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Q Английский клуб
Оскар Уайльд
СКАЗКИ
Книга для чтения на английском языке
в старших классах средних школ, гимназии,
лицеев, на II—I I I курсах неязыковых вузов

Адаптация текста, упражнения, словарь


JI. В. Холхоевой

МОСКВА

АЙ РИ С ПРЕСС
2007
УДК 811.111(075)
ББК 81.2Англ-93
У13

Серия «Английский клуб» включает книги и учебные


пособия, рассчитанны е на пять этапов изучения ан г­
лийского языка: Elem entary (для начинаю щ их), Pre-
Interm ediate (для продолжаю щ их первого уровня),
Interm ediate (для продолжаю щ их второго уровня),
U p p er In term ed iate (для продолж аю щ их третьего
уровня) и Advanced (для соверш енствую щ ихся).

Серийное оформление А. М. Драгового

Уайльд, О.
У 13 С казки [= Fairy Tales] / Оскар Уайльд; адаптация тек­
ста, упраж нения, словарь J1. В. Холхоевой. — М.: Айрис-
пресс, 2007. — 192 с.: ил. — (Английский клуб). — (Д омаш ­
нее чтение).
ISBN 978-5-8112-2801-0

Сборник содержит 9 сказок знаменитого английского писателя


XIX в., хорошо известного российскому читателю по роману «Портрет
Дориана Грея*, пьесам «Идеальный муж», «Веер леди Уиндермир» и
др. Тексты сказок слегка адаптированы и сокращены и сопровождают­
ся комментарием и упражнениями; в конце книги приводится словарь.
Сборник предназначен для учащихся старших классов средних школ,
гимназий, лицеев, студентов II—III курсов неязыковых вузов, а также
широкого круга лиц, изучающих английский язык самостоятельно.
Издание сопровождается аудиозаписью.
ББК 81.2Англ-93
УДК 811.111(075)

© О О О «И здательство «А Й РИ С -
пресс», оф ормление, адаптация
текста, словарь и упраж нения,
ISBN 978-5-8112-2801-0 2002
O s c a r W ild e
(1 8 5 4 -1 9 0 0 )

T h o u g h O scar W ilde is k n o w n toda y p rim arily as a playwright


and as the a u t h o r of The Picture o f Dorian Gray (1891) — his only
novel — he also w rote po etry , fairy ta les, essays and criticism , all of
w h ic h express his ae sthetic a p p r o a c h to life and art. I n d e e d , he was
the m ost p o p u la r sp o k e sm a n in the late X I X th c e n tu ry adv ocatin g
the doctrine o f aestheticism , w h ich insisted th at art should be primarily
c o n c e r n e d w ith "a rt for art's s a k e ," not with
politics, relig ion, scien ce, b o u rg eo is m orality.
Oscar W ilde (Fingal O 'F lahertie Wills) was
born in D u b lin on O ctober 16, 1854 to parents
w ho were p r o m in e n t in Ireland's social life. His
father (William R alph Wills) was a leading ear
and eye surgeon who had founded a hospital a
year before W ilde's birth and who. had received
the a p p o in tm e n t o f Surgeon Oculist in Ordinary
to the Q u een , and honorary position especially
created for him in recognition o f his international reputation. W ilde's
m o th e r (F ran cesca Elgee W ilde), nine years younger than her husband,
was know n in literary and political circles as " S p e ra n z a " , a nam e she
adopted in the 1840s to give hope to Irish nationalists and activists in
the w o m a n 's rights movement.
W ilde received an e d u c a tio n ap p ro p ria te to his statio n in life.
W h e n he was ten, he was sent to P o rto r a Royal School (founded by
K in g C h a r l e s II) in E n n i s k i l l e n , U ls te r. In O c t o b e r 1971, he
en tered Trinity College in D u b lin , w here he distingu ished h im s e lf
by w in n in g various prizes and m e d als, particularly for his learning in
the classics. In June 1874, he w o n a sc h o la rsh ip , the classical
D e m y s h ip , to M agdalen College, Oxford U niversity, after com pleting
his third y ea r at Trinity College. At Oxford, W ilde d eve lope d the
m a n n e r o f p o se u r and was widely reco gnised by his fellow stu dents as
a b r illia n t talker.
On M a y 29, 1884 he m a rrie d C o n s ta n c e Lloyd. She came
from a respectable legal family in Ireland. They had two ch ild ren —
Cyril and V yvyan. P robably, his happy family life inspired him to
w rite stories for children . The Happy Prince and Other Tales was
pub lished in 1888, A House o f Pomegranates — in 1891 — 1892.
3
In O cto b e r 1900, following his trip to R o m e , W ilde was ill
w ith an ear infection that developed into en c ep h a litis. On O cto b e r 10,
he u n d e rw e n t an operation. T hus, he died on 10 N o v e m b e r at the
age o f forty-six. His to m b , sculpted by Sir Jacob E p ste in , is in P ere-
Lachaise C e m e tery , Paris.
THE HAPPY PRINCE

H igh above the city, on a tall colum n, stood the statue o f the
H appy P rince. He was covered w ith th in leaves o f fine g o ld 1, for
eyes he h ad tw o bright sapphires, and a large red ruby shone brightly
on his sw ord-hilt.
He w as very m uch adm ired indeed. "H e is as beautiful as a
w eath erco ck ," said one o f th e Tow n C ouncillors, w ho w ished to gain
a re p u ta tio n for having artistic tastes. "Only not quite so useful," he
added because he was afraid th a t people may th in k him u n p ractical,
w hich he really was not.
"W hy c a n 't you be like th e H appy P rince?" asked a sensible
m o th er o f h er little boy who was crying for the m oon. "The H appy
P rince n ev er dream s o f crying for anything."
"I am glad there is som eone in the w orld w ho is quite happy,"
said a d isap p o in ted m an as he looked at the w onderful statue.
5
"H e looks ju st like an angel," said the C harity C h ild re n 2 as
they cam e out o f the cathedral.
"H ow do you know ?" said the M athem atical M aster. "You
have never seen one."
"Ah! But w e have, in our d ream s," answ ered the children; and
the M ath em atical M aster frowned and looked at them angrily, because
he did n o t approve o f children dream ing.
One night th ere flew over the city a little Swallow. H is friends
w ent away to Egypt six weeks before. B ut he stayed b ehind, because
he w as in love w ith th e m ost beautiful Reed. He saw her early in the
spring as he was flying dow n the river after a big yellow m oth. He
w as so attracted by h er slender w aist th at he stopped to talk to her.
"Shall I love y ou?" asked the Swallow, w ho liked to com e to
the p o in t at on ce, and the R eed m ade him a low bow. So he flew
ro u n d and ro u n d her, tou ch in g the w ater w ith his wings. This was
his courtsh ip , and it lasted all th ro u g h the sum m er.
"It is a ridiculous atta c h m e n t," tw ittered the o ther Swallows,
"she has no m oney and far too m any relations;" and, indeed, the
river was quite full o f R eeds. T hen, w hen the autum n cam e, they
all flew away.
A fter they had gone, the Swallow felt lonely and began to
th in k o f his lady-love. "She has no conversation," he said, "and I
am afraid th at she is a co q u ette, for she is always flirting w ith the
w ind." A nd certainly, w henever th e w ind blew, the R eed m ade the
m ost graceful curtseys. "I adm it th at she is dom estic," he continued,
"but I love travelling, and my wife should also love travelling."
"Will you com e away w ith m e?" he said finally to her, but the
R eed shook h er head, she was so attached to her hom e.
"You have b een trifling w ith m e," he cried. "I am off to the
P y ra m id s.3 G ood-bye!" and he flew away.
All day long he flew, and at n ig h t-tim e he arrived at the city.
"W here shall I stay?" he th o u g h t. "I h o p e the tow n has m ade
p rep aratio n s."
T hen he saw th e statue on the tall colum n.
"I will stay th e re ," he cried, "it is a fine position, w ith plenty
o f fresh air." So he settled ju st betw een the feet o f the H appy Prince.
"I have a golden b ed ro o m ," he said softly to him self as he
looked round, and he prepared to go to sleep. But ju st as he was
p u ttin g his head u n d er his w ing, a large drop o f w ater fell on him.
"W hat a curious thing!" he cried. "T here is not a single cloud in the
6
sky, the stars are quite clear and bright, and yet it is raining. The
clim ate in th e n o rth o f E urope is really dreadful. The R eed used to
like the rain, but th ere was only h er selfishness."
T hen an o th er drop fell.
"W hat is the use of a statue if it can n o t keep the rain off?" he
said. "I m ust look for a good c h im n e y -c a p ," and he decided to fly
away.
B ut before he had spread his w ings, a th ird drop fell, he
looked up, and saw — Ah! W hat did he see?
The eyes o f th e H appy P rince w ere filled w ith tears, and the
tears w ere ru n n in g dow n his golden cheeks. H is face was so beautiful
in the m oonlight th at the little Swallow was filled w ith pity.
"W ho are you?" he said.
"I am th e H appy P rin ce."
"W hy are you w eeping th e n ? " asked the Swallow. "Y ou have
m ade m e thoroughly w et."
"W hen I was alive and had a h u m a n h e a rt," answ ered the
statu e, "I did n o t know w hat tears w ere, for I lived in th e P alace
o f S a n s -S o u c i,4 w here sorrow is not allow ed to enter. In the daytim e
I played w ith my c o m p an io n s in th e garden, and in the evening I
led th e dance in the G reat H all. R o u n d the garden ran a very high
w all, but I never cared to ask w hat lay beyond it. E verything about
m e was so beautiful. My cou rtiers called me th e H appy P rin c e , and
happ y , in d eed , I w as, if p leasure be h a p p in e s s .5 So I lived, and so
I died. A nd now th at I am dead, they have put me up here so high
th a t I can see all the ugliness and all th e m isery o f my city. T hough
my h e a rt is m ade o f lead yet I ca n n o t choose but w e e p .6"
"W hat! Is he not solid g o ld ? " 7 said the Swallow to himself. He
was too polite to make any p ersonal rem arks out loud.
"F ar away," continued the statue in a low m usical voice, " far
away in a little street there is a poor house. O ne of the window s is
open, and through it I can see a w om an seated at a table. H er face
is th in and w orn. She has co arse, red h an d s, all pricked by the
needle, for she is a seamstress. She is em broidering passionflowers on
a satin gown for the loveliest of the Q u een 's m aids-of-honour to wear
at the next C ourt-ball. In a bed in the co rner o f the room her little
boy is lying ill. He has a fever, and is asking for oranges. H is m other
has nothing to give him but river w ater, so he is crying. Swallow,
Swallow, little Swallow, will you not bring her the ruby out o f my
sw ord-hilt? My feet are fixed to this pedestal and I cannot m ove."

7
"I am w aited for in Egypt," said th e Swallow. "M y friends are
flying up and dow n the N ile, and talking to the large lotus-flow ers.
Soon they will go to sleep in the tom b o f the great King. The King
is th ere him self in his p ain ted coffin."
"Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the P rince, "can 't
you stay w ith m e for one night, and be my m essenger? The boy is so
thirsty, and th e m o th er is so sad."
"I d o n 't th in k I like b o y s," answ ered the Swallow. "Last
sum m er, w hen I was staying on the river, there were two rude boys,
the m iller's sons, w ho w ere always throw ing stones at me. They
never hit m e, o f course; w e, swallows, fly far too well for that, but
still it was a m ark of disrespect."
B ut th e H appy P rince looked so sad th at the little Swallow was
sorry. "It is very cold h e re ," he said, "but I will stay w ith you for
one night, and be y o u r m essenger."
"T hank you, little Swallow," said the Prince.
So the Swallow picked out the great ruby from the P rin ce's
sword, and flew away w ith it over th e roofs o f the tow n.
He passed by the cathedral tow er, w here the w hite m arble
angels w ere sculptured. He passed by the palace and heard the sound
o f dancing. A beautiful girl cam e out on the balcony w ith her lover.
"H ow w onderful the stars are," he said to her, "and how wonderful
is the pow er o f love!"
"I hope my dress will be ready in tim e for the C o u rt-b all," she
answered. "I have ordered passionflow ers to be em broidered on it;
but the seam stresses are so lazy."
The Swallow passed over the river, and saw the lanterns hanging
on th e m asts o f the ships. He passed over the G hetto, and saw the old
Jew s bargaining w ith each other, and weighing out m oney in copper
scales. At last he reached the p oor house and looked in. The boy was
lying ill in bed. The m o th er was sleeping, she was so tired. The
Swallow laid the great ruby on the table. Then he flew gently round
the bed, fanning the b o y 's forehead w ith his wings. "H ow cool I
feel!" said the boy. "I m ust be getting better," and he fell asleep.
T hen the Swallow flew back to the H appy P rin ce, and told
him w hat he had done. "It is cu rio u s," he said, "but I feel quite
w arm now , although it is so cold."
"This is because you have done a good action," said the Prince.
A nd th e little Swallow beg an to th in k , and th e n he fell asleep.
T hinking always m ade him sleepy.
8
W hen day b roke, he flew dow n to the river and had a bath.
"W hat a rem arkable p h en o m en o n !" said th e Professor of O rnithology,
as he was passing over the bridge. "A swallow in w inter!" And he
w ro te a long le tte r about it to th e local new spaper. Every one
quoted it, it was full o f so m any w ords th at they could not understand.
"T onight I go to Egypt," said the Swallow, and he was in a
good m o o d at the prospect. He visited all the public m o n u m en ts,
and sat a long tim e on the top o f the church. W herever he w ent,
the Sparrows said to each other, "W hat a distinguished stranger!"
So he enjoyed him self very m uch.
W hen the m o o n rose, he flew back to the H appy P rince.
"H ave you any messages for E gypt?" he cried. "I am ju st starting."
"Sw allow , Swallow, little Swallow," said the P rin ce, "can 't
you stay w ith m e one night longer?"
"I am w aited for in Egypt," answ ered the Swallow. "T om orrow
my friends will fly up to the Second C ataract. The river-horse sits
there am ong the bulrushes, and on a great granite th ro n e sits the
G od M e m n o n .' All night long he w atches the stars, and w hen the
m orn in g star shines, he utters one cry o f jo y , and th e n he is silent.
At n o o n the yellow lions com e dow n to the w ater's edge to drink.
They have eyes like green beryls, and th eir roar is louder th an the
ro ar o f th e cataract."
"Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the Prince, "far away
across the city I see a young m an in a small room. He is leaning over
a desk covered w ith papers, and by his side there is a bu n ch of
violets. H is h air is brow n and crisp, and his lips are as red as a
pom egranate, and he has large dream y eyes. He is trying to finish a
play for the D irecto r o f the T heatre, but he is too cold to w rite any
m ore. T here is no fire in the grate, and hunger has m ade him weak."
"I will w ait w ith you one night longer," agreed the Swallow,
w ho really had a good heart. "Shall I take him an o th er ruby?"
"Alas! I have no ruby now ," sighed the P rin ce, "my eyes are
all th at I have left. They are m ade o f rare sapphires, w hich were
b rought out o f Ind ia a th o u san d years ago. Pluck out one o f them
and take it to him. He will sell it to the jew eller and buy firewood,
and fin ish his play."
"D ear P rin ce," said the Swallow, "I cannot do th at," and he
began to weep.
"Sw allow , Swallow, little Swallow," said the P rince, "do as
I co m m an d you."
9
So the Swallow plucked out th e P rin ce 's eye, and flew away to
th e S tu d en t's sm all room . It was easy enough to get in, as there was
a hole in the roof. T hrough this he quickly flew, and cam e into the
room . The young m an had his head buried in his hands, so he did
not h e a r the flu tter o f th e b ird 's wings. W hen he looked up, he
found the beautiful sapphire lying on the faded violets.
"I am beginning to be ap p reciated ," he cried, "this is from
som e great adm irer. N ow I can finish my play," and he looked quite
happy.
The next day th e Swallow flew dow n to the harbour. He sat
and w atched the sailors hauling big boxes out o f the hold w ith ropes.
"H eave a-h o y !"’ they shouted as each box cam e up. "I am going to
Egypt!" cried th e Swallow, but nobody paid m uch attention. W hen
th e m o o n rose, he flew back to the H appy Prince.
"I have com e to say good-bye to you," he cried.
"Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," pleaded the P rince, "can 't
you stay w ith m e one night longer?"
"It is w in ter," answ ered the Swallow, "and the chill snow will
soon be here. In Egypt th e sun is w arm on the green p alm -trees, and
th e cro c o d ile s lie in th e m ud and look lazily about th em . My
com p an io n s are building a nest in th e T em ple o f B a a lb e c ,1" and the
pink and w hite doves are w atching th em , and cooing to each other.
D ear P rin ce, I m ust leave you, but I will never forget you. N ext
spring I will bring you back tw o beautiful jew els to replace those you
have given away. The ruby shall be red d er than a red rose, and the
sapphire shall be as blue as th e great sea."
"In the square below ," said the H appy P rince, "there stands a
little girl w ho sells m atch es. She has let her m atches fall in the
gutter, and they are all spoiled. H er father will beat her, if she does
not bring hom e som e m oney, and she is crying. She has no shoes or
stockings, and h er little head is bare. Pluck out my o ther eye, and
h e r father will not beat her."
"I will stay w ith you one night longer," whispered the Swallow,
"but I cannot pluck out your eye. You would be com pletely blind then."
"Sw allow , Swallow, little Swallow," said the P rince, "do as
I com m and you."
So he plucked out th e P rin c e 's o th er eye, and flew w ith it.
H e found the m a tc h -g irl, and slipped the jew el into h e r hand.
"W hat a lovely b it o f glass!" cried th e little girl, and she ran hom e,
laughing.
1"
T hen th e Swallow cam e back to th e P rince. "You are blind
now ," he said, "so I will stay w ith you always."
"N o , little Swallow," answ ered the P o o r P rin c e , " you m ust
go away to Egypt."
"I will stay w ith you alw ays," said the Swallow, and he slept
at the P rin c e 's feet.
All the next day he sat on th e P rin c e 's shoulder, and told him
stories of w hat he had seen in strange lands. He told him of the red
ibises w ho stand in long rows on th e banks of the N ile, and catch
goldfish; o f th e Sphinx who is as old as the w orld itself, and lives in
the desert, and know s everything; o f the m erch an ts w ho walk slowly
by the side o f th e ir cam els and carry am ber beads in th e ir han d s; of
the King o f the M ou n tain s o f the M oon who is as black as ebony,
and w orships a large crystal; o f the great green snake th at sleeps in a
p a lm -tre e , and has tw enty priests to feed it w ith honey cakes; and of
the pigm ies w ho sail over a big lake on large flat leaves, and are
always at w ar w ith the butterflies.
"D e a r little S w allow ," said th e P rin c e , "you tell m e o f
m arvellous things, but the m ost m arvellous thing o f all is the suffering
o f m en and w om en. T here is no M ystery so great as M isery. Fly
over my city, little Swallow, and tell m e w hat you see th ere."
So th e Swallow flew over th e great city, and saw the rich
m aking m erry in th e ir beautiful h o u ses, w hile the beggars w ere
sitting at th e gates. H e flew into dark lanes, and saw the w hite
faces o f starving ch ild ren looking out at th e black streets. U n d e r a
bridge tw o little boys w ere lying in one a n o th e r's arm s to try and
keep th em selv es w arm . "H ow hungry w e are!" they said. "You
m ust n o t lie h e re ," shouted th e w a tch m an , and they w ent out into
the rain.
T hen he flew back and told the P rince w hat he had seen.
"I am covered w ith fine gold," said the P rin ce, " you m ust
take it off, leaf by leaf, and give it to the poor; people always th ink
th a t gold can m ake th em h a p p y .11"
So the Swallow took off leaf after leaf o f the fine gold, till the
H appy P rin ce looked quite dull and grey. He brought leaf after leaf
o f the fine gold to the poor, and th e c h ild re n 's faces grew rosier, and
they laughed and played gam es in th e street. "We have bread now!"
they cried.
T h en the snow cam e, and after the snow was the frost. The
streets looked as if they were m ade o f silver, they were so bright and
11
glistening; everybody w alked about in furs, and the little boys wore
scarlet caps and skated on the ice.
The p o o r little Swallow grew co ld er and colder, but he would
n o t leave th e P rin ce, he loved him too m uch. H e picked up crum bs
outside the b ak er's door, w hen the b ak er was not looking, and tried
to keep h im self w arm by flapping his wings.
But at last he knew th a t he was going to die. H e had ju st
en o u g h stren g th to fly up to th e P rin c e 's sh o u ld er once m ore.
"G o o d -b y e, d ear Prince!" he said. "W ill you let me kiss your hand?"
"I am glad th a t you are going to E gypt at last, little Swallow,"
said the Prince. "You have stayed too long here; but you m ust kiss
m e on the lips, for I love you."
"It is not to Egypt th a t I am going," said the Swallow. "I am
going to th e H ouse o f D eath. D eath is th e bro th er o f Sleep, is he
n o t?"
A nd he kissed the H appy P rince on the lips and fell dow n dead
at his feet.
At th a t m o m e n t a curious crack sounded inside the statue as if
som ething had broken. The fact was th a t the leaden heart had broken
in t w o .12 It certainly was a dreadfully h ard frost.
Early the next m orning the M ayor was w alking in the square
below w ith th e Tow n C ouncillors. As they passed the colum n, he
looked up at th e statue: "D ear me! H ow shabby the H appy P rince
looks!" he said.
"H ow shabby, indeed!" cried the Town C ouncillors w ho always
agreed w ith the M ayor, and they w ent up to look at it.
"The ruby has fallen out o f his sword, his eyes are gone, and
he is golden no longer," said the M ayor, "in fact, he is little b etter
th a n a beggar!"
"L ittle b etter th a n a beggar," echoed the Tow n C ouncillors.
"And here is actually a dead bird at his feet!" continued the
M ayor. "We m ust issue a p roclam ation th at birds are not to be allowed
to die h ere." And the Town Clerk m ade a note o f the suggestion.
So they pulled dow n the statue o f the Happy Prince.
"As he is no longer beautiful, he is no longer useful," said the
A rt Professor at the University.
T hen they m elted the statue in a furnace, and the M ayor
held a m eeting o f the C orp o ratio n to decide w hat was to be done
w ith th e m etal. "We m ust have an o th er statue, o f course," he said,
"and it shall be a statue o f myself."
12
"O f myself," re p e a te d e a c h o f th e T o w n C o u n c illo rs , a n d th e y
quarrelled. W h e n I last h e a r d o f t h e m , th e y were still quarrelling.
"W hat a strange th in g !" said th e supervisor of th e w o rk m e n .
"T his b r o k e n lead h e a rt will n o t m e lt in th e furnace. W e m u st th ro w
it away." So th e y threw it in a pile of dust w here th e d e a d Swallow
was also lying.
"Bring m e th e two m ost p r e c io u s th ings in t h e city," said G o d
to one o f H is Angels, a n d th e Angel b r o u g h t H i m th e le ad e n h e a rt
a n d th e d e a d bird.
"You have rightly c h o s e n , " said G o d , "for in my g a rd e n of
Paradise th is little bird shall sing for ev e rm o re , a n d in m y city of
gold th e H a p p y P r in c e shall praise m e ."

Commentary
1 fin e gold — зо л о т о в ы с о к о й п р о б ы
Charity Children — п р и ю т с к и е д е ти ; их обуч ал и в ш к о л е д л я
б е д н ы х д е т е й , к о т о р а я с о д е р ж а л а с ь н а б л а г о т в о р и т е л ь н ы е сред­
ства
3
I am o ff to the Pyramids. — Я лечу к п и р а м и д а м . ( И м е ю т с я в
виду п и р а м и д ы в Е г и п т е .)
4
the Palace o f Sans-Souci (sans souci (фр.) — б е з з а б о т н ы й ) — С а н -
Суси, д в о р е ц в стиле б а р о к к о , п о с т р о е н н ы й в П о тс д ам е в
1747 году п р у с с к и м к о р о л е м Ф р и д р и х о м , к о т о р о г о н а з ы в а л и
ф и л о с о ф о м из С а н - С у с и
a n d happy, indeed, I was, i f pleasure be happiness — и я д е й с т в и ­
т е л ь н о бы л с ч а с т л и в , е с л и т о л ь к о в н а с л а ж д е н и я х счастье
I cannot choose but weep — зд. я не м огу у д е р ж а ть ся от слез
7
W hat! Is he not solid gold?— А, т а к он не весь зо л о т о й ?
M e m n o n — М е м н о н , согласно древн егреческой м и ф о л о ги и ,
царь Э ф и о п и и в Т р о я н с к о й вой н е, сраж ался против греков и
бы л у б и т А х и л л е с о м . Е го м а т ь Э о с , б о г и н я у т р е н н е й з а р и ,
вы м о л и л а у Зевса бессмертие для М е м н о н а . И м е н е м М е м н о н а
г р е к и н а з в а л и статую Е г и п е т с к о г о ф а р а о н а А м е н х о т е п а I I I в
Ф и в а х ; п р и восходе с о л н ц а о н а и з д а в а л а ж а л о б н ы й звук , н а п о ­
м и н а ю щ и й ч е л о в е ч е с к и й голос; с ч и т а л о с ь , что т а к М е м н о н п р и ­
ветствует Э о с .
9
Heave a-hoy! (мор.) — Взяли!
13
10 the Temple o f Baalbec — хр ам в Б а а л ь б е к е . Б а а л ь б е к — и з в е с ­
т н ы й в д р е в н о с т и город в Л и в а н е , к о т о р ы й п р и о б р е л особое
з н а ч е н и е во в р е м е н а р и м с к о г о в л а д ы ч е с т в а ; в н е м с о х р а н и л и с ь
о с т а т к и з а м е ч а т е л ь н ы х с о о р у ж е н и й , с р е д и н и х р а з в а л и н ы ог­
р о м н о го храма Ю пи тера.
people always think that gold can m ake them happy — зд. л ю д и
всегда д у м а ю т , что зо л о т о м о ж е т с д ел а ть их с ч а с т л и в ы м и
The fa c t was that the leaden heart had broken in two. — Д е л о бы ло
в т о м , что о л о в я н н о е с е р д ц е р а с к о л о л о с ь .

Exercises

Ш R eadin g Com prehension

1 Re-arrange the sentences from the tale in the right order.

1 T h e statue o f th e H a p p y P r in c e was m u c h a d m ir e d in th e
city.
T h is ti m e t h e H a p p y P r i n c e w a n t e d to help t h e p o o r
y o u n g po et.
T h e Swallow p ro m ise d t h e H a p p y P rin c e to r e t u r n in spring
a n d brin g b a c k from Egypt two beautiful jewels to replace
th o s e th e P r in c e h a d given away.
B ut t h e H a p p y P rin c e asked th e Swallow to stay one night
longer.
T h e Swallow agreed to stay a n d be his messenger.
All t h e day t h e Swallow flew, a n d at nig ht he arrived at
t h e city a n d d e c id e d to settle b e t w e e n t h e feet o f th e
H a p p y P r in c e .
W hen they saw the dead bird at th e feet of th e statue they
issued a p r o c la m a tio n t h a t birds were n o t allowed to die there.
But at last he knew he was going to die.
T h e p o o r little Swallow grew c o ld e r a n d colder, b u t he
w o u ld n o t leave th e P rin c e .
T h e y m e lte d t h e statu e in a furnace.
H e kissed t h e H a p p y P r in c e o n th e lips a n d fell d o w n dea d
at his feet.

14
W hen th e M ayor and the Tow n C ouncillors saw the shabby-
looking statue o f th e P rin ce, they decided to pull it down.
The lead en h eart w ould n o t m elt in the furnace; so they
threw it in the dust.
The H appy P rince asked th e Swallow to stay one night
longer and be his m essenger.
The H appy P rince asked the Swallow to pick out the great
ruby from his sword and pass it to th e boy and his m other.
The H appy P rin ce asked th e Swallow to stay w ith him one
night longer and the Swallow agreed again.
The H appy P rince asked him to pluck out one o f his eyes
w hich w ere m ade o f rare sapphires.
H e asked him to pluck out his o th er eye and bring it to the
girl w ho sold m atches.
The little Swallow agreed again and flew w ith it to the
girl.
The little Swallow stayed b eh in d his friends.

2 Answer the following questions.

1) W hat rem arks did th e people m ake about the statue o f the
H appy Prince?
2) W hy did the Swallow stay beh in d w hile his friends flew
away to Egypt?
3) W here did the Swallow decide to stay for the night and
w hat did he th in k about the place?
4) W hat kind o f story did th e H appy P rince tell the Swallow
about himself?
5) W ho gave the statue th e nam e o f the H appy P rince and
why?
6) W hy was th e H appy P rince weeping?
7) W hy did th e H appy P rin ce ask the Swallow to be his
m essenger?
8) W hom did the H appy P rin ce w ant to give away his ruby
and why?
9) W hom did the Happy Prince have to give away his sapphires?
10) W hy d id n 't the Swallow hurry to leave the H appy Prince?
11) W hat did the Swallow see in strange lands?
12) W hat did th e Swallow see w hen he flew over the great
city?
15
13) W h y did th e M a y o r a n d th e T ow n C o u n c illo rs dec id e to
pull dow n th e statue?
14) W h a t did th e Angel ch o o se as th e m o s t p r e c io u s thin gs in
th e city a n d why?

Vocabulary an d G ra m m a r Tasks

1 Find in the tale the English for:

п р е к р а с н ы й к а к ф л ю г е р - п е т у х ; п р о с л ы т ь за т о н к о г о це­
н и те л я искусств; требовать н ев о зм о ж н о го ; увлечься чем -
л и б о , к е м -л и б о ; н и зк о п о к л о н и т ь с я ; ухаж ивание; стран­
н а я п р и в я з а н н о с т ь ; в о з л ю б л е н н а я ; п р и г о т о в и т ь с я к чем у -
либо; чистое золото; делать зам ечан и е; п р о я в л е н и е
н е п о ч т и т е л ь н о с т и ; алы й к а к гранат; стары й к а к м ир;
ч е р н ы й к а к ч е р н о е д е р е в о ; с р а ж а т ь с я с к е м - л и б о ; и зд а т ь
п о с т а н о в л е н и е ; согреваться че м -л и б о ; зан ести предложе­
ние в книгу

2 Complete the chart of the nationality words in the following order:


country — adjective — person — nation.

Russia Russian a Russian the Russians

Egypt

England

Ireland

Wales

Scotland

France

G reece

Spain

16
3 Complete the words in each sentence by adding the correct prefix
meaning "not": un-, in-, il-, im-, ir-.

1) It is m ost fortunate th a t I was n o t inform ed about it


earlier.
2) W e've b een very lucky w ith th a t car — it's always
breaking down.
3) He m ay com e, but it's very_____likely.
4) It's legal to park y o u r car here.
5) U sing o th er people for y our ow n profit is m oral.
6) It was rath er polite o f you not to w rite and th an k the
hosts.
7) You are asking me to do the____ possible.
8) It was a detail w hich seem ed significant at the tim e
b u t later proved to be crucial.
9) India becam e d ep en d en t o f B ritain in 1947.
10) She dislikes w orking such regular hours.

4 W rite in the plural form of the nouns in brackets.

1) They have got five . (child)


2) W hen he fell over, he broke tw o o f his .
(to o th )
3) W e n eed som e m ore . (knife)
4) T he cat is h u n tin g for tw o at once.
(m o u se )
5) You should have w ritten about it for our
staff, ( m e m o ra n d u m )
6) W hat are the m ain in nature? (phenom e-
non)
7) W e caught three little there, (fish)
8) These are too small for me. They hurt
my . (shoe; foot)
9) Do you know these over there? (person)
10) are th o u g h t o f as ra th e r silly anim als.
(S heep)
11) The gown was em broidered for the loveliest o f the Q ueen's
_________________ . (m aid -o f-h o n o ur)

17
5 Identify the kind of phrase. W rite "C " if the italicised phrase is a
comparative, " S " if the phrase is a superlative, and "E " if the phrase
is an expression of equality or inequality.

1) The Swallow was in love w ith the m ost beautiful Reed.

2) He is as beautiful as a weathercock. _______


3) The R eed m ade the m ost graceful curtseys. ________
4) The satin gown is for the loveliest o f the Q u een’s m aids-of-
honour to w e a r._______
5) The sapphire shall be as blue as the g rea t sea.________
6) The ruby shall be redder than a rose.________
7) The ch ild ren 's faces grew rosier. ________
8) He to ld h im o f th e S phinx w ho is a s o ld a s the w o r ld itself.

9) He to ld him o f the K ing o f the M o u n tain s o f the M oon


w ho is as black as ebony.________
10) T here is no M ystery so g reat as M isery. _______
11) The p o o r little Swallow grew colder a n d colder. ________
12) In fact he is little better than a beggar.______
13) Bring me the the two m ost precious things in the city._______

6 Fill in the blanks with correct prepositions.

1) The M ath em atical M aster d id n 't approve______ children


dream ing.
2) All the day the Swallow flew, and night he arrived
________ th e city.
3) As he was p utting his head his w ing, a large drop
o f w ater fell_________ him .
4) The little Swallow was filled__________pity.
5 )__________ Egypt the sun is w arm , and the crocodiles lie
________ the m ud and look lazily.
6) All the day he sat_________ the P rin ce's shoulder, and told
him stories__________ w hat he had seen__________ strange
lands.
7) He kissed the H appy P rince_________ the lips and fell down
dead_________ his feet.
8) Early next m orn in g th e M ayor was w alking__________ the
square below ________ Tow n C ouncillors.
18
9) The Tow n Clerk m ade a note__________ the suggestion.
10) They m elted the statue__________a furnace, and the M ayor
h eld a m eeting__________ the C orporation.

7 Find these words and phrases in the text, and notice the way in which
they are used. In each case circle a), b) or c) to show which one you
think is the best equivalent of the italicised word.

1) "the flu tte r o f th e b ird 's w ings"


a) agitatio n
b) trem b le
c) m o tio n

2) "hauling big boxes o u f


a) dragging out
b) carrying on
c) pulling out

3) "pluck out my oth er eye"


a) take off
b) pull out
c) gather

4) "starving children"
a) hungry and thirsty
b) sick
c) dying of h unger

5) "issue a proclam ation"


a) w rite a regulation
b) p roduce an official statem ent
c) give a public o rder

6) "pulled dow n the statue"


a) rem ove
b) destroy
c) ruin

7) "have been trifling w ith m e"


a) have been neglecting
b) have been jo k in g
c) have been playing th e fool
19
8) "cooing to e a c h o th e r"
a) taking care
b) m a k in g soft lovely noises
c) conso ling

8 Translate the following sentences into English.

1) Г о р о д с к о й С о в е т н и к ж а ж д а л п р о с л ы т ь за т о н к о г о
ц е н и т е л я и ск у сс тв .
2) П р о л е т а я над г о р о д с к и м и т р у щ о б а м и , Л а с т о ч к а уви­
д е л а с т ар ы х ев р ее в , к о т о р ы е з а к л ю ч а л и м ежду с о б о й
с д е л к и и в з в е ш и в а л и м о н е т ы н а м е д н ы х весах.
3) П р о ф е с с о р о р н и т о л о г и и н а п е ч а т а л об у в и д е н н о м п р о ­
с т р а н н о е п и с ь м о в м е с т н о й газете.
4) Л а с т о ч к а п р о б р а л а с ь в к а м о р к у и п о л о ж и л а р у б и н на
стол р я д о м с н а п е р с т к о м ш в е и .
5) Л а с т о ч к а п о с е т и л а все п а м я т н и к и и до л г о с и д е л а на
ш пиле соборной колокольни.
6) Г л аза С ч а с т л и в о г о П р и н ц а б ы л и с д е л а н ы из р е д к о с т ­
н ы х с а п ф и р о в , п р и в е з е н н ы х из И н д и и т ы с я ч у л ет н а­
зад.
7) Л а с т о ч к а п о о б е щ а л а П р и н ц у в е р н у т ь с я в е с н о й и п р и ­
н е с т и из Е г и п т а дв а д р а г о ц е н н ы х к а м н я вм е с т о тех,
к о т о р ы е он отдал.
8) Ц е л ы й д е н ь Л а с т о ч к а с и д е л а у н его н а п л е ч е и р а с с к а ­
з ы в а л а о т о м , что в и д е л а в д а л е к и х странах.
9) Б е д н а я Л а с т о ч к а м е р з л а все с и л ь н е е и с и л ь н е е , но не
хотела п о к и д а т ь П р и н ц а , т а к к а к о ч е н ь л ю б и л а его.
10) Г о р о д с к о й С о в е т р е ш и л и зд а т ь у к аз, з а п р е щ а ю щ и й
п т и ц а м у м и р а т ь н а э т о м м есте.

D iscussion Tasks

1 D iscuss the following.

1) P rov e t h a t t h e H a p p y P r in c e was c o m p a s s i o n a t e a n d
u n d e r s t o o d th e needs o f th e poor.
2) F i n d som e facts in th e tale to show th a t th e Swallow loved
th e H a p p y P rin c e .

20
3) W ho do you feel m ost sorry for at th e end o f the tale: the
H appy P rince or th e Swallow? W hy?
4) D iscuss the m oral o f the tale.
THE NIGHTINGALE AND THE ROSE

"She said th a t she w ould dance w ith m e, if I brought her red


roses," cried the young S tudent, "but in all my garden there is no red
rose."
F rom h e r nest in th e O ak-tree the N ightingale heard him ,
and she looked out th ro u g h the leaves and w ondered.
"N o t a single red rose in all my garden!" the young m an
cried, and his beautiful eyes filled w ith tears. "Ah, on w hat little
thin g does my happiness depend! I have read all the books the wise
m en have w ritten, and all the secrets o f philosophy are m ine, but I
feel unhappy because I can n o t find a red rose for my love."
"H ere is a true lover at last," th o u g ht the N ightingale. "N ight
after night I sang o f him , th o u g h I knew him not; night after night
I told his story to the stars, and now I see him . H is hair is dark as
the h y acin th -blo sso m , and his lips are red as the rose o f his desire;
22
but passion has m ade his face like pale ivory, and sorrow has set her
seal u p o n his brow ."
"The P rin ce gives a ball to m o rro w n ig h t," said the young
Student, "and my love will be th ere. If I bring h er a red rose she
will dance w ith me till dawn. If I bring h er a red rose I shall hold
her in my arm s, and she will lean h er head u pon my shoulder, and
her h an d will be clasped in m ine. But th ere is no red rose in my
garden, so I shall sit lonely, and she will pass me by. She will take
no n o tice o f m e, and my h eart will break."
"H ere, indeed, is a true lover," said the Nightingale. "W hat I
sing of, he suffers;1 w hat is joy to m e, to him is pain. Surely love is a
wonderful thing. It is m ore precious than emeralds and dearer than fine
opals. Pearls and rubies cannot buy it, nor is it sold in the market place.
It may not be bought from m erchants, n o r can it be exchanged for gold."
"The m usician s will sit in th e ir gallery," co n tin u ed the young
Student, "and play u p o n th eir stringed in strum ents, and my love
will dance to the sound o f the harp and the violin. She will dance
so lightly th a t h e r feet will not to u c h th e floor, and she will be
surrounded by courtiers in th e ir fine dresses. But w ith me she will
not dance, for I have no red rose to give her," and he fell dow n on
the grass, b uried his face in his h ands and began to cry.
"Why is he w eeping?" asked a little G reen Lizard, as he ran
past th e S tudent w ith his tail in th e air.
"W hy, in d eed ?" said a Butterfly, w ho was fluttering about
after a sunbeam .
"W hy, in d e e d ? " w h isp ered a D aisy to his n e ig h b o u r in a
soft, low voice.
"H e is w eeping because o f a red ro se," said the N ightingale.
"A red rose?" they cried. "H ow very ridiculous!" A nd the little
L izard, w ho was som ething o f a cynic, burst out laughing.
B ut the N ightingale u n d ersto o d th e secret o f the S tudent's
sorrow , and she sat silent in the O ak-tree, and th ought about the
m ystery of Love.
Suddenly she spread h er brow n wings for flight, and flew into
the air. She passed th ro u g h th e grove like a shadow , and like a
shadow she sailed across the garden.
In th e cen tre o f the grass-plot th ere was a beautiful R o se-tree,
and, w hen she saw it, she flew over tow ards it.
"G ive m e a red rose," she cried, "and I will sing you my
sweetest song."
23
B ut the Tree shook its head.
"M y roses are w h ite," it answ ered, "as w hite as the foam o f the
sea, and w h iter th an the snow u p o n the m ountain. But go to my
b ro th e r w ho grows round th e old sundial, and, perhaps, he will give
you w hat you w ant."
So the N ightingale flew over to th e R ose-tree th at was growing
round the sundial.
"G ive me a red ro se," she cried, "and I will sing you my
sweetest song."
"My roses are yellow ," it answ ered, "yellow as the h air o f the
m erm aid, w ho sits u p o n an am ber th ro n e; and yellow er th a n the
daffodil th a t bloom s in th e m eadow before the m ow er com es w ith
his scythe. But go to my b ro th e r w ho grows b en eath the S tudent's
w indow , and, perh ap s, he will give you w hat you w ant."
So the N ightingale flew over to the R ose-tree th at was growing
b en eath the S tu d en t's window.
"G ive m e a red rose," she pleaded, "and I will sing you my
sweetest song."
B ut the Tree shook its head.
"My roses are red," it answered, "as red as the feet of doves, and
redder than the great fans o f coral in the ocean cavern. But the w inter
has chilled my veins, and the frost has nipped my buds, and the storm
has broken my branches, and I shall have no roses at all this year."
"O ne red rose is all I w an t," cried the N ightingale, "only one
red rose! Is th ere any way by w hich I can get it?"
"There is a w ay," answ ered the Tree, "but it is so terrible th at
I dare not tell it to you."
"Tell it to m e," said the N ightingale, "I am not afraid."
"If you w ant a red rose," said the Tree, "you m ust build it out
o f m usic by m o o n lig h t, and stain it w ith yo u r own heart-b lo o d .
You m ust sing to m e w ith y o u r breast against a th o rn . All night
long you m ust sing to m e, and the th o rn m ust reach yo u r h eart, and
y o u r lifeblood m ust flow into my veins, and becom e m ine."
"D e a th is a great price to pay for a red ro se ," cried the
N ightingale, "and Life is very dear to all. It is pleasant to sit in the
green w ood, and to w atch the Sun in his chariot o f gold, and the
M o o n in h er chariot o f pearl. Sweet is the scent o f the h a w th o rn ,2
and sweet are the b lu eb ells3 th at hide in the valley, and the h e a th e r4
th at blows on th e hill. Yet Love is b e tte r th an Life, and w hat is the
heart o f a bird com pared to the h eart o f a m an?"
24
So she spread h er brow n w ings for flight, and flew into the
air. She swept over the garden like a shadow , and like a shadow
she sailed th ro u g h the grove.
The young Student was still lying on the grass, w here she had
left him , and th e tears w ere not yet dry in his beautiful eyes.
"Be h ap p y ," cried the N ig h tin g ale, "be happy; you shall have
your red rose. I will build it out o f m usic by m oonlight, and stain it
w ith my ow n h eart-b lo o d . All th a t I ask o f you in re tu rn is th at you
will be a true lover. F or Love is w iser th a n Philosophy, though he
is w ise, and m ig h tier th an Pow er, th o u g h he is m ighty. H is wings
are flam e-co lo u red , and his body is coloured like a flame. H is lips
are sweet as honey, and his b reath is like frankincense."
The S tudent looked up from th e grass, and listened, but he
could not u n d erstan d w hat th e N ightingale was saying to him , for
he only knew th e things th a t are w ritten dow n in books.
B ut th e O ak-tree u n d ersto o d , and felt sad, for he was very
fond o f the little N igh tin g ale, w ho had built h er nest in his branches.
"Sing me one last song," he w hispered. "I shall feel lonely
w hen you are gone."
So th e N ightingale sang to th e O ak -tree, and her voice was
like bubbling water.
W hen she finished h er song, the Student got up, and pulled
a noteb o o k and a lead p encil out of his pocket.
"She is graceful," he said to himself, as he w alked away through
the grove, "th at can n o t be denied; but has she got feeling? I am
afraid not. In fact, she is like m ost artists; she is all style w ithout any
sincerity. She only thinks o f m usic, and everybody know s th a t the
arts are selfish. Still, it m ust be adm itted th a t she has som e beautiful
notes in h er voice. W hat a pity it is th a t they do n o t m ean anything,
or do any p ractical good!" And he w ent into his room , and lay down
on his little p allet-b ed , and began to th in k o f his love; and, after a
tim e he fell asleep.
A nd w hen th e m o o n shone in the sky the N ightingale flew to
the R o se -tre e , and set h er breast against the thorn. All night long
she sang, w ith h er breast against the th o rn , and the cold crystal
m o o n leaned dow n and listened. All night long she sang, and the
th o rn w ent d e e p e r and d eep er in h e r b reast, and h er lifeblood
ebbed away from her.
She sang first of the b irth of love in the heart o f a boy and a
girl. And on th e top o f the R ose-tree blossom ed a m arvellous rose,
25
petal following p etal, as song followed song. Pale was it, at first, as
th e m ist th a t hangs over the river; pale as the feet o f the m orning,
and silver as the w ings o f the dawn. Pale as the shadow o f a rose in
a m irro r o f silver, as the shadow o f a rose in a w ater-p o o l, so was
the rose th a t blossom ed on the top o f the Tree.
But the T ree cried to the N ightingale to press closer against
the th o rn . "Press closer, little N ig h tin g ale," cried the T ree, "or the
Day will com e before th e rose is finished."
So th e N ightingale pressed closer against the th o rn , and louder
and louder grew h er song, for she sang o f the birth o f the passion in
the soul o f a m an and a young w om an.
And a delicate flush o f pink cam e into the leaves o f the rose,
like the flush in the face o f the bridegroom , w hen he kisses the lips
o f th e bride. B ut the th o rn had n o t yet reached her heart, so the
rose's h eart rem ain ed w hite, for only the blood from a N ightingale's
heart can crim son the h eart o f a rose.
And th e Tree cried to the N ightingale to press closer against
the thorn. "Press closer, little N ig h tin g ale," cried the T ree, "or the
Day will com e before the rose is finished."
So th e N ightingale pressed closer against the th o rn , and the
th o rn to u ch ed h er heart, and a sudden feeling o f pain shot through
her. B itter, b itte r was the p ain , and w ilder and w ilder grew her
song, for she sang o f the Love th a t is perfected by D eath, o f the
Love th a t dies n o t in the tom b.
And the m arvellous rose becam e crim son, like the rose o f the
eastern sky. C rim son was th e girdle o f petals, and crim son as a ruby
was the heart.
B ut the N ig h tin g ale's voice grew fainter, and h er little wings
began to beat, and h er eyes grew dim . F ain ter and fainter grew her
song, and she felt th a t could no longer breathe.
Then she gave one last burst o f music. The w hite M oon heard it,
and she forgot the dawn, and still rem ained in the sky. The red rose
heard it, and it trem bled all over w ith ecstasy, and opened its petals to
the cold m orning air. E cho carried it to h er purple cavern in the hills,
and woke the sleeping shepherds from their dreams. It floated through
the reeds o f the river, and they carried its message to the sea.
"Look, look!" cried the Tree. "The rose is finished now ," but
th e N ightingale m ade no answer, for she was lying dead in the long
grass, w ith th e th o rn in h er heart.
A nd at n o o n the S tudent opened his w indow and looked out.
26
"W hy, w h a t a w o n d e rfu l p ie c e o f luck!" he cried. " H e r e is a
red rose! I have n e v e r se en an y rose like it in all m y life. It is so
beautiful t h a t I a m sure it has a lo n g L a t i n n a m e , " a n d h e le a n e d
d o w n a n d p lu c k e d it.
T h e n h e p u t o n his h a t, a n d r a n u p to t h e P ro fesso r's h o u se
w ith t h e rose in his h a n d .
T h e d a u g h t e r o f t h e P ro fe ss o r was sitting in t h e doorw ay,
w in d in g b lu e silk o n a reel, a n d h e r little d og was lying at h e r feet.
"Y ou said y o u w o u ld d a n c e w ith m e if I b r o u g h t y o u a red
r o s e ," crie d t h e S tu d e n t. " H e r e is t h e re d d e s t rose in all t h e world.
Y o u will w e a r it t o n i g h t next to y o u r h e a r t, a n d as we d a n c e to g e th e r ,
it will tell y o u h o w I love y o u ."
B ut t h e girl frowned.
"I a m afraid, it will n o t go w ith m y dress," she answ e re d,
" a n d , besides, t h e C h a m b e r l a i n ' s n e p h e w has s e n t m e s o m e real
jewels, a n d everybody knows t h a t jewels cost far m o r e t h a n flowers."
"W ell, u p o n m y w o rd , y o u a re very u n g r a t e f u l ," said t h e
S tu d e n t angrily; a n d h e th r e w t h e rose in to t h e street, w h e re it fell
in to t h e g u tte r , a n d a c a r tw h e e l w e n t over it.
" U n g r a te f u l!" cried t h e girl. "I tell y ou w h a t, y o u are very
r u d e ; a n d , after all, w h o are you? O nly a S tu d e n t. W hy, I d o n ' t
believe you have even got silver b u ck les to y o u r shoes, u n lik e t h e
C h a m b e r l a i n ' s n e p h e w ," a n d she got u p from h e r c h a ir a n d w e n t
in to t h e h o u se .
"W h a t a silly t h in g Love is!" said t h e S t u d e n t as he w alked
away. " I t is n o t h a l f as useful as L ogic, for it do es n o t p rov e an y th in g .
It is always telling o n e of th in g s t h a t are n o t going to h a p p e n , a n d
m a k in g o n e b elieve th in g s t h a t are n o t tr u e . I n fact, it is q u ite
u n p r a c t i c a l , a n d , in th is age to b e p r a c t i c a l is everything, I shall go
b a c k to P h ilo s o p h y a n d study M e ta p h y s ic s ."
So he r e t u r n e d to his r o o m a n d p u lle d o u t a great dusty b o o k ,
a n d b e g a n to read.

Commentary

1 what I sing of, he suffers — то, о ч е м я л и ш ь п о ю , он п е р е ж и в а е т


на деле
2
hawthorn (бот.) — б о я р ы ш н и к
27
3
bluebell (бот.) — к о л о к о л ь ч и к
heather (бот.) — в е р е с к
I am afraid, it will not go with m y dress — Б о ю с ь , о н а (р о за) не
п о д о й д е т к м о е м у п л ат ью

Exercises

ш R eading Com prehension

1 Read the tale again and complete the following sentences.

1) T h e re is no rose in m y g ard e n , so_________________

2) I feel u n h a p p y b ecause_____________________________________

3) T h e w in te r has chilled m y veins, th e s to r m has b r o k e n


m y b r a n c h e s , a n d __________________________________________

4) T h e S tu d e n t c o u l d n 't u n d e r s t a n d w h a t t h e N ig h tin g a le
was saying, for_____________________________________________

5) T h e N ig h tin g a le m a d e no answer, for____________________

6) W h e n t h e S tu d e n t r a n to t h e Professor's h o u se w ith th e
rose, his ladylove__________________________________________

7) T h e S tu d e n t th re w th e rose in to th e gutter, b e c a u s e _______

8) Love is n o t h alf as useful as Logic, for___________________

2 Answer the following questions.

1) W h a t did t h e N ig h tin g a le h e a r from h e r nest in th e O ak-


tree ?
2) W h e r e did th e N ig h tin g a le fly to look for th e red rose?
28
3) W h a t did the R ose-tree ask th e N ightingale for th e red rose?
4) W h a t did th e N ig h tin g a le sacrifice to help th e S tu d e n t
a n d w h y?
5) W h a t did th e N ig h tin g a le sing o f a n d how did she sing?
6) H o w did his ladylove m e e t th e S tu d e n t w h e n he c a m e to
h e r w ith th e red rose?
7) W here did th e S tudent th ro w th e red rose an d w hat h a p p e n e d
to it?
8) W h y did th e S tu d e n t go b a c k to P h ilosophy?

^ Vocabulary an d G ra m m a r Tasks

1 Find in the text the English for:

д а в а т ь бал; не за м е ч а т ь ; с т р у н н ы й м у з ы к а л ь н ы й ин ст р у­
м е н т ; бы ть о к р у ж е н н о й п р и д в о р н ы м и ; н а р я д н ы е одеж ды ;
несколько ск л о н н ы й к цинизм у; таинство лю бви; распра­
в и т ь к р ы л ь я д л я п о л ет а; к р о в ь в м о и х ж и л а х з а с т ы л а от
з и м н е й стужи; м о р о з п о б и л м о и п о ч к и ; д о р о г а я ц е н а за
к р а с н у ю розу; п р о с и т ь в з а м е н ; я р к о - а л о г о цве та; сид еть у
п о р о г а ; эта р о з а не п о д о й д е т к м о е м у п л а т ь ю ; в ы т а щ и т ь
большую зап ы л ен н у ю кн и гу

2 Complete the following adjectives by adding the correct prefix (ил-,


in- or im -) and put them in the appropriate column below.

happy, prac tica l, tr u e , definite,______ different,


c l e a r , ______ c o m m o n , ______fair,______ k i n d , ______ p l e a s a n t ,
p a tie n t, proper, attentive. co rrec t, co nstant,
grateful, lucky, co n v e n ie n t, personal, sincere

un- in- im -

29
3 Sometimes uncountable nouns are preceded by such noun phrases as a
bit of, a piece of, etc. Match the words on right side with those on the
left side as in the example.
1) a b ar of advice
2) a b it of bread
3) a cake of cake
4) a d rop of 1 ch o co late
5) a grain of glass
6) a loaf of ja m
7) a lum p of luck
8) a pane of news
9) a piece of oil
10) a piece of paper
11) a piece of sand
12) a pot of soap
13) a sheet of sugar

4 Fill in the blanks with correct prepositions.

1) She will take no n otice__________ me.


