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CELEBRATION MINISTRIES INTERNATIONAL

(For discussion)
`

FIVE YEAR (2011 – 2015) STRATEGIC PLAN

Watering The Lords Garden

celebrationcentre@gmail.com

P.O BOX 31O

KUMI
Forward

As a public servant over ten years ago, I felt something was missing in my life. That something was big. It
had a voice. It had power. So Great was this Power that I had to take time to seek the source of this Power.

As I prayed and fasted, I heard a Voice instructing me to “Get out and claim My Harvest”. Who am I to resist
such a divine calling? I am only the smallest of His servants, not worthy to take up this responsibility. His
responsibility.

Through the Lord’s Mighty guidance, that harvest is being reaped. I share the Holy Word every day. I have
embraced leadership in this direction. Celebration Ministries International is the vehicle the Lord has provided for
me to “claim His harvest”. He has blessed me with a strong team. Thank you Lord

This 5 year (2011 -2015) is our combined prayer to the Lord to enable us claim His Harvest.

In His Mighty Name, I welcome you into this Harvest calling.

Apostle Richard Esolu.


Overseer Celebration Ministries International

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Forward.........................................................................................................................................................................................................................i
TABLE OF CONTENTS.............................................................................................................................................................................................ii
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY..........................................................................................................................................................................................v
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................................................................................................6
1.1 Uganda Country Background.................................................................................................................................................................................6
1.2 CMI Background....................................................................................................................................................................................................6
1.3 Identity: CMI is a Christian focused non-governmental organisation that works to uplift needy children, women, orphans and other
vulnerable persons........................................................................................................................................................................................................6
1.4 Vision: A society where the values and principles of Jesus Christ are a basis for transformation........................................................................6
1.5 Mission: To constantly use the spiritual and moral guidance of our Lord Jesus Christ to transform Society.......................................................6
1.6 Values: CMI is driven by the following values and beliefs. .................................................................................................................................6
1.7 Basis for this 5 - Year Strategic (Watering The Lord’s Garden)...........................................................................................................................7
CHAPTER 2: SITUATION ANALYSIS.....................................................................................................................................................................7
2.1 CMI Organisational Context: This section highlights main achievements of CMI as well and its strengths and challenges...............................7
2.1.1 Past Achievements...............................................................................................................................................................................................7
2.1.2 Strengths..............................................................................................................................................................................................................7
2.1.3 Challenges...........................................................................................................................................................................................................8
2.2 Contextual Analysis................................................................................................................................................................................................8
2.2.1 Current Political Situation...................................................................................................................................................................................8
2.2.2 Economic Situation and Issues............................................................................................................................................................................9
2.2.3 Social-Cultural ....................................................................................................................................................................................................9
On access to development technology: The level of technological development in Uganda is generally quite low with rudimentary technology
dominating the largest part of the production process. Agricultural technology is dominated by basic hand-hoe technology due in part to farmers’
high levels of poverty and their focus on subsistence. Most farmers do not have access to high-yielding seeds and other forms of agricultural
inputs. The post-harvest technology or handling is very poor and explains why most exports, such as coffee and cotton, are exported in raw
material form. Tariff and non-tariff barriers in developed countries constrain Uganda‘s access to international markets at reasonable prices.......10
On environmental issues: The advent of wetland rice cultivation and burning of clay bricks, in or near swamps, are two most environmentally
destructive economic activities that have made Kumi the district with the least biomass cover in Uganda. Urgent action needs to be done
otherwise the district is fast becoming a desert. ........................................................................................................................................................10
CHAPTER 3: STRATEGIC FOCUS.........................................................................................................................................................................10
3.1 Strategic Objectives.............................................................................................................................................................................................11
3.2 Strategies .............................................................................................................................................................................................................11
3.3 Programming Area...............................................................................................................................................................................................11
3.4 Strategic Outcomes, Outputs and Actions............................................................................................................................................................11

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3.4.1 CPD Strategic Outcomes, Outputs and Actions ...............................................................................................................................................12
3.4.2 Health Strategic Outcomes, Actions and Outputs.............................................................................................................................................14
3.4.3 CMIPS Strategic Outcomes, Actions and Outputs............................................................................................................................................16
3.4.4 Administration Strategic Outcomes, Actions and Outputs................................................................................................................................18
CHAPTER 4: FINANCIAL PLAN............................................................................................................................................................................20
CHAPTER 5: COORDINATION AND MANAGEMENT.......................................................................................................................................21
Appendix 2: Strategic Plan Matrix for Health Department........................................................................................................................................27
Appendix 3: Strategic Plan Matrix for CMIPS..........................................................................................................................................................31
Appendix 4: Strategic Plan Matrix for Administration..............................................................................................................................................34
Appendix 5: Logical Framework for CMI Child Care Department (2015 – 2013)...................................................................................................38
Appendix 6: Logical Framework for CMI Health Department (2009 – 2013)..........................................................................................................48
Appendix 7: Logical Framework for CMI Joshua Primary School (2011 – 2015)....................................................................................................56
Appendix 8: Logical Framework for CMI Administration (2009 – 2013)................................................................................................................63

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ABBREVIATIONS

AIDS : Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome


ASRH : Adolescent Sexual Reproductive Health
ARV : Antiretroviral Drugs
CPD : Child Care Department
HIV : Human Immunodeficiency Virus
HMIS : Health Management Information Systems
ICT : Information Communication Technologies
IGA : Income-Generating Activity
M&E : Monitoring and Evaluation
MDG : Millennium Development Goals
MOU : Memorandum of Understanding
NGO : Non-Governmental Organisation
OVC : Orphans and Vulnerable Children
PEAP : Poverty Eradication Action Plan
PHC : Primary Health Care
PLE : Primary Leaving Examination
PLWA : People Living with HIV/AIDS
PMTCT : Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV/AIDS
PTA : Parent -Teacher Association
SMC : School Management Committee
TBA : Traditional Birth Attendant
UBOS : Uganda Bureau of Statistics
UGX : Uganda Shillings
UN : United Nations
UNDP : United Nations Development Program
UNEPI : Uganda National Expanded Program for Immunisation
UNHS : Uganda National Household Survey
UPE : Universal Primary Education
USD : United States Dollars

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The CMI management has developed a five-year strategic plan in order to provide the organisation with long-term direction
and improve its sustainability. Here we have presented the context in which CMI operates. Included is also the analysis of
operating environment in Uganda (i.e. politically, economically, socially among others).
For the period 2011 to 2015, CMI strategic foci are:
i) Children from poor families access to quality basic quality education that can make them self –reliant and productive
citizens (CPD & CMIPS)
ii) Promoting healthy living among disadvantaged communities (CMIHC)
iii) Spiritual and moral guidance and counselling for disadvantaged communities (CMISG)
iv) Realising an effective, efficient, productive, financially stable and accountable CMI (REAP).
The Key result areas for each of the CMI Strategic Programmes are:
• CPD & CMIPS: establishing a scholarship fund for sponsored children, improving psycho-social and spiritual support
for children, establishing a child sponsorship unit in CMI, assisting families in starting IGAs and starting a departmental
IGA. CMIPS Primary School plans to accomplish the following: acquire land for and constructing CMIPS, licensing and
registering the school, implementing a computerized system for data collection, purchasing a school vehicle, creating a
computerized question bank, introducing a health education program, introducing co-curricular activities, building
strong relationships with parents and guardians of children.
Promoting healthy living among disadvantaged communities through CMIHC: Completing construction of CMI
Church and allocating a section for a Health Centre that offers diagnostic and clinical services.
• The Administratively through the REAP intervention, CMI plans to: Source for major partners, recruiting staff
where they do exist, build an administration building, purchasing land for a bigger CMI Centre, acquire a generator and
establish management information system.
• The CMI spiritual and moral guidance programme (CMISG) will involve training of pastors; home based counselling,
holding spiritual outreaches, participating in joint pastors’ meetings and developing appropriate spiritual guidance
literature.
Overall and cutting across all the four Strategic Programme Areas (SPA) of CMI, will be a system of monitoring and evaluation
of the implementation of the activities of the Strategic Plan with a view to effective, efficient and timely service delivery.
This Strategic Plan will be implemented by CMI Management Team, composed of The Overseer, Director of
Development, Four Programme Heads and Accountant. They will be supervised and guided by CMI Executive
Committee.

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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION

1.1 Uganda Country Background


Whereas Uganda has made significant improvements in terms of HIV/AIDS, other indicators of development are still
unacceptable low. For example, the national per capita income is USD 310 (with a very huge disparity between the poor and
the rich); the national life expectancy is 49 years; it is has the highest population growth rate in Africa standing at 3.2; over
85% of the households live in rural areas with over 80% of the working population deriving their livelihoods from farming
activities.1Faced with these challenges, CMI initiated social, economic and spiritual programmes to support the most
vulnerable people in Uganda.
CMI focus is northern and eastern Uganda which is just emerging from the ravages of more than 10 years of war. It is
anticipated that CMI will in the next 5 years have spiritual and socio-economic development programmes in the entire
country as well as in South Sudan, where invitations are being made. CMI will prayerfully and carefully answer to this calling,
all with the guidance of Almighty Lord.

1.2 CMI Background


Celebration Ministries International (CMI) is a charitable, indigenous, non-government organisation located in Kumi Town
Council of Kumi district in north eastern Uganda. CMI was founded in 1990 by Apostle Richard Esolu after he resigned from
public upon a divine calling from the Lord. Through the guidance of the Lord CMI is steadily growing in spiritual empowerment
as well as embracing several aspects of human development for the needy and disadvantaged in society. CMI is registered
with the National NGO registration Committee Certificate Registration. No. S5914/7180).
1.3 Identity: CMI is a Christian focused non-governmental organisation that works to uplift needy children, women, orphans
and other vulnerable persons.
1.4 Vision: A society where the values and principles of Jesus Christ are a basis for transformation.
1.5 Mission: To constantly use the spiritual and moral guidance of our Lord Jesus Christ to transform Society.
1.6 Values: CMI is driven by the following values and beliefs.
• The Bible and Jesus Christ as The Word and Inspiration: The Bible’s principles and the teachings of our Lord
Jesus Christ are the foundation for all CMI work.
• Team work: As team guided by Jesus Christ, we shall win.
• Mutual respect. Respect of another as we reap the benefits of Christ’s love.
• Empathy. CMI joins in the need, depravity and suffering of needy and disadvantaged persons and communities.
• Tolerance: CMI believes tolerance is the key to protecting diversity for humankind.

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MFPED (2006) Poverty Status Report
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• Results-oriented performance: CMI strives to make a lasting, positive impact in the lives of people in its target
groups.
• Respect of diversity. The Almighty Lord created us many different
1.7 Basis for this 5 - Year Strategic (Watering The Lord’s Garden)
From CMI’s humble start, this Strategic Plan named Watering The Lord’s Garden is the first step towards long-term
strategic programming aimed at programming sustainability.
The CMI long-term strategy or strategic plan is developed to:
i) Provide long-term direction to the management within the Ministry for improved results.
ii) Improve organisational (financial and programme) sustainability of Celebration Ministries International.

CHAPTER 2: SITUATION ANALYSIS


2.1 CMI Organisational Context: This section highlights main achievements of CMI as well and its strengths and
challenges.
2.1.1 Past Achievements
Since its founding CMI has successfully accomplished the following:
• Child sponsorship, 10 children are under sponsorship from baby class or nursery to senior four. This funding is coming from
Celebration Centre New Zealand.
• Land was acquired in Kumi Town Council on which a building is at roofing level to house CMI Church, Administration Unit
and Health Centre.
• Land was acquired for the construction of CMI Church in Akibui-Otipe Parish in Kumi Sub County.
• More than 20 radio programmes are run every year focussing on spiritual guidance and family counselling. .
• CMI has got 13 churches and the number is growing. They are distributed as follows: In Soroti district (Soroti town, Kelim
and Acuna churches); In Kaberamaido (Apapai, Otuboi, Lwala and Abarikole churches); In Kumi district (Kumi town council,
Akibui-Otipe, Omerein, Kakures and Ogooma churches) and in Bukedea district (Malera church).

2.1.2 Strengths
• The Overseer of CMI, Apostle Richard Esolu is a leading elder of Christians in Eastern and Northern Uganda. He provides a
lot of Christian support to Pastors and Christians of ministries. This has endeared CMI to a lot of Christians and friends.
Therefore there is a lot of goodwill from among fellow Christian Ministry Leaders and Christians.
• Executive Committee of CMI is very committed, hardworking and spirit led.
• The Director of Development of CMI has a calling to serve the disadvantaged, highly skilled and committed.
• As a Christian-based organisation, CMI uses Christian principles and values to guide all of its activities.

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• The organisation adheres to national legal regulations, such as registration with the National NGO Board.
• CMI has an increasing number of children under sponsorship. CMI supports needy children through meeting their education,
medical care and food needs. In this way, CMI assists the government of Uganda in filling fundamental gaps in
governmental service delivery in education and medical care.
• CMI is located and headquartered in Kumi town, a post-conflict trading centre which enables it to meet the needs to post
conflict and traumatised societies. CMI is not a city Ministry that is divorced from the needs of the poor. Yet this location is
strategic and easily accessible to both development partners and needy communities.
• At community level CMI has 11 strong churches that are located as enumerated in 2.1.1 above.
• CMI works closely with and is very transparent to our partners. CMI is grateful to Celebration Centre of New Zealand.
• The Christians generate about 5% of the current funding of CMI. This is a huge commitment considering that the people are
just emerging from ravages of war and depravity.
2.1.3 Challenges
CMI has the following challenges. All the challenges are associated with a growing organisation that has got part resources
but is missing the financial means to develop these resources. It is our belief that God will provide for these needs:
• The current CMI Church building in Kumi town is incomplete (is at roofing level). When complete, this building will house not
only the CMI Church but also serve administrative functions. The completion of the Church is threatened because CMI’s
from friends from New Zealand, Christchurch, were hit by a devastating earthquake in February 2011. Their Church is New
Zealand was the epicentre of the earthquake. Funding from these partners is likely to be threatened as their efforts will be
focussed on rebuilding their Church and homes. We pray that God gives them strength and resources to do this.
• CMI’s low Church collections are not enabling the completion of permanent worship places even though Christians have
contributed more than 3 different pieces of land to erect churches.
• As the CMI grows, there is likely to be a challenge of trained staff to man the various planned programmes.
• CMI does not have a portable public address system, tent and chairs to enable Christian outreach.
• CMI does not have electronic communication systems like computers, printers and modem to enable quick and timely
interaction with friends, well-wishers, partners and Christians.
2.2 Contextual Analysis
The contextual analysis presents a snapshot of key country-wide trends which highlight opportunities and threats that are
relevant to CMI. The analysis covers five categories: political, economic, socio-cultural, technological and environmental
factors and trends. A glance at child poverty in Uganda is also presented to conclude the summary of the external context in
which CMI development efforts take place.

