b out for world refugee day.
c out to be really good.
d out a new thriller.
e out with someone new.
Total: / 25
/5

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This sheet may be photocopied and used within the class.
Progress test Unit 7

Vocabulary Grammar
A Choose the correct answer. C Complete the sentences with the active or
passive form of the verb in brackets.
1 at this. It says U2 are touring next year.
A Watch B See C Look D Listen 1 It (believe) that three people were
2 Oprah Winfrey is the world’s most famous chat involved.
show . 2 Millions of viewers will (disappoint) if
A critic B journalist C jockey D host the show (axe).
3 When I’m bored I spend hours the 3 Brad Pitt (see) entering the theatre
Internet. through the back door.
A looking B watching C browsing D finding 4 When (you/born)?
4 I need to a lot of phone calls this 5 Our website has (updated).
morning. 6 They (offer) me a job at a local radio
A take B make C do D get station.
5 The decided not to publish the article /6
about the movie star’s divorce.
A editor B reporter C correspondent
D journalist D Complete the second sentence so that
it has the same meaning as the first
6 A sound is someone who controls the
sentence. Use the word in brackets.
sound on a film or TV show.
A recorder B jockey C host D engineer 1 We painted our house last month. (had)
7 Hey, don’t be a stranger. touch. We last month.
A Keep in B Keep C Lose D Lose in 2 I would like to see Johnny Depp in the part.
8 Television enjoyed last night’s episode of (have)
Prison Break. I by Johnny
A subscribers B audience C listeners D viewers Depp.
3 Someone broke into our house. (broken)
/8 Our into.
4 Didn’t Alfred Hitchcock direct Vertigo? (by)
B Complete the sentences with words from Wasn’t Alfred
the box in the correct form. Hitchcock?
5 They’ve done a lot to their new house. (had)
hear • listen They to their
look • see • watch new house.
6 The mechanics at that garage fixed our car. (got)
1 Have you ever the film Psycho? We the
2 I’m a really funny film on Channel 4. mechanics at that garage.
3 to this, it’s really funny.
4 Can you that noise? What is it, I /6
wonder?
5 at you! That colour really suits you.

/5

Total: out of 25

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This sheet may be photocopied and used within the class.
Progress test Unit 8

Vocabulary Grammar
A Choose the best answer. C Complete the sentences with the words in
brackets in the correct form.
1 My was doing better than me and I knew it.
A spectator B teammate 1 If I (call) my mum every night, it would
C opponent D competitor make her happy.
2 The most important pieces of equipment in boxing 2 I (be) pleased if I won a million
are the . pounds.
A punches B rings C bats D gloves 3 If you (buy) these trainers, you save
3 The 100 metre sprint is my favourite track and more than €20.
event. 4 If you train hard, you (do) very well.
A throw B field C court D pitch 5 The rule is simple. If you study, you
4 I’m so happy I Karen at tennis – she usually (do) well.
wins. 6 I (love) to come, but I’m afraid I can’t.
A won B beaten C win D beat
/6
5 I was thinking I might a new sport.
A take on B work out C hang out D take up
6 We waited for hours before she finally . D Circle the correct option.
A knocked out B took up 1 Unless / As long as it snows we’ll definitely be
C turned up D worked out going swimming.
7 There were more than 80,000 at the game. 2 Provided / Suppose you do what I tell you, you’ll
A spectators B audience C viewers D watchers be fine.
8 The game ended in a(n) so no one won. 3 If / What if something goes wrong?
A draw B equa C win D beat 4 Suppose / Provided your mum comes home early.
What will you do then?
/8 5 He swims as / like a professional.
6 As / Like any parent, I worry when my children stay
out late.
B Complete the sentences with words from
the box in the correct form. /6

do • go (x3) • play

1 Have you ever fishing?


2 I’ve been photography for more
than five years now.
Total: out of 25
3 I badminton every weekend.
4 George sailing in his friend’s boat
on Saturday.
5 Pete’s a professional swimmer, but he
skateboarding with his mates in his
free time.

