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Replacement and Improvement Standards

Replacement Standards Guidelines............................................................................................................ 3


Improvement Standards Guidelines........................................................................................................... 4

Replacement Standards
Audiovisual: Electronic Audio and Video Units ...................................................................................... 7
Audiovisual: Sound Systems .................................................................................................................... 8
Ceiling Acoustical Tile (glued on)............................................................................................................. 9
Computer Hardware – MLS (Local Unit) Computers ............................................................................. 10
Countertop ............................................................................................................................................... 11
Doors with hardware, interior ................................................................................................................. 12
Door, storefront ....................................................................................................................................... 13
Drapes ..................................................................................................................................................... 14
Fascia ...................................................................................................................................................... 15
Fencing and Gates: Chain Link ............................................................................................................... 16
Flooring: Carpet ...................................................................................................................................... 17
Flooring: Tile – Ceramic or Quarry ......................................................................................................... 18
Floors: Hardwood ................................................................................................................................... 19
General Site: Trees................................................................................................................................... 20
General Site: Shrubs & Groundcovers..................................................................................................... 21
General Site: Lawns................................................................................................................................. 22
General Site: Irrigation Systems .............................................................................................................. 23
Gutters and Downspouts ......................................................................................................................... 24
HVAC: Air Cooled Condensing Units .................................................................................................... 25
HVAC: Air Handling Unit with Coils ..................................................................................................... 26
HVAC: Chiller ......................................................................................................................................... 27
HVAC: Cooling Tower............................................................................................................................ 28
HVAC: Digital Thermostat...................................................................................................................... 29
HVAC: Duct Furnace .............................................................................................................................. 30
HVAC: Forced Air Furnace (Packaged).................................................................................................. 31
HVAC: Hot Water or Steam Boiler ......................................................................................................... 32
Irrigation System, Residential.................................................................................................................. 33
Lighting: Interior/Exterior ...................................................................................................................... 34
Millwork: Under 12” in width ................................................................................................................. 35
Organ: Electronic ..................................................................................................................................... 36
Partition Accordion, Folding ................................................................................................................... 37
Paving: Asphalt........................................................................................................................................ 38
Paving/Sidewalks/Stairs/Curbs: Concrete ............................................................................................... 39
Piano: Upright.......................................................................................................................................... 40
Roofing: Built-up Asphalt or Bitumen .................................................................................................... 41
Roofing: Composition Shingles............................................................................................................... 42
Roofing: Concrete Tile ............................................................................................................................ 43
Roofing: Metal Shingles .......................................................................................................................... 44
Roofing: Single-ply Rubber Membrane (EPDM) – Ballasted................................................................. 45
Roofing: Single-ply Rubber Membrane (EPDM) – Fully Adhered......................................................... 46
Roofing: Standing Rib or Metal Panels ................................................................................................... 47
Roofing: Wood or Shake Shingles........................................................................................................... 48
Seating: Non-upholstered......................................................................................................................... 49

O&M-PS-0003 Date Revised: 17 April 2008 Page 1 of 59


Seating: Upholstered................................................................................................................................ 50
Soffits....................................................................................................................................................... 51
Stall, Toilet: Partitions ............................................................................................................................. 52
Wall covering: Sisal................................................................................................................................. 53
Wall covering: Vinyl/Fabric .................................................................................................................... 54
Wall tile: Ceramic .................................................................................................................................... 55
Windows and Skylights ........................................................................................................................... 56

Improvement Standards
Building Interior: Reconfigure Space or Change Room Use .................................................................. 57
General Site: Landscaping Replacement or Upgrade ............................................................................. 58
HVAC: System Upgrade.......................................................................................................................... 59

Guiding Principles:

"Older buildings are architectural examples of their time and need not be remodeled to look like
modern meetinghouses."
(Facilities Management Guidelines for Meetinghouses and Other Church Property, 6)

Standards communicate the desired appearance of facilities as established by the presiding


councils of the Church and ensure consistency throughout the world. When properly used,
standards empower facilities managers to make more decisions at the local level.