2) H is beautiful eyes were filled__________tears.
3) She will be surrounded__________ courtiers__________ th eir
fine dresses.
4) The N ightingale spread her brow n wings__________ flight.
5) You m ust sing_______ me w ith your_breast________the thorn.
6) D eath is a great price to pay__________ a red rose.
7) Life is dear_________ all.
8) All th a t I ask you_________ retu rn you will be a true lover.
9) H er little dog was lying_________ her feet.
10) He threw the rose__________the street.

5 Use the verbs in brackets in the Past Simple.

1) The N ightingale__________________ the secret o f S tudent's


sorrow , (u n d erstan d )
2) The N ightingale _________________ over the R ose-tree th at
ro u n d the sundial, (fly; grow)
3) The Y oung S tudent___________________still on the grass,
w hen she_______ h i m . (lie; leave)
4) He__________________ into his ro o m , and_________________
30
d o w n on his b ed , and after a tim e h e __________________
asleep, (go; lie; fall)
5) W h e n th e M o o n __________________ in the sky, th e N ightingale
_________________ to the R o s e -tre e , (shine; fly)
6) She___________________first o f th e b ir th o f love in th e h e a rt
o f a boy and a girl, (sing)
7) The w hite M o o n it, and she_________________
th e daw n , and still__________________ in th e sky. (hear; forget;
rem ain )
8) T he N i g h t i n g a l e no a n s w e r, fo r she
__________________ d e a d in th e long grass, (m ak e ; lie)
9) T h e d a u g h t e r o f th e P ro f e s s o r _____________________in th e
d o o r w a y ,___________________b lu e silk on a reel, an d h e r
little dog___________________at h e r feet, (sit; w ind ; lie)
10) H e______________________ th e rose in to th e street, w h e r e it
_______________________ in to t h e g u tte r , a n d a c a r t w h e e l
_____________________o v e r it. (throw ; fall; go)

6 Study the following comparative phrases, translate them into Russian.


Find out the sentences in the tale in which they are used. Make up
your own sentences.

d ark as th e h y a c in th b lo ss o m ; as red as the rose o f desire; m o r e


p r e c io u s ; d e a r e r t h a n fine opals; as w h ite as th e fo am o f the
sea; th e sw eetest song; as yellow as th e h a ir o f th e m e r m a id ; as
red as th e feet o f doves; r e d d e r t h a n th e g reat fans o f coral;
L o v e is w ise r th a n P h ilo s o p h y ; L ove is m ig h tie r t h a n P o w e r;
as sweet as h o n e y ; d e e p e r and d e e p e r in h e r breast; as p ale as
th e sh a dow o f th e rose; press closer; lo u d e r and lou d e r; w ild e r
and w ild er; fainter and fainter; th e red d e st rose

7 Explain the meanings of the italicised phrasal verbs in the following


sentences, use a dictionary if necessary.

1) She looked out th r o u g h th e leaves.


2) She p a sse d through th e grove like a shadow.
3) Y o u m u s t build it out o / m u s i c by m o o n lig h t.
4) T he S tu d e n t looked up from th e grass and listened.
5) T he S tu d e n t g o t up, an d p u lle d a n o te b o o k and a p en c il
out o / his pocket.

31
6) H e r lifeblood ebbed away from her.
7) H e p u t on his hat, a n d ran up to th e Professor's house .
8) I a m afraid, it will n o t go with m y dress.

Translate the following sentences into English.

1) Е го в о л о с ы б ы л и т е м н ы , к а к т е м н ы й г и а ц и н т , а губы
его к р а с н ы , к а к та р о з а , к о т о р у ю он и с к а л .
2) «Е сл и я п р и н е с у к р а с н у ю розу, о н а будет т а н ц е в а т ь со
м н о й до рас св ета » , — ш е п т а л Студент.
3) «В м о е м саду н е т к р а с н о й р о з ы , и м н е п р и д е т с я си ­
д е ть в о д и н о ч е с т в е » , — дум ал он.
4) О д и н т о л ь к о С о л о в е й п о н и м а л с т р а д а н и я Студента;
он тихо си д е л н а дубе и дум ал о т а и н с т в е л ю б в и .
5) С о л о в е й р а с п р а в и л с в о и т е м н ы е к р ы л ь я и в з в и л с я в
воздух.
6) С о л о в е й р е ш и л п р и н е с т и се б я в ж е р тву р а д и л ю б в и .
7) Всю н о ч ь С о л о в е й п ел , п р и ж а в ш и с ь грудью к ш и п у , и
х о л о д н а я л ун а, с к л о н и в с в о й л и к , сл уш а ла эту п е с н ю .
8) И стал а а л о й в е л и к о л е п н а я р о з а , п о д о б н о у т р е н н е й
за ре н а в о с т о к е .
9) « Б о ю с ь , что эта р о з а не п о д о й д е т к м о е м у п л атью », —
о т в е т и л а она.
10) «В л ю б в и и н а п о л о в и н у н е т т о й п о л ь з ы , к а к а я есть в
л о г и к е » , — р а з м ы ш л я л Студент.

Discussion Tasks

D iscuss the following.

1) D esc rib e t h e S tu d e n t's feelings to his ladylove.


2) Agree or disagree w ith th e N ig htingale: " D e a t h is a great
price for t h e rose."
3) P rove t h a t th e S tu d e n t's ladylove was selfish a n d d i d n 't
deserve such a sacrifice.
4) S peak ab o u t th e N ig h tin g a le a n d h e r great deed.
5) Discuss th e m o r a l o f th e tale.
THE SELFISH GIANT

Every afternoon, as they were com ing hom e from school, the
children used to go and play in the G iant's garden. It was a large lovely
garden, w ith soft green grass. H ere and there over the grass stood
beautiful flowers w hich were like stars. There were twelve peach-trees
that in the springtim e broke out into delicate blossoms of pink and pearl;
and in the autum n they gave rich fruit. The birds sat on the trees and
sang so sweetly that the children used to stop their games in order to
listen to them . "H ow happy we are here!" they cried to each other.
One day the G iant cam e back. H e had been to visit his friend,
and had stayed w ith him for seven years. After the seven years were
over, he m ade up his m ind to retu rn to his own castle. W hen he
arrived, he saw the children playing in the garden.
"W hat are y ou doing h ere?" he cried angrily, and the children
ran away.
33
"My ow n garden is my own g arden," said the G iant, "any one
can u n d erstan d th at, and I will allow nobody to play in it but myself."
So he built a high wall all round it, and put up a notice-board:

TRESPASSERS
WILL BE
PROSECUTED

He was a very selfish G iant.


The p o o r children had now now here to play. They tried to
play on th e road, but the road was very dusty and full o f hard stones,
and they did not like it. They used to w an der round the high walls,
w hen th e ir lessons w ere over, and talk about the beautiful garden
inside. "H ow happy we were there!" they said to each other.
Then th e Spring cam e, and all over the country there w ere
little blossom s and little birds. Only in the garden o f the Selfish
G ian t it was still w inter. The birds did not w ant to sing in it,1 as
th ere w ere no child ren , and the trees forgot to b lo sso m .2 O nce a
beautiful flower put its head out from the grass. W hen it saw the
n o tice-b o ard , it was so sorry for the children th at it slipped back into
the ground again and w ent off to sleep. The only creatures w ho were
pleased w ere the Snow and the Frost. "Spring has forgotten this
g arden," they cried, "so we will live here all the year round." The
Snow covered the grass w ith his great w hite cloak, and the Frost
p ain ted all th e trees silver. Then they invited the N o rth W ind to stay
w ith th em , and he cam e. H e was w rapped in furs, and he roared all
day about th e g arden, and blew th e chim neys down. "T his is a
delightful p la c e ," he said, "we m ust ask th e H ail on a visit." So the
H ail cam e. Every day for three hours he rattled on the ro o f o f the
castle till he broke m ost o f the slates, and th en he ran round and
round the garden as fast as he could go. He was dressed in grey, and
his b reath was as cold as ice.
"I ca n n o t u n d erstan d why the Spring is so late in com ing,"
said th e Selfish G iant, as he sat at th e w indow and looked out at his
cold, w hite garden. "I hope there will be a change in the w eather."
B ut the Spring never cam e, n o r did the Sum m er. The A utum n
gave golden fruit to every garden, except for the G ia n t's garden.
"H e is too selfish," she said. So it was always w inter th e re , and the
N o rth W ind and th e H ail, and th e Frost, and the Snow danced
about through the trees.
34
One m orning th e G iant was lying awake in bed, w hen he heard
some lovely m usic. It sounded so sweet to his ears th at he thought it
m ust be the K in g 's m usicians passing by. It was really only a little
linnet singing outside his window. But it was so long, since he had
heard a bird sing in his garden that it seem ed to him to be the m ost
beautiful m usic in the world. Then the H ail stopped dancing over his
head, and the N o rth W ind stopped roaring, and a delicious perfume
cam e to him through the open window. "I believe the Spring has
com e at last," said the G iant; and he ju m p e d out o f bed and looked
out.
W hat did he see?
H e saw a m ost w onderful sight. T h rough a little hole in
th e w all th e c h ild re n had crep t in, and they w ere sitting in the
b ra n c h e s o f th e trees. In every tree th a t he could see th e re was a
little child. A nd th e trees w ere so glad to have the c h ild re n back
again th a t they h ad covered th em selv es w ith b lo sso m s, and w ere
w aving th e ir b ra n c h e s gently above th e c h ild r e n 's h ead s. The
b ird s w ere flying ab o u t and tw itte rin g w ith delight. The flowers
w ere lo o k in g up th ro u g h th e green grass and laughing. It was a
lovely scene. Only in one c o rn e r it w as still w in ter. It w as the
farth est c o rn e r o f th e g ard en , and in it was stan d in g a little boy.
He w as so sm all th a t he co u ld n o t re a c h up to the b ra n c h e s o f the
tree. H e was w a n d e rin g all ro u n d it, crying bitterly . The p o o r
tre e w as still co v ered w ith frost and snow. The N o rth W ind was
blo w in g and ro a rin g above it. "C lim b u p , little boy!" said the
T ree, and it b e n t its b ra n c h e s dow n as low as it co u ld ; b u t th e boy
w as too tiny.
A nd th e G ia n t's heart m e lte d 3 as he looked out.
"H ow selfish I have been!" he said. "N ow I know why the
Spring w ould not com e here. I will put th at p o o r little boy on the
top o f the tree. T hen I will knock dow n the wall. My garden shall
be the c h ild re n 's playground for ever and e v e r.4" He was really very
sorry for w hat he had done.
So he opened th e front d oor quite softly, and w ent out into
the garden. B ut w h en the child ren saw him , they were so frightened
th a t they all ran away. And w in ter cam e again. Only the little boy
did n o t ru n , because his eyes w ere so full o f tears th a t he did n o t see
the G iant com ing. And the G iant cam e up behind him and took
him gently in his hand, and put him up into the tree. And the tree
broke at once into blossom . The birds cam e and sang on it. The

35
little boy stretched out his two arm s and flung them round the G ian t's
neck and kissed him . A nd the o th e r children, w hen they saw that
th e G ian t was n o t w icked any longer, cam e ru n n in g back. W ith
th em cam e the Spring.
"It is yo u r garden now , little ch ild ren," said the G iant, and
he knocked dow n the wall.
And w hen th e people w ere going to m arket, they found the
G ian t playing w ith ch ild ren in the m ost beautiful garden they had
ever seen.
All day long they played, and in the evening they cam e to the
G iant to say good-bye to him.
"But w here is y our little com panion?" he said. • "The boy I put
into th e tre e ." The G ian t loved him the best, because he had kissed
him .
"We d o n 't know ," answ ered the children, "he has gone away."
"You m ust tell him to be sure and com e to m orrow ," said the
G iant. But the child ren said th a t they did n o t know w here he lived,
and had never seen him before; and the G iant felt very sad.
Every afternoon, w h en school w as over, the ch ild ren cam e
and p layed w ith th e G iant. B ut th e little boy w hom th e G ian t
loved was n ever seen again. The G ian t was very kind to all the
ch ild ren , y et he longed for his first little friend, and often spoke of
h im .
"H ow I w ould like to see him !" he used to say.
Years w ent over, and G ian t grew very old and feeble. He
could not play w ith children any m o re, so he sat in a big arm chair,
and w atched the children at th e ir gam es, and adm ired his garden.
"I have m any beautiful flow ers," he said, "but the children are the
m ost beautiful flowers o f all."
O ne w inter m orning he looked out o f his w indow , as he was
dressing. He did n o t hate the W inter now , for he knew th a t it was
m erely the Spring asleep, and th a t the flowers w ere resting.
Suddenly he rubbed his eyes in surprise and looked and looked.
It certainly was a m arvellous sight. In the farthest corn er o f the
garden there was a tree quite covered w ith lovely w hite blossom s. Its
b ran ch es w ere golden, and silver fruit hung down from th em , and
u n d e rn e a th it stood th e little boy he loved.
D ow nstairs ran the G iant in great jo y , and out into the garden.
He hurried across the grass, and cam e n ear to the child. And w hen
he cam e quite close his face grew red w ith anger, and he said, "W ho
36
has d are d to w o u n d yo u ?" F o r o n th e p alm s o f th e ch ild 's h a n d s were
m arks from two nails, a n d th e m arks from two nails were on th e little
feet.
"W h o has d a r e d to w o u n d y o u ? " cried th e G i a n t . "Tell m e,
t h a t I m a y ta k e m y big sword a n d kill h i m . "
" N o , " answ e re d th e child, " b u t th e se are th e w o u n d s o f Love."
"W h o are y o u ? " said th e G i a n t , a n d a strange feeling fell on
h im , a n d he k n e lt before th e little child.
A n d t h e child smiled o n t h e G i a n t , a n d said to h im , "You let
m e play o n c e in y o u r g a r d e n , to d a y you shall c o m e w ith m e to my
g a r d e n , w h ic h is P a r a d ise ."
A n d w h e n t h e c h i ld r e n r a n in t h a t a f te rn o o n , th e y fo u n d th e
G i a n t lying d e a d u n d e r th e tr e e , all co vered w ith w hite blossom s.

Commentary

1 The birds did not want to sing in it — П т и ц ы не х о те л и р а с п е в а т ь


та м с в о и х п е с е н
2
the trees forgot to blossom — зд. д е р е в ь я т а к и н е р а с п у с т и л и с ь
the Giant's heart melted — с е р д ц е В е л и к а н а р а с т а я л о
M y garden shall be the children's playground fo r ever a n d ever. —
М о й сад н а в е к и в е ч н ы е с т а н е т м е с т о м д е т с к и х и гр.

Exercises

ш R eadin g Com prehension

1 Answer the following questions.

1) W h e re did the ch ild ren go on th e ir way bac k h o m e from


school?
2) W h a t did th e G i a n t see w h e n he c a m e b a c k h o m e from his
friend?
3) W hy did th e G i a n t get so angry a n d w hat m easures did he
ta ke?
37
4) W h y were t h e c h i ld r e n so u n h a p p y w h e n th e G i a n t h a d
forb id d e n t h e m to play in his g arden?
5) W h y did t h e Spring c o m e all over t h e c o u n t r y except th e
G i a n t 's g ard en?
6) W h a t did th e G i a n t h e a r lying awake in b e d a n d w h a t did
he see t h r o u g h th e o p e n w in d o w one m o r n in g ?
7) W h y was he awfully sorry for w h a t he h a d d o n e?
8) W h y were th e c h i ld r e n frigh tened at first w h e n th e y saw
th e G i a n t a n d w h e n did th e y r u n b a c k to his g arden?
9) W hy did t h e G i a n t long for his first little friend?
10) W h a t d id t h e G i a n t see in t h e farthest c o r n e r o f t h e
garden?

Vocabulary an d G ra m m a r Tasks

1 Find in the tex t the English for:

повесить объявление; правонаруш итель; наказы вать; про­


п о л з т и ; б ы ть з а к у т а н н ы м в меха; град; гро х о тат ь, гр ем ет ь;
р а с ц в е с т и ; щ е б е т а т ь , ч и р и к а т ь (о п т и ц а х ) ; п р о т я н у т ь р у к и ;
его с е р д ц е р а с т а я л о ; з л о й , н е х о р о ш и й ; п р о т е р е т ь глаза;
ладонь

2 Insert articles if necessary.

1) It was large lovely g arden.


2) In_______ a u t u m n _______ trees gave_______ rich fruit.
3) W h e n he arrived, he saw c h i ld r e n playing in______
g ard e n .
4) I h o p e t h e r e will b e _______ ch a n g e _in_______ w ea th er.
5) I believe_______ Spring has c o m e _at_______ last.
6 )_________ c h i l d r e n w ere sitting in________ b r a n c h e s of______
trees.
7) W h e n _______p eo p le were going to _______ m a rk e t, th e y found
______ G i a n t playing w ith ________ch ild re n .
8) It was_______ m o st beautiful g a r d e n th e y h a d ever seen.
9 )________ G i a n t loved his little c o m p a n i o n ________ best.
10)_______ G i a n t sat in big a r m c h a ir , a n d _w a tc h e d ______
c h i ld r e n at t h e i r games.

38
3 Complete these sentences by adding like or as.

1) T h e h o u s e is beautiful. It's a palac e.


2) B o b failed his driv ing test___________w e ex p ected.
3) K a te looks____________h e r m o th e r.
4 )_____________ I said y esterday, I 'm th in k in g o f going to C anada.
5) H e w o rk s in a b a n k , m o s t o f his friends.
6) W e did____________he suggested.
7) I n e v e r k n o w w h a t to do in situation s____________ this.
8) I'll ring y o u up t o m o r r o w evening____________ usual.
9) She is an excellent sw im m er. She sw ims____________a fish.
10) E very b o d y is ill at h o m e . O u r h o u se is___________ a hospital.
11) She h a s j u s t foun d a j o b ___________ a secretary.
12) W hy do y o u b eh a v e a child?

4 Complete these sentences by adding pronouns with -se lf (-selves) or


each other.

1) P e o p le give___________________ pr e s e n ts at C h ristm as.


2) D id y o u enjoy___________________ w h e n y o u w ere on h o lid a y
in Spain?
3) M a ry lo o k e d at___________________ in th e m irror.
4) L in d a an d T o m are h a p p y together. T hey love___________
__________ very m u c h .
5) T hey q u arrelled last w eek. T hey are still n o t speaking to

6) M e n are very selfish. T hey only t h in k o f ___________________ .


7) M a ry and I d o n 't see__________________ very often th ese days.
8) Y o u 'll h u rt___________________ if y o u play w ith th e scissors.
9) T he bride and the b rid eg ro o m held 's hands.
10) L e t 's go and w ash__________________ ..
11) T h e stu d e n ts in th e class to ld abo u t th e ir
o w n c o u n tries.
12) A re y o u very tired? Y o u d o n 't seem__________________ today.
13) H o w long have Ja n e an d J o h n k n o w n ___________________ ?

5 Choose the right word — adjective or adverb.

1) T h e m u s ic so u n d s____________________ to my ears, (sweet,


sw eetly)
39
2) D rive__________________ . (careful, carefully)
3) This soup tastes__________________ . (nice, nicely)
4) Tom cooks very__________. (good, well)
5) D o n 't go up the ladder. It d o e sn 't look__________________ .
(safe, safely)
6) We were relieved th at he arrived__________________ . (safe,
safely)
7) Do you feel___________________before the exam inations?
(nervous, nervously)
8) H urry up! Y ou're always so_________________ . (slow, slowly)
9) He looked at m e__________________ w hen I in terrupted him.
(angry, angrily)
10) The child ren behaved very_________________ . (good, well)
11) I trie d ___________________ to re m em b er his n am e b u t I
c o u ld n 't, (hard , h ardly)
12) The co m p an y 's financial situation is not_________________
at p resen t, (w ell, good)
13) Jack has started his ow n business. E verything is going
quite__________________ . (good, well)
14) D o n 't w alk so fast! C a n 't you w alk m ore_________________ ?
(slow, slowly)
15) W hat beautiful flowers! They smell_________________ . (nice,
n icely)

6 a) Find in the tale sentences with u sed to and translate them into
Russian.
b) Complete the sentences with u sed to + a verb.

1) The baby d o e sn 't cry so m u ch , but she_________________


every night.
2) She_________________ my best friend but we are n o t friends
any longer.
3) We live in M oscow now but we__________________ in Kiev.
4) N ow th e re is only one shop in the village b u t th e re
________________ three.
5) W hen I was a child I__________________ ice cream , but I
d o n 't like it now.
6) N ow Tom has got a car. He_________________ a m otorcycle.
7) T h e se d ays he d o e s n 't go away very o fte n b u t he
a lot.
40
8) Jane_________________long hair but she cut it some tim e ago.
9) The building is now a superm arket, but it_________________
a cin em a.
10) Jack d o e sn 't dance these days but a lot.
11) He__________________ beer. N ow he drinks w ine.
12) She does n o t w ork here now , but she________________
13) I__________________ to the cinem a a lot, b u t I never get
th e tim e now.
14) It__________________ th a t the E arth is flat.

7 Recall the situations in which these modal verbs were used. Translate
the sentences into Russian.

1) He ha d been to visit his friend.


2) A nyone can u n d erstan d th a t, I will allow nobody to play
in it b u t myself.
3) We m ust ask th e H ail on a visit.
4) I cannot u n d erstan d why the Spring is so late in com ing.
5) He th o u g h t it m ust be the K ing's m usicians passing by.
6) W ho has dared to w ound you?

8 Can you fill in the missing words?

1) He p u t up a n o tic e -b o a rd : "__________________ w ill be


prosecuted."
2) The Snow covered the grass w ith great w hite_______________,
and the Frost all the trees________________
silver.
3) The N o rth W ind was___________________ in furs, and he
_________________all day about the garden.
4) The H ail on the roof o f the castle till it
b roke m ost o f the__________________ .
5) The G ia n t's h eart as he looked out.
6) It was really only a little__________________ singing outside
his w indow .
7) T h ro u g h alittle h o le in th e w all th e c h ild re n had
________________ in.
8) The birds were flying about and________________ w ith delight.
9) The little boy his two arm s and flung
ro u n d th e G ia n t's neck.
41
10) Years w ent over, th e G ia n t grew very old and_

9 Translate the following sentences into English.

1) К а ж д ы й д е н ь , в о з в р а щ а я с ь из ш к о л ы , д е т и , к а к п о ­
в е л о с ь , з а х о д и л и в сад В е л и к а н а п о и г р а т ь .
2) В е л и к а н о б н е с с в о й сад в ы с о к о й с т е н о й и п о в е с и л
о б ъ я в л е н и е : «Вход в о с п р е щ е н . Н а р у ш и т е л и будут
наказаны».
3) М а л ь ч и к бы л т а к м ал , что не м о г д о т я н у т ь с я до вет­
вей д е р е в а и т о л ь к о ходил в ок ру г н е г о и г о р ь к о пла­
кал.
4) Я с л о м а ю стену, и м о й сад с т а н е т н а в е к и в е ч н ы е
м е с т о м д л я д е т с к и х и гр.
5) В е л и к а н т е п е р ь был о ч е н ь д о б р ко вс ем д е т я м , н о он
т о с к о в а л о с в о е м м а л е н ь к о м друге и ч а ст о о н е м в с п о ­
минал.
6) Год п р о х о д и л за го д о м , и В е л и к а н с о с т а р и л с я и од­
ря х л ел .
7) В с а м о м у к р о м н о м у го л ке сада с т о я л о д е р е в о , с п л о ш ь
п о к р ы т о е восхи ти тельн ы м белым цветом.
8) Н а д р у г о й д е н ь , к о г д а д е т и п р и б е ж а л и в сад, о н и
н аш л и В ели кан а мертвым.

5 D iscussion Tasks

1 D iscuss the following.

1) D esc rib e th e G i a n t 's g arden .


2) Speak a b o u t th e G ia n t . H ow does his c h a r a c t e r in th e
story develop a n d ch a n g e as th e story progresses?
3) Agree or disagree with t h e s ta te m e n t from th e tale: " T h e
c h ild r e n are th e m ost beautiful flowers o f all."
4) C o m m e n t on th e title of th e story.
5) Discuss th e m o r a l of th e tale.
THE DEVOTED FRIEND

O ne m o rn in g th e old W ater R at p u t his h ead out o f his


hole. H e h ad b rig h t beady eyes and stiff grey w hiskers, and his
tail was like a long b it o f b lack I n d ia -ru b b e r.1 The little ducks
w ere sw im m in g ab o u t in th e p o n d , lo o k in g ju s t like a lot o f
yellow c an aries. T h eir m o th e r, w ho w as p u re w hite w ith real red
legs, w as try in g to te a c h th em how to stand on th e ir head s in the
w ater.
"You will never be in the best society unless you can stand on
y our head s," she kept saying to th em ; every now and th e n she showed
th em how it was done. B ut the little ducks paid no atten tio n to her.
They w ere so young th at they did not know w hat an advantage it is
to be in society at all.
"W hat disobedient children!" cried the old W ater Rat. "They
really deserve to be drow ned."
43
"N o th in g o f the k ind," answ ered the D uck, "every one m ust
m ake a beginning, and p arents can n o t be too p atien t."
"Ah! I know n o th in g about th e feelings o f p aren ts," said the
W ater Rat. "I am n o t a family m an. In fact, I have never been
m arried, and never inten d to be. Love is all very well in its way, but
friendship is m u ch higher. Indeed, I know o f n o thing in the w orld
th a t is eith er n o b ler or rarer th a n a devoted friendship."
"And w hat is y o u r idea o f th e duties o f a devoted friend?"
asked a green L in n et, w ho was sitting on a w illo w -tre e 2 nearby,
and heard the conversation.
"Yes, th a t is ju s t w hat I w ant to know ," said the D uck; and
she swam away to the end o f the p o n d , and stood upon her head, in
order to give h er ch ild ren a good exam ple.
"W hat a silly question!" cried the W ater Rat. "I should expect
my devoted friend to be devoted to m e, o f course."
"And w hat would you do in retu rn ?" said the little bird, flapping
his tiny wings.
"I d o n 't u n d e rsta n d ," answ ered the W ater Rat.
"L et m e tell y ou a story on th e subject," said the Linnet.
"Is th e story about m e?" asked the W ater Rat. "If so, I will
listen to it. You know I am extrem ely fond o f fiction."
"It may be about you as w ell," answ ered the L innet; and he
flew dow n and began to tell the story o f The D evoted Friend.
"O nce u p o n a tim e," began th e L innet, "there was an honest
little fellow n am ed H an s."
"W as th ere som ething special about him ?" asked the W ater
Rat.
"N o ," answ ered the L innet, "I d o n 't think there was som ething
special about him , except for his kind h eart, and funny, round,
g o o d -h u m o u red face. He lived in a tiny cottage all by himself, and
every day he w orked in his garden. In all the countryside there was
no garden so lovely as his. All kinds of flowers bloom ed or blossom ed
in th e ir p ro p e r o rd er as th e m o n th s w ent by, one flow er taking
an o th er flow er's place. So there w ere always beautiful things to look
at, and p leasant odours to smell.
"L ittle H ans had a great m any friends. But the m ost devoted
friend of all was big H ugh the M iller. Indeed, so devoted was the
rich M iller to L ittle H ans, th at he w ould never go by his garden
w ith o u t leaning over th e wall and plucking a large n o se g a y .3 He
w ould never go by his garden w ith o u t having a handful o f sweet
44
herbs or filling his pockets w ith plum s and cherries, if it was the fruit
season.
'"R e a l friends should have everything in co m m o n ,' the M iller
used to say. Little H ans nodded and smiled. He felt very proud of
having a friend w ith such noble ideas.
"S om etim es, indeed, the n eighbours th ought it strange th at
the rich M iller n ever gave L ittle H an s anything in return. All knew
th at the M iller had a h u n d red sacks o f flour stored in his m ill, and
six m ilch c o w s ,4 and a large flock o f woolly sheep. But H ans never
tro u b led his h ead about these things. N o th in g gave him greater
pleasure th a n to listen to all th e w onderful things the M iller used to
say about the unselfishness o f tru e friendship.
"So Little H an s w orked hard in his garden. D uring the spring,
the sum m er, and the au tu m n he was very happy. B ut w hen the
w inter cam e, and he had no fruit or flowers to bring to the m arket,
he suffered a good deal from cold and hunger. Often he had to go to
bed w ith o u t any supper but a few dried pears or som e hard nuts. In
the w inter, also, he was extrem ely lonely, as the M iller never cam e
to see him then.
" T h e re is no good in my going to see Little H ans as long as the
snow lasts,' the M iller used to say to his wife. 'W hen people are in
trou b le, they should be left alone and not be b o thered by visitors. At
least, th a t is my idea about friendship, and I am sure I am right. So
I shall w ait till the spring com es, and th e n I shall pay him a visit.
And he will be able to give me a large basket o f p rim ro se s,5 and th at
will m ake him so hap p y .'
'"Y ou are certainly very thoughtful about o th e rs,' answ ered the
Wife, as she sat in h er com fortable arm chair by the big pinew ood
fire. 'Very thoughtful, indeed. I am so delighted to hear you talk
about friendship. I am sure the clergym an him self could not say such
beautiful things as you do, th o u g h he does live in a th ree-sto ried
house, and does w ear a golden ring on his little finger.'
'"B u t could not w e ask L ittle H ans up h ere?' said the M iller's
youngest son. 'If p oor H an s is in trou b le, I will give him h alf my
porridge, and show him my w hite rabbits.'
'"W h at a silly boy you are!' cried the M iller. 'I really d o n 't
know w hat is the use o f sending y ou to school. You seem to learn
n oth in g . W hy, if L ittle H an s cam e up h ere, and saw our w arm
fire, and good supper, and a cask o f red w ine, he m ight get envious.
Envy is a terrible thing and can spoil anybody's nature. I certainly
45
will n o t allow H an s' n atu re to be spoiled. I am his best friend, and
I will always w atch over him , and see th at he is not led into any
tem p tatio n . Besides, if H an s cam e h ere, he m ight ask me to let him
have some flour on credit, and th a t I could not do. F lo u r is one
th in g , and friendship is another, and they should not be confused.
W hy, the w ords are spelt differently, and m ean quite different things.
Everybody can u n d erstan d th a t.'
'"H o w well you talk!' said the M iller's Wife, pouring herself
out a large glass of w arm ale. 'R eally I feel quite drowsy. It is like
being in ch u rch .'
'"L o ts o f people act w ell,' answ ered the M iller, 'but very few
people talk well. It shows that talking is the m ore difficult thing of
th e tw o, and a m uch finer thing also ,' and he looked sternly across
the table at his little son. The boy felt so asham ed o f him self th at he
hung his head dow n, and grew quite scarlet and began to cry into his
tea. H ow ever, he was so young th a t you m ust excuse him ."
"Is th a t the end o f the story?" asked the W ater Rat.
"C ertainly n o t," answ ered the L innet, "that is the beginning.
"As soon as th e w in ter was over, and the prim roses began to
open th e ir yellow stars, th e M iller said to his wife th at he w ould go
dow n and see Little H ans.
'"W hy, w hat a good heart you have!' cried his W ife, 'Y ou are
always th in k in g o f others. And be sure to take the big basket w ith
you for the flow ers.'
"So the M iller w ent down to the hill with the basket on his arm.
'" G o o d m orning, Little H a n s,' said the M iller.
'" G o o d m o rn in g ,' answ ered H ans, sm iling from ear to ear.
'"A nd how have you been all the w in ter?' said the M iller.
'"W ell, really,' cried H ans, 'it is very good o f you to ask, very
good, indeed. I am afraid I had ra th e r a hard tim e o f it. But now
the spring has com e, and I am quite happy, and all my flowers are
doing w ell.'
'"W e often talked o f you during th e w inter, H a n s,' said the
M iller, 'and w ondered how you w ere getting on.'
'" T h a t was kind o f y o u ,' said H ans. 'I was half afraid, you had
forgotten m e.'
"' H ans, I am surprised at y o u ,' said the M iller. 'F rien d sh ip
n e v e r forgets. T hat is th e w onderful th in g about it, b u t, I am
afraid, you d o n 't u n d erstan d the poetry o f life. H ow lovely your
p rim roses are looking, by the way!'
46
'"T h ey are certainly very lovely,' said H ans, 'and it is a m ost
lucky thin g for m e th a t I have so m any. I am going to bring them
into m arket and sell them to th e B u rg o m aster's daughter, and buy
back my w heelbarrow w ith the m o n ey .'
'"B uy back y o u r w heelbarrow ? You d o n 't m ean to say you have
sold it? W hat a very stupid th in g to do!'
'"W ell, th e fact is,' said H an s, 'th a t I had to. You see, the
w in ter was a very bad tim e for m e, and I really had no m oney at all
to buy b read with. So I first sold the silver b u tto n s o f my Sunday
coat, and th e n I sold my silver ch ain , and th en I sold my big pipe,
and at last I sold my w heelbarrow . B ut I am going to buy them all
back again now .'
" 'H a n s ,' said th e M iller, 'I will give y ou my w heelbarrow . It
is not in very good co n d itio n ; indeed, one side is gone, and there is
som ething w rong w ith th e w h eel-spokes; but in spite o f th at I will
give it to you. I know it is very generous of me. A great m any people
would th in k m e extrem ely foolish for partin g w ith it, but I am not
like the rest o f th e world. I th in k th a t generosity is the essence of
friendship. Besides, I have got a new w heelbarrow myself. Yes,
you may set y o u r m ind at ease, I will give you my w heelbarrow .'
'"W ell, really, th a t is generous o f y o u ,' exclaim ed L ittle H ans,
and his funny round face shone all over w ith pleasure. 'I can easily
rep air it, as I have a plank o f w ood in th e hou se.'
'"A plank o f w ood!' said the M iller. 'W hy, th a t is ju st w hat I
w ant for th e ro o f o f my barn. T here is a very large hole in it, and
the corn will all get dam p if I d o n 't m end the roof. H ow lucky you
m en tio n ed it! It is quite rem arkable how one good action always
breeds another. I have given you my w heelbarrow , and now you are
going to give me y o u r plank. O f course, the w heelbarrow is w orth
far m ore th a n the plank, but tru e friendship never notices things
like that. Please get it at once, and I will set to w ork at my barn this
very d ay .'-
"'C e rta in ly ,' cried Little H an s, and he ran and brought the
plank.
'" I t is not a very big p lan k ,' said the M iller, looking at it,
'an d 1 am afraid th a t after I have m ended my barn-roof, there w o n 't
be any left for you to m end th e w heelbarrow w ith; but, o f course,
th a t is n o t my fault. A nd, as I have given you my w heelbarrow , I am
sure, you w ould like to give m e some flowers in return. H ere is the
basket, and be sure you fill it quite full.'
47
'"Q u ite full?' w hispered L ittle H ans, ra th er sorrowfully, as it
was really a very big basket. He knew th at if he filled it, he w ould
have no flowers left for th e m arket. He was very anxious to get his
silver b u tto n s back.
'"W ell, really ,' answ ered the M iller, 'as I have given you my
w heelbarrow , I d o n 't th in k th a t it is m uch to ask you for a few
flowers. I m ay be w rong, but I should have thought th a t friendship,
tru e friendship, was quite free from selfishness o f any kind.'
'"M y dear friend, my best friend,' cried Little H ans, 'you are
w elcom e to all th e flowers in my garden. I w ould rath er have your
o p in io n th a n my silver b u tto n s, anyway!' and he ran and plucked his
pretty p rim roses, and filled the M iller's basket.
'" G o o d -b y e , Little H a n s,' said the M iller, and he w ent up
th e hill w ith th e plank on his shoulder, and the big basket in his
hand.
" 'G o o d -b y e ,' answ ered Little H ans, happily; he was so pleased
about the w heelbarrow .
"The next day he was nailing up some h o n ey su c k le6 against
th e p o rch , w hen he heard the M iller's voice calling him from the
road. So he ju m p e d off the ladder, and ran down the garden, and
looked over th e wall.
"There was the M iller w ith a large sack of flour on his back.
'" D e a r L ittle H a n s,' said the M iller, 'w ould you m ind carrying
this sack o f flour for me to m ark et?'
'"O h , I am so sorry,' said H ans, 'but I am really very busy
today. I have got all my c re e p e rs7 to nail up, and all my flowers to
w ater, and all my grass to roll.'
'"W ell, really,' said the M iller, 'I think, th at considering that
I am going to give you my w heelbarrow , it is rath er unfriendly of you
to refuse.'
'" O h , d o n 't say th a t,' cried L ittle H a n s, 'I w o u ld n 't be
unfriendly for the w hole w o rld ,' and he ran in for his cap, and lifted
th e big sack on to his shoulders, and carried it away.
"It was a very hot day, and th e road was terribly dusty. Before
H ans had reach ed the sixth m ilestone, he was so tired th at he had
to sit dow n and rest. H ow ever, he w ent on bravely, and at last he
reached the m arket. After he had been there for some tim e , he sold
the sack o f flour for a very good price. Then he returned hom e at
once, because he was afraid th at if he stayed too late, he m ight m eet
som e robbers on th e way.
48
'" I t has certainly been a h ard day ,' said L ittle H ans to him self
as he was going to bed, 'but I am glad I did n o t refuse the M iller. He
is my best friend, and besides, he is going to give me his w heelbarrow .'
"Early th e next m o rn in g the M iller cam e dow n to get the
m oney for his sack of flour. L ittle H ans was so tired th at he was still
in bed.
'" U p o n my w o rd ,' cried th e M iller, 'you are very lazy. Really,
considering th a t I am going to give you my w heelbarrow , I th ink you
m ight w ork harder. Idleness is a great sin, and I certainly d o n 't like
any o f my friends to be idle or slow. You m ust not m ind my speaking
quite plainly to you. O f course, I should not dream of doing so, if
I w ere n o t y our friend. B ut w hat is a good friendship, if one cannot
say exactly w hat one m eans? A nybody can say charm ing things and
try to please and flatter, but a true friend always says unpleasant
things, and does not m ind giving pain. Indeed, if he is a really true
friend he prefers it, for he know s th at th en he is doing good.'
'" I am very sorry,' said L ittle H ans, rubbing his eyes and
taking off his n ig h t-c a p , 'but I was so tired th a t I th ought I w ould lie
in bed for a little tim e, and listen to the birds singing. D o n 't you
know th a t I always w ork b e tte r after hearing the birds sing?'
'"W ell, I am glad o f th a t,' uttered the M iller, clapping Little
H an s on the back. 'I w ant you to com e up to the m ill as soon as you
are dressed and m end my b a rn -ro o f for m e.'
"P o o r Little H ans was very anxious to go and w ork in the
garden, for his flowers had not been w atered for two days. But he
did not w ant to refuse the M iller, as he was such a good friend to
him .
'" D o you th in k it w ould be unfriendly o f m e, if I said I was
busy?' he asked in a shy and tim id voice.
'"W ell, really ,' answered the M iller, 'I do not think it is m uch
to ask of you, considering that I am going to give you my w heelbarrow ;
but, of course, if you refuse, I will go and do it myself.'
'"O h! On no a c c o u n t,8' cried L ittle H ans; and he ju m p ed out
o f bed, and dressed himself, and w ent up to the barn.
"H e w orked th ere all day long, till sunset. A t sunset the
M iller cam e to see how he was getting on.
'"H a v e you m ended the hole in the ro o f yet, Little H ans?'
cried th e M iller cheerfully.
'" It is quite m e n d e d ,' answ ered Little H ans, com ing down the
ladder.
49
"'A h!' said th e M iller, 'th ere is no w ork so delightful as the
w ork one does for o th ers.'
'" It is certainly a great privilege to hear you talk ,' answered
L ittle H an s, sitting dow n and w iping his forehead, 'a very great
privilege. B ut I am afraid I shall never have such beautiful ideas as
you have.'
'"O h! They will com e to y o u ,' said the M iller, 'but you m ust
m ake m ore effort. At present you have only the practice o f friendship;
some day you will also have th e th eo ry .'
'"D o y ou really th in k I shall?' asked L ittle H ans.
'" I have no doubt o f it,' answ ered the M iller, but now you
have m ended the roof, you had b e tte r go hom e and rest, because I
w ant you to take my sheep to the m o u n tain to m o rro w .'
"P o o r L ittle H an s was afraid to say anything against this.
Early the next m orn in g the M iller b rought his sheep round to the
cottage, and H ans started off w ith them to the m ountain. It took
him the w hole day to get there and back. W hen he retu rn ed he was
so tired th at he w ent off to sleep in his chair, and did n o t wake up
till it was broad daylight.
'" W h a t a delightful tim e I shall have in my g ard en !', he
th o u g h t, and he w ent to w ork at once.
"But som ehow he was never able to look after his flowers at
all, as his friend the M iller was always com ing round and giving him
tasks, or getting to help at the mill. L ittle H ans was very m uch
distressed at tim es, as he was afraid his flowers w ould th in k th at he
had forgotten th em . B ut he consoled h im self w ith the reflection
th at the M iller was his best friend. 'B esides,' he used to say, 'he is
going to give me his w heelbarrow , and that is an act o f pure generosity.'
"So Little H ans w orked hard for the M iller, and the M iller
said all kinds o f beautiful things about friendship, w hich H ans used
to take dow n in a n o teb o o k and read over at night. H ans was a very
good scholar.
"N ow it h ap p en ed th a t one evening L ittle H ans was sitting
by his fireside w hen he h eard a loud knock at the door. It was a
very w ild night, and th e w ind was blow ing and roaring ro u n d the
house so terribly th a t at first he th o u g h t it was only the storm . But
a second k n o ck cam e, and th e n a th ird , lo u d er th a n any o f the
oth ers.
'" It is som e p o o r traveller,' said Little H ans to himself, and
ran to the door.
50
" T here stood th e M iller w ith a lan tern in one han d and a big
stick in the other.
'" D e a r L ittle H a n s,' cried the M iller, 'I am in great trouble.
My little boy has fallen off a ladder and h urt himself. A nd I am
going for the D o cto r, but he lives so far away. A nd it is such a bad
night, th at it has ju s t o ccurred to m e th a t it w ould be m uch b etter
if you w ent instead o f me. You know I am going to give you my
w heelbarrow , and so it is only fair th at you should do som ething for
m e in re tu rn .'
" 'C e r ta in ly ,' an sw ered L ittle H a n s, 'I tak e it quite as a
com p lim en t y o u r com ing to m e, and I will start off at once. But you
m ust lend m e y o u r lan tern , as th e night is so dark th a t, I am afraid,
I m ight fall into th e ditch .'
'"I am very sorry,' answered the M iller, 'but it is my new lantern,
and it w ould be a great loss to m e, if anything happened to it.'
'"W ell, never m ind, I will do w ith o u t it,' cried L ittle H ans.
He took dow n his great fur coat, and his w arm scarlet cap, and tied
a m uffler round his th ro at, and started off.
"W hat a dreadful storm it was! The night was so black that
L ittle H an s could hardly see. The w ind was so strong th at he could
hardly stand. H ow ever, he was very courageous, and after he had
been w alking about th ree ho u rs, he arrived at the D o c to r's house,
and knocked at th e door.
'"W h o is th e re ? ' cried th e D o cto r, p u ttin g his head out o f his
bed ro o m w indow .
'" L ittle H an s, D o c to r.'
'"W h at do you w ant, Little H an s?'
'"T h e M iller's son has fallen from th e ladder, and has hurt
himself. The M iller w ants you to com e at o n ce.'
'"A ll right!' said the D o cto r, and ordered his horse, and his
big b o o ts, and his lantern. He cam e dow nstairs and rode off in the
directio n o f th e M iller's house. L ittle H an s, w ith heavy legs, followed
slowly on behind.
"B ut the storm grew w orse and w orse, and it was raining so
heavily. L ittle H ans could not see w here he was going, or keep up
w ith th e horse. At last he lost his way, and w andered off on the
m oor. The m o o r was a very dangerous place, as it was full o f deep
holes. A nd p o o r Little H ans was drow ned there. H is body was found
the next day by some goatherds, floating in a great pool o f w ater,
and was b ro u g h t back by th em to the cottage.

51
"Everybody w ent to L ittle H a n s' funeral, as he was so po p u lar,
and th e M iller was th e chief m ourner.
'"A s I w as his best friend,' said the M iller, 'it is only fair th a t
I should have th e best p la c e .' So he w alked at the head o f th e
p rocession in a long black cloak, and every now and th en he w iped
his eyes w ith a big handkerchief.
'"L ittle H ans is certainly a great loss to everyone,' said the
B lacksm ith, w hen the funeral was over, and they w ere all seated
com fortably in the inn, drinking w ine and eating sweet cakes.
'"A great loss to m e at any ra te ,' answ ered the M iller. 'W hy,
I had given him my w heelbarrow , and now I really d o n 't know w hat
to do w ith it. It is very m uch in my way at hom e, and it is in such
bad co n d itio n th a t I could not get anything for it if I sold it. I will
certainly take care not to give away anything again. One certainly
suffers from being g en ero u s.'"
"W ell?" said th e W ater R at, after a long pause.
"W ell, th a t is th e end," said the Linnet.
"But w hat becam e o f the M iller?" asked the W ater Rat.
"Oh! I really d o n 't know ," answ ered the L innet, "and I am
sure th at I d o n 't care."
"It is quite evident th en th at you have no sym pathy in yo u r
n a tu re ," said th e W ater Rat.
"I am afraid you d o n 't quite see the m oral o f the story," noticed
the Linnet.
"The w hat?" scream ed the W ater Rat.
"The m oral."
"D o you m ean to say th at the story has a m oral?"
"C ertainly," said the Linnet.
"W ell, really," said the W ater Rat, in a very angry m anner,
"I th in k you should have told me th a t before you began. If you had
done so, I certainly w ould not have listened to you. In fact, I should
have said 'P o o h ,' like th e critic. H ow ever, I can say it now ," so he
shouted out "P o o h ", at the top o f his voice, and w ent back into his
hole.
"And how do you like the W ater R at?" asked the D uck, who
cam e some m in u tes afterwards. "H e has a great m any good points.
B ut for my own part, I have m o th e r's feelings. I can never look at
a confirm ed b ach elo r w ith o u t the tears com ing into my eyes."
"I am rath er afraid th at I have annoyed him ," answ ered the
L innet. "The fact is th a t I told him a story w ith a m oral."
52
"Ah! T h a t is always a very d a n g e ro u s th in g to d o , " said th e
Duck.
A n d I q u ite agree w ith her.

Commentary

1 his tail was like a long bit o f black India-rubber — х в о с т его п о х о ­


дил на д л и н н ы й черны й р ези н о в ы й шнур
2
w illow -tree (бот .) — и в а
nosegay — б у к е т и к ц в е т о в
milch cows — д о й н ы е к о р о в ы
primrose (бот.) — п е р в о ц в е т , п р и м у л а
honeysuckle (бот.) — ж и м о л о с т ь
creeper (бот.) — в ь ю н о к
8
on по account — н и в к о е м сл учае

Exercises

R eadin g Com prehension

1 Are the following statements about the tale true or false "! If there is
not enough information, write don't know.

1) Little H a n s h a d a g reat m a n y friends b u t t h e m o s t d evoted


friend of all was t h e M iller. '
2) T h e n e ig h b o u rs t h o u g h t H a n s to b e a very strange p e rso n .

3) D u r i n g all t h e seasons H a n s was very h a p p y , b u t w h e n


w in te r c a m e , he suffered from cold a n d h u n g er.___________
4) T h e M ille r w a n te d to visit H a n s in w in te r b u t his wife was
against i t . __________
5) H a n s h a d to sell his w h ee lb arro w in w in te r, b e c a u s e he
n e e d e d m o n e y to bu y b r e a d with.___________
6) T h e M ille r gave his ow n w hee lb arro w to H a n s , b e c a u s e
he felt sorry for h im .___________
53
7) H a n s refused to give his flowers to th e M ille r b ec au se he
w as s t i n g y . __________
8) T h e M ille r always c a m e to H a n s a n d gave h im various
tasks a n d H a n s h a d no tim e to do s o m e th in g a b o u t his
own h o u s e . __________
9) W h e n th e M iller sent H a n s for th e D o c t o r on t h a t storm y
ev ening, th e M ille r even did n o t give h i m his la n te r n .

10) H a n s got lost on his way b a c k from th e d o c t o r a n d was


d r o w n e d in th e m o o r.___________
11) T h e M iller u n d e r s t o o d his guilt a n d was th e ch ief m o u r n e r
at th e funeral.___________

2 Answer the following questions.

1) W h a t kin d o f p e rso n was H a n s? H o w does th e a u t h o r


describe his a p p e a r a n c e ?
2) W h e r e did H a n s live a n d w h a t did he grow in his g arden?
4) H ow m a n y friends did H a n s have a n d w ho was his best
friend?
5) W hy was w in te r th e worst season for H an s?
6) W hy d i d n ' t th e M iller visit H a n s in w in te r a n d w h a t sort
of a r g u m e n ts did he give to his son?
7) W h a t are th e M iller's ideas a b o u t friendship?
8) W h a t tasks did th e M ille r give to H an s?
9) H a d H a n s ever refused t h e Miller? H o w did H a n s feel at
tim es?
10) W h a t h a p p e n e d to H a n s on his way b a c k from th e D o c to r ?
11) W h e re was p o o r Little H a n s found?
12) H o w did th e ch ief m o u r n e r b ehave at th e funeral?

Vocabulary an d G ra m m a r Tasks

1 Find in the text the English for:

п о давать х о р о ш и й п р и м е р ; р а с с к а з а т ь одну и с т о р и ю по это­


му п оводу; з а б а в н о е к р угл ое л и ц о ; о д и н - о д и н е ш е н е к ; со­
р в а т ь б у к е т и к ц в е т о в ; стадо д л и н н о ш е р с т н ы х о в е ц ; тер­
п ет ь хол од и г ол од; з а б о т и т ь с я о других; п о д в е р г а т ь с я
54
с о б л а з н у ; м ы о т н о с и м с я друг к другу с б о л ь ш о й с и м п а т и ­
ей; у л ы б а т ь с я во все л и ц о ; о ц е н и т ь п о э з и ю ж и з н и ; нахо­
д и т ь с я в х о р о ш е м с о с т о я н и и ; без щ е д р о с т и н е т д р у ж б ы ;
не б е с п о к о и т ь с я ; его з а б а в н о е к ругл ое л и ц о п р я м о з а с и я л о
от р а д о с т и ; ч и н и т ь к р ы ш у ; п р о д а т ь м уку за х о р о ш и е д е н ь ­
ги; н е р а д и в о с т ь — б о л ь ш о й п о р о к ; н и в к о е м случае; от­
п р а в и т ь с я ; д а в а т ь п о р у ч е н и я ; п р и х о д и т ь в о т ч а я н и е ; уте­
ш а т ь с е б я м ы с л ь ю ; это у д и в и т е л ь н а я щ е д р о с т ь с его сто­
р о н ы ; бы ть б о л ь ш о й у т р а т о й д л я к о г о - л и б о ; п о с п е в а т ь за
л о ш а д ь ю ; и д т и во главе п о г р е б а л ь н о й п р о ц е с с и и ; м н о г о
г о в о р и ть ; з а в о п и т ь во всю глотку; что к а с а е т с я м е н я ; убеж­
д ен н ы й холостяк

2 a) Н еге are some sentences from the tale. Define the difference
between the meanings o f italicised words.

1) O n e flower takes another flower's p lace.


2) F l o u r is one th in g , a n d friendship is another.
3) Y o u a re always t h i n k i n g o f others.
4) I t is q u ite rem a rk a b le how one go od a c tio n always b reeds
another.
5) T h e r e is no work so delightful as th e w ork o n e does for
others.

b) Complete the sentences by adding one of these words: other, others,


another.

1) She is cleverer t h a n th e ____________________ .


2) H e finished his sausage a n d asked for__________________
o n e.
3) We go to E u r o p e every___________________ year.
4) Are th e r e any__________________ problem s?
5) I f y ou w a n t a d ouble r o o m t h a t will cost____________
$15.
6) I saw J o h n w ith so m e____________________ boys.
7) A few of t h e m are red, t h e ___________________ are brow n.
8) T h e r e m u st be__________________ way o f doing it.
9) T h e r e are p le nty ___________________ways of getting th e r e
t h a n by car.
10) H e c a m e here for__________________ reason.
55
11) I'm in a hurry; I'll do it__________________ tim e.
12) You can park y o u r car on the side o f the
road.

3 Choose the right word: either or neither.

1) H ave a cup of coffee or tea. — I can have________________ .


2) He drinks, sm okes n o r eats m eat.
3) Take o f the books.
4 )___________________ my b ro th e r n o r I w ere there.
5) It's__________________ blue or red. I c a n 't rem em ber.
6 )___________________o f th e roads is very good.
7) She's one o f those p eople that__________________ love or
hate.
8) W ill y ou have tea o r coffee? N o ,_________________ thanks.
9) If D avid or Jane com es, she or he will
w ant a drink.
10) I h av e n o t re a d th is b o o k , my b r o th e r h a s n 't read

4 Circle the letter of the verb that correctly completes the sentence.

1) R achel had to get used to___________ on the left.


a) drive
b) driving

2) W hen I was a child, I used to chocolate every


day.
a) eat
b) eating

3) It to o k m e a long tim e to get used to___________ glasses.


a) w earing
b) w ear

4) T here used to a restaurant at this corner.


a) being
b) be

5) I'm th e chief. I'm not used to___________ told w hat to do.