2.2.1 Current Political Situation


Uganda is one of the few countries in sub Saharan Africa that has put in place viable policies, laws and systems to protect the
poor. For instance The Constitution of Republic Uganda 1995, The Children Statute 1995, policies on orphans and vulnerable
children, the affirmative action for women and the 2010 National Development Plan, all pronounce clearly the rights to be
enjoyed by children, women, victims of war and other vulnerable persons on the community. However, the enforcement of
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these laws and policies is very limited. For example, Kumi district ranks top most in child marriages in the whole country.
Besides, less than 1% of the women in Kumi own titled land! Furthermore, if 100 girls entered primary school education by
the time the complete primary school, 90 will have dropped out due several reasons, including lack of scholastic materials,
poor sanitary facilities in schools and lack of personal sanitary effects. CMI seeks to feel this gap through this 5 –Year
Strategic Plan. This situation must be reversed.

2.2.2 Economic Situation and Issues


The places where CMI operates namely Northern and Eastern Uganda are the poorest regions in the country as indicated by
the proportion of the population living on less than one dollar a day, 60.7% and 35.9%, respectively. 2 Famine is a cyclic
occurrence every three years. This is militating against the economic development of region and its people.
2.2.3 Social-Cultural
The socio-cultural situation is divided into the following sectors: education, health and other social indicators:

On Education: Uganda was one of the first countries in sub Saharan Africa to implement universal primary and secondary
education. There are serious downsides to this programme. Firstly, ‘universal’ education is not free. Children continue to pay
for scholastic materials whose cost is far greater than tuition. Whereas, the rate of tuition, officially, is about US$ 7 per child
for a 3-months school term, there are other needs to be met by child. For example, scholastic materials and clothing cost at
least US$20 per child per term. Most post-war families cannot get this many even for a whole year. Yet such families have at
least 6 children each. In addition, classrooms and desks are very few compared to the increased enrolment associated with
universal primary and secondary education (from 2.7 million to over 8 million pupils). Additionally classes are overcrowded
with one teacher handling at least 100 pupils. Uganda has in effect become a nation of private schools for those who can
afford at least US$141 per child perm! There is no way an average household can ever afford these fees in northern and
eastern Uganda. This has led to a high wastage rate from primary to post-primary of over 30% (officially). This means that at
least 30% of the pupils that sit for primary leaving exams do not continue with any other form of formal education. 3 CMI
believes that these figures are unrealistically low. The actual wastage rate could be is higher, in northern and eastern
Uganda. CMI hopes to maintain children at school through a systematic sponsorship programme and vocational training.

On Health: On 8th March 20114, President Museveni admitted that Uganda’s child and maternal mortality rates were still
unacceptably high standing at 88 deaths per 1000 live births, (more than twice the MDG benchmark of 41), while child
mortality rate, which stands at 152 per 1000, (2.5 times higher than MDG target of 60). Additionally, the maternal mortality
rate, which stands at 434, is almost five times higher than the MDG target. This was an admission that Uganda will not meet
the MDG health-related targets sets. For the proportion of one year-old children immunised against common preventable
diseases that affect children is 56.8% compared to the national target of 90% while the national per capita health
expenditure is USD 10, three times less than the MDG target of USD 30. The other sad health indicators that CMI will
contribute to improving are:
2
UBOS (2006) National Integrated Household Survey Results – Economic Module
3
Y K Museveni (June,8 2007) State of the Nation Address as published in the Daily Monitor
4
Y K Museveni ( March,8 2011) Address to celebrants of International Women’s Day at Kololo Airstrip
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• Rural disease prevalence of 42%. Malaria is the most common illness and is reported among more than 50% of households.
Sadly, only 17% of households are reported to be using mosquito nets.5
• Whereas the national HIV/AIDS sero-status dropped from 18% to 7.1%6 in 1990 to 2005, this rate is on the rise as HIV/AIDS
is receiving increasingly less funding particularly for community education activities. Whereas there are already more than
one million orphans as a result of loss of their parents to HIV/AIDS, a possible rise in infection is a serious likelihood.
Uganda has got the highest national population growth rate is 3.2%. This places a lot of burden on the existing resources.
Water coverage in the areas where CMI has been working is 54.6%. While this rate is slightly higher than the regional
average, it is significantly lower than the national average of is 68%. This implies that a sizeable 32.4% of households have
no access to clean water. Sanitation indicators show that over 84% of households have a safe means of waste disposal while
a sizeable 16% use the bush or have no toilets. This is a source of diseases, such as typhoid, intestinal worms, cholera and
diarrhoea. These diseases are reported to be common in Kumi and Kumi sub counties in Mbale district.
On access to development technology: The level of technological development in Uganda is generally quite low with
rudimentary technology dominating the largest part of the production process. Agricultural technology is dominated by
basic hand-hoe technology due in part to farmers’ high levels of poverty and their focus on subsistence. Most farmers do
not have access to high-yielding seeds and other forms of agricultural inputs. The post-harvest technology or handling is
very poor and explains why most exports, such as coffee and cotton, are exported in raw material form. Tariff and non-
tariff barriers in developed countries constrain Uganda‘s access to international markets at reasonable prices.
ICT and radio coverage: The information communication technology (ICT) is growing rapidly and currently over 4.5 million
Ugandans subscribe to cellular phone services. The internet is available in most of the urban centres in Eastern Uganda at an
affordable cost for working or middle class Ugandans. However, those who are poor and/or live in rural areas are excluded
from the information and communication revolution. The FM radio is the most common and well-distributed form of
information communication technology. Almost all towns in Eastern Uganda have access to at least one FM radio station. The
advent of ICTs presents both opportunities and threats for CMI. The ICT can provide CMI with opportunities to reach a sizeable
section of the population on different issues and communicate more easily with partners and supporters. However, ICT can
also be a threat as it may promote moral degeneration through forms such as pornography.
On environmental issues: The advent of wetland rice cultivation and burning of clay bricks, in or near swamps, are two
most environmentally destructive economic activities that have made Kumi the district with the least biomass cover in
Uganda. Urgent action needs to be done otherwise the district is fast becoming a desert.

CHAPTER 3: STRATEGIC FOCUS


Arising from the above, CMI will pursue the following strategic objectives in the next five years. These four strategic
objectives will guide programming and planning in executing CMI’s mandate and contributing to its vision.

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UBOS (2006) National Integrated Household Survey
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MOH (2005) Sero-Survey
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3.1 Strategic Objectives
Celebration Ministries International shall focus on four strategic objectives in the next five years. These are:
i. Children from poor families access to quality basic quality education that can make them self –reliant and
productive citizens (CPD & CMIPS)
ii. Promoting healthy living among disadvantaged communities (CMIHC)
iii. Spiritual and moral guidance and counselling for disadvantaged communities (CMISG)
iv. Realising an effective, efficient, accountable and productive. CMI (REAP).
3.2 Strategies
The main strategies in executing CMI’s mandate will include child sponsorship, economic empowerment, provision of health
services provision of primary education, and organisational development. In summary, each of these strategies entails the
following:
i. Child sponsorship: Child sponsorship will entail enabling children to access various levels of education by providing
school fees, scholastic materials and services, spiritual and psychological support and counselling, and welfare
assistance when necessary.
ii. Primary Education: CMI will continue to directly provide high-quality primary education to local children through the
Joshua Primary School.
iii. Economic empowerment: In order to make the CMI intervention sustainable, economic empowerment includes
supporting families with vulnerable children to start income-generating activities is proposed. This strategy will enable
families to contribute towards meeting part of the basic needs of their children.
iv. Health Service Provision: This will involve provision of clinic medical services, including diagnostic/testing services,
inpatient and outpatient treatment, maternity and antenatal care, family planning services, and immunisation. It will
also involve community health services, including health education, sexual and reproductive health services,
traditional birth attendants, immunisation outreaches, oversight of and collaboration with Popular Opinion Leaders and
distribution of anti-malaria treatment and prevention materials in communities.
v. Organisational development: A visible contribution towards development is made by strong, sustainable, learning
organisations. A variety of strategies to enhance CMI’s organisational strength, sustainability, and learning capacity are
proposed in order to build the institutional capacity of CMI effectively and efficiently deliver her programmes.
3.3 Programming Area
CMI will focus on: improving access to and quality of basic education, improving community health, supporting community
economic empowerment and strengthening the capacity of CMI departments to deliver services to the Christians and
community. The target community will be from eastern and northern Uganda..

3.4 Strategic Outcomes, Outputs and Actions


Within the framework of the strategic plan, various strategic activities have been proposed towards delivering stated outputs
which will be translated into planned short-term and long-term results. A summary of short-term outcomes, key activities
and planned outputs for each strategic objective or department is presented below while the details of the different planned
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outputs, activities, responsible person and time frame for each action per department or strategic objective are contained in
the Strategic Plan Matrices and the Logical Frameworks.
3.4.1 CPD Strategic Outcomes, Outputs and Actions
Goal: Children from poor families access basic quality education that can enable them to realize their full social
and economic potential.
Specific Outputs Activities
Outcomes
1. Educated 1.1 Approximately seven hundred 1.1.1 Recruit more children for sponsorship
and (1,000) children sponsored 1.1.2 Lobby with and for more sponsors
empowered cumulatively over 5 years.
children able 1.2 Scholarship funds established for 1.2.1 Establish a scholarship fund
to contribute sponsored students to attend 1.2.2 Fundraise for the scholarship fund
to their own tertiary school and/or university
development, 1.3 Expanded welfare support to 1,000 1.3.1 Establish a welfare pool
the sponsored children to cover basic 1.3.2 Fundraise for the welfare pool
community needs
and the 1.4 A centre established in Kumi all 1.4.1 Fundraise for construction and maintenance costs of a centre in
country sponsorship activities Kumi sponsorship centre
1.4.2 Recruit Field Officers who are willing to live in the areas where
they work
2. Improved 2.1. Every child receives one-on-one 2.1.1 Recruit and hire a facilitator with counselling skills
psycho-social counselling at home and at the 2.1.2 Support the facilitators to conduct counselling services
support for office.
sponsored 2.2 Every child attends a group career 2.2.1 Recruit and hire a facilitator with counselling skills
children and guidance session three times per 2.2.2 Support the facilitator to conduct counselling services
CPD alumni year
2.3 Each child visited at home by Field 2.3.1 Hire Field Officers
Officers at least once a term 2.3.2 Train and closely supervise Field Officers to ensure that they
understand their responsibilities and are fulfilling them
2.4 All children are visited by Field 2.4.1 Hire additional Field Officers
Officers at hostels and schools for 2.4.2 Train and closely supervise Field Officers to ensure that they
follow-up at least once per quarter understand their responsibilities and are fulfilling them
2.5 Counselling out of school children – 2.5.1 Support the facilitator to conduct counselling services
drop outs
2.6 Association for CPD alumni, which 2.6.1 Contact CPD alumni and establish an alumni network
will provide networking and support 2.6.2 Recruit alumni to mobilize/organize the alumni network
opportunities, started/overseen by 2.6.3 Encourage alumni to network for jobs and sponsor children
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Specific Outputs Activities
Outcomes
2.6.4 Designate a CMI staff member to oversee alumni association
CMI
2.7 Alumni matched with sponsored 2.7.1 CMI staff to oversee matches between CPD alumni and
children for mentoring and peer sponsored children
counselling
3. Families 3.1 Between 80 and 100 families 3.1.1 Train and supervise families in income-generating activities
and assisted in starting various income-
communities generating activities
are 3.2 Guardian associations established 3.2.1 Field Officers to gauge interest in a guardian association when
empowered in 5 areas visiting children
economically 3.2.2 Establish which guardians and community leaders have best
to meet leadership and childrearing skills and recruit them to lead
children’s associations
basic needs 3.2.3 Recruit guardian/community leaders to mobilize and organize
guardian associations
3.3 Meetings with guardians and 3.3.1 CPD staff to plan for quarterly meetings with guardians and
community leaders held quarterly community leaders
(for a total of 20 meetings) to 3.3.2 Talk to guardians more when CPD staff visits children at home
discuss challenges and the way
forward
4. Spiritually 4.1 Ten biannual Christian conferences 4.1.1 Organize and fundraise for Christian conferences
supported and held
developed 4.2 Fifty (50) Pastors certified and 4.2.1 Identify the churches which children attend
children trained to assist CMI in spiritual and 4.2.2 Research, interview and approve Pastors who are fit to work
moral work with CPD children
4.2.3 Develop a training programme. Train approved Pastors on how
to care for children and on the spiritual guidance we want them to
provide
5. Improved 5.1 Current photographs of all 5.1.1 Take photos of children at their homes and at events and share
program sponsored children provided to with partners
administration partners once/ twice a year
, management 5.2 One hundred per cent of gifts 5.2.1 Gifts and Welfare Committee to oversee distribution of gifts at
and handed to children quarterly and the end of each quarter.
sustainability reported to partners Gift distribution reported to partners
5.3 Annual updates provided to 5.3.1 Create a more efficient way of collecting, organizing and
partners on each child distributing information about sponsored children to their
sponsors
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Specific Outputs Activities
Outcomes
5.4 Children’s letters sent to sponsors 5.4.1 Facilitate children to write letters to sponsors and send letters to
twice a year sponsors twice a year.
5.5 Adequate recordkeeping and an 5.5.1 Fundraise for and purchase 4 CPD computers
efficient database and registry 5.5.2 Set up a more efficient database for recording information about
established for sponsored children sponsored children
5.5.3 Keep computerized records
5.5.4 Provide staff training on computers, database, etc.
5.5.5 Establish a CPD registry and research and input information on
each child
5.6 At least 20 programs and activities 5.6.1 Identify potential partners, such as schools, churches, hostels,
held in conjunction with clinics, the district and other organisations with child-related
organisational partners programs
5.6.2 Network with organisational partners by calling, emailing,
writing and meeting with their leadership
5.8 Acquire 2 motorcycles and a field 5.8.1 Fundraise for and purchase motorcycles and vehicles (i.e.,
vehicle vehicle maintenance and petrol)

