Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 19

School of Computing, 

Communication and Electronics 

Workspace 5 
Student Manual 
A First Introduction 
(Draft V0.4) 

Douglas Harewood­Gill (MSc Robotics) 
Sanjay Rama (MSc Robotics) 
Joerg Wolf 
Paul Robinson 
Tony Belpaeme

Workspace 5 Student Manual  1  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


Contents 

Page 
1.  Introduction ...........................................................................................3 
2.  The Basics ............................................................................................3 
2.1  Opening Workspace 5 .......................................................................3 
2.2  Screen Layout (Tools Boxes) ............................................................3 
2.3  Opening a Project File .......................................................................5 
2.4  Saving Files and Models....................................................................5 
3  Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Viewing ............................................5 
3.1  Creating Shapes................................................................................5 
3.2  Moving Objects..................................................................................6 
3.3  Orientation/Zooming ..........................................................................6 
3.4  Colour ................................................................................................7 
4  Movement .................................................................................................8 
4.1  Movement using the Teach Pendant .................................................8 
4.3  Changing the Sequence of Movements...........................................11 
4.4  Playing the Sequence of Movements ..............................................11 
4.5  Speed of Movement.........................................................................12 
4.6  Saving Movement Sequences .........................................................13 
4.7  Loading & Attaching a Tool..............................................................13 
4.8  Loading and attaching a tool to the Mitsubishi RV­2AJ robot ..........14 
4.9  Tool Pendant Movement:.................................................................14 
4.10  Tool GP Movement: .....................................................................15 
5  Language................................................................................................16 
5.1  About Melfa Basic:...........................................................................16 
5.2  Selecting a Language:.....................................................................17 
5.3  Creating a Melfa Basic file for the Mitsubishi Robot:........................18 
Appendix........................................................................................................18

Workspace 5 Student Manual  2  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


1.  Introduction 
This  manual  has  been  written  by  students  for  students.  It is  designed  to  en­ 
able  the  user  to  ‘get  to  grips’  with Workspace  5  as  quickly as  possible.  Only 
the  most  important  parts  of  the  Workspace  5  are  described.  Chapter  2  ex­ 
plains how to start the program. The main windows are described along with a 
detailed  description  of  how  to  load  a  robot  model.  Chapter  3  describes  the 
viewing  toolbar,  object  creation  and  manipulation.  Chapter  4  is  devoted  to 
programming robot models and running the resulting simulation. Finally, chap­ 
ter 5 describes how to create a downloadable program from the simulation. 

The majority of the steps in the manual are based around the Mitsubishi RV­ 
2AJ robotic arm. 

2.  The Basics 
2.1  Opening Workspace 5 

Start  Menu  –>  All  Programs  –>  University  Software  –>  Software  U  to  W  –> 
Workspace 5 → Workspace 5, see Figure 1. 

Figure 1.  How to open Workspace 5 

Check the version of Workspace in the title bar. If the title bar mentions 
“Industrial” then you have got the fully functional version. If it mentions 
“demo”  then  you  can  do  everything  the  industrial  version  can,  but  you 
will not be able to save and it will quit after 30 minutes. You should use 
another computer if you want the Industrial version! 

2.2  Screen Layout (Tools Boxes)

Workspace 5 Student Manual  3  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


Once Workspace 5 has been opened, you will see a screen layout similar to 
that of Figure 2. 

Icons

Main screen 

Project Window 

Command line window 

Figure 2.  The default screen layout of Workspace 5. 

Icons at the top of the screen allow quick access to the functions stored within 
the  Menu  Toolbar.  Using  these icons it is  possible to  create  shapes,  change 
angles and save work along with various other functions. 

Directly under these icons, there are two separate windows, the Project Win­ 
dow to the left (tree menu) and the Main Screen to the right. The Project Win­ 
dow is used to give a quick overview of the various projects that are open e.g. 
simulation, tools, animation etc. This Window provides project information by 
simply clicking right mouse button which activates additional menus with vari­ 
ous  options.  The  Project  Window  also  allowed  direct  control  of  the  overall 
model or models being used e.g. movement routines can be made or altered 
though this Window. 