56
a) be
b) being

6) Y ou'll have to get used to less if you w ant to lose


w eight.
a) eating
b) eat

7) I used to Jo h n but now I dislike him.


a) like
b) liking

Jill got tired very quickly. She w asn 't used to_ so
fast.
a) run
b) ru n n in g

9) A nn used to_ a lot o f coffee w hen she was a


student.
a) drinking
b) drink

10) Bob used to_ _very fit. N ow h e's in bad shape.


a) be
b) being

5 Put the verbs in brackets in the correct form in the following conditional
sentences from the tale.

1) If poor H ans in trouble, I will_______________


him h alf my porridge, (be; give)
2) If Little H ans________________ up here, and________________
o u r w arm fire, he m ight__________________ envious, (com e;
see; get)
3) If H ans h ere, he_m ight_________________
m e have som e flo u r on credit, (com e; ask)
4) The corn will all________________ dam p, if I________________
th e roof, (get; n o t m en d )
5) If he__________________ it, he would__________________ no
flow ers left for the m arket, (fill; have)
57
6) I f he , he_m ight___________________ some
robbers on the way. (stop; m e et)
7) I should n o t of doing so, if I________________
y o u r friend, (d re am ; n o t be)
8) It would_________________ m u c h b etter if you________________
instead of m e. (be; go)
9) If you_________ so, I certainly_would_________________
to you. (do; n o t listen)

6 Translate the following sentences into English.

1) У Г а н с а бы ло д о б р о е се рд ц е и з а б а в н о е круглое весе­
лое л и ц о .
2) Ж и л он о д и н - о д и н е ш е н е к в с в о е й м а л е н ь к о й изб уш ­
ке и д е н ь - д е н ь с к о й к о п а л с я у се б я в саду.
3) Г ан с г о р д и л с я , что у н е г о есть друг с т а к и м и благо­
родн ы м и идеями.
4) Соседи иногда удивлялись, почему богатый М е л ь н и к
н и к о г д а н и ч е м не о т б л а г о д а р и т Г анса.
5) З и м о й он т е р п е л холод и голод и ч а с т е н ь к о л о ж и л с я в
п о с т е л ь без уж и н а.
6) С к о р о он п р о д а л м уку за х о р о ш и е д е н ь г и и тут же
п у с т и л с я в о б р а т н ы й путь.
7) Н о к а к - т о все в р е м я вы х о д и л о , что ему не удавал ось
заняться свои м и цветами.
8) Д руг его М е л ь н и к то и д е л о я в л я л с я к н е м у и отс ы л ал
его к у д а -н и б у д ь с п о р у ч е н и е м и л и у в о д и л с с о б о й
пом очь на мельнице.
9) М е л ь н и к г о в о р и л к р а с и в ы е сл ов а о друж бе, к о т о р ы е
Г анс з а п и с ы в а л в те тр ад о ч к у и п е р е ч и т ы в а л по н о ­
ч а м , п о т о м у что он был о ч е н ь п р и л е ж н ы й у ч е н и к .
10) М е л ь н и к п р и ш е л к Г а н с у о д н а ж д ы н о ч ь ю , ч т о б ы
п о п р о с и т ь его сходить за д о к т о р о м , когд а его с ы н и ш ­
ка упал с л е с т н и ц ы и р а с ш и б с я .
11) Ветер все к р е п ч а л , а д о ж д ь л и л к а к из ведра.
12) М а л е н ь к и й Г ан с не п о с п е в а л за л о ш а д ь ю и брел н а­
угад.
13) Он с б и л с я с д о р о г и и п о п а л в б ол о т о, там б е д н ы й
Г анс и утонул в г л у б о к о й т р я с и н е .
14) М е л ь н и к ш ел во главе п о г р е б а л ь н о й п р о ц е с с и и и в р е м я
58
от в р е м е н и в ы т и р а л гл аза б о л ь ш и м н о с о в ы м плат­
ком.
15) « С м е р т ь М а л е н ь к о г о Г а н с а — б о л ь ш а я утр ата д л я всех
н ас », — с к а з а л К у з н е ц .

f i’ D iscussion Tasks

1 Discuss the following.

1) Agree or disagree w ith t h e M iller's ideas a b o u t friendship:


• I kno w n o th in g in th e w orld t h a t is e i th e r n o b le r or
r a r e r t h a n a dev o ted friendship.
• R e al friends sh o u ld have everything in c o m m o n .
• W h e n p e o p le are in t r o u b le , th e y s h o u ld be left alo n e
a n d n o t be b o t h e r e d by visitors.
• Envy is a terrible th in g a n d c a n spoil a n y b o d y 's n a tu re .
• G e n e r o s i ty is t h e essence of friendship.
• T r u e friendship is free from selfishness of an y kind.
• A tr u e friend always says u n p l e a s a n t thing s, a n d does
n o t m i n d giving p ain .
2) Speak a b o u t th e M ille r a n d his ideas a b o u t friendship.
F i n d so m e facts in th e tale w h ic h prove t h a t his ideas
c o n t r a s te d his actio n s.
3) Speak a b o u t H a n s a n d his actio n s. P rov e t h a t H a n s was a
d e v o te d friend.
4) D iscuss t h e m o r a l o f t h e story.
THE REMARKABLE ROCKET

The K in g 's son was going to be m arried, so the w hole court


w as happy to h ear the news. H e w aited a w hole year for his bride,
and at last she arrived. She was a R ussian Princess, and drove all
th e way from F in lan d in a sledge. The sledge was shaped like a great
golden swan, and betw een the sw an's wings lay the little Princess
herself. H er long cloak reached dow n to h er feet, on her head was
a tiny cap o f silver tissue. A nd she was as pale as the Snow Palace,
in w hich she had always lived. So pale was she th a t as she drove
th ro u g h th e streets, all the people w ondered. "She is like a w hite
rose!" they cried, and they threw dow n flowers on h er from the
balconies.
At the gate o f the Castle the Prince was w aiting to receive her.
He had dream y violet eyes, and his h air was like fine gold. W hen he
saw her, he sank u p o n one knee, and kissed h er hand.
60
"Y our p ic tu re was b eau tifu l," he said, "but you are m ore
beautiful th a n y o u r p ic tu re ," and the little P rincess blushed.
"She was like a w hite rose before," said a young page to his
neighbour, "but she is like a red rose now ," and the w hole C ourt
was delighted.
F o r the next th ree days everybody w ent about saying, "W hite
rose, R ed rose, R ed rose, W hite rose," and the K ing gave orders
th at th e P age's salary was to be doubled. As he received no salary at
all, this was n o t o f m u ch use to him . But it was considered a great
h o n o u r, and was duly published in the C ourt G a z e tte .1
W hen th e th ree days w ere over, the m arriage was celebrated.
It was a m agnificent cerem ony. The bride and the bridegroom walked
han d in h an d u n d e r a canopy o f p urple velvet em broidered w ith
little pearls. T hen th ere was a b an q u et w hich lasted for five hours.
The P rince and th e Princess sat at the top o f the G reat H all and
drank out o f a cup o f clear crystal. Only tru e lovers could drink out
o f th is cup. If false lips to u ch ed it, it grew grey, dull and cloudy.
"It is quite clear th at they love each o th er," said the Little
Page, "as clear as crystal!" and the K ing doubled his salary a second
tim e.
"W hat an honour!" cried all the courtiers.
After th e b an q u et th ere was to be a ball. The bride and the
bridegroom w ere to dance the R o se-d an ce together, and the King
had prom ised to play the flute. He played very badly, but no one had
even dared to tell him so, because he was the King. Indeed, he
knew only tw o a irs ,2 and was never quite certain w hich one he was
playing; but it m ade no m atter, for, w hatever he did, everybody
cried out, "C harm ing! C harm ing!"
T he last item on th e p ro g ra m m e was a grand display of
firew orks, to be let off exactly at m idnight. The little Princess had
never seen a firework in h er life, so the K ing gave orders th at the
Royal Pyrotechnist should be in attendance on the day o f her marriage.
"W hat are fireworks like?" she asked the P rin ce, as she was
walking on the terrace.
"They are like the aurora b o re a lis ,3" said the K ing, w ho always
answ ered questions th at w ere addressed to oth er people, "only m uch
m ore natu ral. I prefer th em to stars myself, as you always know
w hen they are going to appear, and they are as delightful as my own
flute-playing. You m ust certainly see th em ."
So at the end o f the K ing's garden a great stand had been set
61
up. A nd as soon as th e Royal P y ro tech n ist had put everything in its
p ro p er place, the firew orks began to talk to each other.
"The w orld is certainly very beautiful," cried a little Squib.
"Just look at those yellow tulips. Why! If they w ere real crackers,
they could not be lo v elier.4 I am very glad I have travelled. Travel
im p ro v es th e m in d w o n d erfu lly , and does away w ith all o n e 's
prejudices."
"The K in g 's garden is not the w orld, you foolish Squib," said
the R om an C andle. "T he w orld is an enorm ous place, and it w ould
take you th ree days to see it thoroughly."
"Any place you love is the w orld to you," exclaim ed the pensive
C ath erin e W heel, w ho had b een attached to an old deal box in early
life, and p rid e d h e rse lf on h e r b ro k e n h e a rt, "but love is not
fashionable any m o re, the poets have killed it. They w rote so m uch
about it that nobody believed th em , and I am not surprised. True
love suffers, and is silent. I rem em b er m yself once... But no m atte r
now. R o m ance is a thin g o f the past."
"N onsense!" said th e R om an C andle. "R om ance never dies.
It is like the m o o n , and lives forever. The bride and bridegroom ,
for instance, love each o th er very dearly. I heard all about them
this m orn in g from a brow n p ap er cartridge, w ho h ap pened to be
staying in the same draw er as myself, and he knew the latest C ourt
new s."
B ut the C atherine W heel shook h er head. "R o m an ce is dead,
R o m ance is dead, R o m ance is dead," she repeated. She was one of
those w ho think th at, if you say the same thing over and over a
great m any tim es, it b ecom es true in the end.
Suddenly, a sharp, dry cough was heard, and they all looked
ro u n d .
It cam e from a tall, haughty R ocket, w ho was tied to the end
o f a long stick. He always coughed before he said anything, so as to
attract attention.
"Ahem! A hem !" he said, and everybody listened, except the
p o o r C atherine W heel, w ho was still shaking h er head, and repeating,
"R om ance is dead."
"Order! Order!" cried out a C racker. He was som ething o f a
po litician , and always to o k a p ro m in e n t part in the local elections,
so he knew the p ro p e r p arliam entary expressions to use.
"Q uite dead," w hispered th e C atherine W heel, and she w ent
off to sleep.
62
As soon as th ere was perfect silence, the R ocket coughed a
third tim e and began. He spoke w ith a very slow, distinct voice, as
if he w ere d ictating his m em oirs. He always looked over the shoulder
o f the perso n , to w hom he was talking. In fact, he had a m ost
distinguished m anner.
"H ow fortu n ate it is for the K in g 's son," he said, "that he is
to be m arried on th e very day, on w hich I am to be let off! Really,
if it had not been arranged beforehand, it could not have tu rn ed out
b etter for him . B ut P rinces are always lucky."
"D ear m e!" said the Squib, "I th o u g h t it was quite the other
way, and th a t we w ere to be let off in the P rin ce's ho n o u r."
"It may be so w ith you," he answ ered, "indeed, I have no
doubt that it is, but w ith me it is different. I am a very rem arkable
Rocket, and com e o f rem arkable parents. My m other was the m ost
celeb rated C a th e rin e W heel o f h er day, and was fam ous for her
graceful dancing. W hen she m ade h er great public a p p ea ran ce,5 she
turned round nin eteen tim es before she w ent out. And each tim e that
she did so, she threw into the air seven pink stars. She was three feet
and a half in diam eter, and m ade o f the very best gunpowder. My
father was a R ocket like myself, and of F rench extraction. He flew
so high th at the people were afraid th at he would never com e down
again. He did, though, for he was a k in d -h earted person, and he
m ade a m ost b rillia n t d escen t in a show er o f golden rain. The
new spapers w rote about his perfo rm an ce in very flattering term s.
Indeed, the C ourt G azette called him a trium ph o f Pylotechnic a rt."
"P y ro tech n ic, P y ro tech n ic, you m ean ," said a Bengal Light.
"I know it is P y rotechnic. I saw it w ritten on my own canister."
"W ell, I said P y lo tech n ic," answ ered the R ocket angrily. And
the B engal Light felt so crushed th a t he began at once to bully the
little squibs, in order to show th a t he was still a person o f some
im p o rtan ce.
"I was saying," con tin u ed th e R ocket, "I was saying... W hat
was I saying?"
"You w ere talking about yourself," replied the R om an Candle.
"O f course, I knew I was discussing som e interesting subject,
w hen I was so rudely interrupted. I hate rudeness and bad m anners
o f every kind, because I am extrem ely sensitive. No one in the
w hole w orld is so sensitive as I am. I am quite sure o f that."
"W hat is a sensitive perso n ?" said the C racker to the R om an
C andle.
63
"A p erso n w ho, because he has corns himself, always treads
on th e o th er p e o p le 's to e s ," 6 answ ered the R om an candle in a low
w hisper; and the C racker nearly exploded w ith laughter.
"Pray, w hat are you laughing at?" inquired the R ocket, "I am
not laughing."
"I am laughing because I am happy," answ ered the Cracker.
"T hat is a very selfish reaso n ," said the R ocket angrily. "W hat
right have you to be happy? You should be thinking about others. In
fact, you should be thinking about m e. 1 am always thinking about
myself, and I expect everybody else to do the same. T hat is w hat is
called sym pathy. It is a beautiful v irtue, and I possess it in a high
degree. Suppose, for in stan ce, anything happened to m e tonight,
w hat a m isfortune that w ould be for everyone! The Prince and Princess
w ould n ever be happy again, th e ir w hole m arried life w ould be
spoiled. As for the K ing, I know he w ould not get over it. Really,
w hen I begin to reflect on the im p o rtan ce o f my position, I am
alm ost m oved to tears."
"If you w ant to give pleasure to o thers," cried the R om an
C andle, "you had b e tte r keep y ourself dry."
"C ertain ly ," exclaim ed th e Bengal Light, w ho was now in
b e tte r spirits; "that is only co m m o n sense."
"C o m m o n sense, indeed!" said the R ocket indignantly, "You
forget th at I am very u n co m m o n , and very rem arkable. W hy, anybody
can have co m m o n sense, if they have no im agination. I never th in k
of things as they really are. I always think o f them as being quite
different. But n one o f you have any hearts. H ere you are laughing
and m aking m erry ju s t as if the P rince and the Princess had n o t ju st
b een m arried."
"W ell, really," exclaim ed a small F ire -b a llo o n 7. "Why not?
It is a m ost joyful occasion. W hen I fly up into the air, I intend to
tell the stars all about it. You will see th em tw inkle w hen I talk to
them about the p retty bride."
"Ah! W hat a trivial view o f life!" said the R ocket. "B ut it is
only w hat I expected. T here is noth in g in you. You are hollow and
em pty. W hy, perh ap s, the Prince and the Princess may go to live in
a country w here th ere is a deep river. P erhaps, they may have only
one son, a little fair-h aired boy w ith violet eyes like the P rince
himself. P erhaps, som e day he may go out to walk w ith his nurse.
P erh ap s, th e nurse may go to sleep u n d er a great e ld e r-tre e .8 And,
p erhaps, the little boy m ay fall into the deep river and be drow ned.

64
W hat a terrible m isfortune! P o o r peo p le, to lose th e ir only son! It
is really too dreadful! I shall never get over it."
"B ut they have n o t lost th e ir only son," said the R o m an
C andle, "no m isfortune has h ap p en ed to th em at all."
"I never said th at they h ad ," answ ered the Rocket. "I said
they m ight. If they had lost th e ir only son, there w ould be no use
in saying any m ore about the m atter. I hate people w ho cry over
spilt milk. But w hen I th in k they m ight lose th e ir only son, I am
very m u ch affected," and he actually burst into real tears, w hich
flew dow n his stick like raindrops.
"H e m ust have a truly ro m an tic n a tu re," said the C atherine
W heel. "H e w eeps w hen th ere is n o th in g at all to w eep about," and
she m ade a deep sigh and th o u g h t about the deal box.
T hen the m o o n rose, and th e stars began to shine, and a
sound o f m usic cam e from the palace.
The P rin ce and P rincess w ere leading the dance. They danced
so beautifully th a t the tall w hite lilies peeped in at the w indow and
w atched them . And the great red p o p p ie s ’ nodded th eir heads and
beat tim e.
T hen te n o 'clo ck struck, and th e n eleven, and th en tw elve,
and at the last stroke o f m idnight every one cam e out on the terrace.
And th e K ing sent for the R oyal Pyrotechnist.
"L et th e firew orks b e g in ," said th e K ing; and the R oyal
P yro tech n ist m ade a low bow , and m arched down to the end o f the
garden. He had six atten d an ts w ith him , each o f w hom carried a
lighted to rch at th e end of a long pole.
It was certainly a m agnificent display.
W hizz! W hizz! w ent the C atherine W heel, as she tu rn ed round
and round. Boom! Boom! w ent the R om an Candle. T hen the Squibs
danced all over th e place, and the Bengal Lights m ade everything
look scarlet. "G o o d -b y e ," cried the F ire-b allo o n , as he flew away,
dropping tiny blue sparks. Bang! Bang! answ ered the C rackers, who
w ere enjoying them selves im m ensely. Every one was a great success
except the R em arkable R ocket. He was so w et w ith crying th a t he
could not go off at all. The best thin g in him was the gunpow der,
and th at was so w et w ith tears th a t it was of no use. All his poor
re la tio n s, to w hom he w ould never speak, except w ith a sneer,
shot up into the sky like w onderful golden flowers with blossom s of
fire. Huzza! Huzza! cried the C ourt; and the Princess laughed w ith
pleasure.

65
"I suppose th e y are reserving m e for so m e g rand o c c a s io n ,"
said th e R o c k e t, "no d o u b t th a t is w h a t it m e a n s ," and he looked
m o r e arro g an t t h a n ever.
T h e n e x t day th e w o r k m e n c a m e to p u t e v e r y th in g tidy.
"T h is is ev iden tly a d e p u t a t i o n ," said th e R o c k e t. "I will receive
t h e m w ith b e c o m i n g d ig n ity ," so he p u t his n o se in th e air, and
b e g a n to frow n severely, as if he w e r e t h in k i n g a b o u t so m e im p o r ta n t
subject. B u t th e y t o o k no n o tic e o f h im at all till th e y w ere j u s t
g o in g away. T h e n o n e o f t h e m c a u g h t sight o f him . "H a llo ! " he
cried. " W h a t a b a d ro c k e t!" and he th r e w h im o v e r th e w all into
th e ditch.
"Bad rocked B a d rockef?" he said, as he m o v e d r o u n d and
r o u n d very fast th r o u g h th e air. "Im possible! G rand rocket, th a t is
w h a t th e m a n said. B a d an d g ra n d s o u n d very m u c h th e sam e,
in d e e d , th e n they often are th e s a m e ," and he fell in to th e m ud.
"It is n o t c o m fo rta b le h e r e ," he said, "but no d o u b t it is som e
fash io n a b le w a te r in g -p la c e , and they have sent m e away to recruit
my hea lth . M y n erves are certainly very m u c h affected, an d I n e e d
rest."
T h e n a little F r o g w ith b r ig h t je w e lle d eyes, a n d a gree n
coat, sw am up to him .
"A new arrival, I see!" said th e Frog. "W ell, after all th e re is
n o th in g like m u d . G ive m e rainy w e a th e r and a d itch, an d I am
quite happy. D o y o u t h in k it will be a w et afterno on? I am sure, I
h o p e so, b u t th e sky is quite b lu e an d cloudless. W h a t a pity!"
"Ahem! A hem !" said th e R o c k e t, and b e g a n to cough.
"W h a t a delightful voic e y o u have!" cried th e F rog. "R eally
it is quite like a croak. C r o a k in g is, o f c o u rse , th e m o s t m u sic a l
so u n d in th e w o rld. Y o u will h e a r o u r g le e - c lu b this e v e n i n g . 1" W e
sit in th e old d u c k - p o n d close by th e f a r m e r 's h o u s e , an d as s o o n as
th e m o o n rises w e b egin. It is so c h a r m i n g th a t e v e ry b o d y lies
aw ake to listen to us. In fact, it w as only y e s te rd a y t h a t I h e a r d th e
f a r m e r 's wife say to h e r m o t h e r th a t she c o u ld n o t get a w in k o f
sleep at n ig h t on a c c o u n t o f us. It is m o s t gratifying to find o n e s e lf
so p o p u la r ."
"Ahem! A h em !" said th e R o c k e t angrily. H e w as very m u c h
a n n o y e d th a t he c o u ld n o t get a w o rd in.
"A delightful v o ic e , ce rta in ly ," c o n t in u e d the F rog. "I h o p e
y o u will c o m e o v er to th e d u c k - p o n d . I am off to lo o k for my
dau g h ters. I have six beautiful d aughters. I am so afraid th e Pike m ay
66
m eet them . H e is a perfect m onster, and w ould have no hesitation
in b re a k fa stin g off th e m . W ell, g o o d -b y e ; I have enjoyed our
conversation very m u ch , I assure you."
"C onversation, indeed!" said the Rocket. "You have talked
the w hole tim e yourself. T hat is n o t a conversation."
"Som ebody m ust listen," answ ered the Frog, "and I like to do
all the talking myself. It saves tim e, prevents argum ents."
"B ut I like arg u m en ts," u ttered the R ocket.
"I hope not," said the Frog. "A rgum ents are extrem ely vulgar,
because everybody in good society has exactly the same opinions.
G ood-bye a second tim e; I see my daughters in the d istan ce," and
the Frog swam away.
"Y ou are a very irritatin g p e rso n ," said the R ocket, "and
very ill-bred. I hate p eo p le, w ho talk about them selves, as you do,
w hen one w ants to talk about oneself, as I do. It is w hat I call
selfishness. Selfishness is the m ost hateful th in g , especially to an y ­
one w ith my te m p e ra m e n t, b e c a u se I am w e ll-k n o w n for my
sym pathetic n atu re. In fact, y ou should take exam ple by m e; you
could not possibly have a b e tte r m odel. N ow th a t you have the
ch an ce you had b e tte r avail y o u rself o f it. You know , I am going
back to C o u rt alm ost im m ediately. I am a great favourite at C ourt.
In fact, th e P rin ce and the P rin cess w ere m arried yesterday in my
h on o u r. O f course, you know n o th in g o f these m atters, for you are
a p ro v in c ia l."
"T here is no good talking to him ," rem arked a D ragon-fly,
w ho was sitting on th e top o f a large brow n bulrush, "no good at
all, because he has gone away."
"W ell, th a t is his loss, not m in e ," answ ered the R ocket. "I
am not going to stop talking to him m erely, because he pays no
a tte n tio n . I like h e a rin g m y self talk. It is one o f my g reatest
pleasures. I often have long co n v ersatio n s all by myself, and I am
so clever th a t som etim es I d o n 't u n d e rsta n d a single w ord o f w hat
I am saying."
"Then you should certainly lecture on Philosophy," said the D ragon­
fly. He spread a pair of lovely wings and flew away into the sky.
"H ow very silly o f him not to stay here!" cried the R ocket. "I
am sure th at he has not often got such a chance o f im proving his
m ind. H ow ever, I d o n 't care a bit. G enius like m ine is sure to be
appreciated some day," and he sank dow n a little deeper into the
mud.
67
After some tim e a large W hite D uck swam up to him . She
had yellow legs, and w ebbed feet, and was considered a great beauty
on account o f h er w addle.
"Q uack, quack, quack," she said. "W hat a curious shape you
are! M ay I ask w ere you b o rn like th at, or is it the result o f an
accid en t?"
"It is quite evident that you have always lived in the country,"
answ ered the R ocket, "otherw ise you w ould know who I am. H owever,
I excuse y o u r ignorance. It w ould be unfair to expect o th er people
to be as rem arkable as oneself. Y ou will no doubt be surprised to hear
th a t I can fly up into the sky, and com e dow n in a show er o f golden
rain."
"I d o n 't thin k m uch o f th a t," said the D uck, "as I cannot see
w hat use it is to anyone. N ow , if you could plough the fields like the
ox, or draw a cart like the h o rse, look after the sheep like the
collie-dog, th a t w ould be som ething."
"M y good creatu re," cried the R ocket, "I see th at you belong
to the low er orders. A p erson of my p o sition is never useful. We
have c ertain m erits, and th a t is m ore th a n sufficient. I have no
sym pathy m yself w ith industry of any kind, least o f all w ith such
industries as you seem to recom m end. Indeed, I have always been of
th e opin io n th a t h ard w ork is simply the refuge o f p eo p le, w ho have
n o th in g w hatever to do."
"W ell, w ell," said the D uck, w ho was a very peaceful creature,
and never quarrelled w ith anyone, "everybody has different tastes.
I h ope, at any rate, th a t you are going to take up yo u r residence
h ere."
"Oh! D e a r n o ," cried th e R ocket. "I am m erely a visitor.
T he fact is th a t I find th is place tiring. T here is n e ith e r society here,
n o r solitude. I shall probably go back to C ourt, for I know th at I am
destined to m ake a sensation in the w orld."
"I had th o u g h ts o f entering public life once myself," said the
D uck. "T here are so m any things th at need reform ing. Indeed, I
to o k the ch air at a m eeting som e tim e ago, and w e passed resolutions
criticising everything th at we did not like. H ow ever, they did not
seem to have m uch effect. N ow I prefer dom esticity, and look after
my fam ily."
"I am m ade for public life," said the R ocket, "and so are all
my relations, even the hum blest o f them . W henever we appear we
attract great a tten tio n . I have n o t actually appeared myself, b u t
68
w h e n I do so, it w ill be a m a g n if ic e n t sight. As for d o m e stic ity , it
ages one quickly, an d distracts o n e 's m i n d from h ig h e r th in g s ."
"Ah! th e h ig h e r th in g s o f life, h o w fine th e y are!" said the
D u ck . " A n d th a t r e m i n d s m e o f h o w h u n g r y I feel," and she swam
away d o w n th e strea m , saying, " Q u a c k , q uack, q u ac k ."
" C o m e back! C o m e back!" sc re a m e d th e R o c k e t, "I hav e a
great deal to say to you!" b u t th e D u c k p a id n o a t te n t io n to him. "I
am glad t h a t she h as g o n e ," he said to himself, "she h as a d ecidedly
m id d l e - c la s s m in d . " A n d he sank a little d e e p e r still in to th e m u d ,
an d b e g a n to t h in k abo u t th e lo ne line ss o f g enius, w h e n suddenly tw o
little b oys in w h ite sm oc k s c a m e r u n n in g d o w n th e b a n k , w ith a
k ettle an d so m e faggots.
"T h is m u s t be th e d e p u t a ti o n ," said the R o c k e t, a n d he tried
to look very dignified.
"H a llo !" cried o n e o f the b oy s, "lo ok at th is old stick; I w o n d e r
h o w it c a m e h e r e ," and he p ic k e d th e r o c k e t out o f th e ditch.
"O ld stick)." said th e R o c k et. "Im possible! G o ld stick, t h a t is
very c o m p lim e n ta r y . In fact, he m is tak e s m e for o n e o f the C o u rt
dignitaries!"
"L e t us p u t it into the fire!" said th e o th e r boy, "it will help
to boil th e kettle ."
So th e y piled th e faggots to g e th e r , and p u t th e R o c k e t on to p ,
an d lit th e fire.
"T h is is m a g n if ic e n t," cried th e R o c k e t, "they are going to let
m e off in b r o a d daylight, so th a t eve ry o n e can see m e ."
"W e will go to sleep n o w ," they said, "a n d w h e n w e w ak e u p ,
th e kettle w ill be b o ile d ," and they lay d o w n on th e grass, an d shut
th e ir eyes.
T he R o c k e t w as very d a m p , so he to o k a lo n g tim e to burn.
A t last, h o w ev e r, th e fire c a u g h t him.
" N o w I am going off!" he cried, and he m a d e h im s e lf very stiff
an d straight. "I k n o w I shall go m u c h h ig h e r th a n th e stars, m u c h
h ig h e r t h a n th e m o o n , m u c h h ig h e r t h a n th e sun. In fact, I shall
go so hig h that!.."
Fizz! Fizz! Fizz! and he w e n t straight into th e air.
"D elightful!" he cried. "I shall go on like th is for ever. W h a t
a success I am!"
B u t n o b o d y saw him.
T h e n he b e g a n to feel a cu rio u s se n satio n all o v er him.
" N o w I am going to e x p lo d e ," he cried. "I shall set th e w ho le

69
w orld on fire, a n d m ake such a noise t h a t n o b o d y will talk abo u t
a n y th in g for a w hole year." A n d he certain ly did explode. Bang!
Bang!
Bang! w e n t th e g u n p o w d e r. T h e r e was no d o u b t ab o u t it.
But n o b o d y h e a r d h im , n o t even th e two little boys, because
th e y were s o u n d asleep.
T h e n all t h a t was left of h im was th e stick, a n d this fell dow n
on th e b a c k of a G o o s e , w h o was taking a walk by th e side of th e
d itc h .
" G o o d heavens!" cried th e G o o s e . " I t is going to rain sticks,"
a n d she rushed in to th e water.
"I knew I sh o u ld cre ate a great se n s a tio n ," said th e R ocket,
a n d he w e n t out.

Commentary

1 was duly published in the Court Gazette — и об этом б ы л о св оев­


р е м е н н о с о о б щ е н о в П р и д в о р н о й Газете
indeed, he knew only two airs — в с у щ н о с т и , он зн а л т о л ь к о две
песенки
aurora borealis — с е в е р н о е п о л я р н о е с и я н и е
4
I f they were real crackers, they could not be lovelier. — Д а ж е е с л и
бы это б ы л и н а с т о я щ и е ф е й е р в е р о ч н ы е о г н и , и тогда о н и не
м о г л и бы б ы ть п р е л е с т н е й .
when she made her great public appearance — во в р е м я св оего
зн а м е н и т о го в ы сту п л ен и я перед п у бли кой
A person who, because he has corns him self, alw ays treads on the
otherpeople's toes. — Э то тот, к то н е п р е м е н н о будет о т д а в л и в а т ь
д р у г и м м о з о л и , ес л и он сам от н и х страдает.
7
Fire-balloon — с п е ц и а л ь н ы й б а л л о н ч и к , п о с ы л а е м ы й с цвет­
н ы м и о г н я м и ( ф е й е р в е р к о м ) в воздух, к о т о р ы й в о с п л а м е н я е т ­
ся
8 н а з а д а н н о й вы с о те .
elder-tree (бот.) — б у з и н а
9 redА poppies •
— красн ы е м аки
You will hear our glee-club this evening. — С е г о д н я в е ч е р о м вы
у с л ы ш и т е в ы с т у п л е н и е н а ш е г о м н о г о г о л о с о г о хора.
I t is going to rain sticks. — С н е б е с н а ч и н а ю т п а д а т ь п а л к и .

70
Exercises

Ш R eadin g Com prehension

1 Are the following statements about the tale tru e or fa lse ? If there is
not enough information in the tale write don 't know.
1) The K in g 's son was going to be m arried, so the w hole
court was p reparing for the occasion.__________
2) The State B anquet lasted for a w e e k .__________
3) The K ing played th e flute very well and everybody enjoyed
listening to h im .__________
4) The King always answered questions that were not addressed
to h im .__________
5) C ath erin e W heel, the R o ck et's m other, was fam ous for
h er graceful d a n c in g .__________
6) The son o f th e P rince and th e P rincess was drow ned in a
deep riv e r.__________
7) The King had seven atten d an ts w ith him , each o f w hom
carried a to r c h .__________
8) The D uck was a very peaceful creature and never quarrelled
w ith a n y o n e .__________

2 Answer the following questions.


1) Why did everybody in th e court look forward to seeing the
Princess?
2) H ow did th e K ingdom celebrate the m arriage and why did
th e au th o r call it "a m agnificent cerem ony"?
3) W hat was th e last item on the program m e th at followed
th e ball?
4) W hat w ere the fireworks talking about w hen the R ocket
in terrup ted them ?
5) H ow did th e R ocket speak and w hat did he say about his
p aren ts and himself?
6) W hen and how did the fireworks begin?
7) Why d id n 't th e R ocket explode and why was the R ocket
th ro w n into th e ditch?
8) W hat did the R ocket think o f the Frog and w hat did he
w ant to talk about?
71
9) W h a t did th e R o c k e t say a bout h im self to th e D u c k ?
10) W h y did th e R o c k e t u n d e r s t a n d th e w ords "B a d R o c k e t "
as " G r a n d R o c k e t " a n d "O ld Stick" as " G o l d Stick"?
11) W h a t h a p p e n e d to th e R o c k e t in t h e end?

^3. Vocabulary an d G ra m m a r Tasks

1 Find in the tex t the English for:

и д т и , д е р ж а с ь за р у к и ; я с н о , к а к я с е н хрусталь; п р и су т­
ствовать; р а з в и в а т ь у м с т в е н н ы е с п о с о б н о с т и ; о с в о б о д и т ь ­
с я от п р е д р а с с у д к о в ; о т р и ц а т е л ь н о к а ч а т ь г о л о в о й ; п р и ­
н я т ь д е я т е л ь н о е у частие; ум ел о п о л ь з о в а т ь с я в с е м и п а р л а ­
м е н т с к и м и в ы р а ж е н и я м и ; д и к т о в а т ь м ем у ар ы ; п о д г о т о в и т ь
ч т о -л и б о за р ан ее ; п р о с л а в и т ь с я г р а ц и о з н о й м а н е р о й т а н ц е ­
вать; ф р а н ц у з с к о г о п р о и с х о ж д е н и я ; о т о з в а т ь с я с б о л ь ш о й
п о х в а л о й ; о тд а в л и в а т ь м о з о л и д ру ги м ; п о с т а р а й т е с ь не от­
сы реть ; бы ть в л у ч ш е м н а с т р о е н и и ; г о р е в а т ь о н е п о п р а в и ­
м ом ; сделать гл у бок и й вздох; приберегать ч т о -л и б о д л я особо
т о р ж е с т в е н н о г о случая; у к р е п л я т ь з д о р о в ь е ; не с о м к н у т ь
глаз всю н о ч ь ; н е за м е т и т ь ; о к а з а т ь с я г д е -л и б о ; не м орг­
нуть и г л а зо м ; это э к о н о м и т в р е м я и п р е д у п р е ж д а е т р аз­
н о г л а с и я ; брать п р и м е р с к о г о - л и б о ; п о с е л и т ь с я ; п р о и з в е ­
сти с е н с а ц и ю ; п р и н и м а т ь р е з о л ю ц и и

2 Write the correct forms of the male or female nouns.

M a le F e m a le
son______________________________________________
_________________________________ a u n t
_________________________________w idow
h u s b a n d ________________________________________
g e n t l e m a n ______________________________________
_________________________________w o m a n
_________________________________bride
_________________________________ m o t h e r
n e p h e w _________________________________________
k i n g ____________________________________________
p rin c e
72
a c t o r _________________________________________
w a ite r ________________________________________
h e r o __________________________________________
ste w a rd _______________________________________

3 Complete the sentences using these words: each other, oth er o r others.

1) It is quite clear th a t they love


2) I th o u e h t it was quite the way.
3) You should be th in k in e about
4) "L et us put it into the fire!" said the boy.
5) The firew orks b e sa n to talk to
6) The K ing always answ ered questions th at w ere addressed
to people.
7) The bride and bridegroom , for instance, love
dearly.
8) It w ould be unfair to expect people to be
as rem arkable as oneself.

4 Complete these words by adding the proper form of the reflexive pronoun
w ith -self.

1) C atherine the W heel prided_______ self on her broken heart.


2) I rem em b er_______ self once.
3) My father was a R ocket like self, and o f F rench
ex tractio n .
4) You w ere talking about________ self.
5) I'm always thinking about self.
6) You had b e tte r keep________ self dry.
7) They m ay have a little fair-h aired boy w ith violet eyes
like the P rince________self.
8) The crackers w ere enjoying selves im m ensely.
9) It is m ost gratifying to find self so popular.
10) You have talked th e w hole tim e________ self.
11) I like to do all the talking________ self.
12) I h ate p eople, w ho talk about________selves, as you do,
w hen one w ants to talk about________self, as I do.
13) I often have long conversations all by________ self.
14) He m ade________self very stiff and straight.
15) B etw een the sw an's wings lay th e little Princess________self.
73
5 Fill in the blanks with correct prepositions.

1) The bride and bridegroom walked hand________ hand_______


a canopy_________p urple velvet em broidered little
pearls.
2) The last item the program m e was a grand display
fireworks.
3) The K ing gave orders th at the Royal P y ro tech n ist should
be________a tten d an ce the day________ her m arriage.
4) H e was som ething________ a politician, and always took a
p ro m in e n t part________ the local elections.
5) My m o th e r was fam ous her graceful dancing.
6) She was th ree feet and a half_______ diam eter, and m ade
_______ the very best gunpow der.
7) The new spapers w rote his perform ance________ very
flattering term s.
8) The only thing that helps one________life is the consciousness
_______ o n e's superiority.
9) I suppose they are reserving me_______ some grand occasion.
10) They took no notice________ him ________ all.
11) She could not get a w ink________ sleep________ night_______
account________ us.
12) In fact, you should take exam ple_________me.
13) He spread a p air of lovely wings and flew away________ the
sky.
14) I have always been________o pinion th at hard w ork is simply
th e refuge_________people w ho have n o thing w hatever to
do.
15) T hat rem inds me________ how hungry I feel.

6 Choose the right word. If you are not sure check the meanings in the
dictionary.

1) It was very________ of you to bring yo u r um brella.


a) sensitive
b) sensible

2) I have bought these________ shoes in the shop near you.


a) com fortable
b) co n v en ien t
74
3) The new s of his d eath will deeply her.
a) effect
b) affect

4) D o n 't m en tio n th a t she's p u t on w eight — she is very


_______ about it.
a) sensible
b) sensitive

5) Are you________ on th at hard stool?


a) com fortable
b) co n v en ien t

6) Sm oking and drinking_________health.


a) affect
b) effect

7) She is very________ about m oney.


a) sensitive
b) sensible

8) They m et in a m utually_________place.
a) com fortable
b) co n v en ien t

9) The advertising cam paign d id n 't have m uch________ on sales.


a) affect
b) effect

10) D o n 't be so — I w a sn 't criticising you.


a) sensible
b) sensitive

11) W ill th ree o 'clo ck be to you?


a) com fortable
b) co n v en ien t

12) H er new dress p roduced quite an________ on everyone.


a) affect
b) effect
75
7 Can you fill in the missing words?
1) T h e __________________ was sh a p ed like a great golden swan.
2) T h e king h a d p ro m ise d to play t h e ___________________ .
3) Travel does away w ith all o n e 's ____________________.
4) H e always___________________ before he said anything.
5) H e always to o k a___________________p a rt in th e local elections.
6) H e spoke w ith a very slow, distinct v o ic e , as if he were
d ic tatin g ___________________.
7) M y f a th e r was a R o c k e t like myself, a n d o f F r e n c h

8) T h e n e w sp a p e r s w rote a b o u t t h e p e r f o r m a n c e in very
_________________ te rm s.
9) I h ate p eo p le w ho cry over__________________ milk.
10) T h ey have sent m e away to___________________ my h e a lth .
11) She was c o n s id e r e d a great b e a u ty on____________________of
h e r w addle.
12) I h o p e , at a n y r a t e , y o u are going to ta k e up y o u r
_________________ here.
13) I know I am d estin e d to m a k e a____________________ in th e
world.
14) W e passed___________________ criticising everything t h a t we
did n o t like.

8 Translate the following sentences into English.


1) П р и н ц и П р и н ц е с с а с и д е л и во главе ст о л а в Б о л ь ш о м
зале и п и л и из п р о з р а ч н о й х р у с т а л ь н о й ч а ш и .
2) Ж е н и х у и н е в е с т е п р е д с т о я л о п р о т а н ц е в а т ь Т а н е ц
розы , а К оро л ь вы звался поиграть на флейте.
3) П у т е ш е с т в и я п р е к р а с н о р а з в и в а ю т ум и п о м о г а ю т ос­
в о б о ж д а т ь с я от п р е д р а с с у д к о в .
4) Р а к е т а всегда н а ч и н а л а св о ю р е ч ь с п о к а ш л и в а н и я ,
д а б ы п р и в л е ч ь к себе в н и м а н и е .
5) О н у в л е к а л с я п о л и т и к о й , всегда п р и н и м а л д е я т е л ь ­
н о е уча ст и е в м е с т н ы х вы б орах.
6) З д р а в ы м с м ы с л о м м о ж е т о б л а д а ть кто у г о д н о , п р и
у с л о в и и о тс у тст в и я в о о б р а ж е н и я .
7) « В е р о я т н о , о н и п р и б е р е г а ю т м е н я д л я о с о б о то р ж е ­
с т в е н н о г о случая», — с к а з а л а Р ак ета .
8) « О н и о т п р а в и л и м е н я сю д а д л я у к р е п л е н и я з д о р о ­
вья», — с к а з а л а она.

76
9) В х о р о ш е м о б щ е с т в е все п р и д е р ж и в а ю т с я а б с о л ю т н о
о д и н а к о в ы х в зг л я д о в .
10) М н е суж д е н о п р о и з в е с т и с е н с а ц и ю и п р о с л а в и т ь с я на
весь свет.
11) «Н е т а к д а в н о я д а ж е о т к р ы в а л а с о б р а н и е , н а к о т о ­
р о м м ы п р и н я л и р е з о л ю ц и ю , осу ж д а ю щ ую все, что
н а м не по вкусу», — з а м е т и л а Утка.

Discussion Tasks

1 D iscuss the following.

1) Agree or disagree w ith th e following sta te m e n ts :


• R o m a n c e is a th in g of th e past.
• Travel im proves t h e m i n d wonderfully, a n d does away
w ith all o n e 's prejudices.
2) S peak a b o u t th e R o c k e t. W hy does th e a u t h o r call th e
R o c k e t " re m a rk a b le " ?
3) Discuss t h e m o r a l o f t h e tale.
THE STAR-CHILD

O nce upon a tim e two p o o r W ood cutters were m aking th e ir


way hom e th ro u g h a great pine forest. It was w inter, and a night
o f b itter cold. The snow lay th ick upon the ground. A nd upon the
b ranches o f the trees th e frost kept snapping the little twigs on either
side o f th e m ,1 as they passed. A nd w hen they cam e to the m o u n tain
to rren t, she was hanging m otionless in the air, for the Ice-K ing had
kissed her.
So cold was it th a t even th e anim als and the birds did not know
w hat to m ake of it.
"U gh!" growled the Wolf, as he ran through the w ood w ith
his tail betw een his legs, "this is perfectly terrible w eather. Why
d o e sn 't the G o v ern m en t look to it?"
"Weet! Weet! W eet!" tw ittered th e green L innets, "the old
E arth is dead, and they have covered h er w ith w hite snow."
78
"The E arth is going to be m arried , and this is h e r bridal
dress," w hispered th e T urtledoves to each other. T heir little pink
feet w ere quite fro st-b itte n .2 But they felt th at it was th e ir duty to
take a ro m an tic view o f the situation.
"N onsense!" said the W olf angrily. "I tell you th at it is all the
fault o f the G o vernm ent. If you d o n 't believe m e, I shall eat you."
The W olf had a thoroughly p ractical m ind, and was never at a loss
for a good argum ent.
"W ell, for my own p art," said the W oodpecker, w ho was a
born philo so p h er, "I d o n 't care an atom ic theory for e x p la n a tio n s.3
If a thing is so, it is so. At p resent it is terribly cold."
Terribly cold it certainly was. The little Squirrels, w ho lived
inside th e tall fir-tre e , kept rubbing each o th e r's noses to keep
them selves w arm . The R abbits curled them selves up in th e ir holes,
and dared n o t even look out o f doors. The only ones w ho seem ed to
enjoy it w ere th e great h orned Owls. T heir feathers got frozen, but
they did not m ind. They rolled th e ir large yellow eyes and called out
to each o th e r across the fo re st,4 "Tu-w hit! T u-w hoo! Tu-w hit! Tu-
whoo! W hat delightful w eath er we are having!"
On and on w ent the tw o W o o d c u tte rs,5 blow ing upon th e ir
fingers, and stam ping w ith th e ir huge boo ts u p o n th e icy snow.
Once they sank into a deep drift. They cam e out as w hite as m illers
are, w hen they stand at g rin d sto n e s.6 And once they slipped on the
h ard sm o o th ice, w h ere th e m a rsh w a te r w as frozen. So th e ir
faggots fell out o f th e ir bundles, and they had to pick them up and
bind th em to g e th e r again. A nd once they th o u g h t they had lost
th e ir way. They w ere terribly frightened, because they knew th at
the Snow is cruel to those w ho sleep in her arms. But they put th e ir
trust in th e good Saint M artin w ho w atches over all tra v ellers.7 They
retraced th e ir steps and w ent w ith caution. At last they reached the
edge of the forest, and saw th e lights o f th e ir village far dow n in the
valley b e n e a th them .
So happy w ere they, w hen they cam e out o f the forest th at
they laughed out loud. The E arth seem ed to them like a flow er of
silver. A nd the M o o n like a flow er o f gold.
Yet, after th a t they had laughed they becam e sad, as they
rem em bered th e ir poverty, and one o f them said to the other, "Why
did we m ake m erry, seeing th a t life is for the rich, and n o t for such
as we are? B etter th a t we had died o f cold in the forest, or th at some
wild beast had fallen u p o n us and eaten us."
79
"T ruly," answ ered his co m p an io n , "m uch is given to some,
and little is given to others."
B ut as they w ere com plain in g about th eir misery to each other,
this strange thing happened. T here fell from heaven a very bright
and beautiful star. It slipped dow n the side of the sky, passing by the
o th e r stars in its course. A nd, as they w atch ed it w ondering, it
seem ed to them to sink b ehind the willow trees th at stood near a
little sheepfold, not far from them .
"T here is a p iece o f gold for w hoever finds it," they cried,
and they ran, so eager w ere they for the gold.
A nd one o f them ran faster th an his m ate, and outran him ,
and forced his way th ro u g h th e willows, and cam e out on the o ther
side. A nd, indeed, th ere was a th in g o f gold lying on the w hite
snow. So he h u rried to it, and leaning over it placed his hands upon
it. It was a cloak o f golden tissue, curiously w rought w ith stars, and
w rapped in m any folds. A nd th en he shouted to his com rade th at he
had found th e treasure th at had fallen from the sky. W hen his com rade
had com e up, they sat down in the snow, and loosened the folds of
the cloak so th at they m ight divide the pieces o f gold. But no gold
was in it, n o r silver, n o r indeed, treasure o f any kind, but only a
little child w ho was asleep.
A nd one o f th em said to the other, "This is a bitter ending to
o u r hope. H ow unlucky we are! F o r w hat good does a child bring a
m an? Let us leave it here and go on our way. W e are po o r m en and
have children o f our own w hose bread we may not give to another."
B ut his co m p an io n answ ered him , "N o , but it is an evil thing
to leave the child to die here in the snow. Though I am as po o r as
you are and have m any m ouths to feed, yet I will bring it hom e with
m e. My wife shall take care o f it."
So very tenderly he took up the child, and w rapped the cloak
around it to p ro tect it from the b itte r cold. He m ade his way down
the hill to the village. H is com rade was very m uch surprised at his
foolishness and softness of heart.
And w hen they cam e to the village, his com rade said to him ,
"You have the child, therefore give me the cloak, because we should
share w hat we have found."
But he answ ered him , "N o , th e cloak is n e ith e r m ine nor
yours, but the ch ild 's only," and saying good-bye to him , he w ent to
his own house and knocked.
And w hen his wife opened the door and saw th at her husband
80
had retu rn ed safe to her, she put her arm s ro u nd his neck and kissed
him . She took from his back the bun d le o f faggots, and brushed the
snow off his b o o ts, and asked him to com e in.
B ut he said to her, "I have found som ething in the forest, and
I have b ro u g h t it to you to take care o f it," and he stirred not from
the threshold.
"W hat is it?" she cried. "Show it to me. The house is bare,
and we need m any thin g s." He drew the cloak back and showed her
the sleeping child.
"M y good, dearest husband!" she said u ncertainly, "have we
n o t enough child ren o f our ow n, th a t you m ust bring the child of
another? A nd w ho know s if it brings us bad fortune? A nd how shall
we look after it?" A nd she got very angry w ith him.
"N o , but it is a S tar-C h ild ," he answ ered; and he told h er the
strange way they found it.
B ut she w ould n o t listen , b u t m ock ed at h im , and spoke
angrily, and cried, "O ur children have no bread, and shall we feed
the child o f another? W ho is th ere w ho cares for us? A nd who gives
us food?"
"N o , but G od cares even for the sparrows and feeds th em ," he
answ ered.
"D o not th e sparrows die o f hunger in the w inter?" she asked.
"And is it not w in ter now ?" A nd the m an said n othing, but did not
m ove from the threshold.
A nd a b itte r w ind from th e forest cam e in th ro u g h the open
door, and m ade h er trem ble. She said to him , "Will you close the
door? T here com es a b itter w ind into the house, and I am cold."
"In to a house, w here a h eart is hard, a b itte r w ind always
com es," he said. A nd the w om an gave no answ er but m oved closer
to th e fire.
A nd after a tim e she tu rn ed round and looked at him . H er
eyes w ere full of tears. And he cam e in swiftly, and placed the child
in h er arms. She kissed it, and laid it in a little bed, w here the
youngest o f th e ir ow n children was lying. And on the next m orning
the W o o d cu tter took the curious cloak o f gold and placed it in a big
box. A chain o f am ber th at was round the ch ild 's neck his wife took
and put in th e box also.