3.4.2 Health Strategic Outcomes, Actions and Outputs


Goal: Improved health status for marginalised communities to enhance their productivity.
Specific Outputs Activities
Outcomes
1. Health unit 1.1Over 5 years, healthcare provided 1.1.1 Provide health services to community members within the
providing to: catchments area
high-quality • 400,000 outpatients & 7,000
National inpatients
Minimum 300,000 maternity patients, 1,000
Healthcare. I new family planning patients,
7,000 antenatal patients & 2,000
HIV/AIDS patients
1.2 20,000 laboratory tests conducted 1.2.1 Continue to provide current diagnostic services
over 5 years 1.2.2 Introduce diagnostic services, such as cultures, blood
transfusion and white blood cell counts total with differentials
Provide medical staff with appropriate training for new services
1.4 Health Centre is stocked with 1.3.1 Obtain funding to purchase sufficient amounts of necessary
sufficient essential drugs/supplies drugs
14
Specific Outputs Activities
Outcomes
Increase budget for drugs

1.5 Health Centre is equipped with 1.4.1 Obtain funding to purchase additional supplies/equipment and
functioning, maintain equipment.
appropriate medical equipment Stock the Health Centre with necessary medical supplies
1.6Medical waste is properly disposed 1.5.1 Fundraise for and construct an incinerator
1.7New toilets provided to patients 1.6.1 Fundraise for and construct patient toilets
1.8Consistent power for clinic 1.7.1 Improve back-up system for power (i.e., solar panel unit)
activities
1.9 Ten (10) biannual monitoring 1.9.1 Produce ten (10) biannual monitoring reports
reports produced
2. Improved 2.1 Retain and provide continuous 2.1.1 Continue facilitating the POL program and collaborating with
community training and necessary supplies to AFFORD
health the following community-level 2.1.2 Provide continuous training, education, support and facilitation
services health workers: to anti-malarial service providers, homopak distributors, community
(Primary • 100 anti-malarial service educators / UNEPI immunisers and ASRH trainers
Health Care)i providers enrolled 2.1.3 Distribute medications and oversee dispensing as directed by
• 6 community educators/UNEPI district policy
immunisers 2.1.4 Continuously supervise community health programs
2.1.5 Create an association of health workers at the community level
2.2 A letter-link program established 2.2.1 Recruit a counsellor to coordinate the program
at 14 schools and 10 churches 2.2.2 Acquire and install letter boxes in 14 schools and churches
2.2.3 Peer educators and trainers to collect and answer questions
monthly
2.2.4Train staff in ASRH counselling and question answering
2.2.5 Produce, acquire and disseminate health messages and
materials
2.3 Over 5 years, immunise 7,000 2.4.1 Expanded immunisation program
children against measles, BCG,
polio, DPT/Hep B/HIB and 7,000
pregnant mothers against tetanus
2.5 Fifty two (52) weekly 2.5.1 Hold 52 weekly immunisation days per year (for a total of 260
immunisation days held per year over 5 years)
(for a total of 260 over 5 years)
2.6 Community health and 2.6.1 Facilitate community health educators/UNEPI immunisers in
15
Specific Outputs Activities
Outcomes
immunisation outreach sessions holding outreaches
held once a month at each centre 2.6.2 Produce, acquire and disseminate health messages and
(for a total of 60 sessions per materials
centre over 5 years).
2.7 Nation Immunisation Days held 2.7.1 Continue to hold National Immunisation Days
for 30 days twice per year (for a Deworm, provide vitamin A and immunise school children
total of 300 days over 5 years)
2.8 4 immunisation outreach centres 2.8.1 Identify underserved villages in the catchments area
established 2.8.2 Establish 4 new immunisation outreach centres in underserved
villages
3. Improved 3.1 USD 40,000 raised through 3.1.1 Research and apply for relevant grants
sustainability mobilizing new sources of funding 3.1.2 Lobby and network with potential partners
of the Health (such as grants) 3.1.3 Provide regular reports to partners
Centre
3.2 200 million shillings received 3.2.1 Sensitize the community about the Assurance Scheme.
through patient fees and three (4) Market the scheme
million shillings received through 3.2.2 Educate the scheme DOD in accounting and computers
the Assurance Scheme over 5 3.2.3 Construction of CMI Health Centre completed
years
3.2.4 Health professionals seconded by at least one foreign partner

3.4.3 CMIPS Strategic Outcomes, Actions and Outputs


Goal: Contribute to realisations of MDG through increased and improved access to universal primary education
Specific Outputs Activities
Outcomes
1. A complete 1.1 A complete, licensed and registered 1.1.1 Fundraise for & Construct CMIPS Boarding Primary School
and well- primary school as per national 1.1.2 Work with the district to immediately acquire license and
equipped standards registration.
primary school 1.1.3 Plan program and curriculum for Primary Seven (7)
for needy, 1.2 School is stocked with sufficient 1.2.1 Identify, fundraise for and purchase needed educational
sponsored learning materials materials
children 1.2.2 Construct and operate CMI library
operational 1.3 A large vehicle (i.e., 60-seater bus) 1.4.1 Fundraise for the vehicle.
purchased for transportation of children Write grant applications and lobby sponsors, partners and other well-
wishers to contribute

16
Specific Outputs Activities
Outcomes
3. Educated 2.1 Quality teaching based on national 2.1.1 Facilitate and support teachers
students who education standards
excel 2.2 Remedial lessons provided to slow 2.2.1 Effectively teach students in accordance with national
academically learners educations standards
and are well- 2.3 Introduction of educational trips twice 2.3.1 Plan trips that complement the curriculum.
rounded, a year 2.3.2 Purchase or rent a vehicle for educational trips. Fundraise for
spiritually petrol and other costs
developed and 2.3.3 Network with partners who could assist with educational outings
knowledgeable
2.4 Educational videos shown to students 2.4.1 Plan and acquire (rent/purchase/borrow) videos to show that will
about world
once a month to enhance learning complement the curriculum
issues
2.5 Health education program introduced 2.5.1 Network with CSOs, health department, to educate teachers and
directly to students
2.6 Enhanced CMIPS co-curricular activities 2.6.1 Network with other schools to hold joint co-curricular activities
2.6.2 Train teachers in skills necessary for co-curricular activities
2.6.3 Purchase necessary co-curricular equipment (for sports, drama)
2.6.4 Seek funding for co-curricular activities
2.7 External examinations from high-quality 2.7.1 Purchase external exams
schools given once a month 2.7.2 Network with other high-quality schools
2.8 Spiritual mutual support groups ) 2.8.1 Establish clubs in school & recruit CMIPS teachers to oversee
introduced clubs
4. Guardians/par 3.1 Meetings with parents/guardians and 3.1.1 Meet with parents/guardians to gauge their interest and mobilize
ents, CMIPS CMIPS staff held once a term them
teachers, 3.1.2 Prepare the venue, send invitations and record minutes
management
actively
develop needy
children
5. Improved 4.1 Computerized question bank and 4.1.1 Teachers to write exam questions for each class, subject and
CMIPS information management created for month/term/year for the bank
administration each class and subject for each end of 4.1.2 Train school secretary and teachers to use the question bank
and the month, term and annual exams 4.2.2 Create a database or other system for data collection
management 4.2 Relationships established with district, 4.2.3 Increase attendance at district functions and NGO networking
Ministry of Education and other local, opportunities
national and international educational 4.3.1 Lobby for increased support from the district (seconded staff,
NGOs funding)
17
3.4.4 Administration Strategic Outcomes, Actions and Outputs
Goal: An efficient, financially stable and accountable institution that is able to realize its goals
Specific Outputs Activities
Outcomes
1. Professionally 1.1 MOUs with partners that clearly 1.1.1 Open discussion around MOUs with any partner. Every to
managed NGO indicate roles, responsibilities and include a baseline amount of support pledged over a specified
with obligations of all parties’ period of time of partnership.
established 1.2 Technical and financial reports produced 1.2.1 Compile & share administrative & financial reports once
systems, regularly. each month, quarter & year
structures and 1.3 Regular communication within and 1.3.1 e-mails, intra-mail and website in place, website regularly
processes externally through Director of updated
Development’s desk 1.3.2 Encourage work parties and other visits from partners.
Ensure that visitors meet with management staff and learn
about CMI operations
1.3.3 Fundraise to support a CMI representative to visit partners
to enhance sharing
1.4 Partner feedback reports compiled at 1.4.1 Write and distribute partner feedback reports to all
least twice yearly (10 over 5 years) or as concerned
mutually agreed. 1.4.2 Compile and analyze partner feedback and respond
accordingly.
1.5 Review existing policies where 1.5.1 Review existing policies once a year
necessary
2. Financially 2.1 Income-generating activities established 2.1.1 Rent out tents, car, chair for community events
sound and and strengthened CMI. 2.1.2 Provide secretarial services to the community.
sustainable 2.1.3 Operate CMI internet café and services
organisation 2.2 Lobby for resources external sources 2.2.1 Attract more support from the district; lobby for seconded
(district and grant-giving organisations) staff, funding.
2.2.2 Operate according to agreements with partners
2.3 Expand funding partner profile 2.3.1 Involve spiritual visitors to CMI
2.3.2 Support Overseer and or DOD to speak and fundraise in
various places
2.3.3 If need be, operate separate accounts for different
partners.
2.4 Computerized financial accounting and 2.4.1 Purchase a new financial accounting package.
reporting system established 2.4.2 Train staff how to use the financial accounting package.
3.2 Regular organisational evaluations 3.2.1 Based on the learning system, conduct regular
conducted and reports produced based organisational evaluations and write evaluation reports
18
Specific Outputs Activities
Outcomes
on learning system

3.3 Organisation-wide learning sessions 3.3.1 Hold learning sessions to address gaps identified in
held to address identified gaps evaluations
3. 4.1 Recruit additional staff members (5- 4.1.1 Recruit additional, well-trained staff to fill necessary
Sufficient/appr Administration, 5-CPD, 4-CMIPS, 14- positions in all departments
opriate, well- Health Department) 4.1.2 Fundraise for additional salaries and include them in the
trained and budget
motivated staff 4.2 Staff are adequately supported and 4.2.1 Fundraise for capacity development of staff and spiritual
trained in relevant areas leaders
4.2.2 Improve support supervision programs
4.2.3 Support all staff’s spiritual growth by involving spiritual
leaders periodically
4.3 Staff remunerated according to clear 4.3.1 Develop a progressive salary scale and budget for it.
pay structure
4.4 Improved benefits for staff 4.4.1Develop a Human Resource Manual and use it to guide HR
operations
4.4.2 Fundraise to meet costs of additional staff benefits
5. Equipped 5.1 Administration building available 5.1.1 Fundraise for administration building completion &
with expansion (construction, furniture and materials).
appropriate 5.2 Adequate organisational transportation 5.2.1 Hire two additional drivers
and sufficient 5.2.2 Fundraise for motorcycles and vehicle for CMI.
facilities 5.3 An additional 20 acres of CMI land for 5.4.1 Fundraise for and purchase additional land
CMIHC & CMIPS
5.5 Consistent power 5.5.1 Fundraise for and purchase generator and a power back-up
system
6.2 Two thousand (2,000) books purchased 6.2.1 Fundraise for and purchase relevant books

3.5 Organisational Sustainability


The development of this plan has taken into consideration sustainability of CMI programmes. CMI undertakes to plan and
implement measures which will improve and maintain its sustainability, both programmatically and financially through:
• Completing current construction work at CMI Church and Health Centre,
• Expanding on the needy children’s education sponsorship programme,
• Forming an active alumni of successfully sponsored children,
19
• Running the Health Centre on a Cost recovery basis,
• Acquiring land for construction of CMIPS (Celebration Ministries International) Primary School.

CHAPTER 4: FINANCIAL PLAN

CMI 2011 -2015 Strategic Plan requires UGX 6,000,000,0000 (six billion shillings) which is US$ 3,000,000 (three million US
dollars) as summarised on table --- below.

Departm 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Total %age


ent
CPD
Health
Centre
CMIPS
Administr
ation
Total

CMI hopes to generate these funds through:


• New Zealand Partners,
• Canadian Partners,
• Government of Uganda (PHC),
• CMIHC and CMIPS Programmes ,
• Other grants which will arise during the implementation of this strategic plan.

The main strategies for raising funds include:


• Writing grant applications thus seeking grants from well-wishers.
• Charging affordable user fees on health services and school transport.

CMI Executive Committee will be responsible for prudent utilisation of financial resources while the Overseer and
Development Director shall be the accounting officers, supported by a professionally qualified accountant.

20
CHAPTER 5: COORDINATION AND MANAGEMENT
The CMI Executive Committee will oversee the implementation of the strategic plan while the management team will
undertake its actual implementation. The management team, under the leadership of the Director of Development, will plan,
execute and report to the Executive Committee and development actors on the progress and resource utilisation within the
proposed framework. The management team (MT) shall be comprised of the Overseer, Director of Development, four Heads
of Departments (CPD, Health Centre, Administration and CMIPS) and Accountant.

The MT shall develop annual plans and budgets and oversee implementation and reporting. The report to the Committee
shall be in line with quarterly and annual reports and will be prepared for accountability and approval. The management
team will also be accountable for holding annual reflections on the progress of implementing this plan.