The  Main Window  on  the  right  hand  side  of  the  Project  Window  is  the  area 
where  all  robot  models,  tools,  objects  and  anything  relating  to  these  are  dis­ 
played. 

The last Window under both the Project and Main Windows is the Command 
Line  Window  that  allows  instructions  to  be  given  in  the  form  of  typed  com­ 
mands as opposed to using mouse actions. The Command Line Window can 
also be used to enter in VBA (Visual basic Applications) commands or macros. 
Many of the available commands allow direct control of Workspace 5 models. 

Workspace 5 Student Manual  4  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


2.3  Opening a Project File 

There is  one  main  basic  file  type  that  appears  in Workspace  5. This  file has 
extension .wsp. 

The  .wsp  file  contains  the  robot  model,  model  of  the  environment,  tools, 
teach­points,  simulation  path  etc.  To  open  a  .wsp  first  select  the  File  drop 
down menu at the top left hand side of the screen and select Open (Ctrl + O). 
To load a robot model for a Mitsubishi robot for example, go to 

C:\Program Files → Workspace 5 → Robots → Mitsubishi and select file RV­ 
2AJ.wsp. 

Once loaded, the robot will be visible in the Main Window.  You can zoom in 
and out from the robot model using the + (plus) or – (negative) icons. 

2.4  Saving Files and Models 
To save a .wsp file select the File menu. Select Save As and enter the desired 
file  name  and  location  and  press  the  save  button.  Make  sure  to  save  your 
work on a memory stick or in your user file­space. Do not overwrite the Mitsu­ 
bishi RV­2AJ file on the C: drive 

3  Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Viewing 
3.1  Creating Shapes 
A  3D  robot  work  cell  may  be  created  in Workspace  5  using  the  shapes  pro­ 
vided in the shape toolbar, Figure 3. 

Fig­ 
Shape toolbar
ure 3: 

Figure 3. Shapes created using the Shape creation toolbar 

Workspace 5 Student Manual  5  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


As an example we will create a box corresponding to the Duplo­base used in 
our  robot  laboratory  exercises.  First  click  on  the  cube  in  the  shape  toolbar, 
Figure 4. Now press i on the keyboard. A dialog box appears which lets you 
specify the size and position of the object. Use a ruler to measure the dimen­ 
sions  of  the  Duplo  base  in  mm.  Enter  the  desired  XYZ  Cartesian  coordinate 
position for the base followed by the measured length, depth and height coor­ 
dinates see Figure 4. 

Box shape icon

Figure 4. Work­cell with table, base and Duplo brick 

3.2  Moving Objects 
To move created objects click the left mouse button over the object of interest. 
This causes the selected object to turn grey. Next, use the right mouse button 
to  bring  up  an  options  menu.  From  this  menu  select  Move.  Once  the  menu 
disappears click  the left  mouse  button  once on  a  clear  area  of  the  screen.  If 
you move the mouse around a white line appears following your mouse cursor 
with  the  origin  of  this  white  line  originating  from  the  location  of  the  first  left 
hand mouse button click. The white line represents a vector. The length of the 
white line represents the distance the object will move and the angle the white 
line is facing represents the direction of movement of the object. Once the dis­ 
tance and direction have been selected, the left mouse button is clicked again 
and the object is moved. 

3.3  Orientation/Zooming 

When planning a series of movements or placing objects in the workspace it 
is often easier to change the observers viewing position or orientation in order 
to understand what is happening. 

Workspace 5 Student Manual  6  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


Orientation and   zooming 
toolbar

Figure 5.  The orientation and zooming toolbar. 