The "life cycle" of a component is sometimes used as the reason for replacement. This is
inaccurate and wasteful. The only criteria used for replacing a component should be when it
meets the written standards for replacement and is validated by onsite inspection. The life cycle
of a component is used for evaluation purposes only.

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Replacement Standards Guidelines

The purpose of the Replacement and Improvement Standards is to ensure that the desired level of quality
approved by presiding councils of the Church is achieved but not exceeded in our facilities. When items are
replaced before they meet the replacement criteria, costs increase and the replacement is no longer defensible. For
this reason, facilities managers are not authorized to replace items that do not meet the replacement criteria.

A certain amount of wear and tear is to be expected in our facilities and is acceptable. When this amount becomes
excessive and generally distracting, the item should be considered for replacement. Replacement standards have
been created for inventory items which are more costly to replace. If a replacement standard does not exist for an
item, the facilities manager should determine whether another replacement standard could be applied. For
example, a replacement standard does not exist for kitchen cabinetry. However, the replacement standard for
Millwork could be used to evaluate whether to replace kitchen cabinetry. Some standards may not apply or
descriptions may need to be adapted for the Area. As facilities managers apply the Replacement and Improvement
Standards, they should use good judgment and common sense to ensure work is needed.

As facilities managers apply the Replacement and Improvement Standards to determine whether to replace an
item, the following guidelines should be considered.

Evaluating the Condition of an Item:

1. Consider the following questions to assess the reliability of an item:


• How well does the item serve its originally designed purpose?
• How often does the item require repairs?
• How often is this item in use?

2. Consider the following questions to assess the appearance, noise level, or comfort level of an item:
• Has the noise or comfort level of the item become a distraction?
• If the style or color of the item is outdated, does the item meet the standard for
replacement? If not, it should not be replaced.

Determining What Action to Take:

1. Consider a repair in the following situation:


• If individual components of a system are failing but can be repaired. However, if major
repairs persist, do a cost breakdown analysis in order to compare repair costs with
replacement costs. In some cases, parts may be obsolete and replacement will be necessary.

2. Consider a retrofit in the following situations:


• If a cost breakdown analysis shows that it is cost effective.
• If new technology for a component will extend its useful life.

3. Consider a partial replacement in the following situations:


• If sections of the inventory item can be replaced with a similar color, pattern or texture, this
type of replacement is justified if the item meets the standard for replacement.

4. Consider a full replacement in the following situations:


• If individual components of a system cannot be replaced due to obsolescence.
• If after conducting a cost breakdown analysis it is found that the inventory item is no longer
cost effective to continually repair.

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Improvement Standards Guidelines

Definition:

Improvements are defined as work that:


• extends the life of components or systems
• increases functionality of the facility, system, or component
• increases the quantity of an inventoried component

Application:

When determining whether to make an improvement, facilities managers should apply the Replacement and
Improvement Standards. Some standards may not apply or descriptions may need to be adapted for the DTA
Area. As facilities managers apply the Replacement and Improvement Standards, they should use good judgment
and common sense to ensure work is needed. If additional quantity is being added or new space is being
reconfigured, the facilities manager should verify that work complies with the standard plan boundaries and
guidelines. For information regarding standard plans, contact the area A&E representative.

The following guiding principles and improvement guidelines should be reviewed before identifying, verifying,
and performing improvement work.

Guiding Principles:

1. “Older meetinghouses are architectural examples of their time and need not be remodeled to look like
modern meetinghouses.”

2. “If exceptional circumstances dictate modification, the results should be in harmony with the character of
the original building.”

3. “When properly maintained, most older meetinghouses continue to be attractive and comfortable and
portray the desired image of dignity and reverence without extensive remodeling.”

