Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 7

Using the National Standards

for Improvement
A SELF-REVIEW TOOL
FOR BOARDS OF TRUSTEES
This self-review tool supports boards of trustees as they work
as leaders with principals and their communities to ensure
schools are using the National Standards for reading, writing,
and mathematics to improve students’ learning and achievement
within the New Zealand Curriculum (NZC). The tool also supports
boards’ self-review processes and so should help to inform
strategic and annual planning. As they engage with the tool,
boards will better understand how to use the National Standards
and what their next steps might be to support the learning of
in-school leaders, teachers, and students.
The overall introduction to the set of self-review tools describes how the tools can support
professional learning focused on improving student outcomes through the development of
curriculum and assessment knowledge. Each tool describes practice in relation to effective use
of the National Standards at three points on a continuum (basic,1 developing, and integrated)
so that users can locate their practice and then set goals for their own learning. These goals
may include building knowledge of the learning progressions for students described in Literacy
Learning Progressions, The English Language Learning Progressions, and the Number Framework
from the Numeracy Development Projects.

A critical aim of self-review is achieving a step up in the performance of the education system for
and with Māori learners. Central to such an achievement and at the core of Ka Hikitia – Managing
for Success is “an unrelenting focus on ako” (Ministry of Education, 2009, page 20). Transforming
the system will require a better understanding of the links between teaching practice and
learning outcomes and of what students can contribute to learning experiences in the classroom.

Board members may use this tool on their own, but research shows that an inquiry process
undertaken with others and with a clear focus on student achievement results in much deeper
understanding. Similarly, self-review may be undertaken with or without support from an
external expert, but working with an “experienced other”, such as a PD provider, results in
deeper learning (Timperley, Wilson, Barrar, and Fung, 2007).

It is important to remember that school self-review covers a much wider range of areas
than those explored in this tool and that many schools use other self-review tools. This tool
represents one important inquiry that can contribute to a school’s strategic review.

1
The National Administration Guidelines have been revised and republished to incorporate requirements in relation to
the National Standards. These requirements are implicit in many of the descriptors at the “basic” level of the self-
review tools. Schools are required to meet the new requirements from 2010 and to report against them in their annual
reports on the 2011 year onwards.
SELF-REVIEW FOR BOARDS OF TRUSTEES

The structure of the tool is based on the key questions of the inquiry and knowledge-building
cycle presented in Teacher Professional Learning and Development: Best Evidence Synthesis
Iteration (Timperley et al., 2007). This cycle has been used because it supports professional
learning in ways that have a positive impact on student outcomes.

What are our


students’ strengths
and learning needs?

What are our


professional strengths
and learning needs?
What has been the
impact of our changed
actions on students?

How do we monitor
implementation of the
standards?

REFERENCES
Ministry of Education (2009). Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success: The Māori Education
Strategy 2008–2012, updated edition. Wellington: Ministry of Education. Available at
http://kahikitia.minedu.govt.nz/default.htm

Timperley, H., Wilson, A., Barrar, H., and Fung, I. (2007). Teacher Professional Learning and
Development: Best Evidence Synthesis Iteration [BES]. Wellington: Ministry of Education.
Available at www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/series/2515

2 SELF-REVIEW FOR BOARDS OF TRUSTEES


WHAT ARE OUR STUDENTS’ STRENGTHS AND LEARNING NEEDS?
Basic Developing Integrated
What do our Boards ensure that: Boards ensure that: Boards ensure that:
students know and • the achievement of • the achievement of students and • the achievement of students and groups of students is assessed,
what do they need students and groups of groups of students is assessed, using using expectations from the NZC, from learning progressions
to learn and do? students is assessed, expectations from the NZC, from in literacy, ESOL, and mathematics, and from the standards as
using expectations from learning progressions in literacy, reference points;
the NZC, from learning ESOL, and mathematics, and from the • appropriate assessments are used in order to identify student
progressions in literacy, standards as reference points; progress and achievement;
ESOL, and mathematics, • assessment information is used to set
and from the standards • differentiated targets that reflect high expectations for groups of
differentiated targets for individuals students are set, with a particular focus on Māori students and on
as reference points; and groups of students, with a those at risk of not meeting the standards;
• assessment information particular focus on Māori students.
is used to set targets for • they are able to use evidence to challenge and critique in-school
groups of students, with leaders’ targets for students.
a particular focus on
Māori students.

What levels of Boards require reports in Boards require reports in which: Boards require reports in which:
analysis do we which: • the analysis of school-wide • the analysis of school-wide assessment information shows trends
need? • school-wide assessment assessment information shows trends and patterns for each year level and for groups of students, with a
information is given for and patterns for each year level particular focus on Māori students;
each year level and for and for groups of students, with a • the pace of progress is a focus for analysis;
groups of students, with a particular focus on Māori students and
particular focus on Māori with the pace of progress as a focus • there is an understanding of the accelerated progress that some
students. for analysis. groups will need to make in order to be able to access the NZC in
the future;
• feedback is incorporated from parents, families, and whānau about

SELF-REVIEW FOR BOARDS OF TRUSTEES


trends in school-wide data and Māori student achievement.