/5

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Progress test Unit 9

Vocabulary Grammar
A Choose the best answer. C Circle the correct option.
1 Scientists have found a creature they think might 1 Perhaps you should / must start taking your own
be a(n) . bags to the supermarket.
A species B animal C alien D beast 2 You ought to / might tell your mother the truth.
2 Yesterday was ! It only got to –5°C. 3 When we were at school we might / had to use
A boiled B boiling C frozen D freezing recycled paper to do our assignments on.
3 Today we are expecting zero 4 It must / can’t be that hard. Everyone seems to be
temperatures so dress up warmly. doing it.
A under B below C above D in 5 She can’t / mustn’t be telling the truth.
4 It was a fine and mild day with a breeze. 6 You don’t have to / mustn’t come if you don’t
want to.
A light B strong C heavy D week
5 It hasn’t rained in months. This is a serious /6
we’re experiencing.
A flood B blizzard C heatwave D drought
D Complete the second sentence so that
6 The industries in the area are the reason for the
it has the same meaning as the first
acid .
sentence. Use the word in brackets.
A wind B rain C air D snow
7 We got caught in the rain and got . 1 It’s a good idea to recycle more. (recycle)
You really more.
A scorched B flooded C rained D soaked
2 It really wasn’t necessary for you to do that.
8 There was a of lightning and then the (didn’t)
loudest bang you’ve ever heard. You do that.
A gust B flash C light D bolt 3 Our trip was ruined because of the rain. (would)
Our trip if it hadn’t rained.
/8 4 I can’t come now, but I’ll be there later. (able)
I can’t come now, but I’ll there
later.
B Complete the sentences with words from
5 We didn’t do enough for the environment and now
the box. There are three extra words.
we are in trouble. (done) If we ,
we would not be in trouble now.
bolt • cloud • come • extinct 6 We won the match because John played. (have) If
rain • reserves • thunder • under John hadn’t the match.

1 Australia has many wildlife where you /6


can see kangaroos, koalas and emus.
2 I’m not coming. I’m feeling a bit the
weather.
3 We’ll be there rain or shine.
4 They’re on nine since they started going Total: / 25
out.
5 Many animals have become in the last
200 years.

/5

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175
Progress test Unit 10

Vocabulary Grammar
A Choose the best answer. C Find and correct the mistakes in these
sentences. Two of the sentences do not
1 the meatballs in a little oil until they’re
have a mistake.
browned all over.
A Fry B Boil C Stir D Put 1 Remember the time which we tried to make a
2 Would you like some cheese on your chocolate souffle?
pasta?
A chopped B grated C sliced D cut 2 John, who’s nose you broke, is in hospital.
3 If you leave food out too long it will go .
A over B of C off D on 3 Grapes, who are rich in antioxidants, are my
4 Chicken soup will help you get your cold. favourite fruit.
A in B on C off D over
5 The knife slipped and I myself. 4 Is that the doctor you saw about your headaches?
A sprained B pulled C grazed D cut
6 I my ankle wearing those heals. I was lucky 5 That’s the restaurant which Jeremy works.
I didn’t break it.
A sprained B pulled C grazed D cut 6 The reason I don’t like junk food is because it’s so
7 If you eat a healthy, balanced diet you will be fattening.
getting all the vitamins and minerals your
body needs.
A mild B raw C essential D tasty /6
8 the chicken in a hot oven for 90 minutes.
A Bake B Boil C Grill D Roast D Circle the correct option.
1 If only I didn’t / don’t have to cook.
/8
2 I wish I had listened / listened to my mother
when I was younger.
B Complete the sentences with words from 3 I’d rather people hadn’t smoked / didn’t smoke
the box. There are three extra words. in here. It’s really annoying.
4 I wish I can / could stick to a diet.
bitter • bland • crisp 5 I really wish you had stopped / would stop
raw • sour • sparkling complaining.
spicy • tasty 6 It’s time you told / tell your teacher the truth.