To change the viewing angle and/or viewing distance a toolbar is provided as 
shown in Figure 5. Starting from the left hand side of the toolbar, the first six 
icons allow the user to select a different orientation of the robot e.g. top, bot­ 
tom, left, right, front and back views respectively. The next four icons give an 
angled  view  of  the  robot,  e.g.  front­left,  front­right,  back­right  and  back­left 
views  respectively.  The  next  two  buttons  are  zoom  in  and  zoom  out.  This is 
followed  by  a  third  button  that  allows  the  user  to  select  a  specific  area  and 
zoom in upon it. The next button, four blue arrows on a white background, is a 
zoom  to  fit  button  which  changes  the  size  of  the  robot  model  to  fit  the  main 
window. The two buttons following this, pan and orbit allows the user to view 
the  robot in  any  required  position  that  was  not  attainable  with  the  previously 
mentioned  icons.  The  last  two  icons  from  this  toolbar  allow  the  user  to  view 
the robot model in either a wire frame format (this uses less computing power 
and  is  suitable  for  slower  computers)  or  a  more  realistic  shaded  format  as 
seen in Figure 5. 

3.4  Colour 
While not vital to the operation of Workspace 5, changing the colour of various 
objects  (including  the  robot)  allow  the  user  to  keep  track  of  different  objects 
that may be similar in shape and size. It is also possible to change the colour 
of different parts of a robot model. To change the colours of any object select 
it with the left mouse button. A successfully selected object will turn grey. Next, 
right click on the object and select the properties options. From here, there is 
a  further  option  to  change  the  colour  of  this  object.  Once  a  new  colour  has 

Workspace 5 Student Manual  7  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


been selected, left click the OK button to finish or APPLY to carry on browsing 
the options for this object.  Finally left clicking the object will change its colour. 

4  Movement 
Workspace  5  enables  robots  to  be  programmed  offline.  However  in  order  to 
offline programme a robot, an accurate mathematical model of the robot is re­ 
quired and the specific robot language needs to be embedded in Workspace. 
The following  section explains  how  to  move  a  robot and  create  a  simulation. 
This is a necessary first step in offline programming. 

4.1  Movement using the Teach Pendant 
There are two main ways to programme or control a robot, i.e. online or offline. 
Online  programming  is  usually  performed  using  a  teach  pendant.  A  teach 
pendant is a hand held device connected to the robot controller via an umbili­ 
cal  cable  which  enables  the  user  to  manually  drive  the  robot  to  the  desired 
positions. These positions are then stored in the controller memory for recall 
as required.  In a similar way Workspace 5 allows the user to control a robotic 
model with a simulated teach pendant. In Workspace 5 the teach pendant can 
be activated by either selecting the view/pendant menu or by pressing the let­ 
ter  p  on  the  keyboard,  Figure  6.  (Please  note  you  can  only  open  the  teach 
pendant  once  you  have  previously  opened  a  robotic  model.  Also  the  teach 
pendant is robot specific). We will use the Mitsubishi RV­2AJ robot model and 
pendant for all examples in this manual. 

Figure 6. The Mitsubishi RV­2AJ robot model and associated pendant

Workspace 5 Student Manual  8  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


Looking at Figure 5, it can be seen that the joint values 1 to 5 refer to the posi­ 
tions of the five axes or joints of the Mitsubishi RV­2AJ robot model. 

Ø  Value 1 – The robot ‘waist’ position  (J1). 
Ø  Value 2 – The robot ‘shoulder’ position  (J2). 
Ø  Value 3 – The robot ‘elbow’ position  (J3). 
Ø  Value 4 – The robot wrist ‘yaw’ position  (J5). 
Ø  Value 5 – The robot wrist ‘roll’ position  (J6). 

To accurately position and orientate an object in 3D (three dimensional space) 
a  robot  must  have  6  DOF’s  (degree  of  freedom).  This  means  that  it  must  be 
able to move the tool to an X,Y,Z position and then rotate the tool about X,Y,Z 
to  provide  the  correct  orientation.  The  Mitsubishi  RV­2AJ  robot  has  only  5 
DOF  and  therefore  has  reduced  functionality,  i.e.  there  will  be  orientations 
within its workspace that it will be unable to achieve. The missing DOF, J4, is 
the wrist pitch movement. In practice this limitation will usually cause, at worst, 
only minor inconvenience. 