4. “Reasonable wear is acceptable when buildings show evidence of appropriate maintenance, cleanliness
and care.”
(Facilities Management Guidelines for Meetinghouses and Other Church Property)

Improvement Guidelines:

1. Consultants
Consultants may be used to assist the FM or PM in developing project scope, cycle time, and estimated
costs. Once the scope has been approved, consultants should use Church standard specifications in all
design work. Designs should be consistent with the cost per square foot established by the DTA Area for
R&I and new space work. Consultants should also be familiar with the Replacement and Improvement
Standards and apply them in their work.

2. Additions
Additions and reconfiguration of existing space may be made when an existing facility no longer provides
for the functional needs of the local units. This is determined by applying the Meetinghouse Adequacy
Standards O&M-PS-0006. For instructions on applying these standards, see Determining Meetinghouse
Adequacy O&M-PS-0007.

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When there is a defensible need to add new space to an existing building, standard plan additions should
be applied where appropriate. Non-standard additions should be designed in consultation with the
Architecture Engineering and Construction Division at Church headquarters or the DTA Area architecture
and engineering staff.

Additions and other improvements should be consistent with the existing architecture of the building.
Existing finishes, fixtures, and components should not be replaced to match the addition unless they meet
the established criteria for replacement in the Replacement and Improvement Standards.

3. Interior Finishes
Existing interior finishes such as face brick or painted concrete block walls should not be upgraded with
plaster and paint or sisal wall covering.

4. Seismic
Before performing any seismic work, the Seismic Strategy found in the Operations & Maintenance
Strategies O&M-PS-0002 should be reviewed. Seismic upgrades should only be performed when other
R&I work creates an opportunity to optimize economic timing and to minimize the impact on occupying
units. Full building seismic upgrades require PFAC approval.

5. HVAC
Air conditioning may be added to existing meetinghouses per the HVAC System Upgrade Improvement
Standard found in the Replacement and Improvement Standards. It is important to ensure that all HVAC
equipment is functioning as intended so that the original design for outdoor ventilation air is achieved.

6. Site Work
Retaining walls, benches, decorative planters and landscape islands in parking areas should not be added
unless required by local code. For most sites, future expansion areas should be left undeveloped with no
unnecessary grading or landscape improvements.

7. Parking
To determine the appropriate number of parking spaces for a facility, see Standard Plans Change
Boundaries A&E-NSP-0003.

8. Landscaping
Before replacing or upgrading landscaping, the following Replacement and Improvement Standards
should be reviewed and applied:
• General Site: Landscaping Replacement or Upgrade Improvement Standard
• General Site: Trees Replacement Standard
• General Site: Shrubs and Groundcovers Replacement Standard
• General Site: Lawns Replacement Standard
• General Site: Irrigation Systems Replacement Standard

Drought tolerant landscape should only be installed on existing buildings when the landscape meets the
standard for replacement or when required by local code. Landscape irrigation systems should not be
added if similar facilities in the area are not commonly irrigated.

9. Parking Lighting
Parking lighting should illuminate stalls close to the building or as needed for safety and to meet local
jurisdiction requirements. Do not provide accent, ornamental, seasonal, or other special lighting and
related exterior power outlets on existing buildings.

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10. Flagpole
If requested by local leaders, a flagpole may be installed at a meetinghouse. The cost of the flagpole and
installation is a local unit expense. The flagpole can usually be placed in a front lawn area and should not
require additional concrete walks.

11. Fencing
If fencing is required, chain link fencing should be installed. Plastic slats may be added when needed for
screening. Other fence types are permitted only when required by local jurisdictions.

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Replacement Standards Audiovisual: Electronic Audio and Video Units

This replacement standard is to be applied by facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members
of the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

This standard is used to evaluate cassette tape recorders/players (CR), compact disk players(CDP), televisions (TV), video
cassette recorders/players (VCRs), combination TV-VCRs, television projectors (TVP), and television cameras. Each
electronic audio and video unit should be evaluated independent of all other units.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each item will maximize its useful life.