21
APPENDICES
Appendix 1: Strategic Plan Matrix for CPD
Goal: Children from poor families access basic quality education that can enable them to realize their full social and economic
potential.
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
1. Educated and 1.1 Approximately seven hundred 1.1.1 Recruit more children into 2011 - 2015 CPD Head,
empowered (1,000) children sponsored sponsorship
children able to cumulatively over 5 years7 1.1.2 Lobby more sponsors 2011 - 2015 Director,
contribute to their 1.2 Scholarship funds established for 1.2.1 Establish a scholarship fund 2011 Director
own development, qualified sponsored students to 1.2.2 Fundraise for the scholarship fund 2011 - 2015 Director,
the community and attend tertiary school and/or
the country university
1.3 Expanded welfare support to 1,000 1.3.1 Establish a welfare pool 2011 CPD Head
sponsored children to cover basic 1.3.2 Fundraise for the welfare pool 2011-2015 Director
needs8 (fundraise)
1.4 A centre established in Kumi (with 1.4.1 Fundraise for construction and 2012 CPD Head,
a house for Field Officers and an maintenance costs of a centre in DOD
office with phone for meeting Kumi.
beneficiaries) 1.4.2 Recruit Field Officers who are 2012 DOD
willing to live where they work
2. Improved 2.1. Every child receives one-on-one 2.1.1 Recruit and hire a facilitator with 2011 DOD
psycho-social personal counselling at home and counselling skills
support for at the office, once per term. 2.1.2 Support the facilitator with her 2011-2015 Administra
sponsored children 2.2 Every child attends a group career counselling tion
and CPD alumni guidance session three times per 2.2.1 Recruit and hire a facilitator with 2011 DOD
year (once a term)—500 children counselling skills
attend sessions per year 2.2.2 Support the facilitator with her 2011-2015 Administra
counselling (Ongoing) tion, CPD
Head
7
580 children sponsored at one time at the end of 5 years
8
This includes:
a) One hundred % of sponsored children provided with mattress, blanket, bed sheet and mosquito nets
b) One hundred % of sponsored girl children provided with sufficient sanitary products and undergarments
c) Families which have been identified as especially needy (approximately 10% of sponsored children’s families) provided with
bedding, clothing, seeds during planting season and housing when necessary
22
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
2.3 Each child visited at home by Field 2.3.1 Hire additional Field Officers 2011 DOD
Officers at least once a term 2.3.2 Train and closely supervise Field 2011-2014 CPD Head,
Officers to ensure that they fulfil (Ongoing) DOD
their roles & responsibilities
2.4 All children are visited by Field 2.4.1 Hire additional Field Officers 2013 DOD
Officers at hostels and schools for 2.4.2 Train and closely supervise Field 2011-2015 CPD Head,
follow-up at least once per quarter Officers to ensure that they (Ongoing) DOD
understand their responsibilities and
are fulfilling them
2.5 Counselling for children who have 2.5.1 Support the facilitator with her 2011-2015 Administra
dropped out of school (to find out counselling (Ongoing) tion, CPD
why they have dropped out and Head
counsel them to return to school)
2.6 Association for CPD alumni, which 2.6.1 Contact CPD alumni to gauge 2011 CPD Head,
will provide networking and support interest in, inform them about and
opportunities, started/overseen by establish an alumni network
CMI 2.6.2 Recruit alumni to 2011 CPD Head,
mobilize/organize the alumni
network
2.6.3 Encourage alumni to network 2011-2015 CPD Head
2.6.4 Designate a CMI staff member to 2011 CPD Head
oversee alumni association
2.7 Alumni matched with sponsored 2.7.1 CMI staff oversees matches 2011-2015 Field staff
children for mentoring and peer between CPD alumni and sponsored (Ongoing)
counselling children
3. Families and 3.1 Between 80 and 100 families 3.1.1 Train and supervise families in 2011-2014 CPD Head,
communities are assisted in starting various income- income-generating activities
socially, generating activities9
economically and 3.2 Guardian associations established 3.2.1 Field Officers gauge interest in a 2012 All staff,
educationally in 5 areas guardian association when visiting Field
empowered to meet children officers
children’s basic 3.2.2 Ascertain which guardians and 2011 Field staff
needs community leaders have best
leadership and childrearing skills and
9
Such as poultry, piggery, goat-rearing, cow rearing, agro-forestry, and cultivating vegetables to sell
23
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
recruit them to lead associations.

3.2.3 Recruit guardian/community 2011 CPD Head,


leaders to mobilize and organize
guardian associations
3.3 Meetings with guardians and 3.3.1 CPD staff plan for quarterly 2011-2015 CPD Head
community leaders held quarterly meetings with guardians and
(for a total of 20 meetings) to community leaders
discuss challenges and the way 3.3.2 Talk to guardians more when CPD 2011-2015 Field staff
forward10 staff visits children at home

4. Spiritually 4.1 Christian conferences held twice a 4.1.1 Organize and fundraise for 2011-2015 CPD Head,
supported/develope year (for a total of 10) Christian conferences DOD
d children
4.2 Forty six (46) Pastors approved 4.2.1 Identify the church children attend 2011-2012 CPD Head
and trained to assist CMI 4.2.2 Research, interview and approve 2011-2015 CPD Head
Pastors who are fit to work with CPD
children.
4.2.3 Train approved Pastors on how to 2011-2015 CPD Head
care for children and on the spiritual
guidance we want them to provide.
Develop a training program
4.3 Ongoing Bible studies held for 4.3.1 Ask Pastors and other spiritual 2011-2015 CPD Head,
sponsored children led by Pastors leaders to lead ongoing Bible studies DOD
and CMI staff (twice weekly)
5. Improved 5.1 Current photographs of all 5.1.1 Take photos of children at their 2011-2015 All CPD
program sponsored children provided to homes and at events (such as staff
administration, sponsors once a year conferences) to send to sponsors
management and 5.2 One hundred per cent of gifts 5.2.1 Gifts and Welfare Committee 2011-2015 CPD Head,
sustainability handed to children quarterly and oversee distribution of gifts at the Welfare
reported to partners end of each quarter. Gift distribution Committee

10
Meetings would be on topics such as the importance of education, children’s rights, the benefits of BCC, guardians’ and community
members’ responsibilities and duties, how to care for children, health, hygiene, nutrition and gender issues.

24
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
reported to sponsors.

5.3 Annual updates provided to 5.3.1 Create a more efficient way of 2011-2015 CPD Head
sponsors on each child collecting, organizing and
distributing information about
sponsored children to their sponsors
5.4 Children’s letters sent to sponsors 5.4.1 Facilitate children in writing letters 2011-2015 All CPD
twice a year to sponsors twice a year. Send staff
letters to sponsors twice a year.
5.5 Adequate record keeping and an 5.5.1 Fundraise & purchase 4 2011-2015 DOD
efficient database and registry computers
established for sponsored children11 5.5.2 Set up a more efficient database 2011 CPD Head,
for recording information about Secretary
sponsored children
5.5.3 Keep computerized records 2011 Secretary
5.5.4 Provide staff training on 2011-2015 DOD
computers, database, etc.
5.5.5 Establish a CPD registry and 2011-2012 CPD Head,
research and input information on Secretary
each child
5.6 At least 20 programs and activities 5.6.1Identify potential partners, such as 2011-2015 Director
held in conjunction with schools, churches, hostels, clinics, the
organisational partners12 district and other organisations with
child-related programs
5.6.2 Network with organisational 2011-2015 CPD Head,
partners by calling, emailing, writing DOD,
and meeting with their leadership Director
5.7 One departmental income- 5.7.1 Fundraise for departmental 2011 DOD
generating activity started13 income-generating activity program
costs
11
All sponsored children and CCD alumni registered at BCC (name, year of birth, contact, family, current job/activities and village)
12
Potential partners include schools, churches, hostels, clinics, the district and other organisations with child-related programs
13
This income-generating activity could be a poultry farm, piggery project, community vegetable farm, or selling art that children make
to local vendors and community members.

25
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
5.8 Additional 3 motorcycles and a 5.8.1 Fundraise for and purchase 2011-2015 DOD
field vehicle vehicles (vehicle maintenance and
petrol)

26
Appendix 2: Strategic Plan Matrix for Health Department
Goal: Improved health status for marginalised communities within the CMI catchments area to enable community members
to live productive lives
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
1. Health unit 1.1 Over 5 years, healthcare provided 1.1.1 Provide health services to 2011-2015 In-charge
providing complete, to: community members within the
high-quality • 40,500 outpatients, 8,100 catchments area
National Minimum inpatients
Healthcare Package • 2,100 maternity patients, 1,200
for a Health Centre new family planning patients, 5,800
III14 antenatal patients
• 3,600 HIV/AIDS patients
1.2 20,500 laboratory tests15 1.2.1 Continue to provide current 2011-2015 In-
conducted over 5 years. diagnostic services (Ongoing) charge, l

1.2.2 Introduce additional diagnostic Transfusion: In-


services, such as cultures, blood 2009 charge,
transfusion and white blood cell count WBC: 2010 laborator
(WBC) total with differential. Provide Cultures: y
medical staff with appropriate 2013 technicia
training for new services. n
1.3 Health Centre is stocked with 1.3.1 Obtain funding to purchase 2011-2015 In-charge
sufficient essential drugs/supplies sufficient amounts of necessary (Ongoing)
drugs. Increase budget for drugs
1.3.2 Include ARVs in the drug stock. 2013 In-charge
Lobby district and AFFORD for ARVs
1.4 Health Centre is equipped with 1.4.1 Obtain funding to purchase 2011-2015 In-charge
functioning, appropriate medical additional supplies/ equipment and
14
Sub-outcomes:
1a) More patients accessing services (improved patient access)
1b) Higher quality medical services and quality of care provided
1c) Increase in the number of medical services provided
1d) Increase in community involvement and evaluation/monitoring of clinic activities
15
Current diagnostic (laboratory) services include blood grouping, HIV testing, syphilis testing, blood smear for malaria, TB testing,
pregnancy testing and typhoid testing. Within the next five years, the following new services will be offered: cultures, blood transfusions,
and white blood cell count, total and with differential.

27
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
equipment16 maintain equipment. Stock the Health
Centre with necessary medical
supplies
1.5 Medical waste properly disposed 1.5.1 Fundraise for and construct an 2014 In-charge
incinerator
1.6 New toilets provided to patients 1.6.1 Fundraise for and construct 2011 In-charge
patient toilets
1.7 Consistent power for clinic 1.7.1 Improve back-up system for 2015 In-charge
activities power
1.8 Completed renovation of health 1.8.1 Fundraise for and construct 2015 In-charge
unit17 expanded/renovated clinic. Purchase
new furniture.
1.9 Ten (10) biannual monitoring 1.9.1 Produce ten (10) biannual 2011-2015 In-charge
reports produced monitoring reports
2. Improved 2.1 Retain and provide continuous 2.1.1 Continue facilitating the POL 2011-2015 In-
community health training and necessary supplies to program and collaborating with (Ongoing) charge,
services (Primary the following (existing) community- AFFORD
Health Care)18 level health workers: 2.1.2 Provide continuous training, 2011-2015 In-
• 20 POLs education, support and facilitation to (Ongoing) charge,
• 53 anti-malarial service providers existing CHWs
• 49 homopak distributors 2.1.3 Distribute medications and 2011-2015 In-
• 4 community educators / UNEPI oversee dispensing as directed by ( charge,
immunisers district policy
• 9 TBAs 2.1.4 Continuously supervise 2011-2015 In-
community health programs (Ongoing) charge,
16
Equipment includes: a) Laboratory: 2 microscopes, x-ray machine, ultrasound, EKG, electric centrifuge
b) Office equipment: desks, chairs, 4 computers, 50 medical books
17
Expanded/renovated clinic facilities to include: female ward with 10 beds, male ward with 6 beds, 2 doctors’ rooms, 2 laboratories,
waiting area, dispensing room, doctors’ night quarters/HMIS room, a large store and janitor/equipment room
18
Sub-outcomes:
2a. Improve and expand Popular Opinion Leaders (POL) program, which is run with AFFORD
2b. Improve services provided by Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs)
2c. Continue working with anti-malarial service providers and homopak distributors
2d. Begin Adolescent Sexual Reproductive Health (ASRH) Program
2e. Improve immunisation outreaches
2f. Continue community health education program
28
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
2.1.5 Create an association of health 2012 In-
• 6 ASRH trainers workers at the community level charge,
2.2 The following new community-level 2.2.1 Train 11 TBAs and 1 community 2011 - 2012 In-
health workers are trained and educator / UNEPI immuniser over 5 charge,
retained: years. Train 36 ASRH peer educators Program
• 11 TBAs per year. me
• 1 community educator/ UNEPI Coordinat
immuniser or
• 36 ASRH peer educators per year
2.3 A letter link program established at 2.3.1 Recruit a counsellor to coordinate 2011 In-charge
14 schools and 10 churches19 the program
2.3.2 Acquire and install letter boxes in 2011 Program
14 schools and 10 churches me
Coordinat
or
2.3.3 Peer educators and trainers 2011-2015 Program
collect and answer questions monthly (Ongoing) me
Coordinat
or
2.3.4 Train staff in ASRH counselling 2011 In-
and question answering charge,
2.3.5 Produce, acquire and disseminate 2011-2015 In-charge
health messages and materials (Ongoing)
2.4 Over 5 years, immunise 10,500 2.4.1 Continue and expand 2011-2015 In-
children against measles, 4,500 immunisation program (Ongoing) charge,
against BCG, 5,900 against polio
and 5,900 against DPT/Hep B/HIB.
Also immunise 4,700 pregnant
mothers against tetanus.
2.5 Fifty-two (52) weekly 2.5.1 Hold 52 weekly immunisations 2011-2015 In-charge
immunisations days held per year days per year (for a total of 260 over (Ongoing)
(for a total of 260 over 5 years) 5 years)

19
The letter link program will disseminate essential sexual/reproductive health information to adolescents by enabling confidential
communication between adolescents and reproductive health providers.

