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Everyone

is talking about
t h e n e w
(has been, for some
time now). The new this, the new that, how to become new, find
the new, what will be the next new, what happened to the last
new. Our civilization is h e lp l e s sly c a p t i v a t e d by this
subject. There are many other ways to describe what is
important to us—we are also a society of the spectacle, we
prefer simulacra to the real in an ecstasy of consumption, we
have a soft spot for nostalgia and for science fiction—but w e a r e , f i r s t a n d f o r e m o s t , l o v e r s o f n o v e l t y .
Everything else is conditioned by this fact. The regard for
newness is so basic and universal that to even notice it, much
less question it, seems extraordinary. W e b e l i e v e t h a t n e w e r i s b e t t e r
Not because it is a fact in each individual case, but because i t i s
an inevitability
in general.
This belief originated during the industrial revolution, when
we first started to figure that history progresses rather than
accumulates. Since then, we have come to take ‘progress’ for
granted; n o w a d a y s new equals i m p r o v e d . The
economic importance of this formula cannot be overstated. The
magic words ‘new and improved’ power consumption,
continuously creating new markets, the lifeblood of capitalism.
The mechanisms of built-in-obsolescence, artificially drawn out
development schedules (which phase in changes in smaller
increments over the longest possible time to ensure a
continuous supply of new-and-improved products), and
contrived categories, (which turned the station wagon into the
new and improved minivan and then the SUV) have become p o s i t i v e l y
epistemic.

NEW
Wes Jones

Fanny Luor
Project 4 / Study 1
NEW

Wes Jones
E v e r y
one is talking about the new
(has been, for some time now).

The new this, the new that, how to become new, find the
new, what will be the next new, what happened to the last
new. Our civilization is helplessly captivated by this subject.
There are many other ways to describe what is important to
us—we are also a society of the spectacle, we prefer simulacra
to the real in an ecstasy of consumption, we have a soft spot
for nostalgia and for science fiction— b u t w e a r e , f i r s t a n d f o r e m o s t , l o v e r s o f n o v e l t y .
Everything else is conditioned by this fact. The regard for
newness is so basic and universal that to even notice it, much
less question it, seems extraordinary. We believe that newer
is better. Not because it is a fact in each individual case, but
because it is an inevitability in general.

This belief originated during the industrial revolution, when


we first started to figure that history progresses rather than
accumulates. Since then, we have come to take ‘progress’
for granted; nowadays new equals improved. The economic
importance of this formula cannot be overstated.

T he ma gic words ‘ new and i m proved’ power c o n s u mp ti o n , continuously creating new markets, the lifeblood
of capitalism. The mechanisms of built-in-obsolescence,
artificially drawn out development schedules (which phase
in changes in smaller increments over the longest possible
time to ensure a continuous supply of new-and-improved
products), and contrived categories, (which turned the
station wagon into the new and improved minivan and
then the SUV) have become p o s i t i v e l y e p i s t e m i c .

Fanny Luor
Project 4 / Study 2
E
veryone is talking about the new (has been, for
some time now). The new this, the new that, how
to become new, find the new, what will be the next
new, what happened to the last new. Our civilization


is helplessly captivated by this subject. There are
many other ways to describe what is important to us— Our civilization is
we are also a society of the spectacle, we prefer
helplessly captivated


simulacra to the real in an ecstasy of consumption, we
have a soft spot for nostalgia and for science fiction— by this subject .
but we are, first and foremost, lovers of novelty.
Everything else is conditioned by this fact to even
notice it, much less question it, seems extraordinary.
We believe that newer is better. Not because it is a fact
in each individual case, but because it is an
inevitability in general.

This belief originated during the industrial revolution,


when we first started to figure that history progresses
rather than accumulates. Since then, we have come to
take ‘progress’ for granted; nowadays new equals
improved. The economic importance of this formula
cannot be overstated. The magic words ‘new and
improved’ power consumption, continuously creating
new markets, the lifeblood of capitalism. The
mechanisms of built-in-obsolescence, artificially drawn
out development schedules (which phase in changes in
smaller increments over the longest possible time to
ensure a continuous supply of new-and-improved
products), and contrived categories, (which turned the

Wes
station wagon into the new and improved minivan and
then the SUV) have become positively epistemic.