So the S tar-C hild was brought up w ith the children o f the


W oodcutter. He sat at the sam e board w ith th em , and was th eir
81
playm ate. A nd every y ear he becam e m ore beautiful to look at. All
th e villagers w ere filled w ith w onder, w hile the W o o d cu tter's children
w ere dark and b lack -h aired , he was w hite and delicate as sawn iv o ry .8
H is curls w ere like th e rings o f th e d affodil.9 H is lips, also, w ere like
th e petals of a red flower. H is eyes w ere like violets by a river of
pure water. A nd his body was like the narcissus o f a field, w here the
m ow er com es not.
Yet, his beauty did w ork evil, because he grew proud, cruel
and selfish. He despised the ch ild ren o f the W o o d cu tter and the
o th e r c h ild re n o f the village. H e said th a t they w ere co m m o n ,
w hile he was o f noble birth , being sprang from a S ta r.10 He m ade
him self m aster over th em , and called th em his servants. No pity
had he for th e poor. H e w ould throw stones at them and drive them
away, and say to th em to beg th e ir bread elsew here. So none of
th em dared com e tw ice to th a t village to ask for help. Indeed, he
was so charm ed by his beauty, and w ould m ock at the w eakly and ill-
favoured, and m ake fun o f them . H im self he loved, and in sum m er,
w hen the w inds were still, he w ould lie by the well in the priest's
orchard and look dow n at th e m arvel o f his ow n face, and laugh for
the pleasure, he had in his fairness.
Often the W o o d cu tter and his wife said to him , "We did not
treat you as you do those w ho are left alone, and have none to help
them . Why are you so cruel to all w ho need pity?"
Often the old priest sent for him , and tau g h t him the love of
living th in g s, saying to him , "The fly is y o u r brother. Do it no
harm . The w ild birds th a t live in th e forest have th e ir freedom .
C atch them not for y our pleasure. G od m ade the b lind-w orm and
the m ole, and each has its place. W ho are you to bring pain into
G o d 's w orld?"
But the S tar-C hild needed not th e ir w ords, but w ould frown
and m ock, go back to his c o m p a n io n s and lead them . A nd his
co m p an io n s followed him , because he was fair, could ran fast and
dan ce, play the pipe and m ake m usic. A nd w herever the Star-C hild
led th em , they followed him , and w hatever the S tar-C hild ordered
th em to do, they did. And w hen he blinded the eyes o f the m ole,
they laughed. And w hen he threw stones at the leper, they laughed
also. And in all things he ruled over th em , and they becam e hard of
heart even, as he was.
O ne day th e re p assed a p o o r b e g g a r-w o m a n th ro u g h the
village. She w as in rags, and h e r feet w ere b leed in g from the
82
ro u g h ro ad , on w h ich she had tra v e lle d , and she w as very p o or,
indeed . A nd b ein g very tire d , she sat dow n u n d e r a c h e stn u t-
tree to rest.
B ut w hen th e S tar-C h ild saw her, he said to his co m panions,
"Look! T here sits an evil b eggar-w om an u n d er th a t fair and g ree n ­
leaved tree. Let us drive h er away, because she is ugly and ill-
favoured."
So he cam e n ear, threw stones at h er and m ocked at her. She
looked at him w ith te rro r in h er eyes, and she could not m ove her
gaze from him . A nd w hen the W o o d cu tter saw w hat the S tar-C hild
was doing, he ran up and said to him , "Surely you are hard o f heart
and know no m ercy. W hat evil has th is p o o r w om an done to you
th a t you should treat h er this w ay?"
And th e Star-C hild grew red w ith anger, and stam ped his foot
upo n the ground, and said, "W ho are y ou to question m e w hat I do?
I am no son o f yours to obey you."
"T hat is tru e ," answ ered the W oodcutter. "Yet, I did show
you pity, w hen I found you in th e forest."
And w h en the w om an h eard these w ords, she gave a loud cry
and fell dow n in a f a in t.11 A nd the W o o d cu tter carried her to his
own house, and his wife took care o f her. W hen she cam e to herself,
they set m eat and drink before her.
B u t she w o u ld n e ith e r eat n o r d rin k , b u t said to th e
W ood cu tter, "D id n o t you say th a t the child was found in the forest?
A nd it is ten years from this day, is it not?"
A nd th e W o o d cu tter answ ered, "Yes, it was in the forest th at
I found him , and it is ten years from this day."
"A nd w hat else did you find w ith h im ?" she cried. "H ad not
he u p o n his neck a chain o f am ber? W as not round him a cloak of
gold tissue b ro id ered w ith stars?"
"T ruly," answ ered the W oo d cu tter, "it was even, as you say."
A nd he to o k th e cloak and the am ber from the box, w here they lay,
and showed th em to her.
A nd w h en she saw th e m she w ept for jo y , and said, "H e is
my little son, w h o m I lost in th e forest. I pray you to send for
him quickly. In search o f him I have w an d ered over the w hole
w o rld ."
So th e W o o d cu tter and his wife w ent out and called to the
Star-C h ild , and said to him , "G o into the house, and there you will
find y o u r m o th e r w ho is w aiting for you."
83
So he ran in, fille d w ith w o n d er and great gladness. But
w hen he saw w ho was w aiting th e re , he laughed scornfully and said,
"W hy, w here is my m other? I see nobody here but this evil beggar-
w o m an ."
A nd th e w om an answ ered him , "I am yo u r m other."
"You are m ad to say so," cried the Star-C hild angrily. "I am
no son of yours, because you are a beggar, and ugly, and in rags.
Therefore get away, and let me see y o u r ugly face no m ore."
"N o , but y ou are, in d eed , my little son, to w hom I gave
b irth in the forest," she cried, and she fell on her knees, and held
out h er arm s to him . "The robbers stole you from m e, and left you
to die," she said, "but I recognised you, w hen I saw you, and I also
recognised th e cloak o f golden tissue and the am ber chain. Therefore,
I pray you to com e w ith m e, because over the w hole w orld I have
w andered in search o f you. C om e w ith m e, my son, because I need
yo u r love."
But the Star-C hild did not m ove from his place, but shut the
doors o f his h eart against h e r ,12 and there was no sound heard, except
the sound o f the w om an w eeping for pain.
And at last he spoke to her, and his voice was hard and bitter.
"If in very tru th you are my m o th er," he said, "it had been better,
if you had stayed away, and had not com e here to bring m e to
sham e. I th o u g h t I was the child of some Star, and n o t a beggar's
child, as you tell me th at I am. Therefore get away, and let me see
you no m ore."
"Oh! My son," she cried, "will you not kiss me before I go? I
have suffered m uch to find you."
"N o ," said the S tar-C hild, "you are too ugly to look at, and
I w ould rath er kiss th e adder or th e toad th a n you."
So th e w om an rose up, and w ent away into the forest w eeping
bitterly. W hen th e S tar-C hild saw th a t she had gone, he was glad,
and ran back to his playm ates.
But w hen they saw him com ing, they m ocked at him and
said, "You are as ugly as the toad, and as disgusting as the a d d e r .13
G et away, because we do not w ant to play w ith you," and they drove
him out o f the garden.
And th e S tar-C hild frowned and said to himself, "W hat is this
th a t they say to me? I will go to the well o f w ater and look into it,
and it shall tell me o f my beauty."
So he w ent to the well of w ater and looked into it. H is face
84
was as the face o f a toad, and his body was scaled like an adder. And
he threw him self dow n on the grass and w ept, and said to himself,
"Surely this has com e u p o n me by reason o f my sin. I have denied
my m o th er, and driven h er away. I have been pro u d and cruel to
her. Therefore I will go and seek h er th ro u g h the w hole w orld, nor
will I rest till I have found her."
And th ere cam e to him the little daug h ter o f the W oodcutter,
and she put her h an d u p o n his shoulder and said, "W hat does it
m atter, if y ou have lost y our beauty? Stay w ith us, and I will not
m ock at you."
A nd he said to her, "N o, but I have been cruel to my m other,
and as a p u n ish m e n t this evil has been sent to me. Therefore I m ust
go and w an d er th ro u g h the w orld till I find her, and she gives me
forgiveness."
So he ran away into the forest and called out to his m o th er to
com e to him , but th ere was no answer. All day long he called to
her. W hen th e sun set he lay dow n to sleep on a bed o f leaves, and
the birds and the anim als fled from him , because they rem em bered
his cruelty. A nd he was alone, except th e toad th at w atched him ,
and the slow adder th a t craw led past.
A nd in the m o rn in g he rose up , and p lucked som e b itte r
berries from the trees and ate th em , and took his way through the
great w ood, w eeping bitterly. And o f everything th a t he m et he
m ade inquiry, if they had seen his m o th er by chance.
H e said to the M ole, "Y ou can go b en eath the earth. Tell
m e, is my m o th e r there?"
A nd the M ole answ ered, "You have blinded my eyes. H ow
should I know ?"
He said to the L innet, "You can fly over the tops o f the tall
trees, and can see the whole world. Tell m e, can you see my m o th er?"
A nd the L in n et answ ered, "You have cut my wings for your
pleasure. H ow should I fly?"
A nd to the little Squirrel, w ho lived in the fir-tree, and was
lonely, he said, "W here is my m o th er?"
A nd the Squirrel answ ered, "You have killed m ine. D o you
seek to kill yours also?"
A nd the S tar-C h ild w ept and bow ed his head, and prayed
forgiveness o f G o d 's things, and w ent on th ro ugh the forest, seeking
for the beggar-w om an. A nd on the th ird day he cam e to the other
side o f th e forest and w ent dow n into the plain.
85
A nd w hen he passed through the villages the children m ocked
at him , and threw stones at him . The p easants w ould not allow him
even to sleep in th e byres, fearing he m ight bring m ildew on the
stored c o r n .14 T here was none w ho had pity on him . N o r could he
h ear anyw here o f the beggar-w om an, w ho was his m other, though
for the space o f th ree years he w andered over the world. Often he
seem ed to see h er on the road in front o f him , and w ould call to her,
and ran after h er till the rough stones m ade his feet bleed. But he
could not find her, and those w ho lived near denied th a t they had
seen her, and they m ocked at his sorrow.

F o r the space o f th ree years he w andered over the w orld, and


in th e w orld th ere was n eith er love n o r kindness, n o r charity for
him . But it was ju s t such a w orld as he had m ade for him self in the
days o f his great pride.

And one evening he cam e to th e gate o f a strong-w alled city


th a t stood by a river, and, though he was tired and his feet ached,
he w anted to enter. But the soldiers w ho stood on guard dropped
th e ir halberds across the e n tr a n c e ,15 and said roughly to him , "W hat
is y o u r business in th e city?"
"I am seeking for my m o th er," he answ ered, "and pray you to
allow m e to pass, because it may be th a t she is in this city."
B ut they m o ck ed at h im , and one o f th em c ried , "O f a
tru th , y o u r m o th e r will not be m erry w hen she sees you. You are
m o re ill-favoured th a n the to ad o f the m arsh, or the adder th a t
craw ls in th e fen. Go away! Go away! Y our m o th e r does not live
in th is city."
A nd an o th er w ho held a yellow b a n n er in his hand said to
him , "W ho is y o u r m o th er, and why are you looking for her?"
And he answered, "My m other is a beggar even as I am, and
I have treated her evilly, and I pray you to allow me to pass that she may
give me her forgiveness, if she lives in this city." But they would not.
A nd, as he tu rn e d away w eeping, one, w hose arm o u r was
inlaid w ith gilt flowers, and on w hose helm et couched a lion th at
had w in g s ,16 cam e up and m ade inquiry o f the soldiers w ho it was,
w ho had sought entrance. And they said to him , "It is a beggar and
the child o f a beggar, and we have driven him away."
"N o ," he cried, laughing, "but we will sell him for a slave,
and his price shall be th e price of a bowl o f sweet w ine."
86
And an old and evil-looking m an w ho was passing by called out
and said, "I will buy him for th a t p rice." Then he to o k the Star-
Child by the h and and led him into th e city.
And after they h ad gone th ro u g h m any streets, they cam e to
a little d o o r. It w as set in a w all th a t w as c o v e re d w ith a
p o m eg ran ate tree. A nd the old m an to u c h e d the d o o r w ith a ring
o f graved ja s p e r, and it opened. They w ent dow n five steps o f brass
into a garden fille d w ith black p o p p ies and green ja r s o f b u rn t
c la y .17 T hen th e old m an to o k from his tu rb a n a scarf o f figured
s ilk ,18 and b o u n d w ith it the eyes o f th e S tar-C h ild , and pushed
him in front o f him . A nd w hen th e scarf was taken off his eyes, the
S tar-C h ild found h im self in a d u n g eo n , th a t was lit by a lan tern
o f h o r n .1’
A nd the old m an set before him som e m ouldy b r e a d 2" on a
p late and said, "E a t," and som e brack ish w a te r 21 in a cup and
said, "D rin k ." A nd w hen he had eaten and drunk, the old m an
w ent out, locking th e d o o r b eh in d him and fastening it w ith an
iron chain.
And on th e next m orn in g th e old m an, w ho was, indeed, the
subtlest o f th e m agicians o f Libya and had learned his art from one
w ho lived in th e to m b s o f the N ile cam e in to him and frow ned at
him , and said, "In a w ood, th a t is n ear to the gate o f this city of
G iaours, th ere are th ree pieces o f gold. O ne is o f w hite gold, and
an o th er o f yellow gold, and the gold of the third one is red. Today
you shall bring m e the piece of w hite gold. If you do n o t bring it, I
will beat you w ith a h u n d red stripes. G et away quickly! At sunset I
will be w aiting for you at the d o o r o f th e garden. See th a t you bring
the w hite gold, or it shall go ill w ith y o u ,22 because you are my
slave. I have b o u g h t you for th e price o f a bowl o f sweet w ine." And
he b o und the eyes o f the S tar-C hild w ith the scarf o f figured silk,
and led him th ro u g h the house, and through the garden o f poppies,
and up the five steps o f brass. And having opened the little door
w ith his ring, he left him in th e street.

A nd the Star-C hild w ent out o f the gate o f the city, and cam e
to th e w ood, o f w hich the M agician had spoken to him .
N ow th is w ood was very fair to look at from outside, and
seem ed full o f singing birds and sw eet-scented flowers. The Star-
Child entered it gladly. Yet its beauty did him little good, because
w herever he w ent harsh briars and th o rn s shot u p 23 from the ground
87
and encom passed him , and evil nettles stung h i m ,24 and the thistle
pierced him w ith h er d a g g e rs .25 So he was in distress. N o r could he
anyw here find th e piece o f w hite gold of w hich the M agician had
spoken, th o u g h he sought for it from m orning to noon, and from
n o o n to sunset. And at sunset he set his face tow ards hom e, w eeping
b itterly, because he knew w hat evil fate awaited him.
B ut w hen he reached th e edge o f the w ood, he heard a cry as
o f som eone in pain from a thicket. And forgetting his sorrow , he
ran back to the place, and saw th ere a little H are caught in a trap
th at som e h u n te r had set for it.
A nd the S tar-C hild had pity on it, and released it, and said to
it, "I am m yself but a slave, yet I may give you yo u r freedom ."
A nd the H are answ ered him , and said, "Surely you have given
m e freedom , and w hat shall I give you in return?"
And the Star-C hild said to it, "I am looking for a piece of
w hite gold, but I can not find it anyw here and if I d o n 't bring it to
my m aster, he will beat m e."
"C om e w ith m e," said the H are, "and I will lead you to it,
because I know w here it is h id d en , and for w hat purpose."
So the S tar-C hild w ent w ith the H are. In a hole in the side
o f a great o ak -tree he saw th e p iece o f w hite gold th a t he was
seeking. A nd he was filled w ith jo y , and took it, and said to the
H are, "The service th at I did to you, you have rendered back again
m any tim es over, and the kindness th at I showed you, you have
repaid a hundredfold."
"N o ," answ ered the H are, "but as you dealt w ith m e, so I did
deal w ith you," and it ran away swiftly, and the S tar-C hild w ent
tow ards the city.
N ow at the gate o f the city there was seated one, w ho was a
leper. Over his face hung a cowl o f grey linen, and through the
eyelet his eyes gleam ed like red c o a ls .26 And w hen he saw the Star-
C hild com ing, he struck u p o n a w ooden bowl, and clattered his
bell, and called out to him , and said, "G ive me a piece o f m oney,
or I m ust die o f hunger. They have driven me out o f the city, and
th ere is no one w ho has pity on m e."
"Ah!" cried the S tar-C hild, "I have but one piece o f m oney in
my w allet, and if I bring it not to my m aster, he will beat m e,
because I am his slave."
B ut the leper entreated him , and prayed o f him , till the Star-
Child had pity, and gave him th e piece o f w hite gold.
88
A nd w hen he cam e to the M ag ician 's house, the M agician
o pen ed the d o o r to him , and b ro u g h t him in, and said to him ,
"H ave you the piece o f w hite gold?" And the S tar-C hild answ ered,
" I have n o t." So the M agician fell u p o n him , and beat him , and set
before him an em pty p late, and said, "E at," and an em pty cup, and
said, "D rin k ," and put him again into the dungeon.
And on th e next m o rn in g the M agician cam e to him , and
said, "If today you do not bring me the piece o f yellow gold, I will
surely keep you as my slave, and give you a h u ndred stripes."
So th e S ta r-C h ild w ent to th e w ood, and all day long he
search ed for th e p iece o f yellow gold, b u t n ow h ere could he find
it. A nd at sun set he sat dow n and b eg an to w eep. As he w as
w eep in g , th e re cam e to him th e little H a re , he had released from
th e trap .
And the H are said to him , "W hy are you w eeping? And w hat
do you seek in the w ood?"
A nd th e Star-C hild answ ered, "I am seeking for a piece of
yellow gold th a t is hidden h ere, and if I find it n ot, my m aster will
beat m e, and keep me as a slave."
"F ollow m e," cried the H are, and it ran through the w ood till
it cam e to a pool o f water. A nd at the b o tto m o f the pool the piece
o f yellow gold was lying.
"H ow shall I th an k y ou?" said th e Star-C hild. "It is the second
tim e th a t you have helped m e."
"N o , but you had pity on me first," said the H are, and it ran
away swiftly.
A nd th e S tar-C hild took the piece o f yellow gold, and put it in
his w allet, and h u rried to the city. B ut the leper saw him com ing,
and ran to m eet him , and knelt dow n and cried, "G ive m e a piece
o f m oney, or I shall die o f hunger."
A nd the Star-C hild said to him , "I have in my w allet but one
piece of yellow gold, and if I bring it not to my m aster, he will beat
me and keep me as his slave."
B ut th e leper entreated him , so th at the Star-C hild had pity
on him , and gave him th e piece o f yellow gold.
A nd w hen he cam e to the M ag ician 's house, the M agician
op en ed th e d o o r to him , and b ro u g h t him in, and asked him ,
"H ave got you the piece o f gold?" And the Star-C hild said to him ,
"I have n o t." So the M agician fell upon him , and beat him , and
fastened him w ith chains, and put him again into the dungeon.
8’
A nd on the next m orning th e M agician cam e to him , and
said, "If today you bring me th e piece o f red gold, I will set you free,
but if you do not b ring it, I will surely kill you."
So th e S tar-C h ild w ent to th e w ood, and all day long he
searched for the piece o f red gold, but now here could he find it. A nd
in the evening he sat dow n and wept. As he was w eeping, there
cam e to him the little H are.
A nd th e H are said to him , "The piece o f red gold th at you seek
is in the cavern th at is behind you. Therefore w eep no m ore but be
glad."
"H ow shall I th an k you?" cried the Star-C hild. "This is the
th ird tim e you have helped m e."
"N o, but you had pity on m e first," said the H are, and it ran
away swiftly.
A nd th e S tar-C h ild entered th e cavern, and in its farthest
co rn er he found the piece o f red gold. So he put it in his w allet, and
h urried to the city. A nd the leper seeing him com ing, stood in the
centre o f th e road, and cried out, and said to him , "G ive me the
p iece o f red m oney, or I m ust die," and the Star-C hild had pity on
him again, and gave him th e piece o f red gold, saying, "Y our need
is greater th a n m i n e ." 27 Yet, his h eart was heavy, because he knew
w hat evil fate aw aited him.
As he passed th ro u g h th e gate, the guards knelt dow n and
said, "H ow beautiful is o u r lord!" A crow d o f citizens followed him ,
and cried out, "Surely there is n o n e so beautiful in the w hole world!"
so th a t th e S tar-C hild w ept, and said to himself, "They are m ocking
at m e, and laughing at my m isery." And so large was the crowd of
th e p eople, th a t he lost his way, and found him self at last in a great
square, in w hich th ere was the palace o f a King.
A nd th e gate o f the palace opened, and the priest and the high
officers o f th e city ran to m eet him , and they knelt dow n, and said,
"You are our lord, for w hom we have been w aiting, and the son of
o u r K ing."
A nd the S tar-C hild answ ered th em , "I am no kin g 's son, but
the child o f a p o o r beggar-w om an. And how can you say th a t I am
beautiful, because I know that I am evil to look at?"
T h e n h e , w hose arm o u r w as in laid w ith gilt flow ers, and
on w hose h e lm e t c ro u c h e d a lio n th a t had w in g s, h e ld up a
shield, and cried , "W hy does n o t my lord believe m e th a t he is
b eau tifu l?"
’"
And th e S tar-C hild looked. H is face was ju s t as it had been,
and his beauty had com e back to him . B ut he n o ticed th at there was
som ething in his eyes w hich he had not seen before.
And th e priests and the high officers knelt dow n and said to
him , "It w as p ro p h esied o f o ld 21 th at on th is day should com e he
w ho was to rule over us. T herefore, let y o u r lord take this crow n
and th is sceptre, and be in his ju stic e and m ercy our K ing over us."
B ut he said to th em , "I am not w orthy, because I have denied
the m o th e r w ho gave me birth. I may not rest till I have found her,
and know n h er forgiveness. T herefore, let m e go, for I m ust w ander
again over th e w orld, and may n o t stay h ere, though yet you bring
m e th e crow n and th e sceptre."
A nd as he spoke, he tu rn ed his face from th em tow ards the
street, th a t led to the gate o f the city. A m ong the crow d th a t pressed
roun d the soldiers he saw the b eggar-w om an w ho was his m other,
and at h er side stood the leper w ho had set by the road.
And a cry o f joy broke from his l i p s ,2’ and he ran over her, and
kneeling dow n, he kissed the w ounds on his m o th er's feet, and wet
them w ith his tears. He bowed his head in th e dust, and sobbing, as
one whose h eart m ight break, he said to her, "M other, I denied you
in the h o u r o f pride. A ccept me in the h o u r o f hum ility. M other, I
gave you hatred. Do give m e y o u r love. M other, I rejected you.
Receive the child now ." But the beggar-w om an answered him not a
word.
And he reached out his han d s, and clasped the w hite feet of
the leper, and said to him , "T hree tim es I did give you my m ercy.
Ask my m o th e r to speak to m e o n ce." But the leper answ ered him
n o t a word.
A nd he sobbed again and said, "M o th er, my suffering is greater
th a n I can bear. Give me the forgiveness, and let me go back to the
forest." A nd the b eggar-w om an put h er h and on his head, and said
to him , "R ise," and th e leper p u t his h and on his head, and said to
him , "R ise," also.
A nd he rose up from his feet, and looked at them . They were
a K ing and a Q ueen.
A nd th e Q ueen said to him , "T his is your father w hom you
have helped."
A nd th e K ing said, "This is y o u r m o th er w hose feet you have
w ashed w ith y o u r tears."
A nd they fell on his neck and kissed him , and brought him
91
into th e palac e a n d dressed h im in beautiful clo th es, a n d set th e
cro w n u p o n his h e a d , a n d th e sceptre in his h a n d . Over th e city th a t
sto o d by t h e river he ruled, and was its lord. M u c h justice a n
m e rc y he did show to all. T h e evil M a g ician he drove away, a n d to
th e W o o d c u t t e r a n d his wife he sent m a n y rich gifts, a n d to th e ir
c h ild r e n he gave high h o n o u r . H e was n o t cruel to birds or beasts,
b u t ta u g h t love a n d kin d n e ss, a n d charity. To th e p o o r he gave
brea d , a n d to th e n a k e d he gave clothes. T h e r e was p e a c e a n d p le n ty
in th e la n d .30
Yet ruled he n o t long, so great h ad b e e n his suffering, a n d so
31
b itt e r th e fire of his testing, for after th e space of th r e e years he
died. A nd he w ho c a m e after h im ruled evilly.

Commentary

1 A n d upon the branches o f the trees the fro s t kep t snapping the little
twigs on either side — М а л е н ь к и е о б л е д е н е в ш и е в е т о ч к и о б л а м ы ­
в а л и с ь с обеих с т о р о н
2
Their p in k fe e t were quite frost-bitten. — И х м а л е н ь к и е р о з о в ы е
н о ж к и с о в е р ш е н н о о к о ч е н е л и от холода.
3
I don't care an atom ic theory fo r explanations. — Я н е н у ж д а ю с ь в
ф и зи ч ес ки х законах для о б ъ я сн ен и я явл ен и й .
They rolled their eyes a n d called out to each other across the forest. —
О н и т а р а щ и л и с в о и о г р о м н ы е ж е л т ы е глаза и п е р е к л и к а л и с ь
друг с д р угом ч е р е з весь лес.
On and on went the two Woodcutters — А двое л е с о р у б о в все ш л и
и ш л и ч е р ез бор
They cam e out as white as millers are, when they sta n d a t grindstones. —
О н и в ы л е з л и оттуда п о х о ж и м и н а м у к о м о л о в , к о гд а те с т о я т у
крутящ ихся ж ерновов.
7
who watches over all travellers — к о т о р ы й п о к р о в и т е л ь с т в у е т всем
п8 у т е ш е с т в е н н и к а м
Не was white and delicate as sawn ivory. — У н е г о л и ц о бы ло
белое и н е ж н о е , с л о в н о в ы т о ч е н н о е из с л о н о в о й к о с т и .
9
H is curls were like the rings o f the daffodils. — З о л о т ы е к у д р и его
были к а к л еп естк и н арцисса.
being sprung from a Star — п р о и с х о д и т от зве зд ы
fe ll down in a fa in t— у пал а без чувств

92
12
shut the doors o f his heart against her — он наглухо з а т в о р и л свое
сердце
13
You are as ugly as the toad, a n d as disgusting as the adder. — Д а
ведь ты м е р з о к , к а к ж а б а , и о т в р а т и т е л е н , к а к гадю ка.
14
The p easants w ould not allow him even to sleep in the byres, fe a rin g
he m ight bring m ildew on the stored corn. — И к р е с т ь я н е н е п о з в о ­
л я л и ему даж е со с н у т ь в а м б а р е , б о я с ь , что от н его м о ж е т сесть
плесень на зерно.
B u t the soldiers who stood on g u a rd dropped th eir halberds across the
entrance— Н о в о и н ы , с т о я в ш и е у в о р о т н а ст р аж е, с к р е с т и л и
ал е б а р д ы
one, whose arm our was in la id with gilt flow ers, a n d on whose
helmet couched a lion that had wings — н е к т о в к о л ь ч у г е , р аз у к ­
р а ш е н н о й з о л о т ы м и ц в е т а м и , и в ш л е м е с г р е б н е м в виде
кры латого льва
17
They w ent down fiv e steps o f brass into a garden fille d with black
poppies a n d green ja rs o f burnt clay. — И о н и с п у с т и л и с ь п о п я т и
б р о н з о в ы м с т у п е н я м в сад, где ц в е л и ч е р н ы е м а к и и с т о я л и
зеленые гл и н ян ы е кувш ины .
18
a scarf o f figured silk — у з о р ч а т ы й ш е л к о в ы й ш а р ф
in a dungeon, that was lit by a lantern o f horn — в т е м н и ц е ,
которая освещ алась ф онарем , п о веш ен н ы м на крю к
mouldy bread — з а п л е с н е в е л ы й хлеб
21
brackish water — с о л о н о в а т а я вода
22
it shall go ill with you — худо т е б е будет
harsh briars and thorns shot up — к о л ю ч и й к у с т а р н и к , п о л н ы й
остр ы х ш и п о в , п о д н и м а л с я п е р е д н и м
evil nettles stung him — з л а я к р а п и в а о б ж и г а л а его н о г и
25
the thistle pierced him with her daggers — ч е р т о п о л о х к о л о л его
острыми, как кинж ал, колю чкам и
O ver his fa c e hung a cowl o f grey linen, a n d through the eyelet his
eyes gleamed like red coals. — Л и ц о его с к р ы в а л с е р ы й х о л щ о в ы й
к а п ю ш о н , и глаза его г о р е л и в п р о р е з я х , с л о в н о угли.
27
Your need is greater than mine. — Т в о я нужда б о л ь ш е м о е й .
I t was prophesied o f old — Б ы л о д а в н е е п р о р о ч е с т в о
29
a cry o f joy broke from his lips — к р и к р ад о с т и с о р в а л с я с его уст
There was peace and p lenty in the land. — В с т р а н е его в с е г д а
ц а р и л и м и р и б л а г о д ен с тв и е .
31
so bitter the fire o f his testing — с л и ш к о м т я ж к о м у п о д в е р г с я он
испы танию
93
Exercises

Щ R eadin g Com prehension

1 Are the following statements about the tale tru e or f a ls e 4! If there is


not enough information, write don 't know.

1) The W o odcutters w ere frightened w hen they found out


they had lost th e ir way.
2) The W o odcutters found the Star-C hild u n d er the tree in
the forest.
3) The W o o d cu tter's wife was happy to see th at her husband
had retu rn ed safe to her.
4) The S tar-C hild was an exceptionally handsom e boy and a
good son.
5) The W o o d cu tter and his wife disliked the way the boy
treated a p o o r beggar-w om an.
6) The S tar-C hild was glad to find his m other.
7) W hen th e S ta r-C h ild p assed th ro u g h th e villages the
children m ocked at him.
8) The M agician bought the boy for a bowl o f sweet wine.
9) The M agician had learned his art in the tom bs o f N ile.
10) The Star-C hild had pity on th e H are and released it from
the trap.
11) The Star-C hild did not have pity on the leper and d id n 't
give him any m oney.
12) H is p aren ts rejected him and he died o f suffering.

2 Read the tale again and complete the following sentences.

1) The m o u n tain to rre n t was hanging m otionless in the air,


for__________________.
2) They w ere terribly frightened because they knew th a t

3) Though I am as p o o r as you are and have m any m ouths to


feed, yet__________________ .
4) W hen his wife saw th a t h er husband had retu rn ed safe,
she_________________ .
5) Yet, his beauty did w ork evil, because___________________.
94
6) And M s com panions followed him because_________________ .
7) I have d en ied my m o th e r, I have b een cruel to her.
Therefore__________________.
8) The old m an took from his tu rb an a scarf o f figure silk,
and_________________ .
9) Today you shall bring m e the piece o f w hite gold. If you
d o n 't bring, I__________________ .
10) But w hen he reached the edge o f the w ood, he heard from
a thicket__________________ .
11) A nd how can y o u say th a t I am b e a u tifu l, b e ca u se

12) It was p rophesied o f old th at__________________ .


13) I m ust w ander again over the w orld, and may not stay
h ere, tho u g h yet__________________ .
14) He was not cruel to b irds or beasts, but__________________ .
15) Yet ruled he not long,__________________ .

3 Answer the following questions.

1) W hat did the W oodcu tters com e across in the forest and
w hat did they do w ith it?
2) W hy was the W o o d c u tte r's wife angry w ith her husband?
3) W here was the S tar-C hild b rought up and in w hat way
w as he different from o th er children in the village?
4) W hom did the Star-C hild see u n d er a c h e stn u t-tre e and
how did he treat her?
5) W hat did th e beggar-w om an learn from the talk betw een
the W o o d cu tter and the Star-C hild?
6) H ow did th e S ta r-C h ild behave w hen he learn ed the
news?
7) W hy did the S tar-C h ild decide to w ander th ro u g h the
w orld and how long had th e boy w andered?
8) W hom did the S tar-C hild m eet at the gate o f the city and
w here was he led by him ?
9) W hat did the M agician ask the Star-C hild to bring first?
10) W here did the S tar-C hild search for it and who helped
him ?
11) W hom did the boy m eet on his way to the city and w hat
was he asked? D id the boy give it to him ?
12) W hat was the result of the S tar-C h ild's pity on the leper?
95
13) H ow was th e S ta r-C h ild m e t in th e city a n d w h at surprised
h im ?
14) W h o m did th e S ta r-C h ild see in th e crow d a n d how did
th e y receive th e boy?

S Vocabulary an d G ra m m a r Tasks

1 Find in the text the English for:

п р о б и р а т ь с я ; п р и д е р ж и в а т ь с я р о м а н т и ч е с к о г о в зг л я д а ;
об л ад ать о ч е н ь т р е зв ы м у м о м ; н и к о г д а н е л е зт ь за с л о в о м
в к а р м а н в с п о р е ; что к а с а е т с я м е н я ; бы ть п р и р о ж д е н н ы м
ф и л о с о ф о м ; д о б р а т ь с я до о п у ш к и л ес а; со д ер ж ат ь боль­
ш ую с е м ь ю ; н е п е р е с т у п и т ь п о р о г а ; п р и н о с и т ь сч астье
(н е с ч а с т ь е ); бы ть и с п о л н е н н ы м у д и в л е н и я (р а д о с т и ); бы ть
б л аго р о д н о го п р о и с х о ж д е н и я ; п р о и сх о д и ть от З в е зд ы ; стать
ж е с т о к о с е р д н ы м ; бы ть в лохм отьях; р о д и ть к о г о -л и б о ; спра­
ш и в а т ь (н а в о д и т ь с п р а в к и ); я ш м о в ы й п е р с т е н ь ; п р о т я н у т ь
руки; тяж елы е и сп ы тан и я

Look at the list of adjectives from the tale and divide them into three
groups: positive, negative and either, according to their meanings.

b itt e r , frig h te n e d , h a p p y , te r r ib le , p r a c tic a l, h a r d , c ru e l,


b eau tifu l, evil, te n d e r, foolish, c u rio u s, p ro u d , cru e l, selfish,
s c o rn fu l, a n g ry , ugly, d isg u stin g , k in d

P ositive (good ) N egative (bad) Either (not sure)

96
3 In the list o f words from the tale below, some o f the verbs have to do
with sound and some with movement. Put them in the appropriate column.

sn a p , grow l, tw itte r, w h isp e r, ru b , c u rl, b lo w , slip , cry,


stir, s c re a m , sh iv e r, tr e m b le , w e e p , so b , clasp

Sound M ovem ent

4 Fill in the blanks with correct prepositions.

1) T w o p o o r W o o d c u tte rs w e re m a k in g th e ir w ay h o m e
_________ a g reat p in e -fo re st.
2 ) T h e T u rtle d o v e s felt th a t it w as th e ir d u ty to ta k e a
ro m a n tic view _________ th e situ atio n .
3) T h e W o lf h a d a th o ro u g h ly p ra c tic a l m in d , a n d w as n ev e r
_________ a loss__________ a good arg u m e n t.
4) A t la st th e y re a c h e d th e edge___________th e forest.
5) It w as a clo ak o f g o ld e n tis su e , cu rio u sly w ro u g h t_________
stars.
6) D o n o t sparro w die__________h u n g e r___________ th e w in te r?
7) H e said th a t th ey w ere c o m m o n , w h ile h e w as__________
n o b le b irth , b ein g sprung a Star.
8) T h e p o o r b e g g a r-w o m a n w a s _________ rags, and h e r feet
w ere b le e d in g __________th e ro u g h road .
9) S urely th is h as co m e_________ m e __________re a s o n _________
m y sin.
10) I h av e b o u g h t y o u _________ th e p ric e o f a b o w l___________
sw eet w ine.

5 Use the verbs in brackets in the Past Simple.

1) T h e snow __________________ th ic k u p o n th e g ro u n d , (lie)


2) T h e ir fag g o ts___________________ o u t o f th e ir b u n d le s , (fall)
97
3) T h e S ta r-C h ild ___________________ up w ith th e c h ild re n o f
th e W o o d c u tte r, (bring)
4) Often th e old priest________________for h im and_______________
h im th e love o f living things, (send; te ac h )
5) W h e n ev e r th e S ta r-C h ild __________________ his c o m p a n io n s ,
th e y ___________________ h im . (lead; follow)
6) W h e n h e _____________________ s to n e s a t th e le p e r , th e y
__________________ also, (th ro w ; laugh)
7) W h e n th e w o m a n _____________________ th e s e w o rd s, she
__________________a lo u d cry a n d __________________ dow n in
a faint, (h e a r; give; fall)
8) T he w o m an ________________ on h e r knees_an d _______________
o u t h e r arm s to him . (fall; hold)
9) T h e rob b ers th e ch ild from his m o th e r
an d ___________________ h im to die. (steal; leave)
10) W h e n th e sun , he__________________ dow n
to sleep o n a b e d o f leaves, (set; lie)
11) He th e eyes o f th e S ta r-C h ild w ith th e
sc a rf o f figured silk, (b in d )
12) H e_____________________th e re a little H a re ________________ in
a tr a p , (see; c a tc h )
13) H e__________________ up from his feet, an d _________________
at th e m , (rise; look)
14) T h e p rie st a n d th e high officers o f th e city_________________
to m e e t h im , a n d th e y __________________ do w n befo re h im .
(ru n ; kneel)

6 Translate the following sentences into English.

1) О н и о ч е н ь о б р а д о в а л и с ь , к о гд а в ы б р а л и с ь н а к о н е ц из
л еса.
2) П р е к р а с н а я , н е о б ы ч а й н о я р к а я зв е зд а у п ал а с н еб а.
3) Его т о в а р и щ о ч е н ь у д и в и л с я п р о се б я т а к о й его глупо­
сти и м я г к о с е р д е ч и ю .
4) Н о к р а с о т а п р и н е с л а ем у т о л ь к о з л о , и б о он в ы р о с
себ я лю б и вы м , горды м и ж есто ки м .
5) « В о и с ти н у у те б я к а м е н н о е с е р д ц е , и ж а л о с т ь тебе
н ев ед о м а » , — с к а за л л есо р у б .
6) М а л ь ч и к , и с п о л н е н н ы й р а д о с т и и и з у м л е н и я , вбе­
ж ал в д о м .
7) И он б р о с и л с я н и ч к о м н а тр аву и з а п л а к а л .
8) Н о к о гд а он п о д х о д и л к о п у ш к е л е с а , и з ч а щ и до
н е г о д о л е те л к р и к — к а з а л о с ь , к т о -т о в з ы в а е т о п о ­
мощ и.
9) О н бы л с п р а в е д л и в и м и л о с е р д е н ко в с ем .
10) О н к о р м и л го л о д н ы х и с и р ы х и о девал н аги х .
11) А п р е е м н и к его бы л т и р а н о м .

f?1 D iscussion Tasks

1 D iscuss the following.

1) G ive as m u c h in fo rm a tio n as possible to p rove th a t it was


really te rrib ly cold w h en th e W o o d c u tte rs w ere re tu rn in g
h o m e from th e p in e forest.
2) F in d som e facts in th e text w hich show th a t th e W o o d c u tte r
was a k in d - h e a rte d m a n .
3) D esc rib e th e S ta r-C h ild 's a p p e a ra n c e a n d p rove th a t it
c o n tra s te d his b eh a v io u r.
4) A gree o r disagree w ith th e a u th o r's s ta te m e n t: " F o r th e
space o f th re e years he w a n d e re d over th e w orld, a n d in
th e w orld th e re was n e ith e r love n o r c h a rity for h im . B ut
it was ju st such a w orld as he h ad m a d e for h im self in th e
days o f his g reat p rid e ."
5) F in d exam ples in th e tex t w h ich show th a t th e M a g ician
w as a n evil m a n .
6) A gree or disagree w ith th e following p roverb: " O n e good
tu r n deserves a n o th e r ." (Д олг п л а т е ж о м к р а с е н .)
7) S p e a k a b o u t th e S ta r - C h ild a n d p ro v e th e follow ing
s ta te m e n t from th e tale: "so g reat h a d b e e n his suffering,
a n d so b itte r th e fire o f his te stin g ".
8) D iscuss th e m o ra l o f th e tale.
THE BIRTHDAY OF THE INFANTA

It w as th e b irth d a y o f th e Infanta. She w as ju s t tw elve y ears old.


T he sun w as shin in g brightly in th e gard en s o f th e p alac e. A lth o u g h
she w as a real P rin c ess and th e In fa n ta o f Spain, she h a d only on e
b irth d a y every y ear, ju s t like th e c h ild re n o f quite p o o r p eo p le. So it
w as n atu rally a m a tte r o f great im p o rta n c e to th e w h o le co u n try th a t
she should h av e a really fine day for th e occasio n . A n d a really fine
day it certain ly w as. T he tall strip ed tu lip s sto o d straig h t, like long
row s o f soldiers. T hey lo o k ed across th e grass at th e ro ses, an d said,
"W e are quite as splen d id as y o u are n o w ." T he p u rp le b u tterflies
flu ttered ab o u t w ith gold dust on th e ir w ings, visiting ea ch flow er in
tu rn . T he little lizard s lay in th e h o t sun. T he p o m e g ra n a te s split and
c ra ck ed w ith th e heat. E ven th e p ale yellow le m o n s seem ed to have
ca u g h t a ric h e r c o lo u r from th e w onderfu l sunlight. A n d th e m a g n o lia
tree s fille d th e air w ith a sw eet perfum e.

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T he little P rin c e ss w alk e d u p and d o w n th e te rra c e w ith h e r
c o m p a n io n s , and p la y e d h id e -a n d -s e e k . O n o rd in a ry d ay s she w as
o nly allow ed to p lay w ith th e c h ild re n o f h e r ow n ran k . So she h ad
alw ays to play a lo n e , b u t h e r b irth d a y w as an e x c e p tio n . T he K in g
allow ed h e r to in v ite any o f h e r y o u n g frien d s, w h o m she lik ed to
c o m e a n d a m u se th e m se lv e s w ith her. T h e re w as a stately g race
a b o u t th e se slim S p an ish c h ild re n , b u t th e In fa n ta w as th e m o st
graceful o f all, an d th e m o st tastefully dressed. H e r ro b e w as o f grey
sa tin , th e skirt an d th e w id e sleeves h eavily e m b ro id e re d w ith silver.
T w o tin y slip p ers w ith big p in k ro ses p e e p e d o u t b e n e a th h e r d ress,
as she w alked. P in k and p e a rl w as h e r g reat fan, an d in h e r h air,
w h ic h like fad ed gold sto o d o u t ro u n d h e r p a le little fac e, she h ad a
b ea u tifu l w h ite rose.
F ro m a w in d o w in th e p a la c e th e sad m e la n c h o ly K in g w a tc h e d
th e m . B e h in d h im sto o d h is b ro th e r, D o n P e d ro o f A r a g o n ,1 w h o m
h e h a te d , an d h is co n fesso r, th e G ra n d In q u is ito r o f G r a n a d a ,2 sat
by h is side. S ad d er ev en th a n u su a l w as th e K in g , fo r as h e lo o k ed
at th e In fa n ta , h e th o u g h t o f th e y o u n g Q u ee n , h e r m o th e r. H e r
m o th e r w h o ca m e fro m th e seem ingly m erry c o u n try o f F ra n c e h a d
d ied six m o n th s after th e b irth o f h e r child. So g reat h a d b e e n h is
love fo r h e r th a t he h a d n o t ev en allow ed h e r to b e b u rie d . She h ad
b e e n e m b a lm e d by a M o o ris h p h y s ic ia n , w h o in r e tu r n fo r th is
service h ad b e e n g ra n te d h is life. A n d h e r b o d y w as still lying in th e
b la c k m a rb le c h a p e l o f th e P a la c e , ju s t as th e m o n k s h ad p u t h e r on
th a t w in d y M a rc h day n ea rly tw elv e y e a rs befo re. O n ce every m o n th
th e K in g , w ra p p e d in a d ark clo ak , w e n t in an d k n e lt by h e r side
ca llin g o u t, "Mi reina! M i reina!"’ an d so m e tim e s, h e w o u ld h o ld
h e r p ale h a n d s in w ild grief, an d try to w ak e th e co ld face by h is m ad
kisses.
T o d ay he seem ed to see h e r again, as h e h ad seen h e r first at
th e C a stle o f F o n ta in b le a u ,4 w h e n he w as fifteen y e a rs o ld , an d she
w as still y o u n g e r. T hey h ad b e e n form ally en g ag ed on th a t o c c a sio n
by th e P a p a l N u n c i o 5 in th e p re se n c e o f th e F re n c h K in g an d all th e
C o u rt. L a te r on follow ed th e m a rria g e , hastily p erfo rm e d at B u rg o s,
a sm all to w n on th e fro n tie r b e tw e e n th e tw o c o u n trie s. T h en th ey
w e n t to M a d rid , w h ere th e c u sto m a ry c e le b ra tio n o f h ig h m a s s 6 at
th e C h u r c h o f L a A to c h a w as h e ld , d u rin g w h ic h n e a rly th re e
h u n d re d h e re tic s , in c lu d in g m a n y E n g lish m e n , w ere b u rn ed .
C e rta in ly he h ad loved h e r m adly. H e h ard ly ev er p e rm itte d
h e r to be o u t o f h is sight. F o r h e r he h ad fo rg o tten , o r seem ed to
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h av e fo rg o tte n , all grave affairs o f S tate. A n d , w ith th a t te rrib le
b lin d n e ss th a t p a s sio n b rin g s u p o n its se rv an ts, h e failed to n o tic e
th a t th e e la b o ra te c e re m o n ie s , by w h ic h h e tr ie d to p le a se h e r,
ag gravated th e stran g e m a lad y fro m w h ic h she suffered. W h e n she
d ied , he w as, fo r a tim e , like o n e w h o is m ad . In d e e d , th e re w as
n o d o u b t th a t he w o u ld have given u p th e th ro n e an d g o n e to th e
g reat T ra p p ist m o n a s te ry 7 at G ra n a d a , if he h a d n o t b e e n afraid to
leave th e little In fa n ta at th e m e rc y o f h is b ro th e r, w h o se cru elty
even in S pain w as n o to rio u s. H e w as su sp e cte d o f h av in g ca u se d th e
Q u e e n 's d e a th by a p a ir o f p o is o n e d gloves th a t h e h a d p re s e n te d to
h e r on th e o c c a s io n o f h e r v isitin g h is castle in A rag o n . E v en after
th e th re e y e a rs o f p u b lic m o u rn in g , th e K in g w o u ld n e v e r allow his
m in iste rs to speak a b o u t a new m a rria g e. A n d w h e n th e E m p e ro r
h im s e lf offered h im th e h a n d o f h is n ie c e , h e asked th e am b assa d o rs
to te ll th e ir m a s te r th a t th e K in g o f S pain w as alread y m a rrie d to
Sorrow .
H is w h o le m a rrie d life, w ith its jo y s and griefs, se em e d to
c o m e b ac k to h im to d a y , as he w a tc h e d th e In fa n ta p lay in g o n th e
te rra c e . She h a d all th e Q u e e n 's p re tty m a n n e rs , th e sam e w ilful
w ay o f to ssin g h e r h e a d , th e sam e p ro u d b ea u tifu l m o u th , th e sam e
w o n d erfu l sm ile, as she lo o k ed up n o w an d th e n at th e w in d o w , or
stre tc h e d o u t h e r little h a n d for th e stately S p an ish g e n tle m e n to
kiss. B u t th e lo u d la u g h te r o f th e c h ild re n d id n o t p le a se h is ears,
an d th e b rig h t su n lig h t m o c k e d at h is sorrow . H e b u rie d h is face in
h is h a n d s , an d w h e n th e In fa n ta lo o k e d up ag ain , th e K in g h ad
already gone.
She felt u p set. Surely he m ig h t h av e stay ed w ith h e r on h e r
b irth d a y . W h a t d id th e stu p id S tate affairs m a tte r? O r h ad h e g one
to th a t gloom y c h a p e l, w h ere th e ca n d le s w ere alw ays b u rn in g , and
w h ere she w as n e v e r allow ed to en ter? H o w silly o f h im , w h e n th e
sun w as sh in in g so b rig h tly , and ev erybody w as so h appy! B e sid es, he
w o u ld m iss th e sh a m bullfight for w h ic h th e tru m p e t w as alread y
so u n d in g , to say n o th in g o f th e p u p p e t show an d th e o th e r w o n d erfu l
th in g s. H e r u n c le and th e G ra n d In q u is ito r w ere m u c h m o re sensible.
T hey ca m e o u t on th e te rra c e , and p a id h e r n ic e c o m p lim e n ts . So
she to ssed h e r p re tty h e a d , an d ta k in g D o n P e d ro by th e h a n d , she
w alk e d slow ly d o w n th e steps to w a rd s a lo n g p a v ilio n o f p u rp le silk.
T he o th e r c h ild re n follow ed h e r in strict o rd e r o f p re c e d e n c e , th o se
w h o h a d th e lo n g e st n a m e s w e n t first.
A p ro c e ssio n o f n o b le b o y s, fan tastically d ressed as toreadors'
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ca m e o u t to m e e t h er. T h e y o u n g C o u n t, a w o n d erfu lly h a n d s o m e
b oy o f a b o u t fo u rte e n , le d h e r so le m n ly to a little g o ld e n an d ivory
c h a ir th a t w as p la c e d on a p la tfo rm above th e aren a. T h e c h ild re n
g ro u p ed th e m se lv e s all ro u n d , w h isp e rin g to ea c h o th e r, an d D o n
P e d ro an d th e G ra n d I n q u is ito r sto o d la u g h in g at th e e n tra n c e .
E v en th e D u c h e ss — the C am erera -M a yo f as she w as ca lle d — a
th in , h a r d -fe a tu re d w o m a n , did n o t lo o k so b a d - te m p e r e d as u sual.
It c e rta in ly w as a m a rv e llo u s b u llfig h t, an d m u c h n ic e r, th e
In fa n ta th o u g h t, th a t th e rea l b u llfig h t she h a d b e e n b ro u g h t to see
at S e v ille 1" on th e o c c a s io n o f th e v isit o f th e D u k e o f P a rm a to h e r
father. S om e o f th e b o y s ro d e rich ly d resse d h o b b y h o rs e s; o th e rs
w e n t on fo o t w av in g th e ir scarlet c lo ak s b efo re th e b u ll, w h e n th e
b u ll w as ab o u t to fall on th e m . A s fo r th e b u ll him self, he w as ju s t
like a live b u ll, an d so m e tim e s in sisted on ru n n in g ro u n d th e a re n a
on h is h in d legs, w h ic h n o live b u ll ev er d re a m s o f d o in g . H e m a d e
a sp le n d id fig h t o f it to o . T he c h ild re n got so ex c ite d th a t th e y sto o d
up u p o n th e b e n c h e s , an d w av ed th e ir h a n d k e rc h ie fs an d cried o u t
B ravo toro! B ravo toro!" ju s t as if th e y h a d b e e n g ro w n up p e o p le . A t
last, h o w ev e r, after a lo n g fig h t, d u rin g w h ic h several h o b b y h o rse s
w ere k illed , a n d th e ir rid e rs d is m o u n te d , th e y o u n g C o u n t b ro u g h t
th e b u ll to h is k n ee s. H av in g got p e rm issio n from th e In fa n ta , he
p lu n g e d h is w o o d e n sw ord in to th e n e c k o f th e a n im a l w ith such
v io le n c e th a t th e h e a d ca m e rig h t off, an d d isc lo se d th e lau g h in g
face o f th e son o f th e F re n c h A m b a s sa d o r at M a d rid .
T he a re n a w as th e n c le a re d am id st m u c h ap p la u se , an d th e
d ea d h o b b y h o rse s w ere dragged aw ay by tw o M o o ris h p ages. T hey
ac te d so w ell, an d th e ir g estu re s w ere so ex trem ely n a tu ra l, th a t at
th e en d o f th e play th e eyes o f th e In fa n ta w ere q u ite d im w ith tears.
In d e e d , so m e o f th e c h ild re n really crie d , an d h ad to b e co m fo rted .
A n A fric an ju g g le r fo llo w ed w h o b ro u g h t in a larg e b a s k e t
co v e red w ith a re d c lo th , and h av in g p la c e d it in th e c e n tre o f th e
a re n a , he to o k fro m h is tu rb a n a c u rio u s p ip e , an d b lew th ro u g h it.
In a few m o m e n ts th e clo th b e g a n to m o v e. A s th e p ip e grew lo u d e r
an d lo u d e r, tw o g ree n and gold sn ak es p u t o u t th e ir stran g e h ea d s
an d ro se slow ly u p . T he c h ild re n , h o w ev e r, w ere ra th e r frig h ten ed
at th e m , an d w ere m u c h m o re p le a se d , w h e n th e ju g g le r m a d e a
tin y o ra n g e -tre e grow o u t o f th e san d an d b e a r p re tty w h ite b lo sso m s
an d re a l fruit. W h e n he to o k th e fan o f th e little girl, an d c h a n g e d
it in to a b lu e b ird , th a t flew all ro u n d th e p av ilio n an d sang, th ey
w ere very m u c h d elig h ted . T he so le m n m in u e t, to o , p e rfo rm e d by

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th e d a n c in g b o y s, w as c h a rm in g . T he In fa n ta h ad n e v e r b efo re seen
th is w o n d erfu l ce rem o n y .
A tro o p o f h a n d s o m e E g y p tia n s — as th e g ip sies w ere called in
th o se days — th e n a p p e a re d in th e arena. S ittin g cro ss-le g g ed , in a
c irc le , th e y b e g a n to p lay softly u p o n th e ir in s tru m e n ts , m o v in g
th e ir b o d ie s to th e tu n e . W h e n th e y c a u g h t sight o f D o n P e d ro ,
th e y frow ned at him . Som e o f th e m lo o k e d te rrified , fo r only a few
w eeks b efo re he h a d h a d tw o o f th e ir trib e h a n g e d in th e m a rk e tp la c e
at Seville. B u t th e p re tty In fa n ta c h a rm e d th e m , an d th ey felt sure
th a t o n e so lovely as she w as co u ld n e v e r b e cru e l to an y b o d y . So
th e y p la y ed on very gently, an d th e ir h e a d s b e g a n to n o d as th o u g h
th e y w ere falling asleep. S u d d en ly , w ith a cry so lo u d th a t it sta rtled
all th e c h ild re n , th e E g y p tia n s ju m p e d to th e ir feet an d w h irle d
m a d ly ro u n d , and sang som e w ild lo v e -so n g in th e ir stran g e lan g u ag e.
T h e n at a n o th e r signal th ey all th re w th e m se lv e s ag a in to th e g ro u n d
an d lay th e re q u ite still. A fter th e y h ad d o n e th is several tim e s, th ey
d isa p p e a re d for a m o m e n t. T h e n th e y ca m e b a c k le a d in g a b ro w n
b e a r by a c h a in , an d ca rry in g on th e ir sh o u ld e rs som e little apes.
T he b e a r sto o d u p o n h is h e a d , an d th e ap es p la y e d all k in d s o f
a m u sin g tric k s w ith tw o gypsy b o y s w h o se em e d to b e th e ir m a ste rs,
a n d fo u g h t w ith tin y re g u la r so ld ie r's drill ju s t like th e K in g 's ow n
b o d y g u ard . In fact, th e gipsies w ere a g reat success.
B u t th e fu n n iest p a rt o f th e w h o le m o r n in g 's e n te r ta in m e n t
w as th e d a n c in g o f th e little Dw arf. W h e n h e a p p e a re d in th e a re n a
o n h is cro o k e d legs and w ith h is h u g e m is sh a p e n h e a d , th e c h ild re n
b u rst o u t laughing. T he In fa n ta h e rse lf la u g h e d so m u c h th a t th e
C a m e r e r a h a d to r e m in d h e r th a t a lth o u g h th e r e w e re m a n y
p re c e d e n ts in S pain fo r a K in g 's d a u g h te r w e e p in g b efo re h e r eq u a ls,
th e re w ere n o n e for a P rin c e ss o f th e ro y al b lo o d m a k in g so m e rry
b efore th o se w h o w ere m u c h lo w er in ran k . T he D w arf, h o w ev er,
w as really fan ta stic . A n d even at th e S p an ish C o u rt su ch a fan ta stic
little m o n s te r h a d n ev e r b e e n seen. It w as h is firs t a p p e a ra n c e , to o .
H e w as fo u n d only th e day b efore by tw o n o b les. T h e D w a rf w as
b ro u g h t by th e m to th e P a la c e as a gift for th e In fa n ta. H is fa th e r
w h o w as a p o o r m a n w as very p le a se d to get rid o f su c h an ugly an d
u seless child. P e rh a p s th e m o st am u sin g th in g a b o u t h im w as th a t
th e D w a rf did n o t k n o w ab o u t h is u gliness. In d e e d , h e seem ed q u ite
h ap p y an d full o f th e h ig h e st spirits. W h e n th e c h ild re n la u g h ed , he
la u g h ed as freely as any o f th e m . A t th e e n d o f e a c h d a n c e h e m a d e
th e m ea c h th e fu n n iest o f b o w s, sm iling an d n o d d in g at th e m ju s t as

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if he was really one o f them selves. As for the Infanta, she absolutely
charm ed him . He could n o t keep his eyes off her, and seem ed to
dance for h er alone. At the end o f th e p erform ance she took out of
her h air a beautiful w hite rose, and partly for a jo k e and partly to
tease th e C a m e re ra , th rew it to h im across th e aren a w ith h er
sweetest smile. He to o k the w hole m a tte r quite seriously, and pressing
the flower to his rough coarse lips, he p u t his han d u p o n his heart,
and sank on one knee before her, sm iling from ear to ear, and his
face was shining w ith happiness.
This so am used the Infanta th at she kept on laughing after the
little D w arf had run out o f the arena. She expressed a desire to h er
uncle th at the dance should be im m ediately repeated. The Cam erera,
however, decided that it w ould be better th at her H ighness should
return w ithout delay to the P alace, w here a wonderful feast had been
already prepared for her. There was also a real birthday cake w ith her
own initials w orked all over it. The In fan ta rose up w ith m uch
dignity, and having given orders th at the little D w arf was to dance
again for h er after the h our o f s ie s ta ,12 she w ent back to her cham ber.
The children followed in the same order in w hich they had entered.
W hen th e little D w arf h eard th a t he was to dance a second
tim e before th e Infanta, and by h er own w ish, he was so proud th at
he ran out into the garden kissing the w hite rose in an absurd ecstasy
of pleasure, and m aking clum sy gestures o f delight.
The Flow ers w ere quite indignant, w hen they saw him in th e ir
beautiful hom e. A nd w hen they saw him ju m p in g up an dow n, and
waving his arm s above his head in such a ridiculous m anner, they
could n o t conceal th eir feelings any longer.
"H e is really far too ugly to be allowed to play in any place
w here we are," cried th e Tulips.
"H e should drink p o ppy-juice, and go to sleep for a thousand
years," said the great scarlet L ilies, and they grew quite hot and
angry.
"H e is a perfect horror!" scream ed the C actus. "W hy, his
head is com pletely out of p ro p o rtio n w ith his legs. If he com es near
m e, I will sting him w ith my th o rn s."
"A nd he has actually got one o f my best b lo o m s," exclaim ed
the W hite R ose-T ree. "I gave it to the Infanta this m orning myself,
as a birthday p resent, and he has stolen it from h e r ." A nd she called
out, "Thief! Thief! Thief!" at th e to p o f h e r voice.
E ven th e red G eran iu m s who w ere know n to have a great
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m a n y p o o r re la tio n s th e m se lv e s tu r n e d aw ay in d isg u st, w h e n th ey
saw h im .
B u t so m e h o w th e B irds liked h im . T h ey saw h im o ften in th e
forest d a n c in g a b o u t like an elf, o r c lim b in g up in th e h o llo w o f
so m e o ld o a k -tre e , sh a rin g h is n u ts w ith th e sq u irrels. T hey d id n o t
m in d h is b ein g ugly a bit. W hy, even th e n ig h tin g a le h e rse lf w h o
sang so sw eetly in th e o ran g e groves at n ig h t w as n o t m u c h to lo o k at
a fte r all. B e s id e s , h e h a d b e e n k in d to th e m , an d d u rin g th a t
te rrib ly b itte r w in te r, w h e n th e re w e re n o b e rrie s o n th e tre e s, an d
th e g ro u n d w as as h a rd as iro n , an d th e w olv es h ad co m e d o w n to th e
very gates o f th e city to lo o k for food, he h ad n e v e r o n c e fo rg o tten
th e m , b u t h a d alw ays given th e m c ru m b s o u t o f h is little h u n c h o f
b la c k b rea d , an d sh a re d w ith th e m w h a te v e r p o o r b rea k fa st h e h ad .
So th e y flew ro u n d an d ro u n d h im , ju s t to u c h in g h is c h e e k
w ith th e ir w in g s, as th e y p assed , a n d c h a tte re d to e a c h o th er. T h e
little D w a rf w as so p le a se d th a t he co u ld n o t h elp sh o w in g th e m th e
b ea u tifu l w h ite ro se, an d te llin g th e m th a t th e In fa n ta h e rse lf h ad
g iven it to h im , b e c a u se she lov ed him .
T he L izard s also liked h im very m u c h . W h e n h e grew tire d o f
ru n n in g a b o u t and th re w h im s e lf do w n on th e grass to rest, th ey
p la y ed and ra n all ov er h im , and trie d to am use th e m se lv es in th e best
w ay th ey could. "E v ery o n e c a n n o t be as b eau tifu l as a lizard ," th ey
cried, "th at w o u ld be to o m u c h to expect. A n d h e is really n o t so ugly
after all, o f co u rse , if o n e shuts o n e 's eyes, an d d o es n o t lo o k at h im ."
T he L izard s w ere extrem ely p h ilo so p h ica l by n a tu re , an d often sat
th in k in g fo r h o u rs and h o u rs to g e th e r, w h en th e re w as n o th in g else to
d o , o r w h e n th e w e a th e r w as to o rainy for th e m to go out.
T h e F lo w e rs , h o w e v e r, w e re very m u c h a n n o y e d at th e ir
b e h a v io u r and at th e b e h a v io u r o f th e birds. "It only sh o w s," th ey
said, "w h a t a vu lg arisin g effect th is ru sh in g an d flying ab o u t h as.
W e ll-b re d p eo p le alw ays stay exactly in th e sam e p la c e , as w e do. N o
o n e ever saw us ju m p in g up an d do w n , o r gallo p in g m ad ly th ro u g h
th e grass after dragon-flies. W h en w e do w an t a c h a n g e , w e send for
th e g ard e n er, and he carries us to a n o th e r bed. T his is dignified, as
it sho u ld be. B u t b ird s and lizards, in d e ed , h av e n o t ev en a p e rm a n e n t
address. They are like th e gipsies, an d shou ld b e tre a te d in exactly th e
sam e m a n n e r." So th e y p u t th e ir n o se s in th e air, an d lo o k ed very
arro g an t, and w ere quite d elig h ted , w h e n after som e tim e th ey saw
th e little D w a rf m ak e h is w ay across th e te rra c e to th e p alac e.
"H e sh o u ld ce rtain ly be k e p t in d o o rs fo r th e rest o f h is n a tu ra l
106
life," th e y said. "L o o k at h is h u n c h e d b ac k , an d h is c ro o k e d leg s,"
an d th e y b e g a n to laugh.
B u t th e little D w a rf k n ew n o th in g o f all th is. H e liked th e b ird s
an d th e lizards very m u c h , and th o u g h t th a t th e flow ers w ere th e m o st
m a rv ello u s th in g s in th e w h o le w o rld , ex cep t, o f co u rse , th e Infanta.
B u t th e n she h ad given h im th e b eautiful w h ite ro se, an d she loved
h im , and th a t m a d e a great difference. H o w h e w ish ed th a t h e h ad
g one b a c k w ith h er! S he w ould have p u t h im on h e r rig h t h a n d , an d
sm iled at h im , an d he w o u ld h av e n e v e r left h e r side, b u t w o u ld h av e
m a d e h e r h is p la y m a te , and ta u g h t h e r all k in d s o f delightful tricks.
F o r th o u g h he h a d n ev e r b e e n in a p alac e befo re, he k n ew a great
m an y w onderful th in g s. H e co u ld m a k e little cages fo r th e g rassh o p p ers
to sing in. H e k n ew th e cry o f every b ird an d th e so u n d o f every
an im al. H e k n ew th e trail o f every a n im al, and co u ld tra c k th e h are
by its d elica te fo o tp rin ts. A ll th e w ild d an c es he k new , th e m a d d an c e
in red c lo th e s w ith th e a u tu m n , th e light d a n c e in b lu e san d als o v er
th e co rn , an d th e b lo sso m d a n c e th ro u g h th e o rc h a rd s in spring. H e
k n ew w h ere th e w o o d p ig e o n s b u ilt th e ir n ests, an d o n ce w h e n a
h u n te r killed th e p a re n t b ird s, he b ro u g h t up th e y o u n g o n es himself.
T h ey w ere q u ite ta m e , and they u sed to feed o u t o f h is h a n d s every
m o rn in g . "S he w o u ld like all th e an im als I lo v e," h e th o u g h t. Yes,
she m u st ce rtain ly co m e to th e forest an d play w ith th e m . H e w o u ld
give h e r h is ow n little bed, and w o u ld w a tc h o u tsid e th e w in d o w till
d aw n, to see th a t th e w ild h o rn e d an im als d id n o t h a rm h er, th e
w olves d id n o t co m e n e a r to her. A n d at daw n h e w o u ld w ake h er,
an d th e y w o u ld go o u t and d a n c e to g e th e r all th e day long. It w as
really n o t a b it lonely in th e forest. C e rtain ly , th e re w as a g reat deal
to lo o k at in th e forest. A nd w h e n she w as tire d , h e w o u ld find a soft
b a n k o f m o ss for h er, o r carry h e r in h is arm s, for he w as very strong,
th o u g h he knew th a t he w as n o t tall. H e w o u ld m ak e h e r a n e c k la ce
o f red b erries, th a t w o u ld be q u ite as pretty as th e w h ite b erries th a t
she w o re on h e r dress, and w h e n she w as tire d o f th e m , she co u ld
th ro w th e m aw ay, an d he w o u ld find h e r others.