The  second  column  of  values  in  the  pendant  menu  of  Figure  6  provides  the 
Cartesian XYZ position of the robot gripper followed by ABC, its three orienta­ 
tion angles.  Workspace 5 allows these values to be entered directly. For ex­ 
ample, if one knows the 3­dimensional co­ordinates of a target position or ob­ 
ject, these co­ordinates can be entered directly into the X,Y,Z boxes within the 
teach pendant. This results in a desired wrist position where a gripper or tool 
could be placed. Changing any one of the X, Y, or Z values will result in two or 
more robot joints changing position. 

Several further options are available using the teach pendant. These are:­ 

–  Follow Mouse – When this box is checked the robot moves to the loca­ 
tion of the mouse click in the main view window, if it is possible to do so. 
–  Home button – Repositions the robot to its home position. Usually the 
home  position  is  the  best  park  position  for  the  robot  when  it  is  not  in 
use. This reduces the amount of tension placed upon the robot’s gears 
and joints. 
–  Learn GP (Geometry Point) button – explained in section 4.2. 
–  Motion Type – The user can set the motion type to either joint motion 
or linear motion via this drop down menu. 
–  Zero button – Resets all the joint values to Zero.

Workspace 5 Student Manual  9  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


4.2  Creating and saving Geometry­Points (GPs) 

Geometry­Points describe a target position for the robot. There are two ways 
to create GPs. 

1.  Drive the robot to the target position using the teach­pendant and press 
“Learn GP” on the teach­pendant 
2.  Create a GP on the surface of the desired object as follows: 
Select  Edit / Selection Mode / Face. 
Click on the face of the object that the robot should approach. 
Select Create / GP / GP on Face from the main menu 
A dialog will appear which lets you adjust the exact position of the GP 
on  the  object  face.  Enter  U=0.5  and  V=0.5  for  the  centre  of  the  face. 
Click Create before closing the dialog box. 
3.  A  new  GP  will  have  appeared  in  your  list  of  GPs.  Right  click  it  and 
choose “Move to”, the robot will move to the surface. 

The user may select an existing path for the GP from the select path dialog, or 
create a new path to place the GP in. Alternatively, the GP can be given “No 
Path”,  which  allows  the  user  to  create  paths  at  a  later  time.  This  process 
needs to be repeated for every desired position. 

Figure 7.  Creating Geometry Points (GP’s). 

Figure 7  shows  the  Project Window  on  the  left  hand  side  of  the  screen con­ 
taining all created GP’s under the “GPs” folder and the path called Path_001

Workspace 5 Student Manual  10  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


which  contains  one  GP.  This  path  comes  under  the  “Paths”  filter.  The  Main 
Window shows two boxes. The top box is the result of simply pressing “Learn 
GP” on the teach pendant. By pressing the “New” button the second box ap­ 
pears allowing the user to create a new Path with a user specified name. 

4.3  Changing the Sequence of Movements 

To  create  a  sequence  of  movement,  several GP’s  are required. The  number 


of  course  depends  on  the  application.  The  more  complex  the  movement  the 
more GP’s will be required. Once all the necessary GP’s have been created, it 
is essential to make sure they are in the right order so that the movement fol­ 
lows the correct path or sequence. When all the GP’s have been created, the 
order  can  be  arranged in  the  Project Window  by  dragging  the  GP’s  from  the 
“GPs”  folder  to  the “Paths” folder  to  the  desired  path  name  by  dragging  with 
the left mouse button. The order of movement within the “Paths” folder for the 
correct paths name can be altered similarly by left click and drag. 

4.4  Playing the Sequence of Movements 

When checking to see if the movement order of GP’s is correct, it is advisable 
to  run  the  simulation  of  the  selected  path  first  to  check for  any  errors.  To  do 
this  right  click  on  the  path  name  that  contains  the  required  movement  se­ 
quence (required GP’s). A drop down  menu will appear, Figure 8. Select the 
top option that says “Set Active”. 