1 Mmm. This soup is really . I love it! /6


2 In many European countries they prefer
water to still water.
3 The meal was really . It had
absolutely no flavour.
4 Are limes just as as lemons?
5 Would you like your vegetables or Total: / 25
cooked?

/5

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Progress test Unit 11

Vocabulary Grammar
A Circle the correct option. C Choose the best answer.
1 The kidnappers asked for a ransom / money, but 1 This place looks lovely. Let’s stop some
didn’t get it. photographs?
2 The police do not know who made / committed A taking B to take C Both
the crime. 2 Roger Federer started tennis when he was
3 The robbers got away with / of millions in uncut six years old.
diamonds. A playing B to play C Both
4 The police blamed the owner for / of the robbery, 3 I can’t stand not . Is she or isn’t she guilty?
saying he didn’t have any security measures in A knowing B to know C Both
place.
4 I’ve decided .
5 Tania can’t have been the culprit. She has an
A confessing B to confess C Both
airtight witness / alibi for that night.
5 Do you remember Gale at my party?
6 The judge sentenced her to / in life imprisonment.
A meeting B to meet C Both
7 No motive / evidence connected Mr Jones to his
wife’s murder. 6 Are you allowed out late?
8 Have you heard? The police have charged / A staying B to stay C Both
blamed Paul McCormick with theft!
/6
/8
D Complete the second sentence so that
B Complete the sentences with words from it has the same meaning as the first
the box in the correct form. sentence. Use the word in brackets.
1 I’m upset because you didn’t tell me you’d be late.
crime • guilt • honesty (could)
innocence • law • mystery You me you’d be late.
2 Perhaps Kathy didn’t lie. (may)
1 Is it to park like that? Kathy lied.
2 I think she’s . I just know she did it. 3 It wasn’t a good night because everyone
3 Do you want to know what I think complained. (can’t) It night
about him? because everyone complained.
4 Will Amelia Earhart’s disappearance 4 I wish I hadn’t told you about Stephen. (should)
ever be solved? I you about Stephen.
5 Stop treating me as if I were a(n) . 5 I’m sure he lied to the police. (must)
I have done nothing wrong. He to the police.
6 I didn’t do it! I’m I tell you!
/5
/6

Total: / 25

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177
Progress test Unit 12

Vocabulary Grammar
A Choose the best answer. C Circle the correct option.
1 If you spend too much money you will end up 1 The new shopping centre is such / so big! Have
in . you been yet?
A retail therapy B broke C owe D debt 2 The money aren’t / isn’t the problem. I just don’t
2 My sister is very fashion . She want to go.
absolutely must keep up with all the latest trends. 3 You know what they say, no news is / are good
A trendy B conscious C loaded D frugal news.
3 That colour really you. You look good 4 I had such / so a good time last night.
in yellow. 5 Neither / Both Mum and I bought new shoes.
A suits B first C goes D looks good 6 None / Neither of the people who attended
4 If the trousers are too , we’ll gladly enjoyed it.
take them in for you for no extra cost. 7 I love all / every of the things I bought.
A long B short C loose D tight 8 I love shopping so many / much that I go every
5 People often spend huge sums of money buying day!
name products.
A mark B important C logo D brand /8
6 You might want to keep your – in
case you want to return it. D Circle the correct option.
A brand B receipt C product D cheque 1 Has anyone / someone arrived yet?
7 Is that a gold on your wrist? 2 Is there something / anything I can do for you?
A necklace B earring C ring D bracelet 3 Almost anyone / everyone enjoys shopping.
8 I can’t walk in high , which is why I 4 I don’t like anything / nothing here. Let’s go into
never wear them. another shop.
A leggings B trainers C shoes D heels
/4
/8

B Complete the sentences with words from the


box. There are three extra words.

cash • denim • do Total: / 25


loaded • made • sense
take • try

1 I’ve put on a few kilos and now I can’t


up my jeans!
2 Gary isn’t just rich – he’s !
3 Do you like my new jacket?
4 My new jeans don’t fit properly. I think I’ll
them back.
5 I like this one. Why don’t you it on?