29
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
2.6 Community health and 2.6.1 Facilitate community health 2011-2015 In-
immunisation outreach sessions educators/UNEPI immunisers in (Ongoing) charge,
held once a month at each centre holding outreach sessions
(for a total of 60 per centre over 5 2.6.2 Produce, acquire and disseminate 2011-2015 In-
years) health messages and materials (Ongoing) charge,
2.7 National Immunisation Days held 2.7.1 Continue to hold National 2011-2015 In-
for 30 days twice per year (for a Immunisation Days. charge,
total of 300 days in 5 years)
2.8 An additional 3 immunisation 2.8.1 Identify underserved villages in 2011-2015 In-
outreach centres established20 community charge,
2.8.2 Establish immunisation outreach 2013-2014 In-
centres in these underserved villages charge,
3. Improved 3.1 USD 25,000 raised through 3.1.1 Research and apply for relevant 2011-2015 In-
sustainability of the mobilizing new sources of funding grants charge,
Health Centre (such as grants) 3.1.2 Lobby and network with potential 2011-2015 DOD,
partners
3.1.3 Provide regular reports to 2011-2015 DOD
partners
3.2 One hundred eighty (180) million 3.2.2 Educate the scheme DOD in 2011 DOD
shillings received through patient accounting and computers.
fees and three (3) million shillings 3.3.1 Increase attendance at district 2011-2015 In-charge
received through the Assurance functions and NGO networking
Scheme over 5 years opportunities

20
This will bring the total number of BCHC immunisation outreach centres to 10.

30
Appendix 3: Strategic Plan Matrix for CMIPS
Goal: Contribute to Millennium Development Goal of achieving universal primary education
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
1. A complete and 1.1 A complete, licensed and 1.1.1 Work with the district to 2011 Head
well-equipped registered primary school as per immediately acquire license and Teacher
primary school for national standards registration
the needy, 1.1.2 Plan program and curriculum for P7 2011 Head
sponsored children Teacher
1.2 School is stocked with sufficient
1.2.1 Identify, fundraise for and 2011 DOD
learning materials21 purchase needed educational
materials
1.4 A large vehicle (60-seater bus) 1.4.1 Fundraise for the vehicle. Write 2011-2015 DOD,
purchased for transportation grant applications and lobby sponsors,
partners and other well-wishers to
contribute
2. Educated students 2.1 Quality teaching based on national 2.1.1 Effectively teach students in 2011-2015 Teachers
who excel education standards accordance with national educational (Ongoing)
academically and standards.
are well-rounded, 2.2 Remedial lessons provided to slow 2.2.1 Hold more remedial lessons and 2011-2015 Teachers
spiritually developed learners22 provide a pay increase (to be included (Ongoing)
and knowledgeable in the budget) for teachers who hold
about world issues remedial lessons
2.3 Introduction of educational trips 2.3.1 Plan trips that complement the 2011-2015 Head
twice a year curriculum teacher
2.3.2 Purchase or rent a vehicle for 2011-2015 DOD,
educational trips. Fundraise for petrol (Ongoing)
and other costs
2.3.3 Network with partners who could 2011-2015 Director,
assist with educational outings

21
Including reading books, scholastic materials and instructional materials in the following amounts:
One textbook per subject per child, 16 exercise books per child per term, 1 set per child per year, 1 ream of ruled paper per class per
term, 1 ruler per child per year, 1 reading comprehension book per child per year, 5 pencils per child per term, 3 pens per child per
term and 3 rubbers per child per year

22
Remedial lessons should be provided to the bottom 5 children from each class at a minimum.
31
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
2.4 Educational videos shown to 2.4.1 Plan and acquire 2011-2015 Head
students once a month to enhance (rent/purchase/borrow) videos to show (Ongoing) Teacher,
learning that will complement the curriculum
2.5 Health education program 2.5.1 Network with TASO, health 2011-2015 Head
introduced (health classes taught department, etc. and have (Ongoing) Teacher,
once a term) representatives provide information
(to teachers and directly to students)
2.6 Enhanced CMIPS co-curricular 2.6.1 Network with other schools to hold 2011-2015 Head
activities23 joined co-curricular activities (Ongoing) Teacher,
2.6.2 Train teachers in skills necessary 2011-2015 Head of
for co-curricular activities Dept
2.6.3 Purchase necessary co-curricular 2011-2015 Head
equipment (for sports, drama, etc.) Teacher,
2.6.4 Lobby for funding for co-curricular 2011-2015 Head
activities Teacher,
2.7 External examinations from high- 2.7.1 Purchase external exams 2011-2015 Head
quality schools given once a month Teacher,
2.7.2 Network with other high-quality 2011-2015 Head
schools Teacher
2.8 Mutual support groups introduced 2.8.1 Establish & recruit CMIPS teachers 2011-2015 DOD
to oversee clubs.
3. Guardians/parents 3.1 Meetings with parents/guardians 3.1.1 Meet with parents/guardians to 2011-2015 Head
and CMIPS teachers and CMIPS staff held once a term24 gauge their interest and mobilize them Teacher
and management
are active partners 3.1.2 Prepare the venue, send invitations 2011-2015 Head
in children’s and record minutes Teacher,
education and
development
4. Improved CMIPS 4.1 Computerized question bank 4.1.1 Teachers write exam questions for 2011-2015 Teachers
administration and created for each class and subject each class, subject and
management for each end of month, term and month/term/year for the bank

23
Accomplished through increased participation in athletic competitions, debate competitions, games and sports, music and dance (every
class competes once per term)
24
At meetings, guardians and community members will be sensitized about the importance of children’s education, how to support their
children’s education and to help them and how to care for children (e.g., basic hygiene and nutrition).
32
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
annual exams25 4.1.2 Secretary will type and save 2014 CMIPS
questions for the bank
4.2 Improved record-keeping through 4.2.1 Fundraise for the purchase of a 2011 DOD
implementation of a computerized computer
method to organize data 4.2.2 Create a database or other 2011 Head
system for data collection Teacher,
4.3 Relationships established with 4.3.1 Increase attendance at district 2011-2015 Head
district, Ministry of Education and functions and NGO networking Teacher
other local, national and opportunities
international educational NGOs 4.3.2 Lobby for increased support from 2011-2015 Director
the district

25
The computerized question bank should have a minimum of three full exams worth of questions for each exam.
For lower classes, there should be 75 questions for each exam.
For upper classes,
For Math: 90 direct questions for Section A and 36 structured questions for Section B.
For Science, SST and agriculture: 120 direct questions for Section A and 45 structured questions for Section B.
For English: 150 direct questions for Section A and 15 structured questions (with 10 sub-questions each) for Section B of each
exam.

33
Appendix 4: Strategic Plan Matrix for Administration
Goal: An efficient, financially stable and accountable institution that is able to realize its goals
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
1. Professionally 1.1 Completed Memorandums Of 1.1.2 Open discussion about an MOUs 2011 DOD
managed NGO Understanding (MOU) with partners with al partners. All MOUs would
with established to indicate roles and obligations ideally include a baseline amount of
systems, support pledged over a specified
structures and period of time.
processes 1.2 Administrative and financial reports 1.2.1 Compile and share administrative 2011-2015 DOD
produced regularly. and financial reports regularly
1.3.2 Create an official communication 2011-2015 Director
system of day-to-day communication (Ongoing)
with partners
1.3.3 Encourage work parties and other 2011-2015 Director
visits from partners. Ensure that (Ongoing)
visitors meet with management staff
and learn about management
1.3.4 Fundraise to support a CMI 2011-2015 Director
representative Overseer and or
Director to visit and speak directly
with partners
1.5 Partner feedback reports compiled 1.5.1 Write and distribute partner 2011-2015 Director
regularly (10 over 5 years) feedback forms. Request that (Ongoing)
partners complete feedback forms
twice annually. Respond to partner
feedback
1.5.2 Compile and analyze partner 2011-2015 Director
feedback forms. Write a partner (Ongoing)
feedback report.
1.6 Review existing policies 1.6.1 Review existing policies once a 2011-2015 Director
appropriately year.

34
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
2. Financially sound 2.1 Income-generating activities 2.1.1 Rent out car, chairs, CMIPS field, 2011-2015 DOD
and sustainable established and/or strengthened26 etc. to community members for (Ongoing)
organisation events
2.1.2 Expand secretarial services and 2012 DOD
offer them through the library. Buy
supplies necessary for binding
2.1.3 Support library’s internet café and 2011-2015 DOD
services
2.2 Resources fundraised from external 2.2.1 Attract more support from the 2011-2015 Director
sources (district and grant-giving district. Lobby for seconded staff,
organisations) funding, etc.
2.2.2 Apply for more grants 2011-2015 Director,
DOD
2.2.3 Operate according to agreements 2011-2015 Director,
with partners DOD
2.3 Partner base expanded. 2.3.1 Involve past volunteers in 2011-2015 Director
American Friends of CMI
2.3.2 Sponsor and support Overseer and 2012 Director
or Director to speak and fundraise
externally
2.4 Computerized financial operating 2.4.1 Purchase a new financial 2011 DOD
system (database / software) accounting system
established 2.4.2 Train staff how to use the 2011 DOD

26
IGAs:
a) Items/space available for rent (including land for events, chairs, vehicles, etc.). Annual income of 1million shillings at the end of
five years.
b) Expanded secretarial services offered to the community through the library (including photocopying, typing, printing, binding and
scanning.) Annual income of 7 million shillings at the end of five years.
c) Library services and internet café established. Funds should cover library running costs.
d) BCC CD of praise and worship songs sold internationally as an income-generating activity
e) CCD income-generating activity established. (Depending on which activity CCD adopts, pork, chicken, vegetables or children’s art
will be available for community members and local vendors to purchase.)
f) Quality primary school education offered. Annual income of 79 million shillings at the end of five years (22.5 million shillings
received from school fees from paying students and 56.5 million shillings received from school fees from CCD-sponsored children).
g) Quality health-care services offered. Annual income of 40 million shillings from patient fees at the end of five years

35
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
accounting system
2.4.3 Open a separate account for 2011 Director
partners funds
4. 4.1 Recruit additional staff members: 4.1.1 Recruit additional, well-trained 2011 DOD
Sufficient/appropr • Five (5) additional staff to fill necessary positions in all
iate, well-trained Administration staff recruited 27 departments.
and motivated 4.1.2 Fundraise for additional salaries 2011 DOD
staff 4.2 Staff are adequately supported and 4.2.1 Fundraise for capacity 2011 - 2015 M&E
trained in development and lobby sponsors, Officer
relevant areas28 partners and other well-wishers to
contribute (Include in the budget)
4.2.2 Improve support supervision 2011 - 2015 M&E
programs Officer
4.3 A working pay structure 4.3.1 Fundraise for salary increases as 2011 - 2015 DOD
implemented and staff remunerated mandated by the salary scale (include
accordingly in the budget.)
29
4.4 Improved benefits for staff 4.4.1 Amend Human Resource Manual 2011 DOD
4.4.2 Fundraise to meet costs of 2011 DOD
additional staff benefits
30
5. Equipped with 5.1 Expanded administration building 5.1.1 Fundraise for administration 2011-2013 DOD
appropriate and building construction
sufficient 5.2 Sufficient staff transportation31 5.2.1 Fundraise for and purchase 2011 DOD

27
Recruit staff to fill the following administrative/financial positions:
a) Communication Officer (to act as spokesperson, update the website, write the newsletter and apply for grants)
b) Librarian (to manage the library resource centre)
c) Organisational Learning (M&E) Officer
d) Financial Controller (to supervise Accountant and coordinate financial issues)
e) Account’s Assistant.
Maintain staff to fill the following positions:
Director, Administrator, Accountant and Secretary/Receptionist
28
Periodical spiritual seminars for all staff. Administrator trained in resource mobilization/grant-writing. CCD staff training sessions
conducted once per quarter. JPS staff facilitated to receive further education. Continuous medical education, seminars and
conferences for Health Department held.
29
Amend Human Resource Manual to allow for multi-year contracts (once MOUs are created which establish funding over a multi-year
period) and provide additional staff benefits, such as medical insurance and retirement benefits
36
Outcomes Outputs Activities Time Lead
Frame Person
additional vehicles
5.4 An additional 5 acres of CMI land 5.4.1 Fundraise for and purchase 2011 DOD
additional land
facilities
5.5 Consistent power 5.5.1 Fundraise for & purchase a power 2011 DOD
back-up system
6. Library resource 6.1 Library resource centre constructed 6.1.1 Fundraise for establishment of 2011 DOD
centre and equipped with electricity and library
established and internet facilities
utilized 6.2 Two thousand (2,000) books 6.2.1 Fundraise for and purchase 2011 DOD
32
purchased relevant books

30
The administration building expansion will include one conference centre (22 seats), one meeting/counselling room (1 desk), one
administrative office (2 desks), one dining hall, one kitchen, one store and three toilets.
31
BCC transportation to include a small car for the Director, a coaster for BCC staff and a bus for JPS.
32
These books would include textbooks, reading books, resources about agriculture, health and current events, as well as literature
books. CCD sponsored children, JPS students, JPS teachers and the greater community could read books for free in the library or
borrow them for an affordable yearly membership fee.
37
Appendix 5: Logical Framework for CMI Child Care Department (2015 – 2013)

Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions


Indicators Information
Goal Children from poor families access • Children’s weight • National
basic quality education that can • Number of meals consumed integrated
enable them to realize their full daily Household
social and economic potential. • Literacy rate surveys
• Percentage of children • Independent
completing primary school/ impact survey/
O-Level / A-Level assessment
• Life expectancy • Uganda
• Employment rate National
• Student-to-teacher ratio Demographic
Reports

Outcom 1. Educated and empowered • Eighty (76) % of sponsored • CMI Annual • Sufficient funding
es children able to contribute to children complete studies Report • Children committed to
their own development, the • Ninety (94) % of sponsored • CPD monthly education
community and the country children gain employment soon reports • Availability of jobs for
after graduation • CPD Field graduates (Ugandan
• One hundred (100) % of Officer reports economic health)
sponsored children able to • CMI • Sponsors willing/ able
support themselves after Administration to continue to support
graduation reports CMI
• Seventy (70) % of sponsored • Community • Families committed to
children attend tertiary school /or surveys children’s education
university
• Twenty (20) % of children have
decent shelter
• One-to-40 (1:40) student to
teacher ratio in schools where
sponsored children attend
• Three (3) % drop-out rate among
sponsored children (both girls
and boys)