Figure  8:  The  drop  down  Paths  menu.  For this  example, the  path  name  is  Test. The  Play 
Simulation icon is shown bordered red in the Simulation and Animation Toolbar.

Workspace 5 Student Manual  11  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


Once the required path has been set as the active path, there are two ways to 
play the simulation. Either go to “Simulate” on the Main Menu and select “Play 
Simulation” from the drop down menu, or press the Play Simulation icon but­ 
ton,  Figure  8.  The  simulation  should  run  and  the  robot  moves  through  the 
stored GP positions. 

4.5  Speed of Movement 

To change the simulation speeds go to the Simulations Options menu, Figure 
9. There are two ways to do this. The first is to select Simulate Options from 
the simulate drop down menu from the main menu. 

Figure 9. The Simulation Options Menu 

The second way uses the Simulation Options icon. This icon is positioned two 
places to the right of the Play Simulation icon in the Simulation and animation 
toolbar.  For  both  methods,  once  the  “Simulation  Options”  menu  is  open,  the 
speed  may  be  changed  by  adjusting  the  Interpolation Interval in  the Timings 
section.  The default setting is 100ms. To increase robot speed, increase the 
interval, to decrease robot speed, decrease the interval. Note that the interpo­ 
lation interval cannot be larger than the simulation interval.

Workspace 5 Student Manual  12  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


4.6  Saving Movement Sequences 

To save movement sequences, paths and GP’s, refer to section 2.4 on saving 
files  and  models.  All  paths,  GP’s  and  robotic  models  are  saved  at  the  same 
time. 

4.7  Loading & Attaching a Tool 

There are several tools that are supplied with Workspace which can be added 
to  a  project  and  then  loaded  onto  the  current  robot  model  in  one  step  using 
the  “Load  and  Attach  Tool”  command.  The  following  example  explains  how 
this  is  achieved  using  the  ABB  IRB2400  robot  using  a  Arcweld  Torch  tool 
model:­ 

1.  Close all open projects and load the ABB IRB2400_16.wsp. 
2.  Select File \ Load and Attach Tool. 
3.  Select an arc weld torch from the Tools\Arc Weld Torches\Binzel direc­ 
tory. 

Result:  The  selected  tool  is  loaded  into  the  project  and  attached  to  the 
faceplate of the robot. 

4.  Right click on the name of the tool and select Properties. 
5.  Left click the Tool behaviour tab. 

Note:  The  tool  behaviour  you  loaded  in  to  Workspace  in  the  last  section 
has  already  been  stored  with  this  tool.  All  VBA  files  are  saved  within  the 
corresponding wsp file when you save or exit Workspace. 

6.  Hit OK to close this dialog. 
7.  Right  click  on  the  name  of  the  new  tool  frame  from  the  robot’s  Tool 
Frame folder in the Project View and select Properties. 
8.  Check the box next to Visible. 
Result: The Tool Frame is now visible and it is located at the end of the 
torch. 
Note: Most Arc welding Torches have an offset between the end of the 
tool and the tool frame. 
9.  Select the Relative to Self page and enter 5 for Translate Along Z, then 
hit OK. 
Result: There is now an offset of 5 mm from the end of the tool to the 
Tool Frame. 
10. Save the project as Robot with Arcweld Torch.wsp.

Workspace 5 Student Manual  13  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


4.8  Loading  and  attaching  a  tool  to  the  Mitsubishi  RV­2AJ 
robot 

We  will  now  load  the  Mitsubishi  RV­2AJ  robot  model  and  attach  a  tool  to  it 
that is identical to the tool used on the real robot arms in the lab. 

1.  Start a new project by selecting File / New. 
2.  Load the Mitsubishi RV­2AJ model. 
3.  Load and attach the tools wsp­file. Note: this file is not available in the 
Workspace 5 directory, but will be made available to you during the ex­ 
ercise.  The  simulated  robot  should  now  look  identical  to  the  robots  in 
the lab. 