/5

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Communication and writing Unit 1

А Guided interview (Grammar: present simple and continuous)


Work in pairs or small groups. The ten answers below were given in an interview. Read the
answers and think of questions that fit them. Then decide what the person interviewed is like and
what his/her job is. When you have finished, share your ideas with the class.

1 6
Yes, I do. I don’t own one.
2 7
Yes, I am. I believe I am.
3 8
At the moment, in the country. I feel good about it.
4 9
Never. Yes, but I want a bigger one.
5 10
I’m planning a trip abroad. It begins next month.
What’s he/she like?: What’s he/she like?:


B What’s my line?
Work in groups. Place the job cards writing side down. Pick a job card and talk about the job for
about a minute. The rest of the group must guess your job.
You are not allowed to:
1 mention the actual job on the card or any word that forms part of the job name
2 show the card
3 draw or write the word

Eg This is a job where you work with very young children. The children learn to be with other children,
they listen to stories, learn numbers, the alphabet, songs and other things. Your job is to help them do
all of these things.

lawyer teacher firefighter office worker

postal worker builder journalist chef

nurse zoo-keeper translator model maker

nursery school
soldier receptionist police officer
teacher

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179
Communication and writing Unit 2

А Guided interview (Grammar: present simple and continuous)


Work in pairs or groups. Place the word cards writing side down in a pile. Pick up a word card and
continue the story using the word on the card. You may write up to three sentences, but you must
include the word on the card only once. Use your imagination! When you have finished, the next
student must pick up a card and continue the story. Swap your finished stories with another pair/
group and vote on the best story.

Begin your story like this: It was a dark November night …

watching television home friends

enjoyable quiet frightened

talking strange sound see

quiet screaming phone



B Writing: an article
Work in pairs. Brainstorm ideas on the topic below. Use the questions to help you. When you
have finished, write your article.

My Hometown
Big, small, exciting or dull? Whatever it is, wherever it is,
we’d like to hear about it!
Write an article of between 120–180 words.

Where is it?
What kind of place is it?
Is it modern or historic?
What does it look like?
What do you like / not like about it?
What are the people like?

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Communication and writing Unit 3

А Guided interview (Grammar: present simple and continuous)


Work in pairs. Write suitable answers to the questions below using the present perfect simple or
continuous. When you have finished, swap your questions with another pair. Who came up with
the most imaginative answers?
Eg Why is it so hot in here? Because someone has turned the heating up.

Why is it so cold in here? Why is it so cold in here?


1 6
Why are you so worried? Why are you so worried?
2 7
Why is Oscar upset? Why is Oscar upset?
3 8
Where is my essay? Where is my essay?
4 9
What is that smell? What is that smell?
5 10


B Tell us about ...
Work in groups (or as a class). Place the cards writing side down. Pick up a card and read it out.
Talk about what is on the card for one minute. Use your imagination! Another student will time
you. If you manage to do it, you get to keep the card. The student(s) with the most cards win(s).
You should not:
1 talk off topic
2 talk for less than a minute
3 hesitate for longer than ten seconds

Tell us about … Tell us about …


a fun time you’ve had. a beautiful place you’ve visited.

Tell us about … Tell us about …


a school trip you’ve been on. a book/story you’ve read.

Tell us about … Tell us about …


a dish you have learnt to cook. a shop you like going to.

Tell us about … Tell us about …


a friend you like spending time with. something good that’s happened to you.

Tell us about … Tell us about …


your favourite TV show. your favourite clothes.