38
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
2. Improved psycho-social support • Seventy (70) % CPD alumni • CMI Annual • CPD alumni are
for sponsored children and CPD attending alumni meetings at Report willing/able to
alumni the end of five years • CPD monthly participate
• One CPD alumni meeting held reports
annually
3. Families and communities are • Sixty (60) % of children with • CMI Annual • Families are
socially, economically and basic needs met33 Report willing/able to start
educationally empowered to • One million shillings of income • CPD monthly and maintain IGAs
meet children’s basic needs generated per family through reports with CMI
IGAs started by CPD • CPD Field
Officer reports
• CMI financial
reports
4. Spiritually supported/developed • 80% of children attending CMI- • CMI Annual • Children are
children sponsored Bible Studies Report willing/able to
• CPD monthly participate
reports • Pastors willing/able to
• CPD Field freely cooperate with
Officer reports CMI
5. Improved program • Twenty (20) programs and • CMI Annual • Sufficient funding
administration, management activities held in conjunction Report • Sponsors willing/ able
and sustainability with organisational partners • CMI to continue to support
• Five (5) % of total CPD funding Administration CMI
coming from departmental reports
IGA • CPD monthly
• Five million (5,000,000) reports
shillings generated annually • CPD training
by CPD’s departmental IGA reports
• Seven hundred (700) sponsors • CMI financial
• Average of 2.5 million shillings reports
provided by each sponsor • Independent
33
Basic needs are defined here as decent shelter that is clean and does not leak, three meals a day, clothing, medical care, safe water
and education.
39
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
annually evaluation(s)

Output Outcome 1 Outputs


s 1.1 Approximately seven hundred • Cumulative number of • CMI Annual • Sufficient funding
(700) children sponsored children sponsored Report • Children committed to
cumulatively over 5 years • Number of sponsored • CPD monthly education
1.2 Scholarship funds established children attending tertiary reports • Sufficient staffing
for qualified sponsored students school and/or university • Staff trained in relevant
• CPD Field
to attend tertiary school and/or • Percentage of sponsored skills
Officer reports
university children having a mattress, • CMI • Families committed to
1.3 Expanded welfare support to blanket, bed sheet and Administration children’s education
700 sponsored children to cover mosquito net
basic needs. reports • Guardians willing to
• Percentage of female • Community freely cooperate with
1.4 A centre established in Kumi sponsored children who have
(with a house for Field Officers surveys CMI
undergarments and sufficient • Sponsors willing/able to
and an office with phone for sanitary products
meeting beneficiaries) continue to support
• Percentage of sponsored CMI
children’s families provided
with bedding, clothing, seeds,
food and housing
• Number of CPD centres
• Number of children who
visit CPD centres

40
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
Outcome 2 Outputs
2.1. Every child receives one-on- • Number of personal counselling • CMI Annual • Children are
one personal counselling at sessions conducted per term Report willing/able to
home and at the office, once per• Number of group • CPD monthly participate
term. counselling/career guidance reports • CPD alumni are
2.2 Every child attends a group session per term willing/able to
• CPD Field
career guidance session three • Number of home visits per term participate
Officer reports
times per year (once a term)— • Sufficient funding
• Existence of a CPD alumni
500 children attend career
association • Sufficient staffing
guidance sessions per year
• Number of alumni matched
2.3 Each child visited at home at
with sponsored children
least once a term
2.4 All children are visited by Field • Number of peer counselling
Officers at hostels and schools sessions held
for follow-up at least once per
quarter
2.5 Counselling for children who
have dropped out of school (to
find out why they have dropped
out and counsel them to return
to school)
2.6 Association for CPD alumni,
which will provide networking
and support opportunities,
started/overseen by CMI
2.7 Alumni matched with
sponsored children for
mentoring and peer counselling

41
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
Outcome 3 Outputs
3.1 Between 80 and 100 families • Number of families running • CMI Annual • Families are
assisted in starting various income-generating activities Report willing/able to start
income-generating activities • Average profit per family • CPD monthly and maintain IGAs
3.2 Guardian associations running income-generating reports with CMI
established in areas. (5 activities • Sufficient staffing
• CPD Field
established in Kumi and Soroti • Number of guardian • Staff trained in relevant
Officer reports
towns, 1000 participants) associations started skills
3.3 Meetings with guardians and • • CMI financial
Number of meetings held with reports
community leaders held guardians and community
quarterly (for a total of 20 leaders per year
meetings) to discuss challenges.
Outcome 4 Outputs
4.1 Christian conferences held • Number of Christian • CMI Annual • Pastors willing/able to
twice a year (for a total of 10) conferences held per year Report freely cooperate with
4.2 Forty six (46) Pastors approved• Number of Pastors recruited, • CPD monthly CMI
and trained to assist CMI approved and trained to support reports • Children are willing/able
4.3 Ongoing Bible studies held for sponsored children’s spiritual to participate
• CPD Field
sponsored children led by development • Sufficient staffing
Officer reports
Pastors and CMI staff in different• Number of Bible studies for • Staff trained in relevant
areas (twice weekly) sponsored children held skills
Outcome 5 Outputs
5.1 Current photographs of all • Number of photographs • CMI Annual • Sufficient funding
sponsored children provided to provided per year Report • Functioning internet
sponsors once a year • Percentage of gifts reported to • CPD monthly • Sponsors willing/ able
5.2 One hundred (100) % of gifts partners reports to continue to support
handed to children quarterly • Number of gifts distributed per CMI
• CPD Field
and reported to partners year Officer reports • Organisational partners
5.3 Annual updates provided to
• Number of updates on each • CMI willing/able to work in
sponsors on each child
child provided to sponsors per administrative conjunction with CMI
5.4 Children’s letters sent to
year reports
sponsors twice a year
• Number of letters sent from
5.5 Adequate record keeping and
each child to sponsor per year
an efficient database and
registry established for • New database set up
• Number of additional
42
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
sponsored children computers
5.6 At least 20 programs and • Number of programs and
activities held in conjunction activities held in conjunction with
with organisational partners organisational partners
5.7 One departmental income- • One departmental income-
generating activity started generating activity started
5.8 Additional 3 motorcycles and a • Number of additional
field vehicle motorcycles and field vehicles
purchased
Activiti Activities for Outcome 1
es Outputs • CPD work plans • Sufficient funding
1.1.1 Recruit more children • CPD budgets • Sufficient staffing
1.1.2 Lobby more sponsors • Staff trained in relevant
• CMI Annual
1.2.1 Establish a scholarship fund skills
Budget
1.2.2 Fundraise for the scholarship • Feasibility of hanging up
fund (lobby sponsors, partners • CMI Annual
Report mosquito nets in
and other well-wishers to children’s homes
contribute) • CPD monthly
reports • Children committed to
1.3.1 Establish a welfare pool
education
1.3.2 Fundraise for the welfare pool • CPD training
• Pastors willing and able
(lobby sponsors, partners and reports
to freely cooperate
other well-wishers to contribute) • CPD Field Officer
1.3.3 Use funds resulting from • Organisational partners
reports
transfers with favourable willing and able to
• Independent collaborate
exchange rates to top up the evaluation(s)
welfare pool • Program graduates
• CMI financial willing and able to
1.4.1 Fundraise for reports cooperate
construction/renting and
maintenance costs of a centre • CMI • Families committed to
in Kumi. Construct/rent the Administration children’s education
centre. reports • Functioning internet
1.4.2 Recruit Field Officers who are • Guardians willing to
willing to live in the areas where freely cooperate with
they work CMI
Activities for Outcome 2 • Sponsors willing/able to

43
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
Outputs continue to support
2.1.1 Recruit and hire a facilitator CMI
with counselling skills
2.1.2 Support the facilitator with
her counselling
2.2.1 Recruit and hire a facilitator
with counselling skills
2.2.2 Support the facilitator with
her counselling
2.3.1 Hire additional Field Officers
2.3.2 Train and closely supervise
Field Officers to ensure that
they understand their
responsibilities and are fulfilling
them
2.4.1 Hire additional Field Officers
2.4.2 Train and closely supervise
Field Officers to ensure that
they understand their
responsibilities and are fulfilling
them
2.5.1 Support the facilitator with
her counselling
2.6.1 Contact CPD alumni to gauge
interest in, inform them about
and establish an alumni
network
2.6.2 Recruit alumni to
mobilize/organize the alumni
network
2.6.3 Encourage alumni to network
for jobs and sponsor children
2.6.4 Designate a CMI staff
member to oversee alumni
association
2.7.1 CMI staff oversees matches
44
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
between CPD alumni and
sponsored children

Activities for Outcome 3


Outputs
3.1.1 Train and supervise families
in income-generating activities
3.2.1 Field Officer to gauge interest
in a guardian association when
visiting children
3.2.2 Ascertain which guardians
and community leaders have
best leadership and childrearing
skills and recruit them to lead
associations.
3.2.3 Recruit guardian/community
leaders to mobilize and organize
guardian associations
3.3.1 CPD staff plan for quarterly
meetings with guardians and
community leaders
3.3.2 Talk to guardians more when
CPD staff visits children at home
Activities for Outcome 4
Outputs
4.1.1 Organize and fundraise for
Christian conferences
4.2.1 Identify which churches the
children attend
4.2.2 Research, interview and
approve Pastors who are fit to
work with CPD children
4.2.3 Develop a training
programme and train approved
Pastors on how to care for
children and on the spiritual
45
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
guidance we want them to
provide
4.3.1 Ask Pastors and other
spiritual leaders to lead ongoing
Bible studies
Activities for Outcome 5
Outputs
5.1.1 Take photos of children at
their homes and at events (such
as conferences) to send to
sponsors
5.2.1 Gifts and Welfare Committee
oversee distribution of gifts at
the end of each quarter. Gift
distribution reported to
sponsors
5.3.1 Create a more efficient way
of collecting, organizing and
distributing information about
sponsored children to their
sponsors
5.4.1Facilitate children in writing
letters to sponsors twice a year.
Send letters to sponsors twice a
year
5.5.1 Fundraise for and purchase 4
additional CPD computers
5.5.2 Set up a more efficient
database for recording
information about sponsored
children
5.5.3 Keep computerized records
5.5.4 Provide staff training on
computers, database, etc.
5.5.5 Establish a CPD registry and
research and input information
46
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
on each child
5.6.1 Identify potential partners,
such as schools, churches,
hostels, clinics, the district and
other organisations with child-
related programs
5.7.1 Fundraise for departmental
income-generating activity
program costs
5.8.1 Fundraise for and purchase
vehicles (vehicle maintenance,
petrol)

47
Appendix 6: Logical Framework for CMI Health Department (2009 – 2013)

Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Means of Assumption and Risks


Indicators Verification
Goal Improved health status for • Life expectancy • Uganda
marginalised communities within • Child mortality rates Demographic
the CMI catchments area to • Infant mortality rates Survey
enable community members to • Maternal mortality rates Reports
live productive lives • Uganda
• Percentage of households that
have good sanitation National
( latrines, plate racks, rubbish Household
pits) Survey
• Percentage of households with • Annual
access to safe water statistical
abstract
• Absenteeism from school due
to illness • HMIS forms
• Girl child drop-out rate • Registers for
sick students
in schools
Outcom 1. Health unit providing complete, • 40,000 outpatients over 5 years • HMIS records • Community members
es high-quality National Minimum • Maximum of 2% of outpatients • Health Centre are willing and able to
Healthcare Package for a Health referred by the end of 5 years evaluation access services from
Centre III reports the Health Centre
• 9,000 inpatients over 5 years
• Maximum of 5% of inpatients • CMI • CMI receives adequate
referred by the end of 5 years institutional funding for all health
• 4,500 maternity patients over 5 evaluation programmes, medical
years reports equipment and other
• Health Centre costs associated with
• Maximum of 15% of maternity
monthly the health department
patients referred by the end of
5 years reports
• 85% of live births (the other • Health Centre
15% are referred) by the end HUMC reports
of 5 years • Health Centre
• 3,600 patients receive HIV/AIDS O’Neil reports
counselling and testing over 5 • CMI Annual
years Reports