B u t w h e re w as she? H e asked th e w h ite ro se, an d it m a d e h im


no answ er. T h e w h o le p a la c e se em ed asleep , an d ev en w h e re th e
sh u tters w ere n o t closed, heavy c u rta in s w ere draw n acro ss th e w in d o w s
to k e e p o u t th e light. H e w a n d e re d all r o u n d lo o k in g fo r so m e
p la c e , th ro u g h w h ic h he m ig h t find an e n tra n c e , an d at la st h e
c a u g h t sight o f a little p riv ate d o o r th a t w as lying o p en . H e slip p ed
th ro u g h , an d fo u n d h im se lf in a sp le n d id h a ll, far m o re sp len d id ,

107
he feared , th a n th e forest. T h ere w as so m u c h m o re gold ev ery w h ere,
an d even th e flo o r w as m a d e o f g reat co lo u re d sto n e s, fitte d to g e th e r
in to a sort o f g e o m e tric a l p a tte rn . B u t th e little In fa n ta w as n o t
th e re , only som e w o n d erfu l w h ite sta tu e s th a t lo o k ed d o w n on h im
from th e ir p e d e sta ls, w ith sad eyes an d stran g ely sm ilin g lips.
A t th e en d o f th e hall h u n g a rich ly e m b ro id e re d c u rta in o f
b la c k v elv et, p o w d e re d w ith su n s and stars, th e K in g 's fav o u rite
dev ices, and b ro id e re d on th e c o lo u r he loved best. P e rh a p s she w as
h id in g b e h in d th a t? H e w o u ld try at any rate.
So he stole q uietly across, an d drew it aside. N o , th e re w as
only a n o th e r ro o m , th o u g h a p r e ttie r o n e , h e th o u g h t, th a n th e
o n e he h a d ju s t left.
T he little D w a rf lo o k e d in w o n d e r all ro u n d h im , and w as
h alf-afraid to go on. H e th o u g h t o f th e p re tty In fa n ta , an d to o k
co u ra g e. H e w a n te d to fin d h e r a lo n e , an d to tell h e r th a t h e , to o ,
loved her. P e rh a p s she w as in th e ro o m b ey o n d .
H e ra n across th e soft M o o rish c a rp e ts, an d o p e n e d th e door.
N o! She w as n o t h e re eith er. T he ro o m w as q u ite em p ty .
It w as a th r o n e ro o m , u s e d fo r th e r e c e p tio n o f fo re ig n
a m b assa d o rs, w h e n th e K in g agreed to give th e m a p e rso n a l a u d ie n c e ;
th e sam e ro o m in w h ic h , m a n y y ea rs b efo re, en v o y s h a d a p p e a re d
from E n g la n d to m a k e a rra n g e m e n ts for th e m a rria g e o f th e ir Q u ee n ,
th e n o n e o f th e C a th o lic so vereigns o f E u ro p e , to E m p e ro r 's eld est
son. O n th e se co n d step o f th e th r o n e w as p la c e d th e k n e e lin g -
s t o o l 13 o f th e In fa n ta , w ith its c u s h io n o f c lo th o f silver tissu e, an d
b elo w th a t ag ain sto o d th e c h a ir fo r th e P a p a l N u n c io w h o a lo n e
h a d th e rig h t to b e seated in th e K in g 's p re se n c e on th e o c c a s io n o f
any p u b lic c e re m o n ia l.
B u t th e little D w a rf ca red n o th in g fo r all th is m a g n ifice n ce .
H e w o u ld n o t have given h is ro se for all th e p e a rls, n o r on e w h ite
p e ta l o f h is ro se fo r th e th ro n e itself. W h a t h e w a n te d w as to see th e
In fa n ta , b efo re she w e n t d o w n to th e p a v ilio n , an d ask h e r to co m e
aw ay w ith h im , w h e n h e h a d fin ish e d h is d a n c e . H e r e , in th e
P a la c e , th e air w as clo se and h ea v y , b u t in th e fo rest th e w in d blew
free, and th e re w as a lo t o f sunlight. T h ere w ere flow ers, to o , in
th e forest, n o t so sp le n d id , p e rh a p s , as th e flo w e rs in th e g ard e n ,
b u t m o re sw eetly sc e n te d for all th a t. Y es, surely she w o u ld c o m e ,
if he co u ld o nly fin d her! She w o u ld c o m e w ith h im to th e fair
forest, an d all day lo n g he w o u ld d a n c e for h e r d elig h t. A sm ile lit
up h is eyes at th e th o u g h t, an d he p assed in to th e n e x t ro o m .

108
O f all th e ro o m s th is w as th e b rightest an d th e m o st beautiful.
B u t he w as n o t alone. S tanding u n d e r th e shadow o f th e d oorw ay, at
th e very en d o f th e ro o m , he saw a little figure w atch in g him . H is h ea rt
trem b led , a cry o f jo y b ro k e from his lips, an d m o v ed o u t in to th e
sunlight. A s he did so, th e figure m o v ed out also, an d he saw it clearly.
It w as a m o n s te r, th e m o st g ro te sq u e m o n s te r h e h a d ever
seen. N o t p ro p erly shaped as all o th e r p eo p le w ere, b u t h u n c h b a c k e d ,
an d cro o k e d -le g g e d , w ith a h u g e ro u n d h e a d an d b la c k hair. T he
little D w a rf frow ned, and th e m o n s te r frow n ed also. H e la u g h ed ,
and it lau g h ed w ith h im , and h eld its h a n d s to its sides, ju s t as he
h im se lf w as doing. H e m a d e it a m o c k in g bow , and it re tu rn e d h im
a low re v e re n c e . H e w e n t to w a rd s it, an d it ca m e to m e e t h im ,
co p y in g e a c h step th a t h e m a d e , and sto p p in g w h e n h e sto p p e d
himself. H e sh o u ted w ith a m u se m e n t, and ra n forw ard, an d re a c h e d
o u t h is h a n d , and th e h a n d o f th e m o n ste r to u c h e d h is, an d it w as as
co ld as ice. H e grew afraid, and m o v ed h is h a n d acro ss, an d th e
m o n s te r's h a n d follow ed it quickly. H e trie d to p ress o n, b u t so m e th in g
sm o o th an d h a rd sto p p ed him . T he face o f th e m o n s te r w as n o w close
to his ow n, and seem ed full o f te rro r. H e b ru sh ed his h a ir off h is eyes.
It im ita te d him . H e struck at it, and it re tu rn e d b lo w for blow . H e
h a te d it, and it m a d e faces at him . H e drew back , an d it retrea te d .
W h a t is it? H e th o u g h t for a m o m e n t, an d lo o k e d ro u n d at
th e rest o f th e ro o m . It w as stran g e , b u t e v e ry th in g se em e d to h av e
its d o u b le in th is in v isib le w all o f c le a r w ate r. Y es, p ic tu r e for
p ic tu re w as re p e a te d , and c o u c h fo r co u c h .
W h a t is E c h o ? H e ca lled to h e r o n ce in th e v alley , an d she
an sw e re d h im w o rd fo r w ord. C o u ld she m o c k at th e eye, as she
m o c k e d at th e v o ice? C ould she m a k e a m im ic w o rld ju s t like th e
rea l w o rld ? C o u ld th e shad o w s o f th in g s h av e c o lo u r an d life and
m o v e m e n t? C o u ld it be th a t — ?
H e sta rte d an d ta k in g from h is b re a st th e b eau tifu l w h ite ro se,
h e tu rn e d ro u n d , and kissed it. T he m o n s te r h a d a ro se o f its ow n ,
p e ta l fo r p e ta l th e same! It kissed it w ith like kisses, an d p resse d it
to its h e a rt w ith h o rrib le g estures.
W h e n he u n d e rs to o d th e tru th , he gave a w ild cry o f d esp air,
an d fell w ee p in g to th e gro u n d . So it w as h e, w h o w as m issh a p e n
an d h u n c h b a c k e d , ugly to lo o k at. H e h im s e lf w as th e m o n ste r, and
it w as at h im th a t all th e c h ild re n h ad b e e n la u g h in g , an d th e little
P rin c e ss , w h o he th o u g h t loved h im — she, to o , h a d b e e n m erely
m o c k in g at h is u g lin ess, and m a k in g m erry ov er h im . W hy h a d n o t

109
th e y left h im in th e forest, w h e re th e re w as no m irro r to te ll h im
h o w ugly he w as? W hy h ad n o t h is fa th e r k illed h im , ra th e r th a n sell
h im to h is sh a m e ? T h e h o t te a rs p o u re d d o w n h is c h e e k s, an d h e to re
th e w h ite ro se to p ie c e s. T h e m o n s te r d id th e sa m e. W h e n h e
lo o k e d at it, it w a tc h e d h im w ith a face d ra w n w ith p a in . H e
tu r n e d aw ay, fearin g to see it, an d co v e red h is eyes w ith h is h a n d s.
H e lay th e re , like so m e w o u n d e d th in g .
A n d at th a t m o m e n t th e In fa n ta h e rs e lf c a m e in w ith h e r
c o m p a n io n s . W h e n th ey saw th e ugly little D w a rf lying on th e g ro u n d
an d b e a tin g th e flo o r w ith h is c le n c h e d h a n d s in th e m o st fan ta stic
an d ex ag g erated m a n n e r, th e y b e g a n to lau g h , an d sto o d all ro u n d
h im an d w a tc h e d him .
"H is d a n c in g w as fu n n y ," said th e In fa n ta , "b u t h is actin g is
fu n n ie r still. In d e e d , he is alm o st as good as th e p u p p e ts , o n ly , o f
c o u rse , n o t q u ite n a tu ra l." A nd she ap p lau d e d .
B u t th e little D w a rf n e v e r lo o k e d u p , an d h is sobs grew fain ter
an d fain ter, and su d d en ly he gave a c u rio u s gasp, an d c lu tc h e d h is
side. A nd th e n he fell b a c k again, an d lay q u ite still.
"T h a t is te rrific ," said th e In fa n ta , after a p a u s e , "b u t n o w
y o u m u st d a n c e for m e ."
"Y e s," crie d all th e c h ild re n , "you m u st get up and d a n c e ,
fo r y o u are as clev e r as th e ap es, and m u c h m o re rid ic u lo u s."
B u t th e little D w a rf m a d e no answ er.
A n d th e I n fa n ta s ta m p e d h e r fo o t, an d c a lle d h e r u n c le ,
w h o w as w alk in g on th e te rra c e w ith th e C h a m b e rla in , re a d in g som e
d e s p a tc h e s th a t h a d ju s t arriv ed from M e x ico . "M y funny little D w a rf
is su lk in g ," she cried , "you m u st w ake h im u p , an d tell h im to d a n c e
fo r m e ."
T hey sm iled at e a c h o th e r, and D o n P e d ro sla p p ed th e D w a rf
o n th e ch e ek w ith his e m b ro id e re d glove. "Y ou m u st d a n c e ," he
said, "petit m onstre.'4 Y ou m u st d an c e. T he In fa n ta o f S pain an d
th e In d ie s w ish es to be am u sed ."
B u t th e little D w a rf n ev e r m oved.
"A w h ip p in g m a ste r should be sent for," said D o n P ed ro w earily,
an d he w e n t b a c k to th e te rra c e . B u t th e C h a m b e rla in k n e lt b esid e
th e little D w arf, an d p u t h is h a n d u p o n h is h ea rt. A n d after a few
m o m e n ts he rose u p , and h av in g m a d e a low b o w to th e In fa n ta , he
said, "Mi bella Princesa,'5 y o u r funny little D w a rf w ill n e v e r d a n c e
again. It is a p ity , for he is so ugly th a t h e m ig h t h av e m a d e th e
K in g sm ile."

110
"B ut why will he n o t d a n c e ag a in ? " asked th e In fa n ta laughing.
"B ecause his h e a rt is b r o k e n ," answ ered th e C h a m b e rla in .
A nd th e In fa n ta frow ned, a n d h e r rosy lips cu rle d . " F o r th e
future let th o se w ho co m e to play w ith m e have no h e a r ts ," she cried
an d ran o u t in to th e g arden.

Commentary

1 Don Pedro o f Aragon — Д о н П е д р о А р а г о н с к и й . А р аго н — об­


л а с т ь н а с е в е р о -в о с т о к е И с п а н и и .
2
the Grand Inquisitor o f Granada — в е л и к и й и н к в и з и т о р Г р ан а­
д ы , в о з г л а в л я в ш и й и н к в и з и ц и ю в и с п а н с к о й п р о в и н ц и и Гра­
н ад а. И н к в и з и ц и я бы л а с о з д а н а в X I I I в е к е в с т р а н а х , где
г о с п о д с т в о в а л а к а т о л и ч е с к а я ц е р к о в ь , д л я р а с п р а в ы с т а к н а­
зы в а е м ы м и е р е т и к а м и — п р о т и в н и к а м и ф е о д а л ь н о - ц е р к о в н о й
и д е о л о ги и . О с о б е н н о ш и р о к о е р а с п р о с т р а н е н и е и н к в и з и ц и я п о ­
лучила в И с п а н и и .
3
M i reina! (исп.) — М о я к о р о л е в а !
the Castle o f Fontainbleau — з а м о к Ф о н т е н б л о п о д П а р и ж е м ,
л етн яя р ези д ен ц и я ф ран ц узски х королей
the Papal Nuncio — п а п с к и й н у н ц и й , п о с т о я н н ы й п р ед ст ав и ­
тел ь р и м с к о г о п а п ы в государствах, с к о т о р ы м и п а п а п о дд ер ­
ж ивает о ф и ц и ал ьн ы е ди п л ом ати чески е отн о ш ен и я
high mass (римск. -катол.) — т о р ж е с т в е н н о е б о го с л у ж ен и е с вос­
к у р е н и е м л а д а н а , м у зы к о й и т. п.
7
the great Trappist monastery — т р а п п и с т ы , о с о б ы й о р д е н р и м с ­
к о -к а т о л и ч е с к о й ц е р к в и , о с н о в а н н ы й в м ест еч к е С о л и н ь и ля
Т р а п п в 1140 г. ( Ф р а н ц и я ) . Е го устав о тл и ч а л с я н е о б ы ч а й н о й
су р о в о сть ю : д о л г и м и м о л и т в а м и , и з н у р и т е л ь н ы м и п о с т а м и , тя­
ж е л ы м ф и з и ч е с к и м трудом и п о ч т и п о с т о я н н ы м м о л ч а н и е м .
toreadors (исп.) — то р е ад о р ы
the Camerera-M ayor (исп.) — с т а р ш а я к а м е р и с т к а , д о л ж н о с т ь
п р и д в о р н о й д ам ы
Seville — С е в и л ь я , город н а юге И с п а н и и
11
Bravo toro! (исп.) — Б р а в о , тореад ор!
siesta (исп.) — си е с т а , п о л у д е н н ы й отды х в ю ж н ы х ст р ан а х
the kneeling-stool — с к а м е й к а , на к о т о р о й И н ф а н т а п р е к л о н я ­
л а к о л е н и п ер е д т р о н о м

111
petit monstre (фр.) — у р о д е ц
M i bella Princesa (исп.) — М о я п р е к р а с н а я п р и н ц е с с а

Exercises

ш R eadin g Com prehension

1 Are the following statements about the tale tru e orfalse" ! If there is
not enough information in the tale, write don't know.

1) T h e little P rin c ess was allow ed to invite only t h e c h i ld r e n


o f h e r o w n rank.___________
2) T h e I n f a n t a 's m o t h e r , t h e Q u e e n o f F r a n c e , d ie d ju s t
after h e r b i r t h . __________
3) T h e I n f a n t a h a d all t h e Q u e e n ' s m a n n e r s , t h e s a m e
w o n d e rfu l s m i l e . __________
4) A t r o o p o f h a n d s o m e E gyp tians a p p e a r e d in t h e a r e n a
after t h e b u llf ig h t .__________
5) T h e d a n c in g of t h e little D w a r f was t h e funn iest p a r t of
t h e e n t e r t a i n m e n t . __________
6) T h e I n f a n t a e x p re ssed a d esire to h e r u n c l e t h a t t h e
d a n c e s h o u ld b e i m m e d ia te ly re p e a te d .___________
7) T h e F lo w e r s liked t h e D w a r f a n d felt sorry for h im .

8) T h e D w a r f loved t h e forest a n d d r e a m e d o f show ing it to


t h e I n f a n t a . __________
9) T h e D w a r f liked t h e t h r o n e - r o o m b e s t in t h e p a l a c e .

10) T h e D w a r f w a n te d to see t h e I n f a n ta b e c a u s e he w a n te d
to d e c la re his love to her.___________
11) W h e n t h e D w a r f saw him s elf in t h e m ir r o r, h e realised
t h e b i t t e r t r u t h . ___________
12) W h e n t h e P rin c ess fo u n d t h e D w a r f lying o n t h e g r o u n d
a n d crying bitterly, she felt sorry for h i m . __________

2 The sentences below are all from the tale. M atch parts of sentences on
the left with their complementations on the right.
112
1) A lth o u g h she w as a re a l w h o in r e t u r n fo r th is
P rin c e ss and th e In fa n ta service h a d b e e n g ra n te d
o f S pain, h is life.
2) T he K in g allow ed h e r to th e K in g w o u ld n ev e r allow
in v ite any o f h e r y o u n g his m in isters to speak about
friends, a n ew m arriag e.
3) T he Q u ee n h ad b e e n 1 she h a d o nly o n e b irth d a y
e m b a lm e d by a M o o ris h every y e a r, ju s t like o th e r
p h y sic ia n , c h i l d r e n o f q u ite p o o r
4) T h e K in g 's b r o th e r w as p e o p le .
su sp ected o f having caused th a t at th e en d o f th e play
th e Q u e e n 's d e a th by a th e e y e s o f th e I n f a n ta
p a ir o f p o iso n e d gloves w ere q u ite d im w ith te ars.
5) E v en after th e th re e y ea rs tw o g ree n a n d gold sn ak es
o f p u b lic m o u rn in g , p u t o u t th e ir stran g e h ea d s
6) T he o th e r children follow ed an d ro se slowly.
th e In fan ta in strict o rd er w h o w as w alk in g on th e
o f p re c e d e n c e , te rra c e w ith C h a m b e rla in ,
7) T hey a c te d so w ell, and r e a d in g so m e d is p a tc h e s
t h e i r g e s tu r e s w e r e so th a t h a d ju s t arrived from
ex tre m ely n a tu ra l, M exico .
8) A s th e p ip e grew lo u d e r w as h a p p y to g et rid o f
an d lo u d e r, such an ugly an d u seless
9) W h e n th e D w a rf ap p e ared child.
in th e aren a on his crooked th e y b e g a n to lau g h , an d
le g s a n d w ith h is h u g e sto o d all ro u n d h im and
m issh a p e n h ead , w a tc h e d him .
10) T h e D w a r f s fa th e r w h o he co u ld n o t h elp show ing
w as a p o o r m a n th e m th e b ea u tifu l w h ite
11) T h e little D w a rf w as so rose.
p le a se d th a t th e c h i l d r e n b u r s t o u t
12) W h e n th e I n f a n t a a n d la u g h in g .
h e r c o m p a n io n s saw th e th a t h e h ad p re s e n te d to
ugly little D w a rf lying on h e r on th e o cc asio n o f h e r
th e g ro u n d and b ea tin g th e visiting his castle in A ragon.
flo o r w ith h is c le n c h e d w h o m she lik ed to co m e
h a n d s, and a m u se th e m s e lv e s
13) A n d th e In fa n ta sta m p e d w ith h er.
h e r fo o t, an d c a lle d h e r th o se w h o h a d th e lo n g est
u n c le , n a m e s w e n t first
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3 Answer the following questions.

1) W hy d id th e K ing allow his d a u g h te r to invite an y o f h e r


yo u n g friends to h e r b irth d a y party?
2) W h y w as th e K ing alw ays in grief?
3) H o w did th e c h ild re n am u se them selves?
4) W h a t w ere th e ite m s o n th e e n te r ta in m e n t p ro g ra m m e ?
5) W hy was th e In fa n ta so am u sed w ith th e last item ?
6) W h a t d id she p re s e n t th e D w a rf w ith?
7) W h at did th e Flow ers in th e g ard en th in k ab o u t th e D w arfs
success?
8) W hy d id th e D w arf w an t to invite th e In fa n ta to th e forest?
9) W h ere d id th e D w arf go to se arch for her?
10) W h a t d id th e D w arf see in th e R o y al P alace?
11) W h a t h a p p e n e d to th e D w arf in th e ro o m he liked th e best?
12) W hy was he so d is a p p o in te d w h en he realised th e tru th ?
13) W h e re did th e In fa n ta a n d h e r friends fin d th e Dwarf?
14) W h a t did th e y all w a n t th e D w arf to do?
15) W h a t did D o n P e d ro say a b o u t th e Dwarf?
16) W h at was th e In fa n ta 's re a c tio n to th e C h a m b e rla in 's words?

Vocabulary an d G ra m m a r Tasks

1 Find in the tale the English for:

дело ч р е з в ы ч а й н о й в а ж н о с т и ; и гр ать в п р я т к и ; д ети своего


круга; вы гл яд ы вать и з -п о д ч е го -л и б о ; бы ть о б р у ч е н н ы м с
к е м -л и б о ; по случаю ; с о в е р ш и т ь б р а к о с о ч е т а н и е ; о тк аза ть ся
от т р о н а ; и зв е с т н ы й своей ж е ст о к о с ть ю ; д ел ать к о м у -л и б о
к о м п л и м е н т ы ; и дти в стр о го й п о сл е д о в а те л ь н о ст и ; бегать н а
задн и х ногах; с о й т и с л о ш а д и ; в о н зи т ь ш п агу в ш ею ж и вот­
н о го ; р а с к а ч и в а т ь с я в та к т м у зы к е; и м еть более н и з к о е п р о ­
и сх о ж д ен и е; бы ть в сам о м п р е к р а с н о м р а с п о л о ж е н и и духа;
п о к л о н и т ь с я ; не сп у ск ать глаз с к о г о -л и б о ; у л ы б аться во все
л и ц о ; д ел ать н еу к л ю ж и е ж есты восто р га; ск р ы в а т ь св о и чув­
ства; гол ова у него н е с о о б р а з н о в е л и к а по с р а в н е н и ю с н о ­
гам и ; во все гор л о ; бы ть п р и р о ж д е н н ы м ф и л о с о ф о м ; запе­
реть д о м а ; это с о в е р ш е н н о другое д ел о ; м я гк о е л о ж е и з мха;
п о д го то в и ть ся к ч ем у -л и б о ; п о р тр е т в п о л н ы й р о ст; к р и к
рад ости с о р в ал ся с его уст; гр и м а с н и ч а т ь

114
2 Group the following phrases taken from the text under the headings
below. Give an example using each, to help you remember them.

like long ro w s o f sold iers; a rich e r c o lo u r; th e m o st graceful;


th e m o st tastefully dressed ; like fad ed gold; sa d d e r th a n u su a l;
m u c h n ic e r; m u c h m o re se n sib le ; th e lo n g e st n a m e s; like a
live b u ll; grew lo u d e r and lo u d e r; so lovely as she is; th e fu n n iest
p a rt; m u c h lo w er in ra n k ; th e h ig h e st sp irits; th e m o st am u sin g
th in g ; as freely as any o f th e m ; th e fu n n iest b o w s; b e tte r; b est
b lo o m s ; as good as u n d e rs ta n d in g ; th e b e st w ay; as b ea u tifu l as
a liz ard ; th e m o st m a rv e llo u s th in g s; love b est; th e b rig h te st
and th e m o st b ea u tifu l ro o m ; as co ld as ice; like th e real w o rld ;
th e m o st fa n ta stic an d ex ag g erated m a n n e r; a c tin g w as fu n n ier;
as good as th e p u p p e ts; h is sobs grew fain ter an d fain ter; clev e re r
th a n th e apes; m u c h m o re rid ic u lo u s; as sp le n d id as y o u are
now ; like fad ed gold: y o u n g e r; so b a d -te m p e re d as u su a l; m u c h
m o re p le a se d ; like th e K in g 's ow n b o d y g u a rd ; m u c h b e tte r
ta ste ; as p re tty as th e w h ite b e rrie s; like an elf

com parative superlative expressions


expressions expressions o f equality
or inequality

3 Complete the words in the sentences below by adding -able or -ible.


M ake any spelling changes that are needed.

1) A d a rk suit is p refer________to a light o n e for ev en in g w ear.


2) W e sp e n t a profit________ day cle a n in g o u t th e c u p b o a rd s.
3) Signs o f e c o n o m ic an d social decay are clearly vis________ in
th e stree ts o f th e ca p ita l.
4) H e w as a very p le a sa n t an d p e rso n ________ y o u n g m an.
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5) T he w e a th e r w as really so h o rr_______ y esterd ay .
6) O f c o u rse , th is m e a t is n o t eat________.
7) I do n o t th in k this w ork is m anag e________for o n e p erso n
alone.
8) I t's no lo n g e r poss________ to find a c h e a p fla t in L o n d o n .
9) M y m o th e r b e c a m e c o m fo rt________ after th e o p e ra tio n .
10) She k eep s an u n b eliev ________ n u m b e r o f ca ts at hom e!
11) It w as very sens________ o f y o u to b rin g y o u r u m b rella.
12) It it a c ce p t________ to w e a r je a n s to th is re c e p tio n ?
13) I do n o t like c h a n g e w e a th e r in L o n d o n .
14) T he te a c h e r m a d e m e re sp o n s________ for k e e p in g th e class
in o rd e r w h ile she w e n t out.
15) T he d am ag e to m y ca r is h ard ly n o tic e ________ .
16) F o r m e she h as an irresist________ fascin atio n !
17) H e is q u ite k n o w led g e ab o u t w ines.
18) T he islan d is access________o nly by boat.
19) Y o u r excuse d oes n o t seem to be re a so n ________ .
20) T his d o c u m e n t is c o m p re h e n s________ o nly fo r law yers.

4 Look at the following list o f words taken from the tale. Discuss them
and put into two groups: adjectives and adverbs.

b r ig h tly , n a t u r a l l y , r e a lly , o r d in a r y , s ta te ly , ta s te f u lly ,


hea v ily , tin y , w in d y , h astily , n ea rly , m a d ly , h a rd ly , g lo o m y ,
w o n d e rfu lly , r ic h ly , softly , p r e tty , lo v e ly , g e n tly , m a d ly ,
fre ely , a b s o lu te ly , p a rtly , se rio u s ly , im m e d ia te ly , c lu m sy ,
strangely, p ro p e rly , funny, c o m p le te ly , ugly, angry, c e rta in ly ,

adjectives adverbs

116
5 Use the right adjective ending in -ing or -e d to complete each sentence.

1) W e w ere all________ w h e n w e h e a rd ab o u t th e e a rth q u a k e .


a) te rrified
b) te rrify in g

2) A re y o u in F re n c h lite ra tu re ?
a) in te re s te d
b) in te re s tin g

3) M y so n 's b e h a v io u r is_________ .
a) frig h te n e d
b) frig h te n in g

4) I w as_________ w ith th e b ook. I e x p e c te d it to b e m u c h


b e tte r.
a) d isa p p o in te d
b) d isa p p o in tin g

5) I'm g oing to th e S tates n e x t w eek. It w ill b e an________


e x p e rie n c e .
a) ex c ite d
b) e x c itin g

6) I w as so w h e n I h e a rd they w ere g ettin g d iv o rced .


T hey h a d alw ays seem ed so h ap p y to g e th er.
a) surprised
b) surprising

7) H e n e v e r stops ta lk in g an d n e v e r says an y th in g _________ .


a) in te re ste d
b) in te re s tin g

8) H e 's th e m o st_________ p e rso n I hav e ev er m e t in m y life.


a) b o red
b ) b o rin g

9) To ask p e o p le for m o n e y is_________ .


a) em b arra sse d
b) e m b a rra ssin g
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10) It is n o t_________ t h a t he failed th e ex a m , h e h a d n o t
stu d ie d h a rd .
a) surprised
b ) surprising

1 1 )1 was w h e n I h e a rd th a t stran g e so u n d a t n ig h t.
a) frig h te n e d
b ) frig h te n in g

12) I was really________ w h e n I was offered th e jo b .


a) a m a z e d
b ) a m a z in g

б Circle the letter o f the word that correctly completes the sentence.
1) T h e K ing's b r o th e r was suspected ________ c au sed th e Q u e e n 's
d e a th .
a) to have
b ) o f having

2) T h e little D w a rf lo o k e d forw ard th e In fa n ta .


a) to see
b ) to seeing

3) T h e m inisters c o u ld n 't p ersu ad e th e K ing a seco n d


tim e .
a) to m a rry
b ) m a rry in g

4) T h e c h ild r e n c o u l d n 't h e lp ________ w h e n th e little D w a rf


a p p e a re d in th e a re n a .
a) to laugh
b ) lau g h in g

5) The little D w arf d rea m ed in th e forest w ith th e In fan ta.


a) to d a n c e
b ) o f d a n c in g

6) T h e I n fa n ta la u g h ed so m u c h th a t th e C a m e re ra n e e d e d
________h e r to b e h a v e p ro p erly .
a) to re m in d
b ) r e m in d in g
118
7) T h e red G e r a n iu m s w ere k n o w n __________ a g rea t m a n y
p o o r re la tio n s.
a) to have
b) having

8) T h e little D w a rf was so p le a se d th a t h e c o u l d n 't help


________th e m th e b ea u tifu l w hite rose.
a) to show
b ) sh o w in g

9) The little D w arf was afraid w h en he saw th e m o n ster.


a) to m ove
b) m oving

10) W h e n th e In fa n ta a n d h e r c o m p a n io n s saw th e D w arf


lying a n d b ea tin g th e floor, th e y b eg a n _________ a n d w a tc h e d
h im .
a) to laugh
b) laughing

7 Translate the following sentences into English.

1) М а л е н ь к а я П р и н ц е с с а п р о г у л и в а л а с ь по т е р р а с е со
св о и м и подругам и , и грала с н и м и в п р я т к и .
2) К о р о л ь бы даж е о т р е к с я от т р о н а и у д а л и л с я в м о н а ­
с т ы р ь , ес л и бы т о л ь к о н е б о я л с я о с т а в и т ь м ал ен ь к у ю
И н ф а н т у н а п о п е ч е н и е св о его брата.
3) И н ф а н т а сд ел а л а н е д о в о л ь н у ю г р и м а с к у и п о ж а л а
п л е ч и к а м и — уж м о г бы он с н е й п о б ы т ь в д е н ь ее
рож дения.
4) Н о с а м ы м з а б а в н ы м р а з в л е ч е н и е м это го утра б ы л и ,
б ессп о р н о , тан ц ы м аленького К арли ка.
5) К а р л и к в в а л и л с я н а ар е н у , к о в ы л я я н а к р и в ы х , к о ­
р о т е н ь к и х н о ж к а х и м о т а я о г р о м н о й б е з о б р а з н о й го­
ловой.
6) О тец его бы л т о л ь к о рад и з б а в и т ь с я от т а к о г о у р о д л и ­
вого и б е с п о л е з н о г о р е б е н к а .
7) С а м о е з а б а в н о е в К а р л и к е б ы л о , м о ж е т б ы ть , то ,
что сам он с о в е р ш е н н о не с о з н а в а л , к а к у р о д л и в и
см еш он.
119
8) И н ф а н т а в ы н у л а и з в о л о с к р а с и в у ю белую р о зу и
б р о с и л а ее ч е р ез всю ар ен у К а р л и к у .
9) К о г д а К а р л и к у с к а з а л и , что он будет ещ е р аз т а н ц е ­
вать п ер ед И н ф а н т о й по ее л и ч н о м у о со б о м у п р и к а ­
зу, он т а к о б р а д о в а л с я , что убеж ал в сад.
10) Я щ ер и ц ы — п ри р о ж д ен н ы е ф и л о со ф ы : они часам и
с п о с о б н ы си д еть н а о д н о м м есте и р а з м ы ш л я т ь , ког­
д а им б о л ьш е н еч его дел ать.
11) М а л е н ь к и й К а р л и к сч и та л , что ц веты — сам о е уди­
в и т е л ь н о е , что есть н а свете, к о н е ч н о , за и ск л ю ч е­
нием И н ф ан ты .
12) М а л е н ь к и й К а р л и к в и з у м л е н и и о з и р а л с я во к р у г и
даж е н е м н о ж к о п о б а и в а л с я и д ти д а л ьш е .
13) О н не отдал бы с в о е й р о зы за все ж ем ч у га бал д ах и н а,
не отдал бы н и о д н о го ее белого л е п е с т к а за т р о н .
14) К о г д а и с т и н а вд руг о т к р ы л а с ь ем у, о н , р ы д а я , с
д и к и м в о п л е м к и н у л с я н а п ол .
15) К а р л и к н и к о г д а б о л ьш е не будет п л я с а т ь , п о то м у что
у н его р а зб и т о сер д ц е.

D iscussion Tasks

1 D iscuss the following.

1) F in d som e facts in th e tale to show th a t th e K ing loved


th e Q u ee n m adly.
2) P rove th a t th e In fa n ta to o k after h e r m o th e r.
3) F in d som e facts in th e tale to prove th a t th e e n te r ta in m e n t
on th e o c c a sio n o f th e I n fa n ta 's b irth d a y was a g reat
success.
4) D escrib e th e forest as if you were th e Dwarf.
5) D escrib e th e p alace as if y ou w ere th e Dwarf.
6) Agree or disagree w ith th e s ta te m e n t th a t th e D w a rfs
a p p e a ra n c e c o n tra ste d his soul.
7) Agree o r disagree w ith th e s ta te m e n t th a t th e In fa n ta was
a cap ricio u s P rincess, h ard o f h eart.
8) C o m p are th e D w arf an d th e In fa n ta .
THE YOUNG KING

It w as th e n ig h t b efore h is c o ro n a tio n , an d th e y o u n g K in g
w as sittin g alo n e in h is b ea u tifu l ch a m b e r. H is c o u rtie rs left h im ,
b o w in g th e ir h e a d s to th e g round. T hey w e n t to th e G re a t H all o f
th e P a la c e to rec eiv e a few last lesso n s from th e P ro fesso r o f E tiq u e tte .
Som e o f th e m h a d still q u ite n a tu ra l m a n n e r s ,1 w h ic h w as a very
serio u s offence for a co u rtier.
T he boy — fo r he w as only six teen y ea rs o f age — w as n o t sorry
th a t th e y h ad left h im , and th re w h im s e lf b a c k w ith a d eep sigh o f
re lie f on th e soft co u c h . H e lay th e re like som e y o u n g a n im a l o f th e
forest new ly c a u g h t by th e h u n te rs.
A n d , in d e e d , it w as th e h u n te r s w h o h a d fo u n d h im a lm o st
by c h a n c e . B a re fo o t an d p ip e in h a n d h e w as fo llo w in g th e flo ck
o f th e p o o r g o a th e r d w h o h a d b r o u g h t h im u p , an d w h o se so n h e
alw ay s th o u g h t h im s e lf to be. H e w as th e c h ild o f th e o ld K in g 's
121
d a u g h te r by a se c re t m a rria g e w ith s o m e o n e m u c h lo w e r in ran k .
S o m e p e o p le said h e w a s a s tra n g e r w h o m a d e th e y o u n g P rin c e s s
lo v e h im by th e w o n d e rfu l m a g ic o f h is lu te - p la y in g . O th e rs sp o k e
o f an a rtist fro m R i m i n i 2 to w h o m th e P rin c e s s h a d sh o w n m u c h
h o n o u r , an d w h o d is a p p e a re d su d d e n ly from th e c ity , le a v in g h is
w o rk in th e C a th e d ra l u n fin is h e d . W h e n th e P rin c e w as a w eek
o ld , he w as s to le n fro m h is m o th e r 's sid e , as she slep t. T h e c h ild
w a s g iv e n to a c o m m o n p e a s a n t a n d h is w ife. T h e y h a d n o c h ild r e n
o f th e ir o w n a n d liv e d in a re m o te p a r t o f th e fo re st, fa r fro m th e
to w n . S o rro w , o r th e p la g u e , as th e c o u r t d o c to r sa id , o r , as
so m e p e o p le su g g e ste d , a swift I ta lia n p o is o n p u t in to a cu p o f
w in e k ille d h is m o th e r w ith in an h o u r o f h e r w a k e n in g . A n d
w h e n th e m e s s e n g e r w h o c a rrie d th e c h ild a c ro ss th e sa d d le o f h is
tir e d h o rs e k n o c k e d at th e d o o r o f th e g o a th e r d 's h o u s e , th e b o d y
o f th e P rin c e s s w as b e in g lo w e re d in to a grav e b e y o n d th e city. It
w a s said th a t a n o th e r b o d y w as also ly in g th e r e , th a t o f a y o u n g
m a n o f m a rv e llo u s an d fo re ig n b e a u ty , w h o se h a n d s w e re tie d
b e h in d h im w ith a c o r d , a n d w h o s e b r e a s t w as c o v e r e d w ith
m a n y re d w o u n d s.
A t least, such w as th e story th a t m e n w h isp e re d to e a c h o th er.
It w as c e rta in th a t lying on h is d e a th -b e d th e old K in g , rea lise d h is
g re a t sin an d h ad sen t fo r th e b o y , an d , in th e p re s e n c e o f th e
C o u n c il, h ad a c k n o w led g e d h im as h is heir.
F ro m th e very first m o m e n t o f h is r e c o g n itio n th e b o y h a d
sh o w n signs o f th a t stra n g e p a s s io n fo r b e a u ty w h ic h h a d g re a t
in flu e n c e o v e r h is life. T h o se w h o a c c o m p a n ie d h im to h is ro o m s
o fte n sp o k e o f th e cry o f p le a s u r e th a t b ro k e fro m h is lip s, w h e n
h e saw th e d e lic a te c lo th e s an d ric h je w e ls th a t h a d b e e n p r e p a re d
f o r h im , an d o f th e jo y w ith w h ic h h e th re w a s id e h is ro u g h
le a th e r n tu n ic an d c o u rs e s h e e p sk in clo ak . H e m isse d at tim e s th e
fre ed o m o f th e fo rest life, and alw ays c riticised th e C o u rt c e re m o n ie s
th a t o c c u p ie d so m u c h o f e a c h day. B u t th e w o n d e rfu l p a la c e —
J o y e u s e ,3 se e m e d to h im to b e a n e w d e lig h tfu l w o rld . A s so o n as
h e c o u ld e s c a p e fro m th e c o u n c il, h e w o u ld ru n d o w n th e g re a t
s ta irc a s e a n d w a n d e r fro m ro o m to ro o m , an d fro m c o r r id o r to
c o r r id o r , lik e o n e w h o w as se e k in g to fin d in b e a u ty a re m e d y
fro m sic k n ess.
D u rin g th e se jo u rn e y s o f d isco v ery , as h e w o u ld call th e m , he
w o u ld so m e tim e s be a c c o m p a n ie d by th e C o u rt pag es. B u t m o re
often he w o u ld be alo n e, feeling th ro u g h a c e rta in q u ic k in s tin c t
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th a t th e se crets o f art sh o u ld be le a rn e d in se cret, a n d th a t B eau ty
like W isd o m loves th e lo n ely w o rsh ip p e r.
M a n y c u rio u s sto ries w ere to ld a b o u t h im at th is p e rio d . It w as
said th a t a B u rg o m a ste r w h o h a d c o m e to m a k e a sp e ec h on b e h a lf
o f th e c itiz e n s o f th e to w n c a u g h t sig h t o f h im k n e e lin g in rea l
a d m ira tio n b efo re a g reat p ic tu re th a t h a d ju s t b e e n b ro u g h t from
V en ic e. O n a n o th e r o c c a sio n he h a d b e e n m issed fo r several h o u rs,
an d after a lo n g se arch h a d b e e n d isc o v e re d in a little c h a m b e r in
o n e o f th e n o r th e r n p a rts o f th e p a la c e lo o k in g , as o n e in a tra n c e ,
at a G re e k gem ca rv ed w ith th e figure o f A d o n is .4 H e h ad b e e n seen ,
so th e ta le r a n , 5 p ressin g h is w arm lips to th e m a rb le o f an a n tiq u e
sta tu e th a t h ad b e e n d isco v ered in th e b e d o f th e riv er on th e o c c a sio n
o f th e b u ild in g o f th e sto n e brid g e.
B u t w h a t h a d o c c u p ie d h im m o st w as th e ro b e h e w as to w ea r
at h is c o ro n a tio n , th e ro b e o f gold, and th e ru b y cro w n , an d th e
sc ep tre w ith its row s and rings o f p ea rls. In d e e d , it w as o f th is th a t
h e w as th in k in g to n ig h t, as he lay on h is co u c h . T h e d esig n s w h ich
w ere from th e h a n d s o f th e m o st fam o u s artists o f th e tim e h ad b ee n
b ro u g h t to h im m an y m o n th s b e fo re , and he gave o rd ers th a t th e
artists w ere to w o rk n ig h t and day to carry th e m o u t. A n d th e w h o le
w o rld w as to be se arch e d for je w e ls th a t w o u ld b e w o rth y o f th e ir
w ork. H e im a g in e d h im s e lf to be sta n d in g at th e h ig h a lta r o f th e
C a th e d ra l in th e fair clo th es o f a K in g , an d a sm ile p la y e d on h is
b o y ish lip s, an d lit up his d ark eyes.
O u tsid e he c o u ld see th e g rea t d o m e o f th e C a th e d ra l lo o m in g
lik e a b u b b le o v e r th e shadow y h o u s e s , an d th e tire d g u ard w alk in g
u p an d d o w n on th e te rra c e by th e river. F a r aw ay, in an o rc h a rd ,
a n ig h tin g a le w as singing. A fa in t p erfu m e o f ja s m in e ca m e th ro u g h
th e o p en w in d o w . H e b ru sh e d h is b ro w n curls b a c k from h is fo re h ea d ,
an d ta k in g up a lu te , he b e g a n to play. H is heav y ey e lid s tre m b le d ,
an d a stra n g e fa in tn e ss ca m e o v er h im . N e v e r b efo re h a d h e felt
so k ee n ly th e m a g ic an d m y stery o f b ea u tifu l th in g s.
W h e n m id n ig h t so u n d e d from th e to w e r clo ck , h e to u c h e d a
b e ll, and h is p ag e s e n te re d and u n d re sse d h im w ith m u c h c e re m o n y ,
p o u rin g ro s e -w a te r ov er h is h a n d s , an d p u ttin g flow ers o n h is pillow .
A few m o m e n ts after th ey h a d left th e ro o m , h e fell asleep.

A n d as he slept he d re a m e d a d re a m , an d th is w as h is d r e a m .6
H e th o u g h t th a t he w as sta n d in g in a lo n g , low a ttic , am o n g
th e c la tte r o f m a n y loom s. A nd th ro u g h th e g rate d w in d o w s 7 he
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co u ld see th e th in figures o f th e w eavers. P a le , sic k ly -lo o k in g c h ild re n
w ere w o rk in g th e re . T hey seem ed to be h u n g ry an d e x h a u ste d , an d
th e ir th in h a n d s tre m b le d . S om e h ag g a rd w o m e n w ere seated at a
ta b le sew ing. A h o rrib le o d o u r filled th e p la ce . T h e air w as heavy,
and th e w alls w ere dam p .
T he y o u n g K in g w e n t ov er to o n e o f th e w eav ers, an d sto o d by
h im an d w a tc h e d him .
A nd th e w ea v er lo o k ed at h im angrily an d said, "W hy are y o u
w a tc h in g m e? A re y o u a spy sent to u s by o u r m a ste r? "
"W ho is y o u r m a ste r? " asked th e y o u n g K ing.
" O u r m a ste r!" crie d th e w eaver, b itterly . "H e is a m a n like
myself. In d e e d , th e re is b u t th is difference b e tw e e n u s — th a t he
w ears fine c lo th e s w h ile I go in rags, and th a t w h ile I am w eak from
h u n g e r, he suffers n o t a little from o v erfeed in g ."
"T h e la n d is free," said th e y o u n g K in g , "a n d y o u are no
m a n 's slave."
"In w ar," answ ered th e w eaver, "th e strong m ak e slaves o f th e
w eak and in p ea ce th e ric h m ak e slaves o f th e poor. W e m u st w o rk to
live, and th ey give us such low w ages th a t w e die. W e w o rk for th e m
all day long, and th ey k eep gold in th e ir tru n k s, an d o u r ch ild re n die
before th e ir tim e , and th e faces o f th o se w e love b e c o m e h a rd and
evil. W e tre a d o u t th e grapes, an d a n o th e r drin k s th e w in e. W e sow
th e co rn , and w e have no bread. W e have ch a in s, th o u g h no eye can
see th e m ; and w e are slaves, th o u g h m e n call u s free."
"Is it so w ith all?" asked th e y o u n g K ing.
"It is so w ith all," an sw ered th e w eav er, "w ith th e y o u n g as
w ell as w ith th e old, w ith th e w o m e n as w ell as w ith th e m e n , w ith
little c h ild re n as w ell as w ith th o s e , w ho are stric k e n in y ears. T h e
m e rc h a n ts o p p ress u s, and w e m u st obey th e m . T he p rie st rid es by
and tells h is b e a d s, and n o m a n cares for us. T h ro u g h o u r sunless
h o m e s c re ep s P o v erty w ith h e r h u n g ry eyes, an d Sin follow s clo se
b e h in d her. M isery w ak es u s in th e m o rn in g , an d S h am e sits w ith
u s at night. B u t w h a t are th e se th in g s to y o u ? 8 Y ou are n o t o n e o f us.
Y o u r face is to o h a p p y ." A nd he tu rn e d aw ay fro w n in g , an d sta rte d
th e lo o m , an d th e y o u n g K in g saw th a t it w as th r e a d e d w ith a
th re a d o f g o ld .9
A nd a g reat te rr o r fell u p o n h im , an d h e said to th e w eav er,
"W h at ro b e is th is th a t y o u are w eav in g ?"
"It is th e ro b e for th e c o ro n a tio n o f th e y o u n g K in g ," h e
answ ered. "W h at is th a t to y o u ? "
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A n d th e y o u n g K in g gave a lo u d cry an d w o k e. H e w as in h is
o w n c h a m b e r, an d th ro u g h th e w in d o w he saw th e g rea t h o n e y -
c o lo u re d m o o n sh in in g in th e d ark sky.
A n d he fell asleep again, and d re a m e d , an d th is w as h is d ream .
H e th o u g h t th a t he w as lying on th e d ec k o f a larg e sh ip w ith
a h u n d re d slaves. O n a c a rp e t by h is side th e m a s te r o f th e sh ip w as
seated. H e w as b la c k as eb o n y , an d h is tu rb a n w as o f c rim s o n silk.
G re a t e a r-rin g s o f silver d ragged d o w n th e th ic k lo b e s o f h is ea rs, and
in h is h a n d s he h ad a p a ir o f ivory scales.
T he slaves w ere n a k e d , b u t for a rag g ed lio n -c lo th , an d ea ch
m a n w as c h a in e d to h is n eig h b o u r. T h e sun w as h o t, an d th e n e g ro e s
r a n u p and d o w n th e d e c k and b e a t th e m w ith w h ip s. T h ey stre tc h e d
o u t th e ir th in arm s and p u lle d th e heav y o ars th ro u g h th e w ater.
A t last th e y r e a c h e d a little bay. A lig h t w in d b le w from th e
sh o re , a n d co v e red th e d ec k an d th e sail w ith fine re d dust. T h ree
A rab s on w ild asses ro d e o u t an d th re w spears at th e m . T h e m a s te r
o f th e ship to o k a p a in te d b o w in h is h a n d an d sh o t o n e o f th e m in
th e th ro a t. H e fell heavily, an d h is c o m p a n io n s ra n aw ay. A w o m a n
w ra p p e d in a y ello w veil follo w ed slow ly on a c a m e l, lo o k in g b a c k
n o w an d th e n at th e d ea d body.
A s so o n as th e y h ad cast a n c h o r an d h a u le d d o w n th e sail, th e
n e g ro e s w e n t in to th e h o ld an d b r o u g h t u p a lo n g ro p e - la d d e r,
h eavily w e ig h te d w ith lead. T he m a s te r o f th e ship th re w it o v er
th e side, m a k in g th e en d s fast to tw o iro n sta n c h io n s . T h e n th e
n e g ro e s c a u g h t th e y o u n g e st o f th e slaves an d k n o c k e d h is fetters off,
an d filled h is n o strils and ears w ith w ax, and tie d a b ig sto n e ro u n d
h is w aist. H e c re p t do w n th e la d d er, an d d isa p p e a re d in to th e sea.
A few b u b b le s rose w h ere he sank.
A fter so m e tim e th e d iv e r ro se up o u t o f th e w a te r w ith a
p e a rl in h is rig h t h a n d . T he n e g ro e s to o k it from h im , an d th ru s t h im
b ack. T he slaves fell asleep ov er th e ir oars.
A g a in and again he ca m e u p , an d e a c h tim e th a t h e d id so he
b ro u g h t w ith h im a b ea u tifu l p earl. T he m a ste r o f th e ship w eig h ed
th e m , an d p u t th e m in to a little b ag o f g ree n le ath er.
T he y o u n g K ing trie d to speak, b u t his to n g u e and lips w o u ld n o t
m ove. T he neg ro es ch a tte re d to ea ch o ther, and b eg an to quarrel over
a string o f b rig h t beads. Two cranes flew ro u n d and ro u n d th e vessel.
T h e n th e d iv e r ca m e u p for th e last tim e , an d th e p e a rl th a t
h e b ro u g h t w ith h im w as fairer th a n all th e p e a rls o f O r m u z ,1" fo r it
w as sh a p e d like th e full m o o n , and w h ite r th a n th e m o rn in g star.