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181
Communication and writing Unit 4

А Making comparisons (Grammar: comparatives and superlatives)


Work in pairs or small groups.
• Write as many comparisons as you can for each group of nouns below. You have only three
minutes for each.
• When you have finished, read your comparisons aloud for the rest of the class to hear.
• The pair or group with the most grammatically correct comparisons wins the round.
Use the following comparative and superlative constructions:
more/less … than, …er/than, The …est, (not) as … as
Eg It is more enjoyable to watch TV than to read a magazine. The radio is the most convenient.

1 3 5
a TV a mobile phone a sofa
a radio a computer a couch
a magazine a landline phone a chair

2 4 6
an aeroplane a computer game a spider
a car a board game a snake
a bike a deck of cards a crocodile


B Story
Work in pairs. Look at the pictures below. First, decide on a logical order for the pictures and then
make up a story to explain the events. Remember to use past tenses to do this. When you have
finished, share your story ideas with the rest of the class. Then write your story. Make sure you
give your story a title and use at least two instances of the past perfect in your stories.

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Communication and writing Unit 5

А The year 2100 (Grammar: future forms)


Work in pairs or small groups. You have ten minutes to write a list of changes you expect to see in
the world by the year 2100. Use at least three different future forms. Use these topics to help you:

Technology Fashion Lifestyles

Science Work Cities

Transport Education Life expectancy

Eg Everyone will have a videophone.


We will have discovered life on other planets.
When you have finished, read out your predictions to the class. The pair/group with the most
predictions wins.

B Speaking
Work in pairs.

Student A, your pictures (A and B) show different


holiday destinations. Compare the pictures, and say
why you think people like to visit places like these.
Student B, time your partner (one minute only) and
give him/her feedback on what they did well and what
A B
they could have done better.
Student B, your pictures (C and D) show different
means of transport. Compare the pictures, and say
which way of getting around is better.
Student A, time your partner (one minute only) and
give him/her feedback on what they did well and what
C D they could have done better.

When you have both finished comparing your pictures, discuss these questions:
1 Are cities safe places to ride a bike? Why/Why not?
2 How can we encourage people to use public transport more?
3 What is the best way to travel when you are on holiday?
4 Do you agree that travel broadens the mind? Why/Why not?

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183
Communication and writing Unit 6

А Getting to know you (Grammar: reported speech)


Work in pairs. Get to know someone in your class who you do not normally sit next to. Ask each
other the questions below. Mark in your partner’s answers. There is a space for one more question
you might like to add.

Do you have any brothers or sisters? How many?

Have you got a few close friends or a lot of friends?

What do you like doing when you go out with friends?

What is your favourite film and film actor/actress?

What is your favourite book and who is your favourite author?

What/Who is your favourite band/singer/composer?

What would you like to be doing ten years from now?

When you have finished, write a report describing what you found out about your classmate.
Eg Peter said he was an only child, but that he had lots of friends. He told me he liked to go to
the cinema or to a cafe with his friends when they went out., etc.

B Writing: an informal letter
You have received the following letter from a friend in an English-speaking country.

We were thinking of starting a film club at our school. I love the idea of seeing good films (old and
new) on a big screen and then talking about them afterwards. I know you did something similar at
your school last year. I’m writing to you for some advice on how we should go about setting it up.
How did you get students interested in your club? How many films did you show a week? Did you
get students to pay an entry fee?
By the way, I've just started learning how to play the guitar.

Work in pairs. Discuss the following:


• Would you like to be part of a film club if it was offered at your school? Why/Why not?
• What kinds of things could you do to get students interested in a film club?
• How will you answer your friend’s questions?
Write your letter. Write between 100–140 words.