Jones

Fanny Luor
Project 4 / Study 3
NEW by Wes Jones

Everyone is talking about the new (has been, for


some time now). The new this, the new that, how
to become new, find the new, what will be the
next new, what happened to the last new.

Our ci vilization is hel plessly capti vated by this subject.

There are many other ways to describe what is We belie ve that new er is better.
important to us—we are also a society of the
spectacle, we prefer simulacra to the real in an Not because it is a fact in each individual case, but
ecstasy of consumption, we have a soft spot for because it is an inevitability in general.
nostalgia and for science fiction—but we are, first
and foremost, lovers of novelty. Everything else This belief originated during the industrial
is conditioned by this fact. The regard for newness revolution, when we first started to figure that
is so basic and universal that to even notice it, history progresses rather than accumulates.
much less question it, seems extraordinary. Since then, we have come to take ‘progress’ for
granted; nowadays new equals impr oved.

The economic importance of this formula


cannot be overstated. The magic words ‘new
and improved’ power consumption,
continuously creating new markets, the
lifeblood of capitalism.

The mechanisms of built-in-obsolescence, artificially


drawn out development schedules (which phase in
changes in smaller increments over the longest
possible time to ensure a continuous supply of new-
and-improved products), and contrived categories,
(which turned the station wagon into the new and
improved minivan and then the SUV) have
become positi vely e pistemic.

Fanny Luor
Project 4 / Study 4
NEW Wes Jones
Everyone is talking about the new (has been, for some time
now). The new this, the new that, how to become new, find the
new, what will be the next new, what happened to the last new.
Our civilization is helplessly captivated by this subject. There are
many other ways to describe what is important to us—we are
also a society of the spectacle, we prefer simulacra to

“ The regard for newness is so basic


and universal that to even notice it, much
the real in an ecstasy of consumption, we have a soft
spot for nostalgia and for science fiction—but we are,
first and foremost, lovers of novelty. Everything else is
less question it, seems extraordinary.
” conditioned by this fact. The regard for newness is so
basic and universal that to even notice it, much less
question it, seems extraordinary. We believe that newer is better.
Not because it is a fact in each individual case, but because it is
an inevitability in general.

This belief originated during the industrial revolution, when we


first started to figure that history progresses rather than
accumulates. Since then, we have come to take ‘progress’ for
granted; nowadays new equals improved. The
economic importance of this formula cannot
be overstated. The magic words ‘new and “ ”
... nowadays new equals improved.

improved’ power consumption, continuously creating new


markets, the lifeblood of capitalism. The mechanisms of built-in-
obsolescence, artificially drawn out development schedules
(which phase in changes in smaller increments over the longest
possible time to ensure a continuous supply of new-and-
improved products), and contrived categories, (which turned the
station wagon into the new and improved minivan and then the
SUV) have become positively epistemic.

Fanny Luor
Project 4 / Study 5
wes jones

Everyone is talking about the new (has been, for some


time now). The new this, the new that, how to become
new, find the new, what will be the next new, what
happened to the last new. Our civilization is helplessly
captivated by this subject. There are many other ways to
describe what is important to us—we are also a society of
the spectacle, we prefer simulacra to the real in an ecstasy
of consumption, we have a soft spot for nostalgia and for
science fiction—but we are, first and foremost, lovers
New
of novelty. Everything else is conditioned by this fact. The
regard for newness is so basic and universal that to even
notice it, much less question it, seems extraordinary.

We believe that newer is better. Not because it is a fact


in each individual case, but because it is an inevitability in
general. This belief originated during the industrial revolution,
when we first started to figure that history progresses rather
than accumulates. Since then, we have come to take
progress’ for granted; nowadays new equals improved.
The economic importance of this formula cannot be
overstated. The magic words ‘new and improved’ power
consumption, continuously creating new markets, the
lifeblood of capitalism.

The mechanisms of built-in-obsolescence, artificially drawn


out development schedules (which phase in changes in
smaller increments over the longest possible time to ensure
a continuous supply of new-and-improved products), and
contrived categories, (which turned the station wagon into
the new and improved minivan and then the SUV) have
become positively epistemic.

Fanny Luor
Project 4 / Study 6

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