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B u t h is face w as strangely p ale. A s he fell u p o n h e d eck , th e b lo o d
b u rst from h is ears an d n o strils. H e tre m b le d for a little , an d th e n
he w as still. T h e n e g ro e s shrugged th e ir sh o u ld e rs, an d th re w th e
b o d y o v erb o a rd .
A nd th e m a ste r o f th e ship lau g h ed , and re a c h e d o u t, h e to o k
th e p e a rl, an d w h e n he saw it, he p resse d it to h is fo re h e a d and
bow ed. "It shall b e ," he said, "for th e sc ep tre o f th e y o u n g K i n g , " 11
and h e m a d e a sign to th e n e g ro e s to draw up th e an c h o r.
A n d w h e n th e y o u n g K ing h e a rd th is, h e gave a g rea t cry and
w o k e, and th ro u g h th e w in d o w he saw th e lo n g grey fin g e rs o f th e
d aw n struggling w ith th e fad in g stars.
A nd he fell asleep again, and d rea m ed , an d th is w as his d ream .
H e th o u g h t th a t he w as w a n d e rin g th ro u g h a d im w o o d , full
o f stran g e fruits an d beau tifu l p o iso n o u s flow ers. T h e ad d e rs h issed at
h im as he w e n t by. T he b rig h t p a rro ts flew sc re am in g from b ra n c h to
b ra n c h . H u g e to rto ise s lay asleep u p o n th e h o t m u d . T h e tre e s w ere
full o f apes an d p e a c o c k s.
O n an d on h e w en t, till he r e a c h e d th e edge o f th e w o o d , 12
an d th e re he saw a g reat cro w d o f m e n w o rk in g in th e b ed o f a d rie d -
up river. T hey sw arm ed up th e crag like ants. T h ey dug d ee p h o les
in th e g ro u n d an d w e n t d o w n in to th e m . Som e o f th e m b ro k e th e
ro c k s w ith g reat axes; o th e rs se a rc h e d in th e sand. T hey h u rrie d
ab o u t, ca llin g to ea c h o th e r, and no m a n w as idle.
F ro m th e d a rk n e ss o f a g reat cave D e a th an d A v arice w a tc h e d
th e m , an d D e a th said, "I am tire d ; give m e a th ird o f t h e m 13 and
let m e go."
B u t A v arice sh o o k h e r h ead . "T h ey are m y s e rv a n ts," she
answ ered.
A n d D e a th said to h er, "W h at do y o u h av e in y o u r h a n d ? "
"I h av e th re e grains o f c o rn ," she answ ered . "W h at is th a t to
y o u ?"
"G iv e m e o n e o f th e m ," crie d D e a th , "to p la n t in m y g ard en ;
only one o f th e m , and I w ill go aw ay."
"I w ill n o t give y o u a n y th in g ," said A v arice, an d she h id h e r
h a n d in th e fold o f h e r clo th es.
A nd D e a th la u g h ed , an d to o k a c u p , an d p u t it in to a p o o l
o f w ate r, an d o u t o f th e cu p rose A gue. She p a s se d th ro u g h th e
g re a t cro w d o f m e n , an d a th ird o f th e m lay d ead . A c o ld fog
follow ed h e r, an d th e w a te r snakes ra n by h e r side.
A nd w h e n A v arice saw th a t a th ird o f th e m w ere d e a d , she
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w ept. She crie d alo u d , "Y ou h av e k illed a th ird o f m y se rv a n ts," she
crie d , "get aw ay. T h e re is a w ar in th e m o u n ta in s o f T a r t a r y ,14 an d
th e K in g s o f e a c h side are ca llin g to you. T h e A fghans h av e k illed
th e b la ck ox, an d are m a rc h in g to b a ttle . T hey h av e b e a te n u p o n
th e ir sh ie ld s w ith th e ir sp e ars, a n d h av e p u t o n th e ir h e lm e ts o f
iron. W h a t is m y valley to yo u ? G o aw ay, and c o m e h e re n o m o re ."
" N o ," an sw e re d D e a th , "b u t till y o u h av e g iven m e a g rain o f
co rn I w ill n o t go."
B u t A varice sh u t h e r h a n d , and c le n c h e d h e r te e th .
"I w ill n o t give y o u a n y th in g ," she said.
A nd D e a th la u g h ed , an d to o k up a b la c k sto n e , an d th re w it
in to th e forest, an d o u t o f it ca m e F ever. She p assed th ro u g h th e
cro w d , an d to u c h e d th e m , an d ea c h m a n th a t she to u c h e d died.
T h e grass w ith e re d b e n e a th h e r feet, as she w alked.
A nd A v arice tre m b le d , an d p u t h e r ashes on h e r h ead .
"Y ou are c ru e l," she c rie d , "you are cru el. T h e re is fam in e in
th e w alled cities o f In d ia , and th e c iste rn s o f S a m a rc a n d h av e ru n
d r y . 15 T h ere is fam in e in th e w alled citie s o f E g y p t, an d th e lo c u sts
h av e c o m e up fro m th e desert. T he N ile h as n o t o v erflo w ed its
b a n k s, an d th e p rie sts have n u rse d Isis an d O s ir is .16 G o aw ay to th o se
w h o n e e d y o u , and leave m e m y se rv a n ts."
" N o ," an sw e re d D e a th , "b u t till y o u h av e g iven m e a g rain o f
c o rn I w ill n o t go."
"I w ill n o t give y o u a n y th in g ," said A varice.
A nd D e a th la u g h ed , an d h e w h istled th ro u g h h is f in g e r s ,17
an d a w o m a n ca m e flying th ro u g h th e air. She co v e red th e valley
w ith h e r w in g s, a n d no m a n w as left alive.
A nd A v arice fled sc re a m in g th ro u g h th e fo rest, an d D e a th
ju m p e d u p o n h is red h o rse and g allo p ed aw ay. H is g allo p in g w as
faster th a n th e w ind.
A nd th e y o u n g K ing w ep t, and said, "W ho w ere th e s e m en ,
and for w h a t w ere th e y seeking?"
" F o r ru b ie s for a k in g 's c ro w n ," an sw e re d o n e w h o sto o d
b e h in d him .
A n d th e y o u n g K in g sta rte d , an d tu rn in g ro u n d , h e saw a
m a n d resse d as a p ilg rim and h o ld in g in h is h a n d a m irro r o f silver.
A n d h e grew p a le , and said, " F o r w h a t K in g ?"
A nd th e p ilg rim an sw ered , "L o o k in th is m irro r, and y o u shall
see h im ."
A nd he lo o k e d in th e m irro r, and seeing his ow n face, h e gave
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a g reat cry an d w oke. T he b rig h t su n lig h t w as stre a m in g in to th e
ro o m , an d fro m th e tre e s o f th e g a rd e n th e b ird s w ere singing.
A n d th e C h a m b e rla in an d th e h ig h officers o f S tate ca m e in
an d b o w e d to h im , and th e p ag es b ro u g h t h im th e ro b e o f g o ld , and
set th e cro w n an d th e sc ep tre b efo re him .
A n d th e y o u n g K in g lo o k e d at th e m , an d th e y w ere b eau tifu l.
M o re b ea u tifu l w ere th e y th a n a n y th in g th a t h e h a d ev er seen. B u t
he re m e m b e re d h is d re a m s, an d he said to h is lo rd s, "T a k e th e se
th in g s aw ay, for I w ill n o t w ea r th e m ."
A n d th e c o u rtie rs w ere su rp rised , an d so m e o f th e m la u g h ed ,
fo r th e y th o u g h t th a t he w as jo k in g .
B u t he said sternly to th e m again , "T ak e th e se th in g s aw ay,
an d h id e th e m from m e. T h o u g h it m ay b e th e day o f m y c o ro n a tio n ,
I w ill n o t w e a r th e m . F o r on th e lo o m o f S orrow , an d by th e w h ite
h a n d s o f P a in , h a s th is m y ro b e b e e n w o v en . T h ere is B lo o d in th e
h e a rt o f th e ru b y , an d D e a th in th e h e a rt o f p e a rl." A n d h e to ld
th e m h is th re e d rea m s.
A n d w h e n th e c o u rtie rs h e a rd th e m , th ey lo o k ed at ea c h o th e r
an d w h isp e re d , saying, "S urely he is m a d ; for w h a t is a d rea m b u t a
d rea m ? T hey are n o t real things. A n d w h a t h av e w e to do w ith th e
lives o f th o se w h o w o rk for us? Shall a m a n n o t eat b rea d till h e h as
seen th e sow er, n o r d rin k w in e till he has ta lk ed w ith th e v in e d re sse r? "
A n d th e C h a m b e rla in said to th e y o u n g K in g , "M y lo rd , I
p ray y o u forget th e se b la c k th o u g h ts o f y o u rs, an d p u t on th is fair
ro b e , an d set th is cro w n u p o n y o u r h ea d . F o r h o w sh all th e p e o p le
k n o w th a t y o u are a k in g , if y o u h av e n o t a k in g 's d ress?"
A nd th e y o u n g K ing looked at him . "Is it so, in d e ed ? " h e asked.
"W ill they n o t know m e for a k i n g ,18 if I have n o t a k in g 's dress?"
"T hey w ill n o t k n o w y o u , m y lo rd ," crie d th e C h a m b e rla in .
"I h ad th o u g h t th a t th e re h ad b e e n m e n w h o w ere like k in g s," he
answ ered, "but it m ay be as y o u say. A nd y et I w ill n o t w ea r th is ro b e,
n o r w ill I be cro w n ed w ith th is crow n, an d I w ill leave th e p alace."
A n d he asked th e m all to leave h im , ex c ep t o n e p ag e w h o m he
k e p t as h is c o m p a n io n , a b oy a y e a r y o u n g e r th a n him self. H im he
k e p t fo r h is se rv ic e , an d w h e n he h a d w a sh e d h im s e lf in c le a r
w a te r, h e o p e n e d a g rea t p a in te d b o x , an d from it h e to o k th e
le a th e rn tu n ic an d ro u g h sh e ep sk in clo ak th a t h e h a d w o rn w h e n he
h a d w a tc h e d on th e h illsid e th e shaggy g o ats o f th e g o a th e rd . T h ese
he p u t on, an d in h is h a n d he to o k h is ru d e s h e p h e rd 's o ld stick.
A n d th e little p ag e o p e n e d h is b lu e eyes in w o n d e r, an d said
128
sm ilin g to h im , "M y lo rd , I see y o u r ro b e an d y o u r sc e p tre , b u t
w h e re is y o u r c ro w n ? "
A n d th e y o u n g K in g p ic k e d a b ra n c h o f w ild b r ia r th a t w as
c lim b in g ov er th e b a lc o n y , and b e n t it, a n d m a d e a sm all circ le o f
it, and set it on h is ow n head.
"T h is shall be m y ow n c ro w n ," he answ ered .
A n d d resse d in th e se c lo th e s he p assed o u t o f th e c h a m b e r in to
th e G re a t H a ll, w h e re th e n o b le s w ere w a itin g fo r him .
A n d th e n o b le s m a d e m e rry o v e r th e y o u n g K in g , an d som e
o f th e m crie d o u t to h im , "M y lo rd , th e p e o p le w ait fo r th e ir k in g ,
an d y o u show th e m a b eg g a r," and o th e rs w ere angry an d said, "H e
b rin g s sh a m e u p o n o u r state, an d is u n w o rth y to b e o u r m a ste r." B u t
h e an sw ered th e m n o t a w o rd , b u t p a sse d o n , a n d w e n t d o w n th e
sta irc a se , a n d o u t th ro u g h th e gates o f b ro n z e , an d sat u p o n h is
h o rse , an d ro d e to th e c a th e d ra l, th e little p ag e ru n n in g b e sid e h im .
A n d th e p e o p le la u g h e d an d said, "It is th e K in g 's fool w h o is
rid in g b y ," an d th e y m o c k e d at him .
A nd he sto p p e d an d said, " N o , b u t I am th e K in g ." A n d he
to ld th e m h is th re e d ream s.
A m a n ca m e o u t o f th e crow d and spoke b itterly to h im , and
said, "Sir, do n o t y o u kn o w th a t o u t o f th e luxury o f th e ric h co m es th e
life o f th e p o o r? B y y o u r p o m p w e are n u rtu re d , an d y o u r vices give us
b read. To w o rk for a m a ste r is b itter, b u t to have no m a ste r to w ork
for is m o re b itte r still. D o yo u th in k th a t th e ravens w ill feed us? A n d
th e se things c a n n o t be changed. W ill yo u say to th e b u y er, 'Y o u shall
buy for so m u c h ,' and to th e seller, 'Y o u shall sell at th is p ric e ? ' I do n o t
th in k y o u can. T herefore go b ack to y o u r p alace and p u t on y o u r p u rp le
an d fine dress. W h a t have y o u to do w ith us, an d w h at w e suffer?"
"A re n o t th e ric h and th e p o o r b ro th ers? " asked th e y o u n g K ing.
"Y e s," an sw e re d th e m a n , " an d th e n a m e o f th e ric h b ro th e r
is C a i n . 1’"
A n d th e y o u n g K in g 's eyes filled w ith te a rs, an d h e ro d e on
th ro u g h th e m u rm u rs o f th e p e o p le , an d th e little p ag e grew afraid
an d left him .
A n d w h e n he r e a c h e d th e g reat d o o r o f th e c a th e d ra l, th e
so ld iers asked, "W h a t do y o u seek h ere ? N o n e en te rs by th is d o o r b u t
th e K in g ."
A n d h is face flushed w ith an g er, an d he said to th e m , "I am
th e K in g ," an d e n tered .
A n d w h e n th e old B ishop saw h im co m in g in his g o a th e rd 's
129
d ress, he rose up in w o n d e r from his th ro n e , and w e n t to m e e t h im ,
and said to h im , "M y son, is th is a k in g 's dress? A n d w ith w h at
cro w n shall I cro w n y o u , and w h a t scep tre shall I p la ce in y o u r h an d ?
Surely th is should be to y o u a day o f jo y , an d n o t a day o f h u m ility ."
"S hall Joy w ea r w h at S orrow h a s fa sh io n e d ? " said th e y o u n g
K ing. A n d he to ld h im h is th re e d rea m s. A n d w h e n th e B ish o p h ad
h e a rd th e m , h e said, "M y son, I am an old m a n , an d in th e w in te r
o f m y d a y s , 2" and I k n o w th a t m a n y evil th in g s are d o n e in th e
w orld. T he b eg g ars w a n d e r th ro u g h th e citie s, and e a t th e ir food
w ith th e dogs. C an y o u m ak e th e se th in g s n o t to be? W ill y o u ta k e
th e le p e r for y o u r bed fello w , an d set y o u r b eg g a r at y o u r b o a rd ? Is
n o t H e w h o m a d e m isery w iser th a n y o u are? T h a t is w hy I c a n n o t
ap p ro v e o f w h a t y o u have d o n e , b u t I ask y o u rid e b a c k to th e p a la c e
and m ak e y o u r face glad, and p u t o n th e k in g 's dress. A n d w ith th e
cro w n o f gold I w ill cro w n y o u , and th e sc ep tre o f p e a rl I w ill p la ce
in y o u r h a n d . A nd as for y o u r d re a m s, th in k no m o re o f th e m . T he
b u rd e n o f th is w o rld is to o g reat for o n e m a n to b ea r, an d th e w o rld 's
sorrow to o heavy for o n e h e a rt to suffer."
"D o y o u say th a t in th is h o u se ? " said th e y o u n g K in g , an d he
p assed by th e B ish o p , and clim b e d up th e steps o f th e altar, and
sto o d b efore th e im age o f C hrist.
H e sto o d b efore th e im ag e o f C h rist, an d on h is rig h t h a n d
an d on h is left w ere th e m a rv e llo u s vessels o f gold. H e k n e lt before
th e im ag e o f C h rist, an d th e g rea t c a n d le s b u rn e d b rig h tly . H e
b o w ed his h e a d in p ray e r, and th e p riests c re p t aw ay from th e altar.
A n d su ddenly w ild cries ca m e from th e street o u tsid e , an d in
e n te re d th e n o b le s w ith d raw n sw ords. "W h ere is th is d re a m e r o f
d r e a m s ? " 21 th e y cried. "W here is th is kin g , w h o is d ressed like a
b eg g a r — th is b o y , w h o brin g s sh am e u p o n o u r state? Surely w e w ill
kill h im , fo r he is u n w o rth y to ru le ov er u s."
A nd th e y o u n g K in g b o w ed h is h e a d again, an d p ray e d , and
w h e n he h a d fin ish e d h is p ra y e r he rose u p , h e lo o k ed at th e m sadly.
A nd th ro u g h th e p a in te d w in d o w s ca m e th e su n lig h t strea m in g
u p o n h im , an d th e su n b e am s w ove ro u n d h im a fin e ro b e th a t w as
fairer th a n th e ro b e th a t h ad b e e n fash io n e d for h is p le a su re . T he
d ea d staff b lo sso m e d , and b are lilies w ere w h ite r th a n p ea rls. T he
dry th o rn b lo ss o m e d , and b are ro ses w ere re d d e r th a n ru b ies. W h ite r
th a n fin e p e a rls w ere th e lilies, and th e ir stem s w ere o f b rig h t silver.
R e d d e r th a n m a le r u b i e s 22 w ere th e ro ses, an d th e ir leaves w ere o f
b e a te n g o ld .23

130
H e sto o d th e re in th e king's dress, a n d th e gates o f th e jew elled
sh rin e o p e n e d , a n d from th e crystal o f th e m a n y -ra y e d m o n s tra n c e
sh o n e a m arvellous a n d m ystical light. H e sto o d th e re in th e king's
dress, a n d th e G lo ry o f G o d filled th e p la c e , a n d th e sa in ts in th e ir
carv en n ic h e s se em e d to m ove. In th e fair dress o f a king he sto o d
before th e m , a n d th e organ p ea le d o u t its m u sic, a n d th e tru m p e te rs
blew u p o n th e ir tr u m p e ts , a n d th e singing boys sang.
A nd th e p eo p le fell u p o n th e ir knees, a n d th e n o b les sh e a th e d
th e ir sw ords a n d did ho m ag e, a n d th e B ish o p 's face grew p a le , an d
his h a n d s tre m b le d . "A g re a te r th a n I have cro w n ed y o u ," he cried ,
a n d he k n elt before him .
A nd th e young K ing ca m e dow n from th e high a lta r, a n d w en t
to his p a la c e th ro u g h th e crow d. B ut no m a n d a re d look u p o n his
face, for it was like th e face o f an angel.

Commentary

1 Some o f them had still quite natural manners — Н е к о т о р ы е из н и х


все ещ е в ел и с е б я с о в е р ш е н н о е с т е с т в е н н о
2
R im ini — Р и м и н и , город в С е в е р н о й И т а л и и
3
Joyeuse (фр.) — р а д о с т н а я , с ч а с т л и в а я . В ц и к л е л е г е н д об
А ртуре, к о р о л е б р и т т о в , С а д о м р а д о с т и — la G a rd e Joy eu se —
н азы вается пом естье р ы ц аря Л анселота. А н гл и й ски е писатели
в т о р о й п о л о в и н ы X IX в е к а в п е р и о д р о м а н т и ч е с к о г о у в л е ч е н и я
с р е д н е в е к о в ы м и сю ж е т а м и ч а ст о о б р а щ а л и с ь к к н и г е « С м ер ть
Артура» (XV ве к ) Т о м а с а М э л о р и , в к о т о р о й в о с п р о и з в е д е н а
вся и с т о р и я к о р о л я А ртура и его р ы ц а р е й .
4
Adonis — А д о н и с , с о г л а с н о д р е в н е г р е ч е с к о й м и ф о л о г и и , п р е­
к р асн ы й ю н ош а, возлю б лен н ы й А ф родиты
so the tale ran — зд. к а к р а с с к а з ы в а л и
and this was his dream — и вот что он у ви д ел во сн е
7
grated windows — з а б р а н н ы е р е ш е т к о й о к н а
B ut what are these things to you ? — Ч т о тебе до этого?
it was threaded with a thread o f gold — н а т к а ц к о м с т а н к е бы ла
н а т я н у т а зо л о т а я н и т к а
Ormuz — О р м у з, н а з в а н и е го р о д а в И р а н е , о с н о в а н н о г о ещ е
до X I I I в е к а . С л о в о у п о т р е б л я л о с ь в е л и к и м а н г л и й с к и м п о э т о м
М и л ь т о н о м к а к с и м в о л В о с то к а.

131
11 I t sh a ll be ... f o r the sceptre o f the yo u n g King. — О н буд ет ...
у к р а ш а т ь с к и п е т р м о л о д о го к о р о л я .
O n a n d on h e went, till h e reached the edge o f the wood — О н ш е л
все д а л ь ш е и д а л ь ш е , п о к а н е д о с т и г о п у ш к и л е с а
13
give те a third o f them — д а й м н е к аж д о го тр етьего
14
Tartary — Т а т а р и я (т а к н а з ы в а л и в д р е в н о с т и о гр о м н у ю об­
л а с т ь м еж ду Д н е п р о м и Я п о н с к и м м о р е м )
the cisterns o f Sam arcand have run dry — к о л о д ц ы С а м а р к а н д а
вы с о х л и
the priests have nursed Isis and Osiris — зд. с в я щ е н н и к и в о з н о ­
сят м оли твы И си д е и О сирису
17
a n d he w histled through his fin g ers— и он с в и с т н у л , з а с у н у в
пальц ы в рот
18
Will they not know m efo r a king — Р а зв е о н и не п р и з н а ю т м е н я
королем
19
Cain (библ.)— К а и н . О тв е ч а я н а сл о в а к о р о л я о т о м , что
б о гаты е и б е д н ы е — б р а т ь я , о д и н и з п р о с т о л ю д и н о в с к а з а л ,
что и м я б огатого брата — К а и н . О н тем с а м ы м хотел д а ть п о ­
н я т ь к о р о л ю , что м еж ду б е д н я к а м и и б о га ч а м и н е м о ж е т бы ть
н и к а к о й д р у ж б ы , к а к ее не б ы л о м еж ду К а и н о м и у б и т ы м им
его бр ато м А вел ем .
20 . , .
in the winter o f m y days — н а с к л о н е д н е й м о и х
Where is this dreamer o f dreams?— Где с н о в и д е ц ?
22
male rubies — р у б и н ы густого т е м н о - к р а с н о г о ц в е та
beaten gold — ч е к а н н о е зо л о то
24
the nobles sheathed their swords a nd did homage — п р и д в о р н ы е
влож и ли свои м ечи в н о ж н ы и п р и ся гн у л и на верн ость

Exercises

R eadin g Com prehension

1 Read the tale again and mark the following with D (= it happened in
the dream), R (= it happened in reality).

1) T h e young K ing b ru sh e d his b ro w n curls b a c k from his


fo reh ead , a n d taking up a lu te , he beg an to play.________
132
2) P a le , sic k ly -lo o k in g c h ild re n w ere w o rk in g th e re .________
3) S om e h ag g a rd w o m e n w ere seated at a ta b le ._______
4) T he y o u n g K in g w e n t o v er to o n e o f th e w ea v ers, an d
sto o d by h im and w a tc h e d him .________
5) T h re e A rabs on w ild asses ro d e o u t an d th re w sp ears at
t h e m . ________
6) A fter som e tim e th e d iv e r rose up o u t o f th e w a te r w ith
a p e a rl in h is rig h t h a n d .________
7) T h e b rig h t p a rro ts flew sc re a m in g from b ra n c h to b ra n c h .

8) T h e re th e y o u n g K in g saw a g reat cro w d o f m e n w o rk in g


in th e b e d o f a d rie d -u p r iv e r ._______
9) T he n e g ro e s c h a tte re d to e a c h o th e r, an d b e g a n to q u arrel
o v er a string o f b rig h t b e a d s ._______
10) D e a th la u g h e d , and to o k u p a b la c k sto n e , an d th re w it
in to th e forest, and o u t o f it ca m e F ev er.________
11) T he y o u n g K ing asked all to leave h im , ex c ep t o n e page
w h o m he k e p t as h is c o m p a n io n .________
12) A n d d ressed in th e se fine c lo th e s th e y o u n g K in g passed
o u t o f th e c h a m b e r in to th e G re a t H a ll, w h e re th e n o b le s
w ere w a itin g for h i m . ________
13) T he y o u n g K ing sto o d b efo re th e im ag e o f C h rist, an d on
h is rig h t h a n d and on h is left w ere th e m a rv e llo u s vessels
o f g o ld ._______

2 Answer the following questions.

1) W h a t w ere th e stories w h isp e re d ab o u t th e y o u n g K in g 's


o rig in ?
2) W h a t did th e old K in g confess on h is d e a th -b e d ?
3) W h a t did o th e r people n o tic e in th e y o u n g K in g 's b eh av io u r?
4) W h a t k in d o f stories w ere to ld a b o u t h im ?
5) W h a t h a d o c c u p ie d th e y o u n g K in g m o st o f all?
6) W h a t did th e y o u n g K in g see in h is first d rea m ?
7) W h a t d id th e y o u n g K in g see in h is seco n d d ream ?
8) W h a t did th e y o u n g K in g see in his th ird d rea m ?
9) W h a t did th e y o u n g K in g refuse to w ea r an d w hy?
10) W h a t d id th e co u rtie rs th in k ab o u t it?
11) W h a t d id th e y o u n g K in g p u t on in stead ?
12) H o w d id th e n o b le s rec eiv e him ?
133
13) H ow did th e old B ishop p ersu ad e th e young K ing to p u t
th e k in g 's dress?
14) W h a t was th e end o f th e story?

Vocabulary an d G ra m m a r Tasks

1 Find in the tale the English for:

п олучить н а с т а в л е н и я п р о ф е с с о р а ; о тк и н у ться назад; с глу­


б о к и м вздохом обл егч ен и я ; быть ни ж е по р о ж д ен и ю , сто ять
м н ого н и ж е п о; ок азать с л и ш к о м м н о го в н и м а н и я ; ж и ть в
глухом лесу; стянуть руки вер евк ам и ; р ас к аять ся в своем боль­
ш о м грехе; п р и зн а т ь к о го -л и б о н а с л е д н и к о м ; со р в аться с
уст; средство от недуга; п р о и зн е с т и речь от и м е н и к о го -л и б о ;
застать, н ай т и к о го -л и б о ; к а к будто в тр а н се ; р ас п о р яд и ть ­
ся; трудиться ночью и д н е м ; н о с и т ь л охм отья; п о р аб о щ ат ь
к о го -л и б о ; д ави ть ви ноград; м о ч к а уха; бросить я к о р ь ; я з ы к и
губы его не слуш ались; н и т к а бус; им еть ф о р м у ч е го -л и б о ;
пож ать п лечам и; русло вы сохш ей р е к и ; вы ры ть глубокую яму;
сжать зубы; оставить кого-л и бо своим к о м п а н ьо н о м ; на склоне
м оих лет; с к л о н и т ь голову; орган зазвучал

2 Find these words and phrases in the tex t, and notice the way in which
they are used. In each case circle a ) , b) or c) to show which one you
think is the best equivalent.

1) "th e tire d guard"


a) th e w eary guard
b) th e cu rio u s guard
c) th e w orking guard

2) "his eyelids tre m b le d "


a) his eyelids o p en e d
b) h is eyelids v ib ra te d
c) h is eyelids clo sed

3) "haggard w o m en "
a) w ild w o m e n
b) w orn w o m en
c) spare w o m en
134
4) "c re p t aw ay from th e altar"
a) left th e a lta r u n n o tic e d
b) craw led aw ay from th e a lta r
c) stole th e a lta r

5) " th ro u g h th e m u rm u rs o f p e o p le "
a) th ro u g h th e g ru m b le o f p e o p le
b) th ro u g h th e w h isp e r o f p e o p le
c) th ro u g h th e m u tte r o f p e o p le

6) "evil th in g s "
a) w ick e d th in g s
b) u n fo rtu n a te th in g s
c) w ro n g th in g s

7) " D e a th g allo p ed aw ay"


a) D e a th fled aw ay
b) D e a th d isa p p e a re d
c) D e a th sent away

8) "T h e a d d e rs hissed at h im "


a) T he ad d e rs sibilated
b) T he ad d e rs w h istled
c) T he ad d ers sh rilled

9) "h a d a fa sc in a tio n fo r h im "


a) c h a rm e d h im
b) d elig h te d h im
c) b e w itc h e d h im

10) "m o c k e d at him "


a) lau g h ed at h im
b) w ere very su rp rised
c) th o u g h t he w as stupid

3 Group the following words under the headings below.

w h is p e r, h o p e , m u rm u r, relief, q u a r r e l, p le a s u r e , so rro w ,
p a s s io n , jo y , tr a n c e , e a g e rn e s s, te rr o r , c h a tte r

135
Related to ways o f speaking Related to ways o f feeling

quiet normal angry good / happy bad / unhappy

4 Fill in the blanks with correct prepositions.

1) It w as th e h u n te rs w ho h a d found him alm ost________ ch an ce.


2) T hey h a d no c h ild re n _________ th e ir ow n an d lived________
re m o te p a rt_________th e forest.
3 )__________ th e p r e s e n c e _______ th e C o u n c il th e o ld K in g
a c k n o w led g e d h im as h is heir.
4) T he y o u n g K in g sh o w ed signs________ th a t stran g e p as sio n
b e a u ty w h ic h h a d g reat in flu en ce_________ h is life.
5) T he y o u n g K ing w as cau g h t kneeling________ real a d m ira tio n
before a g reat p ic tu re th a t h a d b e e n b ro u g h t_________V enice.
6) H e im a g in e d h im s e lf to be sta n d in g __________th e h ig h altar
t h e C a th e d ra l________________ th e fair c lo th e s o f a K ing.
_

7) I am w eak h u n g e r, and he suffers n o t a little_______


overfeeding.
8) H e th o u g h t th a t he w as lying th e deck________ large
ship_________ a h u n d re d slaves.
9) T he m a s te r o f th e ship w eig h e d th e m , an d p u t th e m
a little bag_________g ree n leath er.
10) H e th o u g h t th a t he w as w an d e rin g a d im w o o d ,
full_________strange fruits and beau tifu l p o iso n o u s flow ers.
11) T h ere he saw a g reat crow d ____ m e n _w o rk in g ________
th e b ed ________ a d rie d -u p river.
12) She p assed _________ th e g reat crow d______m e n , an d a
th ird _________th e m lay dead.
13) H e k n elt______ th e im age o f C h rist, an d th e g reat ca n d le s
b u rn t brightly.
14) H e sto o d th e re _________th e k in g 's dress, an d th e G lo ry o f
G o d filled th e p la ce .
136
5 Insert articles if necessary.

1)__________ boy th re w h im s e lf b a c k w ith d eep sigh o f


re lie f on soft co ach .
2) A s so o n as he co u ld esca p e from ________ C o u n c il, h e w o u ld
ru n d o w n g reat sta irca se and w a n d e r f r o m _______
ro o m to ________ro o m , an d fro m _________ c o rrid o r to_______
co rrid o r.
3) B u t m o re often he w o u ld be a lo n e , feeling th ro u g h _______
c e rta in in stin c t th a t B eauty like_________ W isd o m
loves________lonely w o rsh ip p er.
4) It w as said th a t_________ B u rg o m a ste r w h o h a d co m e to
m a k e_______ sp eech on b e h a lf o f__________c itiz e n s o f _______
to w n ca u g h t sight o f h im k n e e lin g in_________ real
a d m ira tio n befo re_________ p ic tu re .
5) B u t w h a t h ad o c c u p ie d h im m o st w as_________ ro b e h e w as
to w ea r at h is c o ro n a tio n ,_________ro b e o f g o ld , and________
ruby cro w n , and sc ep tre w ith its row s_and________
rin g s o f_______ pearls.
6 )__________ designs w h ic h w ere from _________ h a n d s o f _______
m o st fam o u s artists o f tim e h ad b e e n b ro u g h t to
h im m a n y m o n th s before.
7) O utside he could see great dom e o f_______ C ath ed ral
lo o m in g like_________b u b b le over shadow y h o u se s,
and_________ tire d g u ard w alk in g up an d d o w n on________
te rra c e by________ river.
8) A n d ________ D e a th la u g h ed , an d to o k cu p , an d p u t
it in to ________ p o o l o f w ate r, an d o u t o f________ cu p
rose________A gue.
9 )___________C h a m b e rla in _and _________ hig h officers o f _______
S tate ca m e in and b o w ed to h im , and pages b ro u g h t
h im ________ ro b e o f gold, an d set_________ cro w n and_______
sc ep tre b efore him .
10 )_________ y o u n g K in g p ic k ed _________ b ra n c h o f_________w ild
b r ia r th a t w as c lim b in g ov er b a lc o n y , an d b e n t it,
an d m a d e sm all circ le o f it, an d set it on h is ow n
h ead .
11) A nd_________ y o u n g K in g 's eyes w ere fille d w ith ________
te a rs , an d h e ro d e on th ro u g h _________m u rm u rs o f _______
p e o p le , and little p ag e grew afraid an d left h im .

137
12) H e k n e lt b efo re________ im age o f C h rist, an d _________ great
c a n d le s b u rn e d brightly.

6 Complete these sentences by adding little (a little) o r f e w (a few ).

Examples: H u rry up! W e h av e got little tim e.


I last saw J o h n a fe w days ago.

1) T h e re is a sh o rtag e o f w a te r b e c a u se th e re h as b e e n very
__________________ra in rec en tly .
2) T his is n o t th e firs t tim e th e c a r h as b ro k e n dow n. It
h a p p e n e d ___________________tim e s before.
3) T he th e a tre w as alm ost em pty. T here w ere very______________
p eo p le th ere.
4) I d o n 't th in k Jo e w o u ld be a g o o d te a c h e r. S h e 's got
__________________ p a tie n c e w ith ch ild ren .
5) "W o u ld y o u like so m e m o re coffee?" "Y es, p le a se , b u t
o nly __________________ "
6) T his to w n is n 't w ell-k n o w n an d th e re is n 't m u c h to see,
so__________________ to u rists co m e h ere.
7) J a c k 's m o th e r died y ea rs ago.
8) H e d o e s n 't speak m u c h E nglish . O n ly _________________
w ords.
9) W e d id n 't h av e any m o n e y b u t B ob h ad ___________________ .
10) C an y o u d escrib e th e situ a tio n in___________________ w o rd s?
11) T he streets looked alm ost deserted. T h ere w ere______________
p eo p le th ere.
12) "A re th e re m a n y m istak e s in m y c o m p o s itio n ? " — "Q u ite

13) I'm n o t p le ase d w ith h im . H e ta k es very__________________


tro u b le w ith h is w ork.
14) I th in k th a t a good sp e ak e r ca n say m u c h in________________
w ords.
15) "D o y o u speak F re n c h ? " - "Ju st____________________ ."
16) T he c o u rtie rs w e n t to receive_________________ lessons from
th e P ro fesso r o f E tiq u e tte .

7 Can you fill in the missing words?

1) H e w as th e c h ild o f th e o ld K in g 's d a u g h t e r by a
138
m a r r i a g e with s o m e o n e much lower in

2) Som e peo p le said he was a stranger w ho m a d e th e young


Princess love him by th e wonderful magic of his .
3) H e m issed at tim es th e ___________________ o f forest life, an d
always criticised th e C o u rt___________________ th a t o c c u p ie d
so m u c h o f ea c h day.
4) A nd th e w hole w orld was to be se a rc h e d for jew els th a t
w ould be___________________ o f th e ir w ork.
5) T he walls w ere hung w ith ric h ____________________rep resen tin g
th e T riu m p h o f B eauty.
6) W h e n m id n ig h t s o u n d e d from th e _____________________, he
to u c h e d a bell, a n d his pages e n te re d a n d u n d re sse d h im
w ith m u c h c e re m o n y .
7) T h e slaves w ere n a k e d , b u t for a_____________________ lio n -
c lo th , a n d ea c h m a n was c h a in e d to his n eig h b o u r.
8) As so o n as th e y h ad cast a n c h o r a n d ___________________ dow n
th e sail, th e negroes w en t in to th e h o ld a n d b ro u g h t up a
long___________________ , heavily w eighted w ith lead.
9) T h e neg ro es c h a tte re d to ea ch o th e r, a n d beg an to q u arrel
over a___________________ o f b rig h t bead s.
10) A nd A varice fled scream in g th ro u g h th e forest, a n d D e a th
ju m p e d u p o n his red h orse an d ___________________ away.
11) H e o p e n e d a g reat p a in te d box, a n d from it he to o k th e
_________________ tu n ic an d rough__________________cloak th a t
he h ad w orn.
12) H e sto o d th e re in th e king's dress, a n d th e gates o f th e
sh rin e ___________________ o p e n e d , an d from th e crystal o f
th e m a n y -r a y e d _____________________s h o n e a m a rv e llo u s
m ystical light.

8 Translate the following sentences into English.

1) Н а с м е р т н о м одре с т а р ы й К о р о л ь р а с к а я л с я в св о ем
грехе.
2) В п ри сутстви и С овета К о р о л ь п р о во згл аси л ю нош у
своим н асл ед н и ко м .
3) П орою ю н ош е недоставало сво бо д н о й л есн о й ж и зн и .
4) М о л о д о й К о р о л ь л ю б и л о с т а в а т ь с я о д и н д л я т о го ,
ч т о б ы без п о м ех л ю б о в а т ь с я п р е к р а с н ы м и в е щ а м и .
5) « Ц е л ы м и д н я м и м ы т р у д и м с я н а б о га ч е й , а о н и н а­
б и в аю т су н д у к и зо л о то м » , — отвеч ал т к а ч .
6) С п устя н е к о т о р о е в р е м я н ы р я л ь щ и к п о к а з а л с я из
в о д ы , и в п р а в о й р у к е он д е р ж а л ж е м ч у ж и н у .
7) О н ш ел и ш ел , п о к а н е д о с т и г о п у ш к и л ес а; там он
уви д ел в е л и к о е м н о ж е с т в о л ю д е й , р а б о т а в ш и х в рус­
ле в ы с о х ш е й р е к и .
8) М о л о д о й К о р о л ь о то с л ал п р о ч ь всех, к р о м е о д н о го
п аж а, к о т о р о г о он о ст ав и л п р и себе.
9) М о л о д о й К о р о л ь о т к а з а л с я о б л а ч а т ь с я в одеж ду к о р о ­
л я и п о в е д а л им тр и св о и х сн а .
10) В м есто одеж ды к о р о л я он о б л а ч и л с я в одежду пастуха.
11) С т а р ы й е п и с к о п ск а за л : «Я стар и н а с к л о н е л ет зн а ю ,
что м н о г о зл а т в о р и т с я в это м м ире».
12) О н п о п р о с и л ю н о ш у н ад еть н а се б я одежду, п о д о б а­
ю щ ую к о р о л ю .
13) И ю н о ш а п р е д с т а л в п р е к р а с н о м о б л а ч е н и и п ер е д
лю дьм и.

fP D iscussion Tasks

1 D iscuss the following.

1) P rove th a t th e young K ing h a d a passio n for b eau ty .


2) C o m m e n t on th e following s ta te m e n t from th e tale: "T h e
b u rd e n o f th is w orld is to o g reat for on e m a n to b ea r, an d
th e w o rld 's sorrow to o heavy for o n e h e a rt to suffer." G ive
y o u r a rg u m e n ts.
3) D o you th in k th e re c a n be friendsh ip b e tw e e n th e rich
a n d th e p o o r? G ive y o u r arg u m e n ts.
4) D iscuss th e m o ra l o f th e tale.
THE FISH ERM AN AND THE SOUL

E very ev e n in g th e y o u n g F is h e rm a n w e n t to th e sea an d th re w
h is n e ts in to th e w ater. W h en th e w in d blew from th e la n d h e c a u g h t
n o th in g . B u t w h e n th e w in d blew to th e sh o re, th e fish ca m e in
fro m th e d e e p , an d sw am in to h is n e ts, and h e to o k th e m to th e
m a rk e tp la c e an d sold th e m .
Every evening he w en t o u t u p o n th e sea, and o n e evening th e n et
w as so heavy th a t he could hardly draw it into th e boat. A n d h e laughed,
an d said to himself, "Surely I have cau g h t all th e fish th a t swim , or
som e dull m o n ste r th a t w ill be a surprise to m en , or som e th in g o f
h o rro r th a t th e great Q ueen w ill desire," and w ith all his strength he
p u lle d th e coarse ro p es till th e n et rose to th e to p o f th e w ater.
B u t no fish at all w as in it, n o r any m o n s te r o r th in g o f
h o rro r, b u t on ly a little M e rm a id lying fast asleep.
H e r w et h a ir w as like gold. H e r b o d y w as as w h ite as ivory,
141
an d h e r ta il w as o f silver an d p ea rl. L ike seash ells w ere h e r ears,
an d h e r lips w ere like se a -c o ra l.
So b ea u tifu l w as she, th a t w h e n th e y o u n g F is h e rm a n saw
h e r, h e w as filled w ith w o n d er. H e p u t o u t h is h a n d an d d rew th e
n e t close to h im , and le a n in g ov er it, h e h e ld h e r in h is arm s. A n d
w h e n he to u c h e d h e r, she gave a cry like a seagull, an d w o k e, and
lo o k e d at h im in te rro r, and struggled th a t she m ig h t escap e. B u t he
h e ld h e r tig h tly to h im , an d w o u ld n o t let h e r go.
A n d w h e n she saw th a t she co u ld in no w ay esca p e from h im ,
she b eg an to w ee p , an d said, "I p ray y o u let m e go, fo r I am th e
o nly d a u g h te r o f a K in g , and m y fa th e r is o ld and a lo n e ."
B u t th e y o u n g F is h e rm a n an sw e re d , "I w ill n o t let y o u go till
y o u m a k e m e a p ro m ise th a t w h e n e v e r I call y o u , y o u w ill co m e and
sing to m e , for th e fish d elig h t to liste n to th e song o f th e S ea-folk,
an d so shall m y n ets be full."
"W ill y o u let m e go, if I p ro m ise y o u th is ? " crie d th e M e rm a id .
" In very tr u th I w ill let y o u g o ," said th e y o u n g F ish e rm a n .
So she m a d e h im th e p ro m ise and sw ore it by th e o a th o f th e
Sea-folk. A n d he lo o se n e d h is arm s from ab o u t h er, an d she sank
d o w n in to th e w ate r, tre m b lin g w ith a stran g e fear.

E very ev e n in g th e y o u n g F is h e rm a n w e n t o u t u p o n th e sea,
an d called to th e M e rm a id , and she rose o u t o f th e w a te r an d sang
to him . R o u n d and ro u n d h e r sw am th e d o lp h in s , an d th e w ild gulls
w h e e le d above h e r h ea d . A nd she sang a m a rv e llo u s song.
A nd as she sang, all th e fish ca m e in from th e d ee p to listen
to h e r, an d th e y o u n g F is h e rm a n th re w h is n e ts ro u n d th e m and
c a u g h t th e m . A n d w h e n his b o a t w as full, th e M e rm a id w o u ld sink
d o w n in to th e sea, sm ilin g at him .
Y et, she w o u ld n e v e r c o m e n e a r h im th a t h e m ig h t to u c h
her. O ften he c a lle d to h e r and b eg g ed h e r to c o m e clo se, b u t she
w o u ld n o t; and w h e n he w a n te d to c a tc h h e r, she d iv e d in to th e
w a te r, and he d id n o t see h e r again th a t day. A n d e a c h day th e
so u n d o f h e r v o ic e b e c a m e sw eeter to h is ears. So sw eet w as h e r
v o ic e th a t he forgot h is n e ts and h ad no care o f h is craft. W ith lips
p a rte d and eyes dim w ith w o n d e r, he sat idle in h is b o a t a n d listen ed .
A n d o n e ev e n in g h e ca lled to h e r an d said, " L ittle M e rm a id ,
little M e rm a id , I love y o u . T ake m e for y o u r b rid e g ro o m , fo r I
love y o u ."
B u t th e M e rm a id sh o o k h e r h e a d , "Y ou h av e a h u m a n so u l,"
142
she answ ered. " If only y o u w o u ld send y o u r soul aw ay, th e n I co u ld
love y o u ."
A nd th e you n g F ish e rm a n said to himself, "O f w h a t use is my
soul to m e? I c a n n o t see it. I m ay n o t to u c h it. I do n o t k now it.
Surely I w ill send it away from m e , and m u c h gladness shall be m in e ."
A n d a cry o f jo y b roke from his h p s, and stan d in g up in th e p a in te d
b o at, he h eld o u t h is arm s to th e M erm aid . "I w ill send m y soul aw ay,"
he cried, "a n d y o u shall be m y b rid e , and I will be y o u r b rid eg ro o m ,
and in th e d ep th o f th e sea w e w ill live to g eth er, an d all th a t y o u have
sung y o u shall show m e , and all th a t y o u desire I w ill d o ."
A nd th e little M e rm a id la u g h ed for p le a su re an d h id h e r face
in h is h a n d s.
"B u t h o w shall I send m y soul from m e ? " c rie d th e y o u n g
F ish e rm a n . "T ell m e h o w I m ay do it."
"I do n o t k n o w ," said th e little M e rm a id , "th e S ea-fo lk h av e
no so u ls." A n d she sank do w n in to th e d e e p , lo o k in g sadly at him .