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Communication and writing Unit 7

А Complete the stories (Grammar: passive voice)


Work in pairs. Read the first sentences of the news stories below. Complete the stories. Write
about 100 words and use at least two passive constructions in each story. When you have
finished, read your stories to the rest of the class. How different are they?

ed es were hear
d
s t u d e n t h a s been award Strange nois
A
h e s t a w a r d for bravery. a l r e s id e n t s last night.
the hig by loc


B Speaking
Work in pairs. These pictures show different ways of finding out about what is happening in the
world. First, talk to each other about the advantages and disadvantages of each. Then decide
which two are the most useful.

A B C

D E F

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185
Communication and writing Unit 8

А Getting to know you (Grammar: reported speech)


Work in pairs. Get to know someone in your class who you do not normally sit next to. Ask
each other the questions below. Mark in your partner’s answers. There is a space for one more
question you might like to add.

1 If I could try a new sport, …

2 English would be an easier language to learn if …

3 My parents don’t like it when …

4 If I had the day off tomorrow, …

5 When I’m on holiday, …

6 As long as I study, …

7 Unless something unexpected happens, …

8 If my best friend got into trouble, …

9 If a friend asked me for money, …

10 If I could travel abroad, …

11 If I found a wallet with money inside, …

12 If I saw someone shoplifting, …


B Superstitions
Here are two common superstitions:
If you walk under a ladder you will have bad luck.
If you break a mirror you will have seven years’ bad luck.

Work in pairs. Come up with a list of common superstitions from your country. You may use the
ideas below to help you. When you have finished, read out your superstitions to the class. Who
has the most?
• wedding bouquet
• scratch left hand
• black cat
• touch wood
• a person with an empty bucket

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Communication and writing Unit 9

А What should I do? (Grammar: modals)


Work in pairs or small groups. Give the people in these situations advice or make suggestions
that might help them. When you have finished, compare what you have written with the rest of
the class. How similar or different are they?

Use the following modal verbs to make suggestions or give advice:


must, (don’t) have to, should, could, may, might, need to, can

1 I have noticed my best friend cheating in 3 My boyfriend/girlfriend cancelled our


an exam. I know a lot of students cheat, date last night. My best friend said she
but my friend and I have always been saw him/her out with anther girl/boy.
against it. Any suggestions? What should I do?

2 I saw two people fighting in the street. It 4 I know my sister has been playing truant.
looked as if the man was trying to steal I’m worried that if she continues to miss
the woman’s bag. I just ignored them. school, she’ll fail her exams. What can I
What could I do in a situation like that? do about this?


B Environment awareness day
You have been asked to present ideas about what your school could (or should) do to help the
environment for Environment awareness day.
Work in small groups. Come up with some things you could do as a school and as individuals to
make a difference to the environment. You might want to think about the following:

• use of paper
• use of electricity
• recycling / recycling bins
• plastic water bottles/cups
• throwing litter
• cleaning the school

When you have finished, present your group’s ideas to the class.

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187
Communication and writing Unit 10

А Definitions (Grammar: relative clauses)


What thing, food, place or person is being defined below? Compare your ideas with a partner.

Eg A place where you can find food. – a supermarket


A place where you can eat.
A fruit that is very sour.
A person whose job it is to cook.
A food that can be eaten rare.
A cuisine that is particularly spicy.

In pairs, write five more definitions of things, food, places or people like the ones above. Use
relative clauses in your definitions. When you have finished, give your definitions to another pair.
Can they guess who or what is being defined?

B Writing: an essay
You have recently had a discussion in your English class about health and nutrition. Now your
teacher has asked you to write an essay, giving your opinion on the following statement.

We should only eat healthy food and we should exercise daily.

Work in pairs. Before you start writing, discuss what you think about the statement and come up
with three ideas to support your opinions. Share your opinions and ideas with the class.

Write an essay of between 200–250 words.

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Communication and writing Unit 11

А What should I do? (Grammar: modals)


Work in pairs. Match all the sentence halves to make sentences. Some beginnings may go with
more than one ending. The first pair to make 11 correct sentences wins.

We’re not allowed to take up swimming.

I remember going to the cinema tonight.

The witness helped to ask Penny about the letter.