3
SELF-REVIEW FOR BOARDS OF TRUSTEES
EVIDENCE SUPPORTING OUR PLACEMENT ON THE CONTINUUM

Basic Developing Integrated


What do our
students know and
what do they need

4
to learn and do?
SELF-REVIEW FOR BOARDS OF TRUSTEES

What levels of
analysis do we
need?

SELF-REVIEW FOR BOARDS OF TRUSTEES


WHAT ARE OUR PROFESSIONAL STRENGTHS AND LEARNING NEEDS?
Basic Developing Integrated
How have we as a Boards: Boards: Boards:
board contributed to a • require reports on • ensure that they have sufficient • ensure that they have sufficient knowledge of the NZC and the
range of outcomes for students’ progress and knowledge of the NZC and standards to be able to:
all students? achievement in relation the standards to be able to - discuss, critique, and challenge required reports on students’
to expectations from the understand and discuss required progress and achievement;
NZC and the standards. reports on students’ progress
and achievement. - review the effectiveness of school structures, processes, and
practices in supporting students’ cultural and learning needs, with
a particular focus on students at risk of not meeting the standards.

How does information Boards: Boards: Boards:


on student • reflect on funding • ensure that there are links • ensure that there are links between priorities for professional
achievement inform priorities for professional between priorities for learning, the budget, the strategic and annual plans, and the
our own learning learning for themselves, professional learning for principal’s performance agreement and that all these focus on ongoing
needs and those of leaders, and teachers. themselves, leaders, and improvement of student outcomes, using expectations from the NZC
leaders and teachers? teachers and priorities in the and the standards as reference points.
strategic and annual plans.

EVIDENCE SUPPORTING OUR PLACEMENT ON THE CONTINUUM

How have we as a
board contributed to a
range of outcomes for
all students?

SELF-REVIEW FOR BOARDS OF TRUSTEES


5
How does information
on student
achievement inform
our own learning
needs and those of
leaders and teachers?
SELF-REVIEW FOR BOARDS OF TRUSTEES
EVIDENCE WE MONITOR
HOW DOSUPPORTING OUR IMPLEMENTATION OF THE STANDARDS?
PLACEMENT ON THE CONTINUUM

Basic Developing Integrated


What evidence is Boards: Boards: Boards:
there that agreed • approve strategies • require regular reports on the • monitor, in a planned and deliberate way, the implementation of
strategies are in in the annual plan implementation of strategies from strategies from the annual plan focused on the use of the standards
place for meeting

6
relating to the use of the annual plan focused on the use to support students’ progress and achievement.
our achievement the standards. of the standards to support students’
targets relating to progress and achievement.
the standards?

EVIDENCE SUPPORTING OUR PLACEMENT ON THE CONTINUUM


SELF-REVIEW FOR BOARDS OF TRUSTEES

What evidence is
there that agreed
strategies are in

SELF-REVIEW FOR BOARDS OF TRUSTEES


place for meeting
our achievement
targets relating to
the standards?
WHAT HAS BEEN THE IMPACT OF OUR CHANGED ACTIONS ON STUDENTS?
Basic Developing Integrated
What evidence Boards: Boards: Boards:
is there that • require reports that show the • require reports that identify trends • require reports that identify trends and patterns in the progress
students have progress and achievement of and patterns in the progress and and achievement of students as a whole and of groups of students
progressed students as a whole and of achievement of students as a whole in relation to expectations from the NZC and the standards, with a
in relation to groups of students in relation and of groups of students in relation particular focus on Māori students and on students at risk of not
expectations to expectations from the to expectations from the NZC and the meeting the standards;
from the NZC and the standards, with standards, with a particular focus on
NZC and the • use this information, along with in-depth consultation with key
a particular focus on Māori Māori students; stakeholders, to report to the school community and to discuss
standards? students; • use this information, along with in the annual report:
• use this information to report limited consultation with stakeholders, - school strengths and identified areas for improvement;
to the school community to report to the school community and
and to discuss in the annual to discuss in the annual report: - the basis for identifying areas for improvement;
report: - school strengths and identified - planned actions for lifting achievement.
- school strengths and areas for improvement;
identified areas for - the basis for identifying areas for
improvement; improvement;
- the basis for identifying - planned actions for lifting
areas for improvement; achievement.
- planned actions for lifting
achievement.

EVIDENCE SUPPORTING OUR PLACEMENT ON THE CONTINUUM

What evidence

SELF-REVIEW FOR BOARDS OF TRUSTEES


is there that
students have

7
progressed
in relation to
expectations
from the
NZC and the
standards?
SELF-REVIEW FOR BOARDS OF TRUSTEES