E arly on th e n e x t m o rn in g th e y o u n g F is h e rm a n w e n t to th e
h o u se o f th e P rie st an d k n o c k e d th re e tim e s at th e d oor.
T h e n o v ic e lo o k e d o u t, a n d w h e n h e saw w h o it w as, h e
o p e n e d th e d o o r an d said to h im , " E n te r."
A n d th e y o u n g F is h e rm a n e n te re d , an d k n e lt d o w n on th e
flo or, and c rie d to th e P rie st, w h o w as re a d in g o u t o f th e H o ly B o o k
an d said to h im , " F a th e r, I am in love w ith o n e o f th e S ea-folk,
an d m y soul h in d e rs m e from h av in g m y desire. T ell m e h o w I ca n
sen d m y soul aw ay fro m m e , for in tr u th I do n o t n e e d it. O f w h a t
u se is m y soul to m e? I c a n n o t see it. I m ay n o t to u c h it. I do n o t
k n o w it."
A nd th e P rie st b e a t h is b re a st, an d an sw ered , "O h , y o u are
m a d , o r h av e e a te n som e p o iso n o u s h e rb , for th e soul is th e n o b le st
p a r t o f a m a n , an d w as given to u s by G o d th a t w e sh o u ld n o b ly use
it. T h ere is n o th in g m o re p re c io u s th a n a h u m a n soul. It is w o rth
all th e gold th a t is in th e w o rld , an d is m o re p re c io u s th a n th e ru b ies
o f th e kings. T h e re fo re , m y son, th in k n o t any m o re o f th is m a tte r,
for it is a sin th a t m ay n o t be forgiven. A n d as for th e S ea-folk th ey
are lo s t ,1 an d th o s e , w h o w o u ld deal w ith th e m , are lo st also. T hey
are th e b e a sts o f th e field th a t do n o t u n d e r s ta n d th e d ifferen ce
b e tw e e n g o o d an d evil, and fo r th e m th e L o rd h a s n o t d ie d .2"
T he y o u n g F is h e r m a n 's eyes filled w ith te a rs, w h e n h e h e a rd
th e b itte r w o rd s o f th e P rie st, an d he rose up from h is k n e e s an d said
143
to him , "F ath er, the F au n s live in the forest and are glad, and on
th e rocks sit th e M erm en w ith th e ir harps o f red gold. Let me be as
they are, for th e ir days are as the days of flowers. A nd as for my
soul, w hat good does my soul do m e, if it stands betw een me and the
th in g I love?"
"The love o f the body is vile," cried the Priest, "and vile and
evil are th e pagan th in g s 3 G od allows to w ander th ro u g h H is world.
The singers o f th e sea! I have heard th em at n ig h t-tim e. They knock
at the w indow and laugh. They w hisper into my ears the tale o f th eir
jo y s. They tem p t m e w ith tem p tatio n s, and w hen I pray, they m ake
m o u th s at m e. They are lost. I tell you, they are lost. F o r them
th ere is no heaven n o r hell, and n e ith e r shall they praise G o d 's
n am e."
"F ath er," cried the young F ish erm an, "you do not know w hat
you say. O nce in my net I caught the daughter of a King. She is
fairer th a n the m orning star, and w hiter th a n the m oon. F o r her
body I w ould give my soul, and for h er love I w ould surrender
heaven. Tell me w hat I ask of you, and let m e go in peace."
"Away! Away!" cried the Priest. "Y our lem an is lost, and you
shall be lost w ith her." A nd he gave him no blessing, but drove him
from his door.
And the young F ish erm an w ent to the m arketplace, and he
w alked slowly, and w ith a bow ed head, as one w ho is in sorrow.
A nd w hen th e m e rc h a n ts saw him com ing, they began to
w hisper to each other, and one o f th em cam e up to m eet him and
called him by n am e, and said to him , "W hat do you have to sell?"
"I will sell you my soul," he answ ered, "I pray you buy it of
m e, for I am very tired o f it. O f w hat use is my soul to m e? I cannot
see it. I may not to u c h it. I do not know it."
B ut the m erch an ts m ocked at him , and said, "O f w hat use is
a m a n 's soul to us? It is not w orth a clipped piece o f silver.4 Sell us
y o u r body for a slave, and we will put on you sea-purple clothes and
a ring on y our finger, and m ake you the m inion o f the great Q u e e n .5
B ut do not talk o f the soul, to us it is nothing, it has no value for our
service."
A nd the young F ish erm an said to himself, "H ow strange a
th in g this is! The Priest tells me th a t the soul is w orth all the gold in
th e w orld, and the m erch an ts say th a t it is not w orth a clipped piece
o f silver." A nd he left the m ark et-p lace, and w ent down to the shore
o f the sea, and began to th in k w hat he should do.
144
And at n o o n he rem em b ered how one o f his co m panions w ho
was a gath erer o f sam phire, had told him o f a certain young W itch
who lived in a cave at the head o f the bay and was very good at her
w itcheries. A nd he set to and ran, so eager he was to get rid o f his
soul. The young W itch knew th a t he was com ing, and she laughed
and let dow n her red hair. W ith h er red h air falling around her, she
stood at th e o pening o f the cave, and in h er hand she had a spray
o f wild h em lo ck th a t was b lo sso m in g .6
"W hat do you la c k ? 7 W hat do you lack?" she cried, as he
cam e. "F ish for y o u r net? I have a little reed p ipe, and w hen I
blow on it, the m u llet com e sailing into the bay. But it has a price,
pretty boy, it has a price. W hat do you lack? W hat do you lack? A
storm to w reck the ships? I have m ore storm s th an the w ind has, for
I serve one, w ho is stronger th a n the w ind. I can send the great
ships to the b o tto m o f the sea. B ut I have a price, pretty boy, I
have a price. W hat do you lack? W hat do y ou lack? I know a flower
th a t grows in the valley, none know s it but I. It has purple leaves,
and a star in its heart, and its ju ic e is as w hite as milk. Should you
to u ch w ith th is flo w er the hard lips o f the Q ueen, she w ould follow
you all over the w orld. O ut o f the bed of the K ing she w ould rise,
and over th e w hole w orld she w ould follow you. B ut it has a price,
pretty boy, it has a price. W hat do you lack? W hat do you lack? Tell
me y our desire, and I will give it to you, and you shall pay me a
price, pretty boy, you shall pay m e a price."
"M y desire is but for a little th in g ," 1 said the young F isherm an,
"yet the Priest has been very angry w ith m e, and driven m e out. It
is but for a little thing, and the m erch an ts have m ocked m e, and
denied me. Therefore I have com e to you, though m en call you
evil, and w hatever be y our price I shall pay it."
"W hat w ould you do?" asked the W itch, com ing near to him .
"I w ould send my soul away from m e," answ ered the young
F ish erm an .
The W itch grew pale, and trem bled, and hid her face in her
blue m antle. "P retty boy, pretty boy," she said, "that is a terrible
thin g to do."
H e laughed. "M y soul is n o th in g to m e," he answered. "I
can n o t see it. I m ay not to u ch it. I do not know it."
"W hat will you give m e, if I tell y ou?" asked the W itch,
looking dow n at him w ith h er beautiful eyes.
"Five pieces o f gold," he said, "and my nets, and the house
145
w here I live, and the p ain ted boat in w hich I sail. Only tell me how
to get rid of my soul, and I will give you all I possess."
She laughed m ockingly at him , and struck him w ith the spray
o f hem lock. "I can tu rn the autum n leaves into gold," she answered.
"H e w hom I serve is rich er th an all the kings o f this w orld."
"W hat th e n shall I give y o u ," he cried, "if yo u r price be
n eith er gold n o r silver?"
The W itch stroke his h air w ith her th in w hite hand. "You
m ust dance w ith m e, pretty boy," she said, smiling at him.
"N o th in g but th a t? " cried the young F isherm an in w onder,
and he rose to his feet.
"N othing but th at," she answered, and she smiled at him again.
"T hen at sunset in some secret place w e shall dance together,"
he said, "and after we have danced, you shall tell me the thing,
w hich I desire to know ."
She shook h er head. "W hen th e m oon is full, w hen the m oon
is full," she repeated. T hen she looked all round, and listened. A
blue bird rose scream ing from its nest, and three birds w histled to
each other. T here was no sound, except the sound o f a wave. So
she reached out h er h an d , and drew him near to h er and put her dry
lips close to his ear.
"T onight you m ust com e to the top o f the m o u n tain ," she
w hispered. "It is a Sabbath, and He will be there."
The young F isherm an looked at her, and she showed her w hite
teeth and laughed. "W ho is H e, o f w hom you speak?" he asked.
"It d o e sn 't m a tte r," she answ ered. "T onight go and stand
u n d e r the b ran ch es o f th e h o rn b e a m ,’ and w ait for my com ing. If a
black dog runs tow ards you, strike it w ith a rod o f willow, and it will
go away. If an owl speaks you, m ake it no answer. W hen the m oon
is full, I shall be w ith you, and we will dance to gether on the grass."
"But will you swear to me to tell m e how I may send my soul
from m e?" he asked.
"By th e hoofs o f the goat I swear it," she answered.
"You are the best o f the w itch es," cried the young F isherm an,
"and I will surely dance w ith you to n ig ht on the top o f the m ountain.
I w ould not have m in d ed if you had asked me for gold or silver. But
as y o u r price is such a trifling m atter, so be it." A nd he took off his
cap to her, and b en t his head low, and ran back to the tow n filled
w ith a great joy.
And the W itch w atched him , as he went. And after a tim e
146
she clenched h er h an d s in anger. "H e should have been m in e," she
said, "I am as fair as she is."
A nd th a t ev en in g , w h en th e m o o n had risen , the you n g
F ish erm an clim bed up to the top o f th e m o u n tain , and stood u n d er
the b ran ch es o f the hornbeam . The round sea lay at his feet, and
the shadow s o f the fishing boats m oved in the little bay. A great owl
w ith yellow eyes, called to him by his n am e, but he m ade it no
answer. A black dog ran tow ards him and barked. He struck it w ith
a rod of willow , and it w ent away.
At m id n ig h t the w itches cam e flying th ro u g h the air. "Phew!"
they cried, as they lit u p o n the ground, "there is som eone here, we
do not know!" and they sniffed about, and ch attered to each other,
and m ade signs. L ast o f all cam e the young W itch, w ith her red
h a ir stre a m in g in th e w ind. She w o re a d ress o f gold tissu e
em broidered w ith p eaco ck s' eyes, and a little cap of green velvet
w as on h er head.
"W here is he, w here is he?" cried the w itches, w hen they saw
her, but she only laughed, and ran to the h o rnbeam , and taking the
F ish erm an by th e h an d , she led him out into the m oonlight and
began to dance.
R ound and round they w hirled, and th e young W itch ju m p ed
so high th at he could see the scarlet heels o f her shoes. Then right
across the dancers cam e the sound o f the galloping o f a horse, but
no horse was to be seen, and he felt afraid.
"F aster," cried the W itch, and she threw her arm s around his
neck, and h e r b reath was hot upon his face. "F aster, faster!" she
cried. The earth seem ed to tu rn fast b en eath his feet, and his brain
grew tro u b led , and a great te rro r fell on him , as of som e evil thing
th a t was w atching him . And at last he becam e aware th a t u n d er the
shadow o f a rock th ere was a figure th at had not been there before.
It w as a m an dressed in a suit o f black velvet, cut in the
Spanish fashion. H is face was strangely pale, but his lips w ere like
a pro u d red flower. He seem ed tired and was leaning back. On the
grass beside him lay a hat, and a p air o f riding gloves. A short cloak
hung from his shoulder, and his delicate w hite hands were gem m ed
w ith rings. Heavy eyelids trem bled over his eyes.
The you n g F isherm an w atched him . A t last th e ir eyes m et,
and w herever he danced, it seem ed to him , the eyes o f the m an
w ere u p o n him . H e heard th e W itch laugh, and caught h er by the
w aist, and w hirled her m adly round and round.
147
Suddenly a dog bayed in the w ood, and the dancers stopped,
and going up tw o by tw o, knelt dow n, and kissed the m a n 's hands.
As they did so, a little smile to u ch ed his p roud lips, as a b ird 's wing
to u ch es the w ater and m akes it laugh. But there was no respect in
it. He kept looking at th e young F isherm an.
"Com e! L et us w orsh ip ," w hispered the W itch, and she led
him up, and he followed her. B ut w hen he cam e close, and w ithout
know ing why he did it, he m ade the sign o f the Cross on his breast,
and called u p o n the holy nam e.
No sooner had he done so, th an the w itches scream ed and
flew away, and the face, th at had been w atching him , m oved w ith
a spasm o f pain. The m an w ent over to a little w ood, and whistled.
A je n n e t w ith silver trappings cam e ru n ning to m eet him . As he
ju m p e d u p o n the saddle, he tu rn ed ro u n d , and looked at the young
F ish erm an sadly.
And the W itch w ith the red hair tried to fly away also, but the
F ish erm an caught h er by h er w rists, and held her fast.
"Loose m e," she cried, "and let m e go. F or you have nam ed
w hat should n o t be n am ed, and shown the sign that may not be
looked at."
"N o ," he answ ered, "but I will not let you go till you have told
m e the secret."
"W hat secret?" said the W itch, fighting w ith him like a wild
cat, and biting h er lips.
"You know ," he m ade answer.
H er grass-green eyes grew dim w ith tears, and she said to the
F ish erm an , "Ask m e anything but that!"
He laughed, and held h er m ore tightly.
And w hen she saw th at she could not free herself, she w hispered
to him , "Surely I am as fair the d aughter o f the sea, and as beautiful
as those w ho live in the blue w aters," and she ju m p e d on him and put
her face close to his.
But he pushed h er back frow ning, and said to her, "If you do
not keep y o u r prom ise, I will kill you."
She grew grey and trem bled. "Be it so," she said. "It is your
soul and n o t m ine. Do w ith it as you w ill." And she took a little
knife that had a h andle o f green v ip er's skin, and gave it to him.
"W hat shall this serve m e?" he asked o f her w ondering.
She was silent for a few m o m en ts, and a look o f terro r cam e
over her face. T hen she brushed h er fair hair back from h er forehead,
148
and sm iling strangely, she said to him , "W hat m en call the shadow
o f the body is not th e shadow o f the body, but it is the body o f the
soul. Stand on the seashore w ith y o u r back to the m oon, and cut
away from around y o u r feet y our shadow , w hich is y o u r soul's body,
and ask y o u r soul leave you, and it will do so."
The you n g F ish erm an trem bled. "Is th is tru e?" he asked.
"It is tru e, and I w ish I had not told you of it," she cried,
throw ing herself to his knees, w eeping.
H e p u t h er from him self and left h er in the grass, and going
to the edge o f the m o u n tain , he placed the knife in his belt and
began to clim b down.
A nd his Soul th a t was w ithin him called out to him and said,
"I have lived w ith you for all th ese y ears, and have b een yo u r
servant. Do not send m e away from you now , for w hat evil have I
done you?"
And the young F ish erm an laughed. "You have done me no
evil, but I have no need o f you," he answ ered. "The w orld is w ide,
and th ere is H eaven also, and H ell, and th a t dim tw ilight house th at
lies betw een. Go w herever you will, b u t tro u b le me n ot, for my
love is calling to m e."
A nd his Soul asked him piteously, but he w ould n o t listen to
it. At last he reached the level ground and the yellow shore o f the
sea. W ell-built, like a statue m ade by a G recian, he stood on the
sand w ith his back to the m oon. And out o f the foam cam e white
arm s, and out o f th e w aves rose dim form s. Before him lay his
shadow w hich was th e body o f his soul, and behind him hung the
m o o n in th e h o n ey -co lo u red air.
A nd his Soul said to him , "If indeed you m ust drive m e from
you, do n o t send me w ithout a heart. The w orld is cruel, give me
y o u r h eart to take w ith m e."
He tossed his head and smiled. "W ith w hat should I love my
love, if I gave you my heart?" he cried.
"N o , b u t be m erciful," said his Soul, "give me yo u r heart,
for th e w orld is cruel, and I am afraid."
"M y h eart is my lo v e's," he answ ered, "therefore get away."
"S hould I n o t love also?" asked his Soul.
"G e t away, for I have no n eed o f y ou," cried the young
F isherm an. H e took the little knife w ith its handle o f green viper's
skin, and cut away his shadow from around his feet. A nd it rose up
and stood before him , and looked at him , and it was even as himself.
149
He put th e knife into his b elt, and a strange feeling cam e
over him . "G e t aw ay," he said, "an d let m e see y o u r face no
m ore."
"N o , but we m ust m eet again," said the Soul. Its voice was
low and sounded like a flute, and its lips hardly m oved while it
spoke.
"H ow shall w e m eet?" cried th e young F isherm an. "You will
not follow m e into the depths o f the sea?"
"O nce every y ear I will com e to this place, and I will call to
y o u ," said the Soul. "It m ay be th a t you will have need o f m e."
"W hat need should I have o f you?" cried the young F isherm an,
"but be it as you will," and he sank dow n into the w ater, and the
Tritons blew th e ir horns, and the little M erm aid rose up to m eet
him , and put h er arm s around his neck and kissed him on the m outh.
And the Soul stood on the lonely beach and w atched them .
A nd w hen they had sunk dow n into the sea, it w ent w eeping away
over the m arshes.

And after a y ear was over the Soul cam e dow n to the shore
o f th e sea and called to the young F ish erm an, and he rose out o f the
deep, and said, "Why do you call to m e?"
And the Soul answ ered, "C om e nearer, th a t I may speak w ith
you, for I have seen m arvellous things."
So he cam e nearer, and co uched in the shallow w ater, and
leaned his head on his hands and listened.

And th e Soul said to him , "W hen I left you, I tu rn ed my face


to th e East and jo u rn ey ed . From the East com es everything th at is
wise. Six days I jo u rn e y e d , and on the m orning o f the seventh day I
cam e to a hill th a t is in the country o f the Tartars. I sat dow n u n der
the shade o f a tree to shelter m yself from the sun. The land was dry
and b u rn t up w ith the heat.
"W hen it was n o o n , a cloud o f red dust rose up. W hen the
T artars saw it, they, having ju m p e d u p o n th eir little horses, galloped
to m eet it. The w om en ran away scream ing to the waggons.
"At tw ilight the T artars retu rn ed , but five o f them w ere m issing,
and o f those th a t cam e back m any had been w ounded.
"W hen th e m o o n rose, I saw a cam p-fire b u rn in g on the
plain, and w ent tow ards it. A com pany o f m erchants w ere seated
ro u n d in on the carpets. T heir cam els w ere behind th em , and the
150
negroes w ho w ere th e ir servants w ere setting up te n ts u p o n the
sand, and m aking a high wall.
"As I cam e n e a r th em , th e ch ief o f the m erch an ts rose up
and asked me my business.
"I answ ered th a t I was a P rin ce in my own land, and th at I
had escaped from the Tartars w ho w anted to m ake me th eir slave.
The chief sm iled.
"Then he asked m e who was the pro p h et o f G od, and I answered
him M oham m ed.
"W hen he heard the nam e o f th e false pro p h et, he bow ed and
to o k me by the h an d , and placed me by his side. A negro brought me
som e m a re 's m ilk, and a piece o f lam b 's m eat.
"At day break we started on our jo u rn ey . I rode on a re d ­
haired cam el by the side o f the chief. T here w ere forty cam els in the
caravan, and th e m ules w ere tw ice forty in num ber.
"We w ent from the country o f th e T artars into the country of
those who curse th e M oon. As we passed over the m o u n tain s we
held o u r b reath , fearing the snows m ight fall on us. As we w ent
th ro u g h th e valleys, the Pygm ies shot arrows at us from the hollow s
o f the trees. W hen w e cam e to th e Tow er o f A pes, we gave them
fruits, and they did not harm us. W hen we cam e to the Tow er of
Serpents, we gave them m ilk, and they let us go by.
"The kings o f each city im posed taxes upon us, but w ould not
allow us to en ter th e ir gates. They threw us bread and cakes over the
walls. F o r every h u n d red baskets we gave them a bead o f amber.
"In th e fourth m o n th w e reach ed the city o f Illel. It was
n ig h t-tim e , w hen we cam e. W e to o k th e ripe pom egranates from the
trees, and drank th e ir sweet juices. T hen w e lay dow n on our carpets
and w aited for th e dawn.
"And at dawn we rose and knocked at the gate o f the city. The
guards asked us our business. The interpreter of the caravan answered
th at we had com e from the island of Syria w ith m any goods. They said
th at they w ould open the gate to us at noon, and told us to w ait till then.
"W hen it was noo n , they opened th e gate, and as w e entered
in, the people cam e crow ding out o f the houses to look at us.
"A nd on the first day the priests cam e and b artered w ith us,
and on the second day cam e th e nobles, and on the th ird day cam e
th e craftsm en and th e slaves. A nd th is is th e ir cu sto m w ith all
m e rch an ts, as long as they stay in the city.
"And w hen the m oon rose, I w andered away through the streets
151
o f the city and cam e to the garden o f its god. The priests in their
yellow robes m oved silently through the green trees, and on a pavem ent
o f black m arble stood the rose-red house, in w hich the god lived.
"In front of th e tem ple was a pool o f clear water. I lay down
beside it, and w ith my pale fingers I to u ched the broad leaves. One
o f th e priests cam e tow ards m e and stood behind me.
"After a little w hile he spoke to m e, and asked me my desire.
"I told him that my desire was to see the god.
'"T h e god is h u n tin g ,' said th e priest, looking strangely at me
w ith his small slanting eyes.
'"T ell m e in w hat forest, and I will ride w ith h im ,' I answered.
'"T h e god is asleep,' he said.
'"T ell me on w hat couch, and I will w atch by h im ,' I answered.
'"T h e god is at the feast,' he cried.
"If the w ine is sweet, I will drink it w ith him , and if it is
bitter, I will d rink w ith him also,' was my answer.
"He bow ed his head in w onder, and, taking me by the hand,
he raised m e up, and led m e into the tem ple.
"And in th e first ch am b er I saw an idol seated on a th ro n e of
ja sp e r and great orient pearls. It was m ade o f ebony, and the stature
was the size o f the stature o f a m an. On its forehead was a ruby,
and thick oil dripped from its h air on to its thighs. Its feet were red
w ith the blood o f a new ly-killed kid.
"And I said to th e priest, 'Is this the god?' A nd he answered
m e, 'T his is the god.'
'"S h o w me th e god,' I cried, 'o r I will surely kill y o u .' A nd I
to u ch ed his h and, and it becam e w ithered.
"And the priest begged m e, 'L et my lord heal his servant, and
I will show him th e god.'
"So I b reath ed w ith my b reath u p o n his hand, and it becam e
w hole again, and he trem bled and led m e into the second cham ber,
and an idol standing on a lotus o f ja d e hung w ith great em eralds. It
was m ade o f ivory, and in stature was tw ice the stature o f a m an. On
its forehead was a chrysolite.
"And I said to the priest, 'Is this th e god?' A nd he answ ered
m e, 'T his is the god.'
'"S h o w me th e god,' I cried, 'o r I will surely kill y o u .' A nd I
to u ch ed his eyes, and they becam e blind.
"And the priest begged m e, 'L et my lord heal his servant, and
I will show him th e god.'
152
"So I b reath ed w ith my b reath u p o n his eyes, and the sight
cam e back to th em , and he trem b led again, and led me into the
th ird cham ber. T here was no idol in it, n o r im age o f any kind, but
a m irro r o f ro u n d m etal set on an altar o f stone.
"And I said to th e priest, 'W here is th e god?'
"And he answ ered m e, 'T h ere is no god but this m irro r th at
you see, for this is th e M irro r o f W isdom . A nd it reflects all things
th a t are in heaven and on earth, except for the face o f the one, who
looks into it. This it reflects not, so th a t he w ho looks into it may
be wise. M any o th e r m irro rs are th e re , but they are m irro rs of
O pinion. This only is the M irro r o f W isdom . And they w ho possess
this m irro r know everything. A nd they w ho possess it n ot, have not
W isdom . T herefore, it is the god, and we w orship it.'A n d I looked
into the m irror, and it was exactly as he had said to me.
"And I did a strange thing, but w hat I did m atters not, for
in a valley th a t is but a day's jo u rn e y from this place I have hidden
the M irro r o f W isdom . D o but let m e en ter into you again and be
y o u r servant, and you shall be w iser th a n all the wise m en, and
W isdom shall be yours. Let me en ter you, and none will be as wise
as you."
B u t th e y o u n g F is h e rm a n lau g h ed . "L ove is b e tte r th a n
W isdom ," he cried, "and the little M erm aid loves m e."
"N o , but th ere is noth in g b e tte r th a n W isdom ," said the Soul.
"Love is b etter," answ ered th e young F isherm an, and he sank
dow n in to th e deep , and th e Soul w ent w eeping away over the
m arshes.

A nd after th e second y ear was over, the Soul cam e down to


the shore o f th e sea, and called to the young F isherm an and he rose
out o f the deep and said, "W hy do you call to m e?"
A nd th e Soul answ ered, "C om e nearer, th a t I may speak w ith
you, for I have seen m arvellous things."
So he cam e nearer, and couched in the shallow w ater, and
leaned his head u p o n his hand and listened.
A nd th e Soul said to him , "W hen I left you, I tu rn e d my face
to the South and jo u rn ey ed . F rom the South com es everything that
is precious. Six days I jo u rn e y e d along the highw ays, by w hich the
pilgrim s go, and on the m orn in g o f the seventh day I opened my
eyes, and the city of A shter lay at my feet, for it is in a valley.
"T here are nine gates to this city, and in front o f each gate
153
th ere is a bronze horse th a t n e ig h s ,1" w hen the B edouins com e down
from th e m ountains.
"W hen I w anted to enter, the guards stopped me and asked, who
I was. I answered that I was a D e rv ish 11 and on my way to the city of
M ecca. They were filled w ith w onder, and allowed me to enter.
"Inside it is even as a bazaar. Surely you should have been
w ith me. A cross th e narrow streets the to rch es o f p ap er hang like
large butterflies. W hen th e w ind blow s over the roofs, they rise and
fall. In front o f th e ir shops sit th e m erch a n ts on silken carpets.
Some o f th em sell curious perfum es from the islands o f the Indian
Sea, and the oil o f red roses.
"At last I stopped at a square w hite house. T here were no
w indow s to it, only a little d oor like the d oor o f a tom b. I knocked
th ree tim es w ith a co p p er ham m er. An A rm enian in a caftan of
green leather looked though the w icket. A nd w hen he saw m e, he
opened, and spread a carpet on the ground, and the w om an stepped
out. As she w ent in, she tu rn ed ro u n d and sm iled at me again. I had
never seen anyone so pale.
"W hen the m o o n rose, I retu rn ed to the same place and sought
for the house, but it was no longer there. W hen I saw th at, I knew
w ho th e w om an w as, and why she had sm iled at me.
"C ertainly you should have been w ith me. On the feast o f the
N ew M oon th e young E m p ero r cam e out o f his palace and w ent into
his m osque to pray.
"At sunrise he cam e out o f his palace in a robe o f silver, and
at sunset he retu rn ed to it again in a robe o f gold. The people threw
them selves on th e ground and hid th e ir faces, but I w ould not do so.
I stood by th e stall o f a seller o f dates and w aited. W hen the
E m p ero r saw m e, he raised his p ain ted eyebrows and stopped. I
stood quite still, and did not bow him. The people w ere surprised at
my courage, and advised me to run away from the city. I paid no
atten tio n to th em , but w ent and sat w ith the sellers o f strange gods.
W hen I told them w hat I had done, each o f them gave me a god and
prayed me to leave them .
"T hat night, as I lay on a cushion in the tea-h o u se th at is in
th e Street o f P o m eg ran ates, th e guards o f the E m peror entered and
led me to the palace. As I w ent in, they closed each door behind
m e, and put a chain across it.
"As I passed across the court, two veiled w om en looked down
from a balcony. The guards hastened on. They opened a gate, and I
154
found m yself in a w atered garden of seven terraces. It was planted with
tulip and m o o n -flo w ers,12 and silver a lo e s .13 The cypress-trees were like
b u rn t-o u t torches. From one o f them a nightingale was singing.
"At th e end o f th e g ard en stood a little p av ilio n . As we
ap p ro ach ed it, tw o eu n u ch s cam e out to m eet us. They looked
curiously at me. O ne o f th em drew aside the captain o f the guard,
and in a low voice w hispered to him.
"After a few m o m en ts th e cap tain o f the guard dism issed the
soldiers. They w ent back to the p alace, th e eunuchs following slowly
beh in d and p lucking the sweet berries from the trees, as they passed.
O nce the elder o f the tw o tu rn e d ro u n d , and sm iled at m e w ith an
evil smile.
"T hen the cap tain o f the guard led m e tow ards the en trance of
the pavilion. I w alked on w ith o u t trem bling.
"T he y o u n g E m p e ro r w as lying on a cou ch o f lion skins.
B ehind him stood a N u b ian nak ed dow n to the w aist, and w ith
heavy earrings in his ears. On a table by the side o f the couch lay a
big sword.
"W hen th e E m p ero r saw m e, he frow ned, and said to m e,
'W hat is y o u r nam e? Do not you know th at I am E m p ero r o f this
city?' But I m ade him no answer.
"H e p o in ted w ith his finger at th e sword, and the N u bian
seized it, and rushing forward struck at me w ith great violence. The
blade w hizzed th ro u g h m e, and did m e no harm . The m an fell on
the floor, and w h en he rose up , his te e th ch attered w ith terror, and
he hid h im self b eh in d th e couch.
"T he E m p ero r ju m p ed to his feet, and taking a lance from a
stand o f arm s, he threw it at me. I caught it in its flight, and broke
it into tw o pieces. He shot at me w ith an arrow , but I held up my
han d s and it stopped in m idair. T hen he took a dagger from his
belt, and killed th e N ub ian in th e th ro at, fearing the slave should
tell of his dishonour.
"As soon as he was dead, the E m p ero r turned to m e, and w hen
he had w iped away blood from his brow w ith a little napkin o f pure
silk, he said to m e, 'Are you a p rophet, th at I may not harm you,
or the son o f a prophet, that I can do you no harm ? I pray you leave
my city tonight, for w hile you are in it, I am no longer its lord.'
"A nd I answ ered him , 'I will go for h alf o f yo u r treasure.
Give m e h alf o f the treasu re, and I will go away.'
"H e took me by the h an d , and led m e out into the garden.
155
W hen the cap tain saw, he w ondered. W hen the eunuchs saw m e,
th e ir knees shook and they fell u p o n the ground in fear.
"T here is a cham ber in the palace th at has eight walls. The
E m p ero r to u c h e d one o f th e w alls, and it opened, and we passed
dow n a co rrid o r th a t was lit w ith m any to rches. In niches upon
each side stood great w ine ja rs filled w ith silver pieces. W hen we
reach ed th e centre o f the co rrid o r the E m p ero r uttered the w ord th at
m ay n o t be u ttered , and a granite d oor opened on a secret spring.
"You could not believe how m arvellous a place it was. There
w ere huge shells full of pearls, and m oonstones of great size piled up
w ith red rubies. The gold was stored in coffers o f elephant hide, and
the gold-dust in leath er bottles. T here w ere opals and sapphires in
cups o f crystal and ja d e . R ound green em eralds were ranged in order
u p o n th in plates o f ivory, and in one co rn er w ere silk bags filled w ith
precio u s stones.
"A nd the E m p ero r said to m e, 'T his is my house o f treasure,
and h alf th at is in it is yours, as I prom ised to you. A nd I will give
you cam els and cam el drivers, and they shall carry out yo u r orders
and take y o u r share o f th e treasure to w hatever part o f the w orld you
desire to go. A nd the thing shall be done tonight, for I w ould not
th a t th e Sun w ho is my father should see th at there is in my city a
m an w hom I can n o t kill.'
"But I answ ered him , 'The gold that is here is yours, and the
silver is also yours, and yours are the precious jew els and the things of
price. As for m e, I have no need of these. I shall take nothing from
you but the little ring th at you w ear on the finger o f your hand.'
"And th e E m p ero r frowned. 'It is a ring o f lead,' he cried, 'it
has no value. Take y o u r h alf o f the treasure and go from my city.'
" 'N o ,' I answ ered, 'but I will take nothing but th a t leaden
ring, for I know w hat is w ritten w ithin it, and for w hat purp o se.'
"And the E m p ero r trem bled, and begged me and said, 'Take
all th e treasure and go from my city. The h alf th at is m ine shall be
yours also.'
"And I did a strange thing, but w hat I did m atters not, for in
a cave that is but a day's journey from this place have I hidden the Ring
of Riches. It is but a day's journey from this place, and it waits for your
coming. He who has the Ring is richer than all the kings of the world.
Com e therefore and take it, and the w orld's riches shall be yours."
B ut th e y o u n g F is h e rm a n laughed. "Love is b e tte r th a n
R ich es," he cried, "and the little M erm aid loves m e."
156
"N o , but th ere is noth in g b e tte r th a n R iches," said the Soul.
"Love is b e tte r," answ ered the young F isherm an, and he sank
dow n in to th e deep , and th e Soul w ent w eeping away over the
m arshes.

A nd after the th ird y ear w as over, the Soul cam e dow n to the
shore o f th e sea, and called to th e young F isherm an, and he rose out
o f the deep and said, "Why do you call to m e?"
A nd th e Soul answ ered, "C om e nearer, th a t I may speak w ith
you, for I have seen m arvellous things."
So he cam e nearer, and co u ched in the shallow w ater, and
leaned his h ead u p o n his h and and listened.
A nd the Soul said to him , "In a city th a t I know o f there is
an inn th a t stands by a river. I sat th ere w ith sailors w ho drank w ines
and ate bread. A nd as we sat and m ade m erry, there entered an old
m an, b earing a carpet and a lute th a t had two horns o f amber. And
w hen he had laid out th e carpet on the floor, struck on the strings of
his lute, and a girl, w hose face was veiled, began to dance before
us. H er face was veiled, but h er feet w ere naked. N aked w ere her
feet, and they m o v ed over th e c a rp e t like little w hite pigeons.
N ev er I have seen anything so m arvellous, and the city, in w hich
she dances, is b u t a day's jo u rn e y from this place."
W hen the young F ish erm an h eard the w ords o f his Soul, he
rem em b ered th a t the little M erm aid had no feet and could n o t dance.
A nd a great desire cam e over him , and he said to himself, "It is but
a d ay's jo u rn e y , and I can retu rn to my love," and he laughed, and
stood up in the shallow w ater, and w ent tow ards the shore.
A nd w hen he had reached th e dry shore, he laughed again,
and held out his arm s to his Soul. A nd his Soul gave a great cry of
jo y and ran to m eet him , and entered into him , and the young
F ish erm an saw stretched before him the shadow o f the body, th at is
the body o f the Soul.
And his Soul said to him , "L et's hurry and start at once, for the
Sea-gods are jealous, and have m onsters that do w hatever they w ant."

So they h u rried , and all th a t night they jo u rn ey e d b en eath the


m o o n , and all th e next day they jo u rn e y e d ben eath the sun, and on
th e evening o f th e day they cam e to a city.
A nd th e young F ish erm an said to his Soul, "Is this the city in
w hich she dances, o f w hom you speak to m e?"
157
A nd his Soul answ ered him , "It is not this city, but another.
N evertheless let us en ter in."
So they entered in and passed th ro u gh the streets, and as they
passed th ro u g h the Street of Jew ellers, the young F ish erm an saw a
fair silver cup in a shop. A nd his Soul said to him , "Take th at
silver cup and hide it."
So he to o k the cup and hid it in th e fold o f his tu n ic, and they
w ent hurriedly out o f the city.
A nd after they h ad gone away from the city, th e young
F ish erm an frowned, and threw the cup away, and said to his Soul,
"W hy did you tell m e to take this cup and hide it, for it was an evil
th in g to do?"
B ut his Soul answ ered him , "Be at peace, be at peace."
A nd on the evening o f the second day they cam e to a city,
and the young Fish erm an said to his Soul, "Is this the city in w hich
she dances, o f w hom you spoke to m e?"
A nd his Soul answ ered him , "It is not this city, but another.
N evertheless let us en ter in."
So they entered in and passed through the streets and as they
p assed th ro u g h th e Street o f th e Sellers o f Sandals, the young
F isherm an saw a child standing by a ja r of water. And his Souls said
to him , "Strike th at child." So he struck the child till it w ept, and
w hen he had done this, they w ent hurriedly out o f the city.
A nd after they had gone away from th e city, the you n g
F ish erm an grew very angry, and said to his Soul, "W hy did you tell
me to strike th e child, for it was an evil thing to do?"
B ut his Soul answ ered him , "Be at peace, be at peace."
And on the evening o f the th ird day they cam e to a city, and
th e young F ish erm an said to his Soul, "Is this the city in w hich she
dances, o f w hom you did speak to m e?"
And his Soul answ ered him , "It m ay be th at it is this city,
therefore let us enter in."
So they entered in and passed th ro u gh the streets, but now here
could th e young F ish erm an find th e river or the inn th at stood by its
side. And the people o f the city looked curiously at him , and he
grew afraid and said to his Soul, "L et's go away, for she w ho dances
w ith w hite feet is not here."
B ut his Soul answ ered, "N o , let us stay, for the n ight is
dark, and th ere will be robbers on th e way."
So he sat dow n in the m arketplace and rested, and after a
158
tim e a m e rc h a n t cam e up to him . And th e m erch an t said to him ,
"Why do you sit in th e m arketplace, seeing th at the shops are closed?"
And the young F ish erm an answ ered him , "I can find no inn
in this city, I have no relatives w ho m ight give me shelter."
"Are we n o t all relatives?" said the m erchant. "And did not
one G od m ake us? Therefore com e w ith m e, for I have a guest-
ch am b er."
So th e young F isherm an rose up and followed the m erch an t to
his house. A nd w hen he had passed th ro u g h a garden o f pom egranates
and entered into the house, the m erch an t brought him rosew ater in
a cop p er dish th a t he m ight w ash his han d s, and ripe m elons th at
m ight quench his th irst, and p u t rice and a piece o f roasted m eat
before him.
And after he had finished, the m erch an t led him to the guest-
cham ber, and asked him to sleep and be at rest. A nd the young
F isherm an th an k ed him , and kissed the ring th at was on his hand,
and threw him self dow n on th e carpets. A nd w hen he had covered
him self w ith a covering o f black lam b 's-w o o l, he fell asleep.
And th ree hours before daw n, and w hile it was still night, his
Soul w oke him and said to him , "Rise up and go to the room o f the
m erch an t, and kill him , and take from him all the gold, for we
have need o f it."
A nd the young F ish erm an rose up and w ent tow ards the room
of the m erch an t. Over the feet o f the m erchant there was lying a
sword, and by the side o f the m erch an t th ere were nine purses of
gold. A nd he reach ed out his h and and to uched th e sword, and
w hen he to u c h e d it, the m erch an t awoke and cried to the young
F ish erm an , "D o you retu rn evil for good, and pay w ith blood for
the kindness th a t I have shown you?"
A nd his Soul said to the young F ish erm an, "Strike him ," and
he struck him so th a t he fainted, and he took the nine purses o f gold,
and ran away hastily through th e garden o f pom egranates, and set
his face to the star th a t is the star o f m orning.
A nd w h en they had gone away from the city, th e young
F ish erm an b eat his breast, and said to his Soul, "W hy did you order
me to kill th e m erch an t and take his gold? Surely you are evil."
B ut his Soul answ ered him , "Be at p eace, be at peace."
"N o ," cried the young F ish erm an , "I may not be at peace,
for all th a t you have m ade me do I hate. You also I hate, and please
tell m e why you have treated m e this way."
159
A nd his Soul answ ered him , "W hen you sent me away into the
w orld you gave m e no heart, so I learned to do all things and love
th e m ."
"W hat do you say?" asked th e young Fisherm an.
"You know ," answ ered the Soul, "you know it well. H ave you
forgotten th a t you gave me no h eart? And so trouble n o t yourself nor
m e, but be at p eace, for th ere is no pain th at you shall give away,
n o r any pleasure th a t you shall n o t receive."
A nd w hen the young F ish erm an heard these w ords, he trem bled
and said to his Soul, "N o , but y ou are evil, and have m ade me
forget my love, and have tem p ted m e w ith tem p ta tio n s, and have
set my feet in the ways o f sins."
A nd his Soul answ ered him , "You have not forgotten th at
w h en you sent m e away into th e w orld, you gave m e no heart.
C om e, let us go to an o th er city, and m ake m erry, for we have nine
purses o f gold."
B ut the young F ish erm an to o k n in e purses o f gold, and threw
th em dow n, and crushed th em u n d e r his feet.
"N o ," he cried, "but I will have n o thing to do w ith you, nor
will I jo u rn ey w ith you anyw here, but as I sent you away before, so
will I send you away now , for you have b rought me no g o o d ." And
he tu rn e d his back to the m oon, and w ith the little knife th a t had
the h an d le o f green v ip er's skin he cut from his feet th at shadow of
the body w hich is the body o f th e Soul.
Yet his Soul stirred not from him , n o r listened to his com m and,
but said to him , "The secret th a t the W itch has told you does not
help y ou any m o re, for I may not leave you, n o r may you send me
away. O nce in his life m ay a m an send his Soul away, but he w ho
receives back his Soul m ust keep it w ith him for ever, and this is his
p u n ish m en t and his rew ard."
A nd th e young F ish erm an grew pale and clenched his hands
and cried. "She was a false W itch in th a t she told me not that."
" N o ," answ ered his Soul, "but she w as true to H im she
w orships, and w hose servant she will be ever."
A nd w hen the young F ish erm an knew th a t he could no longer
get rid of his Soul, and th a t it was an evil Soul, and w ould live w ith
him always, he fell u p o n the ground w eeping bitterly.

And w hen it was day, the young F isherm an rose up and said to
his Soul, "I will tie my hands th at I may not carry out your orders,
16"
and close my lips th at I may not speak your w ords, and I will return
to the place, w here she w hom I love lives. Even to the sea I will
return, and to th e little bay, w here she sings, and I will call to her
and tell her the evil I have done and the evil you have ordered m e."
A nd his Soul tem p ted him and said, "W ho is y o u r love, that
you should re tu rn to her? The w orld has m any fairer th a n she is.
T here are the d ancing-girls o f S a m a ris ,14 w ho dance in the m a n n er o f
all kinds o f birds and beasts. T heir feet are p ain ted w ith h en n a , and
in th e ir hands they have little copper bells. They laugh, w hile they
dan ce, and th e ir laug h ter is as clear as th e laughter of water. Com e
w ith me and I will show th em to you. F o r w hat is the trouble of
yours about th e things o f sin? Is th a t w hich is pleasant to eat not
m ade for the eater? Is there p oison in th a t w hich is sweet to drink?
Trouble n o t yourself, but com e w ith me to another city. T here is a
little city n ear by, in w hich th ere is a garden o f tu lip -trees. And
th ere live in th is beautiful garden w hite peacocks and peacocks that
have blue breasts. T heir tails, w h en they spread them to the sun,
are like disks o f ivory. A nd she w ho feeds th em dances for pleasure,
and som etim es she dances on h er h an d s, and at o th er tim es she
dances w ith h er feet. She laughs w hile she dances, and the silver
rings th a t are about h er ankles tinkle like bells o f silver. A nd so
tro u b le not you rself any m ore, b u t com e w ith m e to this city."
B ut th e you n g F ish erm an answ ered n o t his Soul, but closed
his lips w ith the seal o f silence and w ith a tight cord tied his hands.
He jo u rn e y e d back to the place from w hich he had com e, to the little
bay, w here his love used to sing. A nd ever did his Soul tem p t him
by the way, but he m ade no answ er, n o r w ould he carry out any of
his orders, so great w as the pow er o f the love th at was w ithin him.
A nd w hen he reached the shore o f the sea, he loosened the
cord from his h an d s, and took the seal o f silence from his lips, and
called to th e little M erm aid. B ut she cam e not to his call, though
he called to h er all day long.
A nd his Soul m ocked him and said, " Surely you have but little
jo y out o f y o u r love. You are as one w ho in tim e o f death pours
w ater into a b ro k en v e s s e l.15 You give away w hat you have, and
n o th in g is given to you in return. It w ere b etter for you to com e
w ith m e, for I know w here the Valley o f Pleasure lies."
But th e F ish erm an answ ered not his Soul, but he built him self
a ho u se, and lived th ere for the space o f a year. A nd every m orning
he called to th e M erm aid, and every n o o n he called to h er again,
161
and at n ig h t-tim e he called h er by nam e. Yet, never did she rise out
o f th e sea to m eet him , n o r in any place o f the sea could he find
her, though he sought for h er in th e caves and in the green w ater,
in th e wells th a t are at th e bo tto m o f the deep.
And ever did his Soul tem p t him w ith evil, and w hisper of
terrible things. Yet it did not co n q u er him , so great was the pow er
of his love.
And after the y ear was over, th e Soul th o ught w ithin himself,
"I have tem p ted my m aster w ith evil, and his love is stronger th an
I am. I will tem p t now w ith good, and it may be th at he will com e
w ith m e."
So he said to th e young F ish erm an , "I have told you o f the joy
o f the w orld, and y ou have tu rn ed a deaf ear to me. Let m e now tell
you o f th e w o rld 's p ain , and it may be th at you will listen to me. F o r
o f a tru th pain is th e L ord o f this w orld, n o r is there anyone w ho
escapes from its net. T here be som e who lack clothes, and others
w ho lack bread. T here be widow s w ho sit in purple, and widows w ho
sit in rags. The beggars go up and dow n to the highw ays, and th eir
w allets are em pty. T hrough the streets o f the cities w alks F am ine,
and the Plague sits at th eir gates. C om e, let us m end these things,
and m ake th em not to be. W hy should you stay here calling to yo u r
love, since she never com es to y o u r call? A nd w hat is love, th at you
should set this high store upon it?"
B ut the young F isherm an answ ered it no th in g , so great was
the pow er o f his love. A nd every m orning he called to the M erm aid,
and every noon he called to h er again, and at n ig h t-tim e he called
h er by h er nam e. Yet never did she rise out o f the sea to m eet him ,
n o r in any place o f th e sea could he find her, though he sought for
her in the rivers o f th e sea, and in th e valleys th a t are u n d er the
waves, in the sea th a t the night m akes p urple, and in the sea that
the daw n leaves grey.
And after th e second y ear was over, the Soul said to the young
F ish erm an at n ig h t-tim e , and as he sat in his house alone, "N ow I
have tem p ted you w ith evil, and I have tem pted you w ith good, and
y o u r love is stro n g er th a n I am. T herefore will I te m p t you no
longer, but I pray y ou to let m e en ter y our heart, th a t I may be one
w ith you ju s t as before."
"Surely you m ay enter," said the young F isherm an, "for in
the days, w hen w ith no heart you did go through the w orld, you
m ust have suffered m u ch ."
162
"Oh!" cried th e Soul, "I can find no place o f e n tran ce, so
com passed about w ith love is th e h eart o f yours."
"Yet I w ould th a t I could help y o u ," said the young F isherm an.
A nd as he spoke, there cam e a great cry o f m o u rn in g from the
sea, like th e cry th at m en hear, w hen one o f the Sea-folk is dead.
A nd the young F ish erm an ran dow n to the shore. A nd the black
w aves cam e h u rry in g to th e shore. Lying at his feet, th e young
F ish erm an saw th e body o f the little M erm aid. D ead at his feet it
was lying.
W eeping in p ain, he threw him self dow n beside it, and he
kissed the cold red of the m outh, and toyed w ith the w et am ber o f the
hair. He threw him self dow n beside it on the sand, w eeping as one
trem bling w ith jo y , and in his brow n arms he held it to his breast.
Cold were the Hps, yet he kissed them . Salt was the honey of the
hair, yet he tasted it w ith a b itter joy. He kissed the closed eyelids,
and the wild spray th at lay upon th e ir cups was less salt th a n his tears.
And to the dead thing he m ade confession. Into the shells o f its
ears he poured the b itter wine of his tale. He put the little hands round
his neck, and w ith his fingers he touched the thin reed of the throat.
Bitter, b itter was his joy, and full of strange gladness was his pain.
The black sea cam e nearer, and the w hite foam m o an ed like
a leper. W ith w hite claws o f foam the sea struck at the shore. F rom
the palace o f th e Sea-K ing cam e th e cry o f m ourning again, and far
out u p o n the sea th e great T ritons blew u p o n th e ir horns.
"R un aw ay," said his Soul, "for th e sea com es nearer, and if
you stay, it will kill you. R un away, for I am afraid, seeing th at
y o u r h eart is closed against me because o f the greatness o f yo u r love.
R un away to the place o f safety. Surely you will not send us w ithout
a h eart into an o th er w orld?"
B ut the young F isherm an listened not to his Soul, but called on
the little M erm aid and said, "Love is better th an w isdom , and m ore
precious th a n riches, and fairer th an the feet of the daughters o f men.
The fires can n o t destroy it, n o r can w aters quench it. I called on you
at daw n, and you did not com e to my call. The m oon heard your
nam e, yet you w ould not listen to me. F o r evilly I had left you, and
to my own h urt I had w andered away. Yet I never forgot your love,
and ever was it strong, though I have looked upon evil and good. And
now that you are dead, surely I will die w ith you also."
A nd his Soul asked him to leave, but he w ould not, so great
was his love. A nd th e sea cam e n earer to cover him w ith its waves.
163
A nd w hen he knew th a t the end was near, he kissed w ith m ad lips
the cold lips o f the M erm aid, and th e heart th at was w ithin him
broke. A nd as th o u g h the fullness o f his love did break, the Soul
found an entran ce and entered in, and was one w ith him even as
before. And the sea covered the young F isherm an w ith its waves.

And in th e m orning the Priest w ent to bless the sea, for it had
been troubled. And w ith him w ent the m onks and the m usicians, and
the candle-bearers, and the swingers o f c e n s e rs ,16 and a great com pany.
And w hen th e Priest reach ed th e shore, he saw the young
F ish erm an lying drow ned, and clasped in his arms was the body of
the little M erm aid. A nd he tu rn ed away frowning, and having m ade
the sign o f the cross, he cried aloud and said, "I will not bless the
sea n o r anything th at is in it. A ccursed be the Sea-folk, and accursed
be all they w ho are w ith them . And as for him w ho for love's sake
gave up G o d , and so lies h ere w ith his lem an killed by G o d 's
ju d g e m e n t, take up his body and th e body o f the lem an, and bury
th em in the co rn er o f th e F ield o f the F u lle r s .18 A nd set no m ark
above th em , n o r sign o f any kind, th at n one may know the place of
th e ir resting. F o r accursed w ere they in th eir lives, and accursed
shall be they in th e ir deaths also."
And th e p eople did as he com m anded them . In the corner o f
the F ield o f the F ullers, w here no sweet herbs grew, they dug a
deep h o le, and laid th e dead things w ithin it.
And w hen the th ird y ear was over, and on a day th at was a
holy day, the Priest w ent up to the chapel, th a t he m ight show to
th e people the w ounds o f th e L ord, and speak to th em about the
w rath o f God.
And w hen he entered in, he saw that the altar was covered with
strange flowers, he never had seen before. Strange were they to look
at, and o f curious beauty, and th eir beauty troubled him , and th eir
odour was sweet. He felt glad and did not understand why he was glad.
W hen he began to speak to the p eople, desiring to speak to
th em o f the w rath o f G od, the beauty o f the w hite flowers troubled
him , and th e ir o d o u r was sweet, and there cam e an o th er w ord into
his lips, and he spoke not o f the w rath o f G od, but o f the G od,
w hose nam e is Love. A nd why he spoke so, he did not know.
And w hen he finished his speech, the people w ept, and the
P riest's eyes w ere full o f tears. A nd the deacons cam e in and began
to undress him , but he stood as one in a dream .
164
A n d after t h a t th e y h a d u n d r e s s e d h im , he looked at t h e m an d
said, "W hat are th e flowers t h a t sta n d on th e altar, a n d w here do
th e y c o m e from ? "
A n d th e y an sw ered h im , "W h at flowers th e y are, we c a n n o t
tell, b u t th e y c o m e from th e c o r n e r o f th e F u llers' F ie ld ." A n d th e
Priest tr e m b le d , a n d r e tu r n e d to his own h o use a n d prayed.
A n d in th e m o r n in g , while it was still daw n, he w e n t w ith th e
m o n k s a n d th e m usicia n s, a n d th e c a n d le -b e a r e r s a n d t h e swingers
of censers, a n d a great c o m p a n y , a n d c a m e to th e shore of th e sea,
a n d blessed t h e sea, a n d all th e wild th ings t h a t are in it. T h e F a u n s
also he blessed, a n d th e little thin g s t h a t d a n c e in t h e w o o d la n d ,
a n d t h e b r ig h t- e y e d th in g s t h a t p e e r t h r o u g h th e leaves. All th e
th in g s in G o d 's w orld he blessed, a n d th e p e o p le were filled w ith jo y
a n d w o n d e r. Yet n eve r again in t h e c o r n e r of th e F u llers' F ield grew
flowers of any kind, b u t t h e field r e m a i n e d b a r r e n even as before.
T h e Sea-folk never c a m e in to th e bay as th e y u se d to , for th e y w ent
to a n o t h e r p a r t o f t h e sea.

Commentary

1 they are lost — зд. их н и ч т о не с п а с е т (в д е н ь С т р а ш н о г о Суда)


2
fo r them the Lord has not died — и не за н и х у м и р а л И с к у п и т е л ь
( с о г л а с н о Б и б л и и , Х р и с т о с с в о и м и с т р а д а н и я м и и с к у п а л грехи
людей)
3
and vile and evil are the pagan things — и м е р з о с т н ы и п а г у б н ы те
твари я зы ч е с к и е
4
I t is not worth a clipped piece o f silver. — О н а ( д у ш а ) н е с т о и т
л о м а н о го грош а.
m ake you the minion o f the great Queen — и ты будеш ь л ю б и м ы м
рабом К оролевы
a spray o f wild hemlock that was blossoming— ц в е т у щ а я в е т к а
д и к о й цикуты
7
W hat do you lack? — Ч е г о тебе не хватает?
M y desire is butfor a little thing. — Н е в е л и к о м о е ж е л а н и е .
stand under the branches o f the hornbeam — в с т а н ь под в е т в я м и
белого граба
a bronze horse that neighs — б р о н з о в ы й к о н ь , к о т о р ы й р ж е т
Dervish — д е р в и ш , м у с у л ь м а н с к и й н и щ е н с т в у ю щ и й м о н а х

165
12
moon-flower (бот.) — л у н н ы й ц в е т о к (т а к в А н г л и и н а з ы в а ю
хр и з а н т е м у и л и а н е м о н , в А м е р и к е — в ь ю н о к )
silver aloe (бот.) — с е р е б р и с т о е а л о э ( с т о л е т н и к )
14
Sam aris— С а м а р и я , д р е в н е е госу д ар с тво И з р а и л ь
You are as one who in time o f death pours w ater into a broke
vessel. — Т ы п о д о б е н том у, к то во в р е м я засухи л ь е т воду
р а з б и т ы й сосуд.
the swingers o f censers — с в я щ е н н о с л у ж и т е л и с к а д и л ь н и ц а м и
17
the Field o f the Fullers — П о г о с т О т в е р ж е н н ы х (у г о л о к к л а д б и
щ а , где х о р о н я т н е ч е с т и в ц е в )

Exercises

R eadin g Com prehension

1 Are the following statements about the tale true or false? If there is
not enough information, write don't know.

1) O n e day t h e young F i s h e r m a n c a u g h t a little M e r m a i d


in to his nets.
2) T he M e r m a i d p r o m is e d to c o m e w h e n e v e r he w a n te d a n d
swore h e r p ro m ise by t h e oath of t h e Sea-folk.
3) T he yo ung F i s h e r m a n fell in love w ith h e r a n d m a d e a
p r o p o sa l to her.
4) She c o u l d n 't a c c e p t his p r o p o sa l b ecause h e r fath e r was
old a n d alon e.
5) T h e P rie s t a n d t h e m e r c h a n t s l a u g h e d at t h e y o u n g
F i s h e r m a n 's desire to get rid of his Soul a n d drove h im
away.
6) T h e r e was n o th in g left for h im to do b u t go to see a w itch.
7) T h e young W itch w a s n 't very good at h e r witcheries.
8) T h e W i tc h c o u l d n 't help th e young F i s h e r m a n a n d sent
h im to a n o t h e r p lace.
9) T he young F i s h e r m a n got rid o f his Soul, t h o u g h it asked
h im to be merciful a n d n o t to send it away w ith o u t a
h e a rt.
10) His Soul j o u r n e y e d to th e East a n d th e S o u th a n d c a m e
166
back to his m aster to tell him w hat he had seen in strange
lands.
11) T hough his Soul asked th e F ish erm an to jo u rn e y together
b u t he w o u ld n 't agree.
12) H is Soul always tried to te m p t him w ith tem p ta tio n s but
th e F isherm an w ould tu rn a deaf ear to it.
13) The F ish erm an built h im self a house on the sea shore,
and lived th ere for a space of a year.
14) H e c o u ld n 't find his little M erm aid anyw here though he
tried hard.
15) The F ish erm an was w eeping w ith p ain w hen he found the
dead body o f the M erm aid.

Answer the following questions.

1) W hat did th e young F ish erm an catch into his nets one
day?
2) W hat did the M erm aid prom ise the young F isherm an?
3) W hy d id n 't the M erm aid accept the young F ish e rm a n 's
proposal at once?
4) W hy did he go to see the young W itch?
5) W hat did the young W itch tell him ?
6) H ow did the young F ish erm an get rid o f his Soul?
7) W hat did th e Soul tell th e F isherm an about his jo u rn ey to
th e East?
8) W hat did the Soul tell the F isherm an about his jo u rn ey to
th e South?
9) W here did the young Fisherm an and his Soul journey together?
10) W hat evil things did his Soul tem p t him with?
11) W hy c o u ld n 't the young F ish erm an get rid o f his Soul
again?
12) W hy did the young Fisherm an refuse to continue the journey
w ith his Soul?
13) W here did the young F ish erm an go instead and w hat did
he do there?
14) W hat did the young F ish erm an h ear from the sea one
day?
15) W hat h ap p en ed to the young Fisherm an?
16) W here did th e Priest o rd er to bury the dead bodies o f the
y o ung F isherm an and the M erm aid?
167
17) W h a t did th e Priest no tic e in th e C h a p e l after th r e e years?
18) W h a t did th e Priest realise?