4.9  Tool Pendant Movement: 

When a tool has been loaded and attached, a Teach Pendant is available for 
controlling the tool directly. In order to use a Teach Pendant you will first need 
to  set  the  gripper  as  Active:  in  the  Simulation  view,  follow  the  tree  down  to 
“Mechanisms”.  Right  click  “Gripper”  and  select  “Set  as  active  Mechanism”. 
The tools teach Pendant can now be used and is activated via two methods. 
The  methods  are  either  selecting  View  drop  down  menu  and  selecting  Pen­ 
dant or by pressing the letter “p” on the keyboard while in Workspace 5. 

Note: if you wish to use the pendant to move the robot, you will first need to 
set the robot as active by right clicking “RV2AJ” and selecting “Set as Active 
Robot”. 

Figure 10: A Teach Pendant for the Robot tool. 

With  the  tool  Teach  Pendant  active  (figure  10)  the  “Joint  Values”  of  the  tool 
can  manipulated  by  left  clicking  on  the  up/down  scroll  bar  or  by  inputting  a

Workspace 5 Student Manual  14  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


value into the “Joint Values” window. Pressing the “Home” and “Zero” buttons 
in the pendant will move the tool to their respective positions. 

4.1  Tool GP Movement: 

To get a tool to perform a required action at a certain GP, the following steps 
are required:­ 

1.   Open the Paths folder of the robot, and click the path to which you have 
assigned GPs. Right click with the mouse on the GP in the Path folder that 
you  want  to  assign  the  tool  action  to  and  when  the  drop  down  menu  ap­ 
pears select Properties. 

2.  A box should appear. Select the “Actions” tab. The box will now look like 
the one in figure 11. 

Figure 11: The GP Properties window. 

3.  Click on the new button to the left side of the red cross in the “Actions” 
strip. From the Select a new GP Action Type dialog, left click on the Tool 
action radio button and left click OK. 

4.   From here, left click on the down area under the “Tool Action” section and 
a list of actions will appear (figure 12). The list of actions will differ from 
tool to tool. Figure 12 shows the options available for a gripper.

Workspace 5 Student Manual  15  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


Figure 12: The Tool action drop down list. 

5.    Once the action has been selected, press OK to go back to the previous 
menu. In this menu press Apply and then Close if no further actions are 
required. 

If the action of the tool is to manipulate an object in anyway (like moving it), it 
is  required  that  the  objects  name  be  entered  into  the  Parameters  box  in  the 
GP Tool Action window as seen in figure 13. Please note: the name of the ob­ 
ject  to  be  manipulated  must  be in  quotation marks.  If  a  name  of an object  is 
not required, the box will be greyed out and no text can be entered. 

Figure 13: A Grasp action should be told which object to grasp. 

The tool does not need to be touching the object in order to grasp it. A grasp 
action will only move the tool and the grasped object simultaneously. There is 
no physical grasping simulated. 

5  Language 
5.1  About Melfa Basic: 

The University of Plymouth is currently the home to various different robots, 
three  of  these  is  the  Mitsubishi  RV­2AJ  robotic  arms.  Like  all  robotic  arms, 
there are various ways to program them, however the method for offline pro­

Workspace 5 Student Manual  16  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


gramming involves a language called Melfa Basic (created by Mitsubishi). As 
the  name  suggest,  this  language  is  a  version  of  “Basic”.  There  are  various 
programs  for  writing  Melfa  Basic robotic  instructions,  mostly  supplied  by  Mit­ 
subishi. However, one of these programs is Workspace 5 

5.2  Selecting a Language: 

There  are  many  different  Robotic  companies  around  the  world,  each  of  the 
companies generally program their own robots in their own specified language. 
Workspace 5 has the ability for the user to select a language for the appropri­ 
ate  robot.  With  this  language,  Workspace  5  can  change  a  sequence  of 
movements  into  a  program  written  in  the  language  of  the  robot  ready  to  be 
uploaded  to  the  robots  controller  module.  However,  the  license  for  each  of 
these  languages  needs  to  be  obtained.  For  the  University  of  Plymouth,  only 
the  Melfa  Basic  IV  language  has  been  obtained  for  use  with  the  Mitsubishi 
RV­2AJ robotic arm. 

