Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 3

MDST

 3559-­‐002  Dataesthetics  
Spring  2011  |  Prof.  Alvarado  
T  R  11-­‐12:15  |  Alderman  317  
Course  web  site:  http://pages.shanti.virginia.edu/Dataesthetics_S11
Syllabus  Version  2.1  

Description  
This  course  will  introduce  you  to  the  theory  and  practice  of  database  application  design  in  the  
context  of  the  digital  liberal  arts.  Beginning  with  the  premise  that  the  database  is  the  defining  
symbolic  form  of  the  postmodern  era,  you  will  review  literature  about  databases,  study  
examples  of  their  use  in  projects  from  a  variety  of  disciplines,  and  engage  in  the  actual  design  of  
a  database  application  as  a  course  project.  Topics  to  be  covered  will  include  data  models,  web-­‐
based  database  development  (using  PHP  and  MySQL),  interface  design,  data  visualization,  and  
the  role  of  databases  in  scholarship.  

What  you  will  learn  


1. Basic  programming  skills  in  HTML,  PHP,  and  SQL.  
2. Knowledge  of  common  data  formats  such  as  CSV  and  RSS  and  techniques  for  working  with  
them.  
3. Design  principles  at  the  levels  of  data  modeling  and  interface  design.  
4. A  theoretical  framework  within  which  to  conceptualize  the  structure  and  function  database-­‐
driven  applications.  
5. Familiarity  with  the  data  and  design  goals  of  digitual  humanities  projects.  

Requirements  
1. Attendance  and  Participation  (20%)  
2. Code  Assignments  (25%)  
3. Midterm  Quiz  (15%)  
4. Final  Project  (25%)  
5. Final  Report  (15%)  
 
Details  about  each  assignement  will  be  provided    on  the  course  web  site  as  necessary.    Code  
assignments  will  be  relatively  simple  tasks  reflective  of  the  skill  being  learned  during  the  week  
they  are  assignment.      

Schedule  
The  following  is  an  overview  of  the  topics  to  covered  in  the  the  course.    Please  note  that  the  
sequence  is  not  written  in  stone—I  reserve  the  right  to  make  adaptive  responses  to  the  
situation  as  it  unfolds.    For  detailed  information  about  assigned  readings  and  activities,  always  
consult  the  web  site.  
 

  1  
Introduction  
1. Introduction  to  the  course   R  01/20    
2. Data  Journalism     T  01/25  and  R  01/27    

Basic  Skills  
3. Basic  HTML     T  02/01  and  R  02/03    
4. HTML,  CSS,  and  jQuery   T  02/08  and  R  02/10   Assignment  1  due  (T)  
5. PHP:  Basics,  Includes,  Forms   T  02/15  and  R  02/17   Assignment  2  due  (T)  
6. From  CSV  to  SQL   T  02/22  and  R  02/24   Assignment  3  due  (T)  
7. PHP:  From  Database  to  Interface   T  03/01  and  R  03/03    
             SPRING  BREAK   T  03/08  and  R  03/10    
8. The  interface:  Search,  List  and  Display   T  03/15  and  R  03/17   Assignment  4  and  5  due  

Case  Studies  
9. Case  1   T  03/22  and  R  03/24   Midterm  due  (T)  
10. Case  2   T  04/01  and  R  04/03    
11. Case  3   T  04/08  and  R  04/10    

Projects  
12. Projects   T  04/15  and  R  04/17    
13. Projects   T  04/22  and  R  04/24    
14. Projects   T  04/29  and  R  04/31    
15. Presentations   T  05/03   Projects  due  
             Exam  Period   TBA   Reports  due  

Policies  
Classroom  attendance.    Attendance  is  required  for  all  class  sessions.    Reasonable  excuses  will  
be  accepted  with  prior  notification;  examples  include  sickness  and  travel  for  academic  
purposes.  Unexcused  absences  in  excess  of  two  days  will  result  in  loss  of  a  letter  grade.    Long-­‐
term  excused  absences  may  result  in  downgrading  as  well.    Please  see  the  instructors  if  you  
anticipate  missing  more  than  two  classes.  
 
Classroom  participation.    Classroom  participation  means  contributing  to  seminar  conversation  
with  ideas  and  questions  informed  by  your  reading.    It  also  means  thoughtful  responses  to  what  
classmates  and  instructors  have  to  say.    Studio  participation  means  performing  the  in-­‐class  
activities  as  assigned  and  collaborating  with  others  as  required.  
 
Reading  before  class.    Reading  is  the  fuel  that  drives  course  discussion.    Whether  you  have  done  
the  reading  will  affect  the  quality  of  your  contributions  and  class  discussions  as  a  whole.      
 
Timely  completion  of  assignments.    Late  assignments  will  not  be  accepted  without  loss  of  a  
letter  grade.    Assignments  more  than  a  week  late  will  not  be  accepted  at  all.    If  you  anticipate  

  2  
conflicts  with  your  work  in  other  courses,  please  schedule  a  meeting  with  one  of  us  and  bring  
your  other  course  syllabi  so  that  we  may  determine  if  an  accommodation  is  required.    In  
general,  it  is  a  good  idea  to  plan  your  semester  in  the  first  two  weeks  of  class,  using  all  of  your  
course  syllabi  and  a  calendar  to  map  at  a  work  strategy.    
 

  3