48
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Means of Assumption and Risks
Indicators Verification
• 1,000 new users of family
planning added over 5 years
• 7,000 mothers receive
antenatal care
2. Improved community health • 10,000 children complete an • Health Centre • TBAs transform their
services (Primary Health Care) immunisation regimen over 5 monthly health practices in
years reports favour of adopting
• 4,700 pregnant women receive • Health Centre recommended
immunisation against tetanus HUMC reports practices in child
• 1,200 new users of family • Health Centre delivery
planning added over 5 years O’Neil reports • Immunisation is
• Adolescents (15-24 year-olds) positively valued by
• CMI Annual
at 14 schools and 10 churches parents and guardians
Reports
provided with comprehensive • Reproductive health is
• National appreciated as a tool
sexual reproductive health (District)
and HIV/AIDS information for better quality of
immunisation life
reports
• Government continues
• Homopak to provide
reports immunisations and
support
3. Improved sustainability of the • 60% of departmental budget • CMI financial • Partners view
Health Centre covered by revenue from reports supporting CMI as a
patient fees at the end of 5 • CMI Annual way to realise their
years Reports philanthropic
objectives
• Patients are willing and
able to pay fees
Outputs Outcome 1 Outputs
1.1 Over 5 years, healthcare • Number of outpatients, • Health Centre • There are adequate
provided to: inpatients, maternity patients, monthly resources for
• 40,500 outpatients laboratory tests and family reports implementing
• 8,100 inpatients planning patients per year • Health Centre activities as well as
• 2,100 maternity patients • Referral rates for outpatient, HUMC reports strong stewardship
• 1,200 new users of family inpatient and maternity care over resources
49
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Means of Assumption and Risks
Indicators Verification
planning • Medical drug/supplies stock • Health Centre
• 5,800 antenatal patients levels O’Neil reports
services • Availability of essential drugs • CMI Annual
• 3,600 HIV/AIDS patients • Quantity of essential drugs Reports
1.2 20,500 laboratory tests • Number of diagnostic services • Medical
conducted over 5 years offered equipment
1.3 Health Centre is stocked with • Number of routine inventory
sufficient essential immunisation days held at the
drugs/supplies clinic
1.4 Health Centre is equipped with • Meeting governmental safety
functioning, appropriate and health regulations
medical equipment regarding the disposal of
1.5 Medical waste properly medical waste
disposed
• Number of toilets available for
1.6 New toilets provided to
patient use
patients
1.7 Consistent power for clinic • Completion of Health Centre
activities physical expansion/renovation
1.8 Completed renovation of • Number of people subscribing
health unit to the Assurance Scheme
1.9 Ten (10) biannual monitoring • Number of Quarterly monitoring
reports produced reports produced
Outcome 2 Outputs
2.1 Retain and provide continuous • Number of trained and active • Health Centre • Immunisation is
training and necessary POLs working with BCHC monthly positively valued by
supplies to the following • Number of women receiving reports parents and guardians
(existing) community-level antenatal care from TBAs per • Health Centre • Reproductive health is
health workers: month HUMC reports appreciated as a tool
• 20 POLs • Referral rate from TBAs • Health Centre for better quality of
• 53 anti-malarial service • Number of safe deliveries O’Neil reports life
providers conducted by each TBA each • CMI Annual
• 49 homopak distributors month Reports
• 4 community educators/ • Number of anti-malarial service • National
UNEPI immunisers providers (District)
• 6 ASRH trainers • Number of homopak immunisation
50
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Means of Assumption and Risks
Indicators Verification
2.2 The following new community- distributors reports
level health workers are • Number of ASRH educators
trained and retained: trained
• 11 TBAs • Number of churches and
• 36 ASRH peer educators per communities reached by ASRH
year • Each year, the number of
• 1 community educator/ UNEPI children (under 1 and under 5
immuniser years of age) immunised
2.3 A letter link program against measles, BCG, polio
established at 14 schools and and DPT/Hep B/HIB. The
10 churches number of pregnant mothers
2.4 Over 5 years, immunise immunised against tetanus.
10,500 children against • Number of immunisation
measles, 4,500 against BCG, outreaches held
5,900 against polio and 5,900 • Number of UNEPI vaccinators
against DPT/Hep B/HIB. trained
Immunise 4,700 pregnant • Number of patients dewormed
mothers against tetanus. • Number of immunisation
2.5 Fifty-two (52) weekly outreach centres
immunisation days held per
• Number of community
year (for a total of 260 over 5
educators
years)
2.6 Community health and
immunisation outreach
sessions held once a month at
each centre (for a total of 60
per centre over 5 years)
2.7 National Immunisation Days
held for 30 days twice per year
(for a total of 300 days over 5
years)
2.8 An additional 3 immunisation
outreach centres established

51
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Means of Assumption and Risks
Indicators Verification
Outcome 3 Outputs
3.1 USD 25,000 raised through • Percentage of resources raised • Finance reports • Patients are willing and
mobilizing new sources of through fundraising from • Health able to pay fees
funding (such as grants) additional sources34 Department • Partners (individuals
3.2 One hundred eighty (180) • Amount raised from patient HUMC reports and organisations)
million shillings received fees • Health view supporting CMI
through patient fees and three Department as a way to realise
• Size of the Assurance Scheme
(3) million shillings received O’Neil Reports their philanthropic
funds
through the Assurance Scheme objectives
• CMI Annual
over 5 years
Report
3.3 Forty eight (48) million
shillings received from the
district over 5 years
Activiti Activities for Outcome 1
es Outputs • Health • Community members
1.1.1 Provide health services to Department are willing and able to
community members within work plans access services from
the catchments area • Health the Health Centre
1.2.1 Continue to provide current Department • CMI receives adequate
diagnostic services budgets funding for all health
1.2.2 Introduce additional • Health Centre programmes, medical
diagnostic services, such as monthly equipment and other
cultures, blood transfusions reports costs associated with
and white blood cell count total the health department
• Health Centre
with differential. Provide
HUMC reports • Patients are willing and
medical staff with appropriate
• Health Centre able to pay fees
training for new services.
O’Neil reports • TBAs transform their
1.3.1 Obtain funding to purchase
• CMI Annual health practices in
sufficient amounts of
Reports favour of adopting
necessary drugs.
recommended

34
The amount used by Australian committee will be used as a baseline figure at the start of implementing of the Strategic Plan.
52
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Means of Assumption and Risks
Indicators Verification
1.3.2 practices in child
Obtain funding to purchase delivery
additional supplies/equipment • Immunisation is
and maintain equipment. Stock positively valued by
the Health Centre with parents and guardians
necessary medical supplies • Reproductive health is
1.5.1 Fundraise for and construct appreciated as a tool
an incinerator for better quality of
1.6.1 Fundraise for and construct life
patient toilets • Partners view
1.7.1 Improve back-up system for supporting CMI as a
power (solar panels) way to realise their
1.8.1 Fundraise for and construct philanthropic
expanded/renovated clinic. objectives
Purchase new furniture.
1.9.1 Produce ten (10) biannual
monitoring reports

Activities for Outcome 2


Outputs
2.1.1 Provide continuous training,
education, support and
facilitation to existing TBAs,
anti-malarial service providers,
homopak distributors,
community educators / UNEPI
immunisers and ASRH trainers.
2.1.3 Distribute medications and
oversee dispensing as directed
by district policy
2.1.4 Continuously supervise
community health programs
2.1.5 Create an association of
health workers at the
community level
2.2.1. Train 36 ASRH peer

53
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Means of Assumption and Risks
Indicators Verification
educators per year.
2.3.1 Recruit a counsellor to
coordinate the program
2.3.2 Acquire and install letter
boxes in 14 schools and 10
churches
2.3.3 Peer educators and trainers
collect and answer questions
monthly
2.3.4 Train staff in ASRH
counselling and question
answering
2.3.5 Produce, acquire and
disseminate health messages
and materials
2.4.1 Continue and expand
immunisation program
2.5.1 Hold 52 weekly
immunisation days per year
(for a total of 260 over 5 years)
2.6.1 Facilitate community health
educators/UNEPI immunisers in
holding outreach sessions
2.6.2 Produce, acquire and
disseminate health messages
and materials
2.7.1 Continue to hold National
Immunisation Days. Deworm,
provide vitamin A and
immunise school children
2.8.1 Identify underserved villages

54
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Means of Assumption and Risks
Indicators Verification

in the catchments area


2.8.2 Establish 3 additional
immunisation outreach centres
in these underserved villages
Activities for Outcome 3
Outputs
3.1.1 Research and apply for
relevant grants
3.1.2 Lobby and network with
potential partners
3.1.3 Provide regular reports to
partners
3.2.1 Sensitize the community
about the Assurance Scheme.
Market the scheme
3.2.2 Educate the scheme DOD in
accounting and computers
3.3.1 Increase attendance at
district functions and NGO
networking opportunities

55
Appendix 7: Logical Framework for CMI Joshua Primary School (2011 – 2015)

Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions


Indicators Information
Goal Contribute to Millennium • Literacy rate • National
Development Goal of achieving • PLE Pass rate Integrated
universal primary education • Drop-out rate Households
Surveys
• Independent
impact
survey(s)
• Uganda
National
Demographic
Reports
• Ministry of
Education
reports
Outcom 1. A complete and well-equipped • Sixty five (65) percent of students • CMI Annual • Children committed to
es primary school for the needy, are CPD sponsored Reports their education
sponsored children • Seven classes at Joshua (P1-P7) • CMIPS monthly
reports
• CMI
Administratio
n reports
2. Educated students who excel • Pass rates35 • CMI Annual • Children committed to
academically and are well- • Number of children who are Reports their education and
rounded, spiritually developed regularly involved in church • CMIPS monthly spiritual development
and knowledgeable about activities36 reports
world issues

35
Ninety % (90%) of students pass internal exams (end of month, end of term, end of year); Eighty-five % (85%) of students pass
external examinations from high quality schools; Eighty-five % (85%) of students pass PLE examination; Ninety-five % (95%) of
students graduate to the next class; Ninety-five (95%) of students graduate from Joshua
36
To evaluate, establish a scale of how often children attend church activities, discuss spiritual issues such as Christ and church
activities with others, etc.
56
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
3. Guardians/parents and CMIPS • Seventy percent (70%) of • CMI Annual • Guardians/ families
teachers and management are children’s guardians attend Reports committed to
active partners in children’s meetings • CMIPS monthly children’s education
education and development reports • Guardian/ families
• CMI willing to freely
Administratio cooperate with CMIPS
n reports
4. Improved CMIPS administration • Twenty five percent (25%) of • CMI Annual • Ability of some children
and management school funding is generated Reports to pay school fees
from paying students’ school • CMIPS monthly
fees reports
• Sixty percent (60%) of school • CMI
funding is generated by CPD Administratio
(sponsored children’s school n reports
fees) • CMI financial
reports
Output Outcome 1 Outputs
s 1.1 A complete, licensed and • School licensed and registered • CMI Annual • Sufficient funding
registered primary school as • Number of classes offered at Report • Children committed to
per national standards CMIPS • CMIPS monthly their education
1.2 School is stocked with • Ratio of textbooks to students (for reports
sufficient learning materials each subject) • CMI financial
1.3 Staffroom provided \
• Ratio of reading books to students reports
1.4 A large vehicle (60-seater bus)
purchased for transportation • Existence of a staffroom • CMI
• Number of children who can fit in administration
CMIPS vehicle reports
• CMI and CMIPS
inventory

57
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
Outcome 2 Outputs
2.1 Quality teaching based on • Pass rates • CMI Annual • Children committed to
national education standards • Number of remedial lessons Reports their education and
2.2 Remedial lessons provided to provided • CMIPS monthly spiritual development
slow learners • Number of children attending reports
2.3 Introduction of educational remedial lessons • CMI
trips twice a year • Number of teachers teaching Administratio
2.4 Educational videos shown to remedial lessons n reports
students once a month to
• Number of educational trips per • CMI financial
enhance learning
year reports
2.5 Health education program
• Number of educational videos
introduced (health classes
shown to students
taught once a term)
2.6 Enhanced CMIPS co-curricular • Number of health classes taught
activities • Number of co-curricular events
2.7 External examinations from and competitions in which CMIPS
high-quality schools given once students participate
a month • Percentile ranking of CMIPS
2.8 Mutual support groups (e.g., students in co-curricular events
spiritual and civic) introduced and competitions
• Percentage of students passing
external examinations from high-
quality schools
• Number of external examinations
from high-quality schools given to
students
• Number of mutual support groups
• Number of CMIPS students
involved in mutual support groups
Outcome 3 Outputs
3.1 Meetings with • Number of meetings held with • CMI Annual • Guardians/ families
parents/guardians and CMIPS parents/guardians per year Reports committed to
staff held once a term • Number of parents/guardians • CMIPS monthly children’s education
attending meetings reports • Guardian/ families
• CMI willing to freely

58
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
Administratio cooperate with CMIPS
n reports

Outcome 4 Outputs
4.1 Computerized question bank • Number of exams covered in • CMI Annual • Ability of some children
created for each class and question bank (number of Reports to pay school fees
subject for each end of month, subjects, classes and types of • CMIPS monthly • Sufficient staff
term and year exams exams—end of month, term and reports • Consistently functioning
4.2 Improved record-keeping year) power
• CMI
through implementation of a • Total number of questions in • Staff provided with
Administratio
computerized way to organize question bank adequate training in
n reports
data • Number of questions per exam relevant areas
4.3 Relationships established with • CMI financial
in question bank reports
district, Ministry of Education • Existence of a computerized
and other local, national and database
international educational NGOs
• Amount of financial support
4.4 School fees increased to
received from the district
360,000 shillings annually per
paying child • Number of seconded staff
4.5 School income from paying members at CMIPS
students increased to 22.5 • Number of events and seminars
million shillings per year at the held in conjunction with other
end of 5 years schools and NGOs
• School fees paid per paying
student
• Total amount of fees paid to
school
Activiti Activities for Outcome 1 • CMIPS work • Sufficient funding
es Outputs plans • Children committed to
1.1.1 Work with the district to • CMIPS budgets their education
immediately acquire license • Sufficient staff
• CMI Annual
and registration. • Ability of some children
Budget
1.1.2 Plan program and curriculum to pay school fees
for P7 • CMI Annual

59
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
1.2.1 Identify, fundraise for and Report • Guardians/ families
purchase needed educational • CMIPS monthly committed to
materials reports children’s education
1.2.2 Make use of the CMI library, • Independent • Guardian/ families
once it is constructed evaluation(s) willing to freely
1.3.1 Fundraise for construction cooperate with CMIPS
• CMI financial
and furniture costs for • Staff provided with
reports
staffroom adequate training in
1.4.1 Fundraise for the vehicle. • CMI
Administratio relevant areas
Write grant applications and
n reports • Consistently functioning
lobby sponsors, partners and
power
other well-wishers to
contribute • High-quality schools
willing/able to network
Activities for Outcome 2 with CMIPS
Outputs • Health professionals
2.1.1 Effectively teach students in willing/able to
accordance with national contribute to CMIPS
educational standards. health program
2.2.1 Recruit teachers to hold • CMI Library’s
more remedial lessons and construction
provide a pay increase (to be • District willing/ able to
included in the budget) for work with CMIPS and
teachers who are holding provide support to the
additional remedial lessons school
2.3.1 Plan trips that complement • Teachers willing/ able
the curriculum to create question
2.3.2 Purchase or rent a vehicle bank
for educational trips.
Fundraise for petrol and
other costs
2.3.3 Network with partners who
could assist with educational
outings
2.4.1 Plan and acquire
(rent/purchase/borrow)

60
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
videos to show that will
complement the curriculum
2.5.1 Network with TASO, health
department, etc. and have
representatives provide
information (to teachers and
directly to students)
2.6.1 Network with other schools
to hold joint co-curricular
activities
2.6.2 Train teachers in skills
necessary for co-curricular
activities
2.6.3 Purchase necessary co-
curricular equipment (e.g.,
for sports and drama)
2.6.4 Lobby for funding for co-
curricular activities
2.7.1 Purchase external exams
2.7.2 Network with other high-
quality schools
2.8.1 Establish clubs. Recruit
CMIPS teachers to oversee
clubs.