"Ss. Vocabulary an d G ra m m a r Tasks

1 Find in the tale the English for:

за б р а с ы в а т ь сети в м о р е; п о д н и м а т ь с я из глубин; удивлять


л ю дей ; н а п р я г а я все св о и си л ы ; п о д к р е п и т ь о б е щ а н и е клят­
вой; об и т ат ел и м о р я ; д и к и е ч а й к и л етали над ее г о л овой ;
н ы р я т ь в воду; п огруж а тьс я в м оре; з а к р и ч а т ь от восторга; в
пу ч и н е м о р я ; о тр а в и ть ся я д о в и т ы м и т р а в а м и ; не зн а ть, где
д о б р о и где зло; и с к у ш а т ь с о б л а з н а м и ; к о р ч и т ь р о ж и ; не
стои ть л о м а н о г о г р ош а; стать л ю б и м ы м р а б о м к о р о л е в ы ;
ведьма, и с к у с н а я в делах колд овства; н е в е л и к о мое жела­
н и е; у к ры ться от сол н ц а ; р азби ва ть п ал атк и ; • обратить к о го -
л и б о в раб ст во ; п р о р о к Б ога; облагать к о г о - л и б о н а л о г о м ;
утолить жажду; • ты н а п р а в и л а м о и стоп ы на путь греха; вы­
п о л н я т ь п р и к а з а н и я ; н а л о ж и т ь н а уста п еч ать м о л ч а н и я ;
ли ть воду в р а з б и т ы й сосуд; • не слы ш ать к ого -л и б о ; не иметь
одежды, хлеба; • и сп ов ед оваться; б е зоп асное место; не ста­
вить зн а к а ; • вы ры ть глубокую могилу; гнев Господа

2 Insert articles if necessary.

1) Every evening__________young F is h e r m a n w ent_to________


sea an d threw his nets in to _________ water.
2) A nd w h e n he to u c h e d her, she gave cry like________
seagull, a n d w oke.
3) So she m a d e h im _________prom ise he desired an d swore it
by__________ o a th of_______ Sea-folk.
4) As she sang, all fish c a m e in from_________ deep to
listen to her.
5 )__________ cry of jo y b roke from h e r lips, a n d standing up in
________ p a i n t e d b o a t , he held out his arm s t o ________
M e r m a id .
6) Early________ next m o r n in g _________young F is h e r m a n w ent
to__________house of_______Priest an d k n o ck e d _________ th ree
tim es at_________door.
168
7) "The Soul is w orth all gold th at is in________ w orld,
and is m ore p recious th a n _______ rubies of________ kings,"
said the Priest.
8 )_________ young F ish erm an w ent to________ m ark etp lace, and
he w alked slowly, and w ith_________bow ed head, as one
w ho is in________ sorrow.
9) O ne o f his co m p an io n s told him o f________ certain W itch,
w ho lived in cave a t _____ head o f_________ bay and
was very good at h er w itcheries.
10) It was_______ m an dressed in suit of black velvet,
cut in________Spanish fashion.
11)I answ ered th a t I was________ P rince in my ow n land, and
th a t I had escaped from ________ T artars w ho w anted to
m ake me th e ir slave.
12) After second y ear was over,__________Soul cam e
dow n to________ shore__of_______ sea, and called to_______
young Fisherm an.
13) A cross_______ narrow streets torches o f paper hang
like large butterflies.
14)________A rm enian in_________caftan of________ green leather
looked through_________wicket.
15) At________ sunrise he cam e out o f his_palace in________ robe
o f silver, and at_________ sunset he returned to it again in
_______ robe of gold.
16) They opened_________gate, and I found m yself in_______
w atered garden of________ seven terraces.
17)_________E m p ero r ju m p e d to his feet, and taking_______
lance from stand o f arm s, he threw it at me.
18)_______ F isherm an built him self__________house, and lived
th ere for________ space of________year.
19) W hen Priest entered in, he saw_th at_________altar
was covered w ith________ strange flowers.

Here is a list of irregular verbs used in the tale, but three of the verbs are
regular. Which are they? Write in the Past Simple forms of all the verbs.

beat____________________________b lo w ____________________
b ecom e________________________ b u r n ____________________
begin__________________________ call______________________
b end ___________________________ c a t c h ___________________
169
4 Complete the sentences by adding each, each other, other, others or
another.

1)_ day th e so u n d o f h e r voice b e c a m e sw eeter


to his ears.
2) W h e n th e m e r c h a n t s saw h im c o m in g , th e y b e g a n to
w h is p e r to________________ .
3) A blu e b ird rose sc re a m in g from its nest, and th r e e bird s
w h istle d to________________ .
4) T he w itc h e s sniffed and c h a tte re d to_________________.
5) T he king s o f ________________ city im po sed taxes u p o n us, b u t
w o u l d n 't allow u s to e n te r th e ir gates.
170
6) W h e n I h a d to ld t h e m w h a t I h a d d o n e , _____________ of
t h e m gave m e a god an d p r a y e d m e to leave th e m .
7) A s I w e n t in, they closed __________d o o r b e h i n d me.
8) In n ic h e s u p o n __________ side stood great w in e -ja rs
filled w ith silver pieces.
9) It is n o t o u r city, but . N e v e r t h e le s s let us
e n t e r in.
10) C o m e , let us go to. city, an d m a k e m e rry ,
for w e hav e n in e p u rses o f gold.
11) S o m e tim e s she d a n c e s on h e r h a n d s , an d at_______________
tim e s she d a n c e s w ith h e r feet.
12) Surely, y ou will n o t send us w ithout a heart into______________
world?
13) T h ere c a m e _______________ w o rd into his lips, and he spoke
n o t o f th e w ra th o f G o d , b u t o f th e G o d , w h o se n a m e is
Love.
14) T he Sea-folk n e v e r c a m e in to th e bay as th e y u se d to , for
they w e n t in to ________________ p a rt o f th e sea.

Identify the kind o f phrase. Write "C" if the italicised phrase is a


comparative, " S " if the phrase is a superlative, and "E" if the phrase
is an expression o f equality or inequality.

1) H e r b o d y w as as white ivory.________
2) Like seashells w ere h e r ears, an d h e r lips w ere like sea-
coral. _______
3) A n d w h e n he t o u c h e d her, she gave a cry like a seagull.

4) E a c h day th e so u n d o f h e r voice b e c a m e sw eeter to his


ears.________
5) T he soul is the noblest p a rt o f a man.________
6) T h ere is n o th in g more precious than a hum an soul, and it
is more precious than the rubies o f the kings.________
7) She is fa ir e r than the m orning star, a n d w hiter than the
moon.________
8) H e w h o m I serve is richer than all the kings o f this world.

9) Y ou are the best o f the witches.________


10) I am as fa ir as the daughters o f the sea, a n d as beautiful as
those w ho live in blue waters.________

171
11) Y o u shall be w iser than all the wise men.________
12) L ove is better than Wisdom.________
13) T he w in e o f Schiraz is as sw eet as honey.________
14) T he cypress trees w ere like burnt-out torches.________
15) H e w h o h a s th e ring is richer than all the kings o f the world.

16) T h e ir la u g h te r is as clear as the laughter o f water.________


17) T he b la c k sea cam e nearer, an d th e w h ite foam m o a n e d
like a leper.________

6 Read the following sentences. U se your dictionary to find a word that


could replace the italicised word or phrase. Then find a word that is
opposite in meaning.

1) She lo o k e d at h im in te rro r, and struggled t h a t she m ig h t


escape.
s yn onym :_____________________
a n to n y m :_____________________

2) W h e n she saw th a t she c o u ld in no way esca p e h im , she


b e g a n to weep.
sy nonym :_____________________
a n to n y m :_____________________

3) A n d she sang a m arvellous song.


synon ym :_____________________
an to n y m :_____________________

4) Y o u hav e e a te n som e poisonous herb.


synon ym :_____________________
an to n y m :_____________________

5) T he Soul is m o r e precious th a n th e rubies o f th e kings.


synonym :_____________________
a n t o n y m :____________________ .

6) T he m e r c h a n t s m ocked at him.
syno nym :_____________________
an to n y m :_____________________

172
7) At sunset in some secret place we shall dance together.
sy nonym :____________________
antonym :____________________

8) He took o ff his cap to her.


sy nonym :___________________ .
a n to n y m :____________________

9) The M erm aid sank down into the water.


sy nonym :____________________
antonym :____________________

10) At sunrise he cam e out of his palace in a robe o f gold.


sy nonym :____________________
a n to n y m :____________________

11) T here w ere huge shells full of pearls.


sy nonym :___________________ .
a n to n y m :____________________

12) It is but a day's jou rn ey from this place.


sy nonym :___________________.
a n to n y m :___________________ ,

13) He ran away hastily th ro u g h the garden o f pom egranates.


synonym:____________________
a n to n y m :____________________

14) You have turned a d e a f ear to me.


sy nonym :____________________
a n to n y m :____________________

15) C om e, let us m end these things.


sy nonym :____________________
a n to n y m :____________________

16) D ea d at his feet it was lying.


sy nonym :____________________
a n to n y m :____________________

173
17) A n d to t h e d e a d th in g he m ade confession.
synonym:_____________________
a n to n y m :_____________________

7 Translate the following sentences into English.

1) Д е в а м о р с к а я п о д к р е п и л а свое о б е щ а н и е к л я т в о ю
Обитателей моря.
2) М о л о д о й Р ы б а к р е ш и л и з б а в и т ь с я от д у ш и .
3) И п од у м а л п р о с е б я м о л о д о й Р ы б а к : « К а к это ст р ан ­
но! С в я щ е н н и к убеждает м е н я , что д у ш а ц е н е е , ч е м
все з о л о т о м и р а , а в о т к у п ц ы г о в о р я т , что о н а не
с т о и т и л о м а н о г о грош а».
4) Он в с п о м н и л , что его т о в а р и щ и р а с с к а з ы в а л и ему о
н е к о е й и с к у с н о й в дел ах к о л д о в с т в а ю н о й ведьм е,
ж и в у щ е й в п е щ е р е у входа в за л и в .
5) С в я щ е н н и к р а з г н е в а л с я н а н его и п р о г н а л его п р о ч ь ,
а к у п ц ы о с м е я л и и о тв ергл и его.
6) М о л о д о й Р ы б а к в ы х в ат и л м а л е н ь к и й н о ж с з е л е н о й
р у к о я т к о й из з м е и н о й к о ж и и отрезал св о ю т е н ь у
с а м ы х ног.
7) Ц а р и к аж дого города в з и м а л и п о ш л и н ы и не впуска­
л и п у т е ш е с т в е н н и к о в в г о р о д с к и е в оро та.
8) И с к а за л султан Д уш е: «Здесь х р а н я т с я все м о и с о к р о ­
в и щ а . П о л о в и н а с о к р о в и щ тв о я . Я д а м тебе верблю ­
д о в и п о г о н щ и к о в , к о т о р ы е будут п о к о р н ы тебе и
отвезут тв ою д о л ю , куда т о л ь к о п о ж е л ае ш ь » .
9) К о г д а м о л о д о й Р ы б а к у зн а л , что ему н ет и з б а в л е н и я
от его Д у ш и и что зл ая Д у ш а о т с т а н е т с я с н и м н авсег­
да, он пал н а зе м л ю и го р ь к о з а п л а к а л .
10) И н е п р е с т а н н о Д у ш а и с к у ш а л а его, но он не отвечал
и не с о в е р ш а л д у р н ы х д е я н и й , к к о т о р ы м его побуж­
да л а Д уш а.
11) «Л ю б овь лучш е м у д р о с ти , ц е н н е е бо га тст ва и п р е ­
к р а с н е е , чем н о г и у д о ч е р е й ч е л о в е ч ес к и х » , — дум ал
Рыбак.
12) М о л о д о й Р ы б а к и Д е в а м о р с к а я бы л и з а х о р о н е н ы на
Погосте О тверженных.
13) Н а их м о ги л е в ы р о с л и белые ц в е ты н е о б ы ч а й н о й кра­
соты, которы е смутили С в я щ е н н и к а .
174
D iscussion Tasks

1 Discuss the following.


1) D escribe the M erm aid and the Sea-folk.
2) D iscuss th e c h aracter o f the young F isherm an. H ow does
his c h a ra c ter in the story develop and change as the story
progresses?
3) Speak about his Soul. W hat does the au th o r w ant to say
by creating such a character?
4) Agree or disagree w ith the statem ents from the tale: "The
Soul is the noblest p art o f a m a n ", "It is not w orth a
clipped piece of silver".
5) W hat do you th in k about th e F ish e rm a n 's love to the
M erm aid? W hy was it so tragic?
6) W ho do you feel m ost sorry for at the end o f the tale: the
F ish e rm a n or his Soul? Why?
7) D iscuss th e m oral o f th e tale.
Vocabulary

Принятые сокращения

adj adjective прилагательное зоол. зоология


adv adverb наречие исп. испанский (язык)
int inteijection междометие мин. минералогия
n noun существительное миф. мифология
/?/ plural множественное число поэт, поэтическое
pron pronoun местоимение уст. устаревшее
v verb глагол фр. французский (язык)
бот. ботаника церк. церковное
зд. здесь

А
accom pany [э'клшрэш] v сопровож­ arrogant ['aerougsnt] adj высокомер­
дать ный, надменный
accursed [a'kaisid] adj проклятый ash es faefiz] п pi останки
acknow ledge [sk'nDlid3] v призна­ a ss [aes] n осел
вать, подтверждать attachm ent [a'taetfmant] n привязан­
adder ['aeda] n гадюка ность, преданность
affect [a'fekt] v влиять, трогать, вол­ attendance [a'tendsns] n посещение,
новать присутствие
agate ['aegat] n мин. агат attic ['aetik] n мансарда, чердак
ague ['eigju:] n лихорадка, малярия aught [o:t] n нечто, кое-что, что-
alas [a'lais] int увы! нибудь
ale [eil] n эль, пиво avarice ['aevans] n алчность, жад­
altar ['a:lta] n алтарь ность
am bassador [asm'baesada] n посол
amber ['aemba] n янтарь В
ankle ['aegkl] n лодыжка
anklet ['aerjklit] n ножной браслет bald [bo:ld] adj лысый
ant [aent] n муравей banner [Ъзепэ] n стяг, знамя
antique [aen'ti:k] adj античный banquet ['beegkwit] n банкет
ape [eip] n обезьяна barefoot [ beafut] adv босиком
applaude [a'pb:d] v аплодировать bargain ['bcegin] v торговаться
applause [a'pb:z] n аплодисменты bark [ba:k] v лаять
apple [aepl] n яблоко bam [been] n амбар, сарай, гумно
appreciate [a'prii/ieit] v ценить b arren [Ъаегэп] adj бесплодный,
approve [a'pru:v] v одобрять неплодородный
Armenian [a:'mi:njan] adj армянский; barter ['bcuts] n товарообмен, ме­
n армянин, армянка новая торговля
bay |bei| я залив, бухта breast [brest] л грудь
bay [bei] v лаять; л лай briar [braia] я шиповник
bazaar [ba'za:] я восточный базар bring up ['brio лр] v воспитывать
bead [bird] я бусинка, бисер brow [bran] я бровь
beady ['bi:di] adjпохожий на бусинку brush o ff | Ьгл/ of) v отряхнуть
bedfellow ['bed,felou] я уст. муж, bubble [ЬлЫ] v кипеть; бить клю­
жена; спяший в одной постели с чом; журчать
кем-либо bud |b.\d] я почка
Bedouin ['beduin] я бедуин bull [bul] я бык
beetle ['bi:tl 1 я жук bullfight ['bulfait] я бой быков
beggar [Ъедэ] я нищий, бродяга bully ['bull] v задирать, запугивать
belt [belt] я пояс, ремень bulrush [ЪийлЯ я бот. камыш
bend (bent) [bend] ([bent] ) v гнуть, bunch [bxntJl я пучок, букет
изгибать bundle [ЬлшИ] я вязанка
Bengal [ben'go:!] adj бенгальский bury [Ъеп] v хоронить
beryl ['berrl] я мин. берилл butterfly [ТшэАаг] я бабочка
bind (bound) [batnd] ([baund]) v за­ byre [Ьаш] я амбар, хлев
вязать
bleed [blitd] v быть в крови, крово­ С
точить
bless [bles] v благословить cactus ['ktektas] я кактус
blessing ['blesiq] n благословение, cam el ['kasmal] я верблюд
молитва canary [кэ'пеэп] я канарейка
blind [blamd] adj слепой; v выко­ candle ['kaendlj я свеча
лоть глаза, ослепить canopy ['kaenapi] л навес, балдахин
blindness ['blamdnis] n слепота cart [ka:t] я телега, повозка
bloom |btu:m] n цветение; v цвести cartwheel ['kartwirl] я колесо телеги
blossom ['bbsam] я цветение; v цве­ carve [ka:v] v резать, вырезать
сти, распускаться cataract j'kaetarsekt] л большой во­
blow (b le w , blow n) [blou] ([bin:], допад; сильный ливень
[bloun]) v дуть, веять cathedral [ka'Gitdral] я собор
bluebell['blu:bel] я колокольчик caution ['kotjan] я осторожность
blush IblAf] v вспыхнуть cavern ['ksevsnj л пещера
board [bard] v есть за одним сто­ chamber ['tjeimba] я комната, па­
лом, столоваться лата
bodyguard ['badi,ga:d] л личная ох­ chapel ['t/sepal] я часовня, церковь
рана charity ['tjaeriti] я милосердие
bow [bau] v кланяться; я поклон chatter ['t/seta] я болтовня, щебе­
bowl [boul] я чаша тание; v болтать, щебетать
bracelet f'breislit] я браслет cherry [Ч/еп] я вишня
brackish ['braekijQ adj солоноватая chestnut I'tfesiut] л каштан
brass [brats] adj бронзовый chill [tjil] v охладить, остудить
breakfast o ff ['brekfast ,of] v позавт­ ch im n ey -p o t ['tjimnipot] я колпак
ракать дымовой трубы

177
chrysolite ['knsalait] пмин. хризолит C ouncillor ['kaunsila] n член город­
citron ['sitran] n цитрон, сладкий ского совета
лимон country-side ['kxntnsaidl n сельская
clap [klaep] v хлопать местность
clasp (kia:sp] v сжимать court [kart] n двор
clatter ['kfretaj n грохот; v греметь courtier ['kartja] n придворный
claw [kb:j n коготь courtship ['koitjip] ft ухаживание
clay [kleij n глина cover (with) ['kxva] v покрывать
cleft 1kleft| я дупло cowl [kaul] n капюшон
clench |klentj| v сжимать, стиснуть cow slip t'kauslip] n бот. первоцвет
[зубы) истинный
cloak [klouk] n покров crack [krsek] «трещина, расселина
coarse [kara] adj грубый craftsm an ['k rafts man] n мастер, ре­
coffer I'kofaj n сундук месленник
coffin I'kafinj n гроб crag [kneg] n скала, утес
collie j'kaii] n колли, шотландская crawl [kro:f] v ползти
овчарка c r e e p ( c r e p t ) [krirpj ( [ krept]) v
colum bine j'kolambain] n бот. водо­ красться, подкрадываться
сбор creeper |'kri:pa] n ползучее расте­
com m on ['komanj adj простой ние, вьюнок
com p ass ['kxmpas] n окружность, crim son ['krimzn] adj малиновый; v
круг; v окружать окрашивать в малиновый цвет
condemn [kan'dem] v осуждать, по­ crisp [krisp] adj рассыпчатый
рицать croak [krouk] n кваканье
con fess [kan'fes] v признаваться crocodile I'krakadail] n крокодил
confession [ksn'fejbn] n признание c r o c u s I'kroukas] « бот. крокус,
conscious ['konjas] adj сознательный, шафран
здравый crooked ['krukid] adj кривой, изог­
consciousness ['konjbsnis] n сознание нутый
con sole [kan'soul] n утешать crown |kraun] « корона
coo [ku:] n воркование; v ворковать cruel ['krual] adj жестокий
copper ['kopaj n медь cruelty I'krualti] n жестокость
coq u ette lkou'ket| n фр. кокетка crumb [krxm] « крошка (хлеба)
coral ['karal] n коралл crush [krxf] v раздавить, раздолбить
cord [ko:d] n веревка cry out to ['krai 'aut ta] v крикнуть
corn [ko:n] n зерно кому-либо
coronation Ikora'neijnj n коронация cultivate ['kxltivejt] v возделывать,
co st (co st) Ikost] ([kDst]) v стоить культивировать
costly I'kastliJ adj дорогой, роскош­ cupboard ['kxbad] n буфет, шкаф
ный curious ['kjuarias] adj любопытный,
cottage ['kotidjj n изба, хижина любознательный
couch [kautj] v лежать, притаиться curiousity [,kjusri'ositi]
«любопыт­
(о зверях) ство
cough [ka:fj n кашель curl [karl] я локон, завиток

178
curl up ['каГлр] v съежиться в ко­ dispatch |dis'pcetj] n отправление,
мочек депеша
curse |ka:s] « проклятие; к прокли­ distinguish [dis'tirjgwifl v различать,
нать отмечать
curtsey |'ko:tsi] п реверанс distinguished Idis'tiijgwiJtl adj извес­
cushion I'kujan! л диванная подушка тный
custom I'kAStam] п обычай, традиция distressed |dis'trest] adj бедствующий
custom ary ('kAstaman] adj обычный, ditch [ditf] n канава, ров
привычный dolphin I'dalfin) n дельфин
cut away |'Ы a'wei] v уходить dom e |doum| n купол, свод
cypress ['saipns] n бот. кипарис dom estic [da'mestik] adj семейный,
домашний
D dom esticity [,doumes'tisitt! n семей­
ная жизнь
daffodil ['daefodilj n бот. бледно­ dove fdxvj n голубь
желтый нарцисс drag fdra;g] v тащить, волочить; ~
dagger ['daega] n кинжал out вытаскивать
damask ['daermsk| adj дамасский dragon-fly ['draegan.flai] n стрекоза
damp jdannpl adj сырой drift |drift] n овраг
dawn | dr>:n j n рассвет drive away ['draw s'wei) v выгнать
deacon |'dikan| wдьякон « drown ['draun] м тонуть
deal box ['di:l,boksl n зд. еловая или drowsy ['drauzi] adj сонный, дрем­
сосновая коробка лющий
delay |di'lei | n промедление; v мед­ duchess ['dAtJts] n герцогиня
лить duck [cUkj « утка
deputation [,depju:'tei/3n] n депута­ duke [djuk] n герцог
ция, делегация dungeon ['dAiid^aiil n темница
descent (di'sent) n спуск, снижение dust [dAst] n !рязь
desert ['dezat] n пустыня dusty | 'dAsti| adj пыльный
determ ine |di't3:min| v решить dwarf [dwa:f] « карлик
die (of) [dail v умирать (от)
dig (d u g) |dig| ([dAg]) v копать, E
рыть
dignified f'dignifaid] adj достойный eager ['i:ga| adj стремящийся, силь­
d ign itary ['dignitanj n сановник, но желающий
лино, занимающее высокий пост eagerness ['cgamsj n пыл, рвение
dignity ['digniti] «достоинство earn |o:nj v зарабатывать
disappoint [,disa'paint] v расстроить earnings ['a:nigs] n pi заработок
d isclose [dis'klouz] v раскрыть, ра­ ebb away ('eb a'wei] v ослабевать,
зоблачить угасать; смеркаться
d is m is s [dis'mis] v распускать, ebony I'ebam] n черное дерево
увольнять echo ['ekoul n эхо
dismount [dis'maunt] v слезать (с ло­ edge | ed3 1 n конец
шади) Egypt |'i:d3ipt| л Египет

179
Egyptian (t'd3 ipjan) adj египетский; F
n египтянин,египтянка
elaborate [t'laebarit] adj продуманный fade [feid| у вянуть, увядать
elab orate [I'lasbareitj г тщательно fa g g o t ['fsegpt] n вязанка, охапка
разрабатывать хвороста
elder-tree ['elda,tri:] n бот. бузина faint [feint] adj слабеющий, вялый;
election fi'lekjbn) n выборы утерять сознание; «обморок, по­
elf [elf] n миф. эльф теря сознания
embalm [ппЪазп] v бальзамировать; fail (fell, fallen) [foil] ([fel], [Ыэп])
сохранять от забвения v; ~ out o f рассыпаться; - upon
embroiderfim'broida] v вышивать напасть
emerald ['emarald] я изумруд famine ['ftemin] n голод (стихийное
emperor ['етрэгэ] n император бедствие)
encom pass [in'kxmpas] v окружать fan [fsen] n веер, опахало
entertain [,enta'tein] v развлекать fasten f'faisn] v прикреплять
entertainment [.enta'teinmant] n раз­ fate [feit] я судьба
влечения, увеселения faun [fo:n] n миф. фавн
entrance ['entrans] n вход feast [ftst] n пир, банкет
en tran ce [m'tra:ns] v приводить в feather ['fefla] n перо
состояние транса, восторга feeble ]'fi:bl] adj слабый
entrancin g |in'tra;nsii]] adj чарую­ feed (fed. fed) [fi:d] {[fed]) v кор­
щий, очаровательный мить
entreat [in'tirt] v умолять, упраши­ fen [fen] n болото, топь
вать fetter [feta] n путы, ножные канда­
envious ['envies] adj завистливый лы, оковы
envy fenvi] v завидовать fever [Tuva] я жар, лихорадка
ermine ['a:min] n горностай fiction ['fikjan] п вымысел, выдумка
escape [is'keip] n бегство, побег; v fig [fig] я фиговое дерево
убежать, избежать fir [fa:] я ель
essen ce j'esans] n суть firewood ['faiawud] л дрова
etiq uette ['etiket] n этикет fireworks ('faiawaks] я pi фейерверк
eunuch ['jirnak] л евнух fisherman ['fi/э т э п ] я рыбак
everm ore ['eva'ma] adv навеки, на­ flame [fleim] я пламя
всегда flap [flaep] v взмахивать (крыльями)
evil f'irvl] adj злой ftirt (with) [f!a:t] v флиртовать (с)
evil-visaged ['i:vl,vizid3d] adj страш­ fioat [flout] у плавать
ный и злой с виду flock [flak] n стадо, стая
exaggera te [ig'zaed33reit] v преуве­ flour [flaua] я мука
личивать flow (flew, flown) [flou] ([flu], |flounj)
exhaust [ig'zo:st] v истощать, изну­ v. - down стекать вниз по
рять flush [ПлЛ v вспыхнуть, покраснеть
explode [iks'ploud] v взорваться flute [flu:t] я флейта
eyelet ['ailitl n прорезь flutter['fUta] у порхать, махать кры­
eyelid f'arlid] n веко льями

180
fly [flaij я муха govern ['длуэп] v управлять, пра­
foam [foumj n пена; поэт, море вить
fold [fould] n складка governm ent ['gxvanmant] п прави­
forgive (fo rg a v e, forgiven ) [fa'giv] тельство
([fo'geiv], [fo'givan]) v простить gown [даип] п мантия, халат
forgiveness [fa'grvnis] n прощение grace [greis] п грация, изящество
frankincense J'frser>km,sens] «ладан graceful ['greisfuf] adj грациозный,
frontier ['frxntiaj n граница изящный
frost-bitten |'frost,bitn] a # окоченев­ grain [grein] п зерно, хлебные зла­
ший ки
frown |fraun] v хмуриться granite ['grasnit] л гранит
for [fa:| « мех grass-p lot ['grccs'pbt] л лужайка, га­
furnace ['facnis] « печь зон
grasshopper ['grais.hopo] л кузнечик
grate [greit] п решетка; камин
gratify ['grretifar] v доставлять удо­
gallop ('gtebp] v скакать галопом вольствие, радовать
gasp [gcusp] n затрудненное дыха­ grave [grerv] п могила
ние, удушье g rief [gri:f] л печаль, горе
gate [geit] я ворота ( grind [grind] v размалывать
gather ['ддадэ] v собирать grotesque [grou'tesk] я гротеск
gauze |дэ:г[ я газ, дымка grove [grouv] л роща, лесок
gay [gei] adj нарядный, яркий, пе­ growl [graulj v рычать
стрый grumble [дглтЫ| v ворчать
gaze |geiz) я (пристальный) взгляд guard Igtcd] n охранник
gem [йзет] я гемма, самоцвет gunpow der ['длп,раибэ] n черный
generosity [бзепэ'гэБт] л щедрость порох
generous ['бзепэгэв] adj щедрый gutter ['длю] я канава
geranium [бзэ'гшщэт] я бот. герань
giant ['d3amtj л великан H
gillyflow er ['d3 ili,flaua] л бот. лев­
кой haggard ['haegadj adj измученный,
gipsy ['d3ipsi| л цыган, цыганка удрученный
girdle [ga:dl| я пояс, кушак hail [heil] n град
glisten ['glison] v блестеть halberd ['h®lbo:d] n алебарда
gloom y ['glu:mi[ adj мрачный, угрю­ hammer ['haemal n молот, молоток
мый handful ['haendful] я пригоршня,
goat [gout] я коза горсть
goatherd ['gouthod [ я пастух, пасу­ handle [haendl] n ручка, рукоятка
щий коз harbour ['hccba] я гавань
goblet ['goblit] я бокал, кубок hard-featured ['hcrd/rtjbd] adj с гру­
go o d -h u m o u red ['gud,hju:ni3dj adj быми, резкими чертами лица
добродушный hare [heo] л заяц
go o se [gu:s] л гусь harp [hcupj я арфа

181
harsh [hci:J] adj колючий horn ]ho:n] n рог
haste [heistj n спешка hornbeam ['hainbiim] n бот. граб (де­
hasten ['heisan] v спешить, торо­ рево)
питься horned ]ha:nd] «^рогатый
hastily ['heistili] adv поспешно, то­ huge [hju:d3 ] «*#офомный
ропливо humble [ЬлтЬ1 ] униженный
hasty ['heisti] adj поспешный, необ­ humility [hju/militi] n унижение
думанный hunch [hAntJ] n горб
haul down ['ho:l 'daun] v опускать, hunter ['hAnta] n охотник
травить hurry ['hAri] v спешить
hawthorn ['11э:вэ:п] n боярышник hyacinth ['haiasinG] n гиацинт
heat [hi:t] n жара
heather ]'heda] n вереск I
heave [hi:v] v поднимать
heaven I'hevn] n небеса ibis ['aibis] n зоол. ибис (птица)
heel [hi:l] n пятка, задник idle |aidl] «^ленивый
heir [сэ] n наследник idleness ['aidlnis] n праздность, лень
helm et ['helmit] n шлем, каска idol ['aidl] n идол
hem lock ['hem bk] n бот. болиголов ill-bred [il'bred] «^невоспитанный
крапчатый ill-favoured [il'feivad] adj некраси­
henna ['hena] n бот. хна вый, неприятный
herb [ha:b] n трава, растение im mense [I'mens] «^огромный
heretic ['heretik] n еретик im pose [im'pouz] v облагать
h id e (h id , h id d e n ) [haid] ([hid], incurable [in'kjuarabl] adj неизлечи­
[hid(a)n]) v спрятаться мый
highness ['hainis] n высочество India-rubber ['indja.rxba] n каучук,
hill [hil] n холм резина
hillside I'hilsaid] n склон горы или Infanta [in'fsenta] n исп. инфанта
холма influence ['influans] n влияние, дей­
hinder (from ) ['hinda] v мешать, ствие
препятствовать invisible ]m'vizibl] adj невидимый,
hiss (at) [his] v шипеть, свистеть незримый
hobby I'habi] n конек, хобби irritate ['iriteit] v раздражать
hold (held) [hould] ([held]) v: ~ out irritating I'mteitig] adj раздражающий
протягивать ivory ['aivari] n слоновая кость
hole [houl] n нора, дыра
hollow ['halou] adj пустой J
H oly Book ['houh'buk] «Священная
книга, Библия jade ]d3eid] v заездить, измучить
h on ey-cak e ['hAni,keik] n медовый jar [630:] n дрожание, дребезжание
торт jasm ine ['d3aesmin] n жасмин
honey-suckle ['hAni,SAkl] n бот. жи­ jasper ['d33espa] n мин. яшма
молость jennet l'd3enit] n низкорослая испан­
h oof [hu:f] n копыто ская лошадь; ослица

182
jew el )'d3u:al] n ювелирное украше­ linnet ['lirutl n зоол. коноплянка
ние lizard ['Iizadj n ящерица
jew eller )'d3u:ala] п ювелир lobe [loub] n мочка (уха)
journey [Мзэ:ш] п путешествие, по­ locust ['loukast) n зоол. саранча пе­
ездка; v путешествовать релетная
joy |d 30i] п радость look after ['lukxftaj v ухаживать
joyful |'d 3Diful| adj радостный look to )'luk,tu] усмотреть куда-либо
judge j'd3Ad3 ] v судить loom [lu:m] n очертания, тень
judgem ent )'d3Ad3mant) n приговор lotus ('loutas] n лотос
juggler ['d3Agb] n фокусник, жонг­ lute [Iu:t| n лютня
лер
ju stice ('d3Astis] n справедливость M

К magician [тэ^зфэп] n волшебник


magnolia Imag'noulja] n магнолия
kneel (knelt) [ni:l] ()nelt|) v стано­ maid-of-honour |'meidav,ana] n фрей­
виться на колени лина
knock o ff )'nak 'af) v сбить, смах­ majoram |ma'd 3oram] n майоран
нуть marble [ma:bl] n мрамор
т а г е [теэ] n кобыла
L m arket-place |'ma:kit,pleis] n базар­
ная площадь
ladder ['laeda) n лестница marsh [та:/] n болото
ladysmock ('leidismakj n бот. сердеч­ m ast [ma:st] n мачта; уставить мач­
ник луговой ту
lamb (laem) n ягненок, овечка, ба­ M aster I'mcesta) n учитель
рашек m aster over ['mcrsta 'ouva) у помы­
lance [larns] n пика, копье кать
lane [lein] n узкая дорога, тропинка match [maetf) n спички
lantern I'kentan) n фонарь m a tch -g irl ['maetXgatl] n девочка,
lateen (la'tim) adj треугольный, ла­ торгующая спичками
тинский (о парусе) mayor | теэ) n мэр
lead [led) n свинец meadow ['medou) n луг, луговина
leaden |'ledn| adj свинцовый M ecca |'тек э| n Мекка
lean (lean t) [li:n] ([lent]) v накло­ melancholy ['melankali| n меланхолия
няться melon |'melan| n дыня
leather ['1ебэ[ n кожа melt (melt) v таять
leathern )'ledan| adj кожаный memoirs ['memwaiz) n мемуары
lemon ['leman] n лимон mend [mend) v чинить
leper I'lepa] n прокаженный m erchant ['mat/ant] n купец
lilac ['lailak] n сирень; adj сирене­ m ercy )'ma:si| у пожалеть
вый mermaid )'ma:meid] n русалка
lily I'lili] n лилия merman )'тэ:тагп) n тритон, водя­
linen ['limn] n полотно, холст; белье ной

183
m essenger ['mesind3a] « курьер, по­ mullet ['nulit] n зоол. кефаль
сыльный murmur ]'ma:ma] v ворчать
mighty ['maiti] adj могущественный
milestone ['mailstoun] n мильный ка­ N
мень или столб
mill [mil] n мельница nail [neil] n гвоздь
miller I'mila] n мукомол nail up ['neil 'лр] v заколачивать
minion I'minjan] n фаворит, люби­ narcissus [noi'sisas] n нарцисс
мец nautilus ['naitilas] n зоол. кораблик
minuet Lminju'et] n минуэт {танец) {моллюск)
m isery ['mizori] n бедность n ecklace ['neklis] n ожерелье
m isfortune [mis'foit/sn] n несчастье needle I'niidl] n игла
m isshapen ['mis'Jeipan] adj уродли­ neigh [nei] v ржать; « ржание
вый, деформированный neighbour ['neiba] n сосед
m ist [mist] n туман, мгла nest | nest] n гнездо
moan [moun] n стон; v стонать net [net] n сеть {для рыбной ловли)
mock [mok] v насмехаться n ettle [netl] n крапива
m ole Jmoul] n крот niche [nit/] n ниша
monk [гплрк] n монах night-cap ['naitkaep] n уст. ночной
m onster ['monsta] n чудовище колпак
m onstrance ['manstrans] n церк. да­ nightingale ['naitiggeil] n соловей
роносица N ile [nail] n Нил
monument ['manjumant] n монумент nip ]mp] v укусить
m oonstone ['mu:nstoun] «лунный ка­ noble [noubl] «^благородный, знат­
мень ный
m oor [mua] n поросшая вереском, nod [nod] v кивать
торфянистая местность nosegay ('nouzgei] n букетик цветов
M oorish ['muarij] adj мавританский nostril ['nostril] n ноздря
mosque [mask] n мечеть notice-board ['noutisboid] «доскадля
m oss [mas] n мох; лишайник объявлений
moth ]ma0] n моль, мотылек notorious [nou'toirios] adj пользую­
m otion less ['moufanlis] adj застыв­ щийся дурной славой
ший novice ['novis] « церк. послушник
m ottled ['matld] adj крапчатый, пе­ Nubian I'njubjon] adj нубийский; «
стрый нубиец
mouldy I'mouldi] «^'заплесневелый nurture ['noit/o] « воспитание, обу­
mourn [main] v присутствовать на чение
похоронах nut [iut] « орех
mourner ['mama] n присутствующий
на похоронах О
mower ['moua] n косец, косилка
mud [imd] n грязь, слякоть oak [ouk] « дуб
muffler ['тлПэ] кашне, шарф odour ['oudo] « запах
mule [mjuil] n мул offence | э'fens] « обида, оскорбление

184
offend [a'fend] v обижать, оскорб­ pearl [рэ:1] « жемчуг
лять peasant ['pezant] « крестьянин
onyx ['oniks] n мин. оникс pedestal ('pedistlj « пьедестал
opal ['oupal] n мин. опал peep in ['pi:p'inl v заглядывать
opium ['oupjam] n опиум perm ission [pa'mijan] « разрешение
orchard ['atfad] n фруктовый сад permit (pa'rrntj v разрешить
ornithology |э:ш'0 зЫ з 1] n орнитоло­ petal ['petl] «лепесток
гия phenomenon [fi'nominaii] « явление,
outrun (outran) [aut'iwn] ([aut'raen]) феномен
v перегнать pick out ['pik'aut] v выдергивать, от­
o v e r fe e d (o v erfed ) ['ouva,fad] бирать
(['ouva,fi:d]) v перекармливать pierce [pias] v пронзать
o v e r h e a r (o v e r h e a r d ) ['ouva,hia] pike [paik] « щука
(['ouva,ha:d]) v нечаянно услы­ pile [pail] v складывать
шать pilgrim ['pilgrim] « пилигрим
o v e r ta k e ( o v e r t o o k , o v e r ta k e n ) pillow ['pilou] « подушка
['ouva,teik] (['ouva,tuk], ['ouva,teikn]) p ine-forest |'pain,farast] « сосновый
v узнать бор
owl [aul] n сова pine-wood ['pain.wud] « дрова из со­
ox [oks] n бык сны
pink [pipk] « бот. гвоздика
P pipe [paip] « трубка; свирель; v наи­
грывать на свирели
paddle ['paedlJ n плавник, ласт pity I'piti] « жалость
page [peid3 ] n паж plain [plein] « долина
pale [peil] бледный plank [plaegk] «доска
pallet-bed ['paelit,bed] n соломенная plague [pleig] « чума, моровая язва
постель plough [plau] v пахать, бороздить
palm [pa:m] «ладоньруки pluck |р1лк] v срывать
palm -tree ('pa:m(tri:] « пальма pluck out ['р1лк 'aut] v выбить, вы­
paradise ['pseradais] « рай дернуть
parrot ['pasrat] « попугай plum [р1лт] « слива
pass through ['pais'eru:] v проходить plunge [pL\nd3 ] v нырять; « ныря­
через ние
passer-by |'pa:sa,bai] « прохожий poison ['paizn] v отравить; « яд
p assion-flow er ['pajfan.flaua] « бот. poisonous ['paiznas) adj ядовитый
страстоцвет pom egranate ['рэт,дгагпп] « гранат;
pavement ['peivmant] « тротуар гранатовое дерево
pavilion [pa'viljan] « павильон, кор­ pomp [pamp] « помпа, великоле­
пус пие, пышность
p each -tree l'pi:tf,tri:] « персиковое poor [pua] adj бедный
дерево poppy ['popi] « бот. мак
peacock ['pi:kak] « павлин porch [pa:tf] « подъезд, крыльцо
pear [pea] « горох p ossess [pa'zes] v владеть, обладать

185
possession [pa'zejan] « владение, об- R
ладание
pottery ['potan] « керамика, гончар­ rabbit I'raebit] n кролик
ные изделия rapid I'raepid] «^быстрый
pour [рэ:] у наливать rare [reo] adj редкий
poverty ['pavati] « бедность raven ['ravn] у рыскать в поисках
praise [preiz] v хвалить добычи
precede [pri:'si:d] v предшествовать raven ['reivn] n ворон {не путать с
precedence [pii'sirdans] « предшество­ вороной)
вание, превосходство recognition [.rekag'nijan] п призна­
precious ['prejas] д*# драгоценный ние
prejudice ['pred3Adis] « предрассудок recognize ['rekagnaiz] v узнавать
prevail [pri'veil| v преобладать, пре­ reed [ri:d] «тростник, камыш
валировать reel |ri:l] « вихрь; v кружиться
prick |prik] « укол, прокол reflect [ri'flekt] v отражать
priest [pri:st] «священник reflection [ri'flekfan] «отражение
prim rose ['pnmrouzj « бот. перво­ refuge ('refjuds] « убежище
цвет, примула reject |ri'd 3ekt] v отвергнуть
proclam ation [,prokla'meijan] n про­ release [n'lfcs] у отпустить
кламация remedy I'remidi] «лекарство
profit I'profit] v приносить пользу render I'renda] v платить
prominent ['pronunant] adj знаменитый reserve [n'zarv] у сохранить, беречь
prophet ('profit] n пророк retrace |n'treis] у возвращаться no
pull [pul]v: ~ down сносить; ~ out пройденному пути
вытаскивать reverence ['revarons] « реверанс; по­
punish 1'рлшЯ v наказывать чтение
punishment ['рлш /тэт] n наказание reward [Avaid] « вознаграждение
puppet-show ('pxpitjou] n кукольный ride (rod e, ridden) [raid] ([roud],
театр [ridn]) уехать верхом
purchase ['pa:tjas] v покупать ripe |raip] «^спелый
pure |pjua] adj чистый river-horse ['riv^hars] « гиппопотам,
purple ['рэ:р1| «^пурпурный бегемот
purse [pa:s] n кошелек roam through I'roum '9ru:| v бродить
pygmy I'pigmi] n пигмей, карлик no
pyrotechnist [,pairou'teknist] n пиро­ roar |ro:| v шуметь, свистеть
техник roast [roust] « жаркое; жареное
robber ['roba] « разбойник
Q rob e [roub] « мантия, широкая
одежда
quarrel ['kworol] v ругаться, ссо­ rock [rok] « скала, утес
риться rod [rod] « прут, стержень
quench [kwentf] у гасить, тушить, roll [rol] у таращить
утолить (жажду) roof |ru:f] « крыша
quote [kwout] у цитировать rope [roup] « канат, веревка, трос

186
rope-ladder ['roup,lasd3j n верёвоч­ shallow ['Jaelou] adj мелкий, поверх­
ная лестница ностный
rough [глП adj грубый sham [faem| n притворство, обман
row [rou] n ряд sh atter ['JaetsJ v разбить вдребезги
rub (глЬ) v тереться shawl ЦЪ:1| n шаль, платок
ruby ['ru:bi| n рубин shed [fed] n навес, сарай
rude [ru:d] adj грубый sheepfold ['Jupfould] n овчарня
sheepskin ['frpskinj n овчина
S shell [felj n оболочка, скорлупа
sh elter ['Jelta) n приют, кров; v ук­
sack [saek] n мешок рывать, дать приют
sacrifice ['saeknfais] n жертва shepherd I'Jepad] n пастух
saddle ['saedlj n седло shield Lfi:ld] n щит
samphire ['saemfaia] n бот. критмум shine (shone) [fain) ([founj) v све­
морской титься), сиять
sapphire ['saefaia] n мин. сапфир shiver I'Jiva] v дрожать
satin ['saetin) n атлас shore [fn:J n берег моря
saw (sawed, sawn) [so:] ([so:d], |so:n|) sh oot through ['Jut'eru:! v простре­
v распиливать, точить лить насквозь
scale [skeil] n шкала; чаша весов shutter I'jAtal n ставень
scarf [sktcf] n повязка; шарф sign [sain] // знак, символ
scarlet ['ska:lit[ я*# пурпурный silk [silk] n шелк
sceptre ['septo| n скипетр sin [sin] n грех
scold [skould] v ругать sin k (sa n k , su n k ) [sipk] ( [saeiyk],
scornful ['sko:nful[ ^презрительны й [sAijk|) v опускаться, снижаться
scythe [said] n коса siren ['saironl n сирена
seagull ['si:,gAj] n чайка skirt [skart] n юбка
sea-h orse ['si:,ho:s] n зоол. морской slanting ['slaintiol adj косой, раско­
конек сый
seal |si:l[ n печать slap [slaep] n шлепок; v шлепать
seam stress ['si:mstns| n швея slate [sleit] n шифер
seashell ['si:jelj n морская раковина slave [sleiv] n раб
sensible [sensibl] я*# разумный sleeve [sli:v[ n рукав
sensitive ['sensitiv] яг# чувствительный slender ['slenda] adj тонкий, строй­
serpent ['sorpontj n змей, змея ный
sew (s e w e d , sew n ) [sou] ([s o u d |, slim [slim] adj тонкий, стройный
|soun ]) v шить, пришивать slip [slip] v ускользнуть
shabby ['Jaebi) adj потертый, потре­ slippers ['slipazj n комнатные туф­
панный ли, тапочки
shaggy ['Jaegi[ adj косматый, лохма­ sm ooth [smud| adj гладкий
тый snake [sneik] n змея
shake (shook , shaken) [JeikJ (lJukj, snap [snaep] v обламываться
Lfeikn]): v~ on e’s head отрицатель­ sniff [smf| v сопеть, фыркать
но качать головой sob [sob] v рыдать

187
solem n ['solam] «^торжественный, sundial ['sAndaiol] n солнечные часы
церемониальный sunbeam ['sAnbi:m] n солнечный луч
solitude ['solitju:d] « одиночество sunset ['sAnset] n закат солнца
soul [soul] « душа surrender [so'rendo] v сдаваться
sovereign ['sovrin] adj суверенный, surround [so'raund] v окружать
самостоятельный suspect (of) [sos'pekt] v подозревать (в)
sparrow ['spaerou] n воробей swallow ['swolou] «ласточка
spear [spio] n копье, дротик swan [swon] «лебедь
sphinx [sfipks] n сфинкс swarm up ['swo:m'Ap] v толпиться
splendid ['splendid] adj великолеп­ sw ear (swore, sworn) [sweo] ([swo:],
ный, роскошный [swo:n]) v клясться, присягать
split (split) [split] ([split]) v раска­ sw ing (swung) [swig] ( [swArj]) v: ~
лывать upon качаться
spoil [spoil] v испортить sword [so:d] « меч, шпага
spot [spot] n место sw ord-hilt ['so:dhilt] « эфес
spray [sprei] « брызги Syria ['siria] « Сирия
spread (spread) [spred] ([spred]) v
раскидывать T
squib [skwib] n петарда, шутиха
squirrel ['skwirol] n белка tail [teil] « хвост
stain [stein] « пятно tam e [teim] adj прирученный, руч­
stamp upon ['staemp л'роп] v топать ной
по, ступать, наступать tapestry ['taspistri] « гобелен, заткан­
stanchion ['stainfon] n стойка ная руками материя
start off [,sta:t 'of] v отправиться tear (tore, torn) [tea] ([to:], [to:n])
stately ['steitli] adj величавый, пол­ v рвать, срывать
ный достоинства tease [ti:z] v дразнить
statue ['staetju:] n статуя tem ple [tempi] « храм
ste a l (s to le , sto len ) [sti:l] ( [stoul] , tempt [tempt] v соблазнять
[stoul(o)n]) v украсть tem ptation [temp'tei/эп] « соблазн
stern [sto:n] adj строгий, суровый tender ['tendo] adj нежный
stick [stik] n палка, трость tenderly ['tendali] adv нежно
stiff [stif] «4/жесткий terrace ['teras] « терраса
sting (stung) [stiiy] ([StAFj]) v колоть thicket ['Gikit] « чаша
store [sto:] n запас, резерв thigh [9ai] « бедро
stream [stri:m] n поток thirsty ['0a:sti] «4/томимый жаждой
stretch out ['stretf'aut] v протягивать thistle [0isl] « чертополох
stringed [stripd] adj струнный (об thorn [0o:n] « шип, колючка
инструменте) thoughtful [ 0o:tful] adj заботливый
stripe [straip] n плеть threshold ['0rejhould] « порог
subtle ['sAtl] adj искусный throne [0roun] « трон
suffer [Wo] v страдать throw (th rew , throw n) (a t) [0rou]
sufficient [so'fijont] «^достаточный ([0ru:], [0roun]) v кидать, бросать
sulk [sxlk] v дуться, быть сердитым (в)

188
tidy ['taidi] adj опрятный veil [veil] я вуаль, покрывало
tiger I'taigsj n ти ф vein [vein] я вена
timid I'timid] adj застенчивый velvet ['velvitj adj вельветовый, бар­
tinkle [tigkl] я звон колокольчика хатный
tiny ['taini] adj маленький, крошеч­ v essel ['vesl] я судно
ный vessel ['vesl] я сосуд
tire [Чаю] v утомляться, уставать vice [vais] я порок, зло
tissue ['tijju:] n ткань vile [vad] adj подлый, низкий
toad [toudj n жаба villager ['vilidjo] я житель селения
tomb [tu:m] n могила с надгробием vinedresser |'vamdreso| я винофадарь
torch [to:tfl я факел violence ['vatolons] я насилие, жес­
torrent ['brant] я стремительный токость
поток, водопад violet ['vaiolit] я фиалка
tortoise [4o:tos] я черепаха violin [vaio'lin] я скрипка
toss [tos] v бросать, кидать viper ['vaipo[ я гадюка; змея, веро­
tower [tauo] п башня ломный человек
track [traek] я след virtue I'vsitjuc] я добродетель
trail [trerl] я след, тропа vulgar [Чл1дэ[ adj грубый, вульгарный
trap [traep] я силок
tread (on) [tred] v ступать, шагать W
treasure [Чгезэ] я сокровище
trifle (w ith) [traifl] v шутить waddle jwodl| я походка вперевалку
Triton ['traitn] я миф. тритон wage [weidj] я зарплата
triumph ['traiamf] я триумф w aist [weist] я талия
troop ['trulp] я отряд, группа людей w allet ['wolit] я кошелек
trumpet [ЧглтрИ] я труба wander off ['wondo 'of] v скитаться
trunk [trArjk] я ствол дерева watchman ['wat/man] я ночной сто­
tulip ]'tju:lip] я тюльпан рож, караульный
tunic ['tjunikj я туника water-rat I'woitonet] я водяная крыса
turban [Чэ:Ьэп] я тюрбан weakly ['wi:kli] adj хилый, болезнен­
turtledove [4o:tldxv] я горлинка ный
twig [twig] я ветка w e a r (w o r e , w o r n ) [wee] ([wo:],
twilight ['twailait] я сумерки [wo:n]) v носить
twinkle [twir)kl| v мерцать, сверкать weary ['weon] adj уставший, утом­
twitter [4wito] v щебетать, чирикать ленный
w eathercock f'wedokok] я флюгер
U weaver ['wi:vo] я ткач, ткачиха
web [web] я перепонка
ugliness ['Aglinis] я уродство weep (wept) [wi:p] ([wept]) v плакать,
ugly ['лдЬ] adj уродливый рыдать
weigh [wei] v взвешивать
у well [wel] я колодец
well-bred ['wel'bred] adj благовоспи­
valley I'vseli] я долина танный

189
w ell-built ['wel'bilt] adj хорошо сло­ wise [waiz] «<# мудрый
женный witch [witj] n ведьма
wet (w ith) |wetj v оросить w itchery ['witjari] n колдовство
whale |weil | n кит w ith er ['wida] v вянуть, сохнуть,
wheel | wi:l] n колесо блекнуть
w heel-spoke |'wi:lspouk] n спица ко­ w oodcutter ]'wud,kAta| n лесоруб
леса woodpecker ['wud,peka| n дятел
wheelbarrow ]'wi:l,baeroii| n тачка wool [wul] n шерсть
whip |wip| v хлестать, сечь woolly ['wuli| adj покрытый шерстью
whirl [wa:l] v вертеться, кружиться worm |wa:m] n червяк
whisker [wiska] n бакенбард(ы); усы worn [wa:n] adj усталый, измучен­
whisper [wispa] v шептать ный
whistle |wisl| v свистеть worship ['waifip] v обожать, бого­
wicked I'wikid] adj нехороший, без­ творить
нравственный worshipper [wa:Jipa] /; обожатель
wicket ['wikit] n калитка, ворота wound [wu:nd] n рана
wilful ('wilful] своенравный wrap [гаер] v закутать, завернуть
willow I'wilou] n ива wrath [гаев] n гнев
wind [wind] n ветер; v проветривать wreck [rek] n крушение, гибель
wing [wig] n крыло wrist [nst] n запястье
wipe [waip] v вытирать wrought [ra:t] adj расшитый
wisdom ['wizdam] n мудрость
Contents

Oscar W ild e ...................................................................................................... 3

The Happy P r in c e .......................................................................................... 5


Commentary......................................................................................... 13
Exercises................................................................................................ 14

The Nightingale and the R o se ...................................................................22


Commentary...........................................................................................27
Exercises................................................................................................. 28

The Selfish G ia n t.......................................................................................... 33


Commentary...........................................................................................37
Exercises................................................................................................. 37

The Devoted F rien d ..................................................................................... 43


Commentary...........................................................................................53
Exercises................................................................................................. 53

The Remarkable R o c k e t............................................................................. 60


Commentary...........................................................................................70
Exercises................................................................................................. 71

The S ta r-C h ild ..............................................................................................78


Commentary.......................................................................................... 92
Exercises................................................................................................. 94

The Birthday of the I n f a n ta ................................................................. 100


Commentary......................................................................................... 111
Exercises................................................................................................112

The Young K ing......................................................................................... 121


Commentary.........................................................................................131
Exercises............................................................................................... 132

The Fisherman and the S o u l................................................................... 141


Commentary.........................................................................................165
Exercises................................................................................................166

V ocabulary......................................................................................................176

191
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Учебное издание
Уайльд Оскар
СКАЗКИ
Адаптация текста, упражнения, словарь Л. В. Холхоевой
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When we first meet fairy
tales by Oscar Wilde, Beginner
we read them for the marvel
of the story only. Elementary
But the more we read them,
Для начинающих
the more we can see the philosophy
that the author poured into them.
Sad and thoughtful, entertaining
and full o f bright fantasy,
O. Wilde'S fairy tales can help
make learning English
really thrilling.
Intermediate

9785811228010

9785811 228010

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