To change the language to Melfa Basic IV there are two methods of selecting 
the  language.  The  first  method  is  to  access  the  “Properties”  Menu  from  the 
“Robot”  drop  down  menu  from  the  Main  Menu.  A  window  will  appear  called 
“Robot  Properties”  (Figure  13),  select  the  “Options”  tab,  and  then  go  to  the 
drop down language menu and select “Melfa Basic IV (Mitsubishi)”. The sec­ 
ond method is to right click on the robot model number in the Project Window 
and select “Properties”. From here the “Robot Properties” window will appear 
once again. Follow the same method as described previously. 

Figure 14: The Options menu allowing the user to change the programming language used.

Workspace 5 Student Manual  17  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


5.3  Creating a Melfa Basic file for the Mitsubishi Robot: 

For creating a Melfa Basic file, a robot model needs to be loaded into Work­ 
space 5. Following this, the robots sequence of movements needs to be cre­ 
ated  to  give  the  robot “Path”.  Creating  the robot  path is  discussed in  section 
4.3. The next action is to select a language for the robot model as achieved in 
the above method (section 5.2). Once this has been achieved the Melfa Basic 
file  can  then  be  created  by  right  clicking  on  the  “Path”  name  in  the  project 
window  and  selecting  “Write  Program”  (Figure  14).  From  here  the  option  to 
save the Melfa Basic file will be given. The user needs to provide a filename 
and select the location to save the file. 

Figure 15: Showing the Options menu allowing the user to create a Melfa Basic file. 

Appendix 
Information on Workspace 

Workspace  5,  created  by  Flow  Software  Technologies  is  the  successor  to 
Workspace  4  created  in  1998. Workspace  5  is  sophisticated  simulation  soft­ 
ware package that has been designed primarily for the robotic industry where 
robotic  arms  are  in  heavy  use  in  automation,  for  example,  in  car  production 
plants. It allows the user to quickly and concisely create a program offline that 
once completed can be uploaded to the robot saving valuable production time. 
However, WS5  can  be  used in  many  other  applications  such  as  research.  It 
gives the ability to import Computer Aided Design (CAD) data from other CAD 
systems, perform robot modelling, generate robot movement, graphically edit 
robot  programs,  generate  robot  programs  off­line  and  give  the  ability  to 
download programs to robot controllers. 

Workspace 5 uses existing mathematical models of robots stored within the 
program. It has a  wide range of existing robot  models, however, if there is a 
robotic  model  it  does  not  have,  then Workspace  5  has  the  facilities  to  allow 
the user to create a new robot model by either drawing the robot in the Work­ 
space 5 environment or by importing a pre­drawn model from a CAD program 
such  as  Auto­CAD.  Once  the  robot  has  been  drawn  or  imported  in,  mathe­ 
matical rules can then be assigned.

Workspace 5 Student Manual  18  Version 0.4  Oct 2006 


Workspace  is  a  32­bit  Microsoft  Windows  application  and  uses  the  ACIS 
CAD kernel to create high quality, high speed, rendered images. Visual Basic 
for applications has been included to simulate mechanism programs and be­ 
haviours to allow sophisticated customisation. 

Flow  System  Technologies,  the  designers  of  Workspace  5,  do  say  that 
Workspace  5  has  been  designed  to  run  on  Windows  98  /  2000  or  NT,  and 
now the new version, Workspace 5.04.1 is said to be fully compliant with Win­ 
dows XP. The University of Plymouth is currently running the new version of 
Workspace  on  Windows  XP  (Professional  Edition)  and  to  date  the  authors 
have  not  come  across  any  compatibility  issues  between  the  two  pieces  of 
software.

Workspace 5 Student Manual  19  Version 0.4  Oct 2006