Activities for Outcome 3


Outputs
3.1.1 Meet with parents/guardians
to gauge their interest and
mobilize them
3.1.2 Prepare the venues, send
invitations and record
minutes

Activities for Outcome 4


Outputs

61
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
4.1.1 Teachers write exam
questions for each class,
subject and month/term/year
for the bank
4.1.2 Secretary will type and save
questions for the bank
4.1.3 For each exam, teachers
select questions (and can
modify them) and the
secretary compiles a
complete exam.
4.2.1 Fundraise for the purchase
of a computer
4.2.2 Create a database or other
system for data collection
4.3.1 Increase attendance at
district functions and NGO
networking opportunities
4.3.2 Lobby for increased support
from the district (seconded
staff, funding)
4.4.1 Incrementally raise school
fees to 360,000 shillings
annually for paying students
4.5.1 Recruit paying children who
will be able to pay full,
unsubsidized school fees

62
Appendix 8: Logical Framework for CMI Administration (2009 – 2013)

Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions


Indicators Information
Goal An efficient, financially stable and • Percentage of resources • CMI financial
accountable institution that is generated from internal sources reports
able to realize its goals • Proportion of administration • CMI audit
expenditures to total reports
expenditures • Plans and
• Revenue (income) performance budgets
of the organisation and its
departments
• Total resource envelope
• Financial ratios
Outcom 1. Professionally managed NGO • Percentage of partners that are • CMI Annual • Partners view
es with established systems, satisfied with CMI performance Reports supporting CMI as a
structures and processes (programmatic and financial) • Departmental way to realise their
•Existence of functional, well- monthly philanthropic
established systems and reports objectives
procedures • CMI finance
•Existence of plans, budgets and reports
reports
• Percentage of repeat partners

63
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
2. Financially sound and •127 million shillings generated • CMI Annual • Successful
sustainable organisation locally (from patient fees, Reports implementation of
school fees, renting out • Departmental new income-
facilities and items, and monthly generating activities
provision of secretarial reports • Community demand for
services) • CMI finance services
•28 million shillings provided from reports • Patients are able and
district willing to pay patient
•Maximum of 70% of funding from fees
Australian Support Committee • Students are able and
•12 grants applied for per year willing to pay school
•Grant application success rate of fees
15% • The District
•Total amount of funding received government is willing
from grants each year and able to financially
•Timely and complete financial assist CMI
reports submitted to
stakeholders
•Proportion of administration
expenditures to total
expenditures
•Total resource envelope
•Financial ratios
3. CMI learning system •A functional M&E in place • CMI Annual • Sufficient funding
established and utilized •Changes made in the organisation Reports
(monitoring and evaluation and program based on M&E • Departmental
systems) reports monthly report
•Number of staff given refresher
training based on appraisals
4. Sufficient/appropriate, well- • Marks received by staff on • CMI Annual • Sufficient funding
trained and motivated staff appraisals Reports
• Staff turnover (retention rate) • Departmental
• Staffs fill all required positions monthly
within the organisation (no staff report
gap) • CMI staff
• Staffs are appropriately trained appraisals
64
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
• Number of staff members that
are qualified in their areas of
practice
• Sufficient CPD staff to maintain a
1:100 field officer-to-child ratio.
• Two (2) CMIPS teachers per class
• Gap between actual staff
remuneration and staff
remuneration required by
working pay structure
5. Equipped with appropriate and •Ratio of staff to offices/desks in • CMI Annual • The District cooperates
sufficient facilities each department Reports in transferring land
•Ratio of staff to computers • Departmental titles to CMI
• Ratio of staff to total number of monthly • Sufficient funding
seats in CMI vehicles reports
• All land titles are in CMI’s name • CMI finance
• CMI is able to construct reports
additional facilities as needed • CMI inventory
•Consistent power lists

6. Library resource centre • Existence of library resource • CMI Annual • Sufficient funding
established and utilized centre Reports
• Number of books in library • Departmental
resource centre monthly
• Number of people using the reports
resource centre per year • CMI finance
reports
• CMI inventory
lists

65
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
Outputs Outcome 1 Outputs
1.1 Completed Memorandums Of • MOUs with partners • CMI Annual • Partners are willing and
Understanding (MOU) with • Number of administrative Reports able to honestly
partners that lay out all and financial reports sent to • Departmental provide feedback
parties’ responsibilities and stakeholders monthly • Functioning internet
obligations • Number of emails/letters reports
1.2 Administrative and financial sent to external actors • Partner
reports produced and sent
• Website is updated feedback
each month, quarter and year
• Number of partner feedback forms
to relevant stakeholders
1.3 Regular communication with reports
external actors maintained
through the Director’s desk
1.4 Updated website (updated
quarterly)
1.5 Partner feedback reports
compiled twice yearly (10 over
5 years)
1.6 Review and make appropriate
changes to existing policies
1.7 New policies developed

66
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
Outcome 2 Outputs
2.1 Income-generating activities • Number of established IGAs • CMI Annual • Americans are willing/
established and/or • Number of grants received Reports able to contribute to
strengthened • Number of partners • CMI financial AFCMI
2.2 Resources fundraised from reports • Successful
• Number of partner
external sources (district and implementation of
organisations • Departmental
grant-giving organisations) new income-
monthly
2.3 Partner base expanded generating activities
reports
(American Friends of CMI and • Community demand for
other sources) services
2.3 Computerized financial
• Patients are able and
operating system (database /
willing to pay patient
accounting software)
fees
established
• Students are able and
willing to pay school
fees
• The District
government is willing
and able to financially
assist CMI
• Partners view
supporting CMI as a
way to realise their
philanthropic
objectives
Outcome 3 Outputs
3.1 Learning system developed • Availability of established • CMI Annual • Sufficient funding
3.2 Regular organisational learning system Reports
evaluations conducted and • Number of organisational • CMI financial
reports produced based on evaluation reports produce reports
learning system • Departmental
3.3 Organisation-wide learning monthly
sessions held to address reports
identified gaps

Outcome 4 Outputs

67
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
4.1 Recruit additional staff • Number of staff recruited in • CMI Annual • Staff is interested in
members: each department Reports pursuing further
• Five (5) additional • Number of training sessions • CMI financial education
Administration staff (Financial held organisation-wide and in reports • Sufficient funding
Controller, Account’s each department • Departmental
Assistant, Communications • Number of staffs trained in monthly
Officer, M&E Officer, and different areas reports
Librarian) • Working pay structure for • CMI Human
• Five (5) additional full-time staff implemented Resource
Field Officers in CPD • Number of staff on pay roll Manual
• Four (4) additional CMIPS staff • Number of staff provided
(3 teachers and one Deputy with benefits
Headmaster)
• Fourteen (14) additional Health
Department staff recruited (1
clinical officer, 1 program
DOD, 1 program coordinator,
1 HMIS manager, 1 registered
nurse, 2 comprehensive
nurses, 3 enrolled nurses, 1
lab assistant, 2 dispensers for
the pharmacy, 1 cleaner)
4.5 Staff are trained in relevant
areas
• Periodical spiritual seminars for
all staff
• DOD trained in resource
mobilization/grant-writing
• CPD staff training sessions
conducted once per quarter
• CMIPS staff facilitated to
receive further education
• Continuous medical education,
seminars and conferences for
Health Department held
4.6 A working pay structure
68
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
implemented and staff
remunerated accordingly
4.7 Improved benefits for staff

Outcome 5 Outputs
5.1 Expanded administration • Number of offices and • CMI Annual • Sufficient funding
building facilities in administration Reports • Land is for sale at a
5.2 Sufficient staff transportation building • CMI financial reasonable price
5.3 Legal and final transfer of • Number of CMI vehicles (and reports
ownership of all CMI property number of seats in each) • Departmental
and buildings into CMI’s name • Availability of legal monthly
5.4 Five (5) additional acres of documents indicating CMI’s reports
CMI land ownership of all CMI property • CMI inventory
5.6 Power back-up system and buildings lists
• Total number of acres of CMI • CMI Land Title
property documents
Outcome 6 Outputs
6.1 Quiet library resource centre • Library is constructed and • CMI Annual • Sufficient funding
constructed and equipped with furnished Reports
electricity and internet • Library has power and • CMI financial
facilities internet installed reports
6.2 Two thousand (2,000) books • Number of books in library • CMI inventory
purchased
• Number of courses offered lists
6.3 Four (4) courses per week
per week
offered to students and
• Number of community
community members
members utilizing resource
centre services
Activiti Activities for Outcome 1 • CMI Annual • Successful
es Outputs Reports implementation of
1.1.1 Continue discussions with • CMI financial new income-
Australia about the MOU. Work reports generating activities
on CMI’s draft with Australia. • Community demand for
• Departmental
1.1.2 Open discussion about an services
monthly
MOU with American partners • Patients are able and
reports
and any new groups of willing to pay patient
partners. All MOUs would • CMI inventory
fees
69
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
ideally include a baseline lists • Students are able and
amount of support pledged • Partner willing to pay school
over a specified period of time. feedback fees
1.2.1 Compile and send forms • The District
administrative and financial • CMI Human government is willing
reports once each month, Resource and able to financially
quarter and year Manual assist CMI
1.3.1 Ask Australian Support
• CMI Land Title • Partners view
Committee if one of their
documents supporting CMI as a
members can be in charge of way to realise their
official day-to-day philanthropic
communication with CMI objectives
1.3.2 Create an official system of
day-to-day communication • Americans are willing
with partners on CMI’s side and able to contribute
1.3.3 Encourage work parties and to AFCMI
other visits from • Partners are willing and
partners/partners. Ensure that able to honestly
visitors to meet with provide feedback
management staff and learn • Staff is interested in
about management pursuing further
1.3.4 Fundraise to support a CMI education
representative (Director or • Sufficient funding
Chairman) to visit Australian • Land is for sale
Support Committee and speak
directly with the Committee
1.4.1 Update website quarterly
1.5.1 Write and distribute partner
feedback forms. Request that
partners complete feedback
forms twice a year. Respond to
partner feedback
1.5.2 Compile and analyze
partner feedback forms. Write
a partner feedback report.
1.6.1 Review existing policies
once a year.

70
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
1.7.1 Make changes and enact
new policies as dictated by the
review.

Activities for Outcome 2


Outputs
2.1.1 Rent out car, chairs, CMIPS
field etc. to community
members for events
2.1.2 Expand secretarial services
and offer them through the
library. Buy supplies necessary
for binding
2.1.3 Support library’s internet
café and services
2.1.4 Record songs for CMI CD.
Design and create CD cover
and lyrics book. Make copies of
the CD, CD cover and lyrics
book. Market and sell the CD.
2.1.5 Advertise and support
income-generating activities in
CMIPS, CPD and clinic
2.2.1 Attract more support from
the district. Lobby for
seconded staff, funding, etc.
2.2.2 Apply for more grants
2.2.3 Operate according to
agreements with partners
2.3.1 Involve past volunteers in
American Friends of CMI
2.3.2 Sponsor and support
Director or Chairman to speak
and fundraise in the US
2.4.1 Purchase a new financial
database (budget and
fundraise for it)

71
Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
2.4.2 Train staff on how to use the
database
2.4.3 Open a separate account for
non-Australian partners

Activities for Outcome 3


Outputs
3.1.1 Develop learning system
3.1.2 Based on the learning
system, conduct regular
organisational evaluations and
write evaluation reports
3.1.3 Hold learning sessions to
address gaps identified in
evaluations

Activities for Outcome 4


Outputs
4.1.1 Recruit additional, well-
trained staff to fill necessary
positions in all departments.
4.1.2 Fundraise for additional
salaries and include them in
the budget.
4.2.1 Fundraise for capacity
development and lobby
sponsors, partners and other
well-wishers to contribute
(include capacity development
in the budget)
4.2.2 Improve support supervision
programs
4.2.3 Support all staff’s spiritual
growth by involving spiritual
leaders periodically
4.2.4 Facilitate staff to receive
training in areas where they

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Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
have gaps. Fundraise for
training costs (include in the
budget)
4.2.5 Work with partners in
setting up workshops and
seminars
4.3.1 Fundraise for salary
increases as mandated by the
salary scale (include in the
budget.)
4.4.1 Amend Human Resource
Manual
4.4.2 Fundraise to meet costs of
additional staff benefits

Activities for Outcome 5


Outputs
5.1.1 Fundraise for administration
building expansion (e.g.,
construction, furniture and
materials) and construct the
administration addition
5. 2.1 Hire two additional drivers
5.2.2 Fundraise for and purchase
additional vehicles.
5.3.1 Complete process of
transferring ownership of land
from the Wandendeya family
to CMI
5.4.1 Fundraise for and purchase
additional land
5.5.1 Fundraise for and purchase
power back-up system

Activities for Outcome 6


Outputs
6.1.1 Fundraise for establishment

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Intervention Logic Objectively Verifiable Source of Assumptions
Indicators Information
of library (construction,
furniture, electricity, relevant
books, computers, internet
connection)
6.1.2 Administration will manage
the library while it is being set
up. Eventually, the library will
become an independent
department.
6.1.3 Recruit a librarian and part-
time internet café assistant.
Include salaries in budget.
6.2.1 Fundraise for and purchase
relevant books.
6.3.1 Plan, organize, advertise
and teach courses.

74
Appendix 5: CMI Organisational Structure

General Meeting

Executive Committee

Overseer
Director of Development

Spiritual and Moral Community Health Child Development and Protection Administration

Family
Church Clinical & Education &
Counsellin Sponsorship
Planting Outreach Research Accounts
g
Assistant

Support staff
Pastors, Researchers, Clinical Officers, Nurses, Teachers, Programme Assistants

Christians and entire community

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i