I must remember the police solve the crime.

Our maths teacher won’t let us to come to class late.

On the way home, I stopped doing my homework.

I haven’t finished to get some milk and eggs.

I stopped me tidy my room.

I’ve decided talk in class.

seeing a tall man with blond hair


Jamie suggested
entering the shop.

My parents make going to the gym because I had no time.

✁✁
B Speaking
You have been asked to present ideas about what your school could (or should) do to help the
environment for Environment awareness day.
Work in small groups. Come up with some things you could do as a school and as individuals to
make a difference to the environment. You might want to think about the following:

• use of paper
• use of electricity
• recycling / recycling bins
• plastic water bottles/cups
• throwing litter
• cleaning the school

When you have finished, present your group’s ideas to the class.

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189
Communication and writing Unit 12

А Complaints (Grammar: too and not enough)


Add a line of explanation to these complaints using too (much/many) or not enough.

Eg This drink tastes terrible. It’s too bitter (or It’s not sweet enough).

When you have finished, compare what you have written with a partner. Who has the best
explanation for each complaint?
This coffee tastes terrible.
I don’t like you.
I can’t come out tonight.
I don’t like this classroom.
I don’t like living here.
I wish I lived in another house/flat.
I hate my clothes.
I’m bored.

B Writing: an article
Work in pairs. Talk about a shopping experience you have had that you will never forget. It could
be a good one or a bad one. Talk about the following:
• When was it?
• Who were you with?
• What happened?
• Why will you never forget it?
Now write an article with the title:
A shopping experience I will never forget. Write 120–180 words.

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Fun and games Unit 1

Wordsearch
Find and circle 20 words from Unit 1 of the Student’s Book. (See pages 11 and 12.)
Then write the words in the categories below.

A G G R E S S I V E O N V J B

C I I T I C R E A T I V E E I

S T R A I G H T H A I R O A T

W L L S E L F I S H T N E L H

C O N F U S E D P W A E R O E

C H E E R F U L R E U I O U A

P L E A S E D S N I N G S S R

U N C L E O Q I L I T H O I E

E M B A R R A S S E D B C S D

W A V Y H A I R N T L O I S T

F A I R S K I N O U E U A A P

E R E F F I C I E N T R B P R

R S E N E R G E T I C P L O O

I R R I T A T E D E N O E H U

A M B I T I O U S N G J L S D

Personal qualities: , , , , , ,
,

Physical appearance: , ,

People in our lives: , ,

Feelings: , , , , ,

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191
Fun and games Unit 2

Taboo
Work in small groups (or pairs). Place the word cards in a pile writing side down. Pick up a word card
and try to explain the meaning of the word or phrase so that the others can guess it. When one student
guesses correctly, the next student picks up a word card and does the same with his/her word or
phrase. The group who manages to guess all the words or phrases first is the winner.

You are not allowed to:


1 use the word or any part of it in your description
2 show the word
3 draw or write the word

You are allowed to:


use descriptions, definitions, explanations, examples, opposites, synonyms, mime, etc.

multiplex
block of flats gym farmhouse
cinema

multi-storey
skyscraper dangerous historic
car park

modern green dull peaceful

homemade housework do the ironing water the plants

walk the dog make your bed safe quiet

shopping centre country house homesick homeless


192 © LLC ‘Rousskoye Slovo – Uchebnik’, Macmillan Publishers Limited, 2015.


This sheet may be photocopied and used within the class.
Fun and games Unit 3

Crossword puzzle
The words for this crossword puzzle all come from Unit 3 of the Student’s Book.

2 3 4

5 6

8 9

10

11

12

13

14

Down Across
1 Miss Smith is a really boring teacher. It’s 2 If you want to be a good student you need to
easy to interest in her class. stop getting into .
3 Schoolchildren in Britain up for 6 I got down because I made a
Christmas on the 20th December. joke when answering the last question.
4 Do you go to a