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The unit functions as The unit delivers high quality sound Do not consider replacement under
designed. and/or picture without distortion. these conditions.
Controls operate properly.
2. Very Good. Necessary adjustments The unit delivers high quality sound Do not consider replacement under
keep the unit functioning as designed. and/or picture without distortion with these conditions.
slight adjustments to the manual
controls.
3. Good. The unit continues to The unit delivers good quality sound Replacement of the item is not
function with regular maintenance and and/or picture. Occasional repairs may justified but should continue to be
intermittent repairs. have to be made to the electronics or evaluated annually. Make necessary
the manual controls to keep it in good repairs and parts replacements as
(It should be possible with proper operating condition. The unit is still needed. It is not yet time to replace
maintenance and timely repairs, to reliable. the unit.
extend the useful life of the unit for
many years.)
4. Fair. The unit no longer functions The sound and/or picture quality Replace this unit.
as designed and will not without major produced detracts from the message
repairs. being presented. The quality may not
be improved without serious repairs.
The unit cannot be relied on to
function upon demand.
5. Poor. The unit no longer functions The sound and/or picture quality This unit is over-due for
as designed and delivers inadequate produced seriously detracts from the replacement.
sound and/or picture quality. message being presented, or does not
operate at all. Repair costs have
become intolerable.

Replacement Directives

1. Replace only with items found in Master Commodity Reference (MCR).

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Replacement Standards Audiovisual: Sound Systems

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The system functions at Occupants can hear clearly. There is Do not consider replacement under
the original design levels. no distracting noise. these conditions.
The system is totally reliable.
Necessary balancing and other
adjustments keep the system
functioning at design levels.
2. Good. The system continues to Occupants can hear clearly. There is Make necessary repairs and parts
function with intermittent component no distracting noise. replacements as needed.
repairs, replacements, and minor
Some components have failed and It should be possible with proper
system improvements.
have been replaced. repairs and maintenance to extend
the life of the sound system without
Others are approaching the end of their
replacement of the entire system.
useful lives.

3. Poor. The overall sound system is Occupants are distracted by the The sound system is over-due for
subject to constant breakdowns and failures of the sound system and noise. replacement.
delivers inadequate sound quality.
The components are old and
undependable.
The technology is out of date.
Repair costs have become intolerable.

Replacement Directives

1. Church approved consultants, drawings, specifications and details should be used when replacing sound system
parts and components.
2. Existing sound system components such as speakers, speaker cans, speaker cable, microphones, pulpit controls, etc.
that are in good condition should be maintained wherever possible.
3. Ensure that an asbestos survey and report is on file for meetinghouses built prior to 1988. Follow asbestos
abatement and management practices outlined in the Church Asbestos Program Handbook when replacing the sound
system.

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Replacement Standards Ceiling Acoustical Tile (glued on)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by
members of the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work can maximize the useful life of the entire
area covered by ceiling tile.

Ceiling tile replacement may include all of the tile in a meetinghouse, or the tile may be replaced in homogeneous wear zones
as preferred by the stake leaders, Wear zones may be identified as

1. Foyers and hallways


2. Classrooms and offices
3. Chapel and overflow
4. Cultural hall

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. Tile is new or like new There is no permanent soiling, staining or, Do not consider replacement under these
condition. discoloration. There are no visible dents, conditions.
cracks or chipped surfaces.

2. Very Good. Tile in the area being Slight discoloration may be present in aging Do not consider replacement under these
inspected is only beginning to show tile or around return air ducts. Spot cleaning conditions.
defects. and minor repairs to prevent sagging and
remove marks have been made to maintain
the condition of the tile. 75% to 95% of the
tile in the area being inspected is still in
excellent condition.

3. Good. Tile is showing defects, but is The tile is showing slight yellowing and Replacement is not yet justified
within acceptable limits. discoloration. Regular spot cleaning has Evaluate the tile annually until replacement is
kept the tile attractive. Repairs and required.
(It should be possible, with proper and replacements have been made to correct
timely repairs and preventive sagging, fading, dented, chipped and broken
maintenance, to extend the life of the tiles. 75% to 95% of the tile in the area
ceiling tile in this condition for many being considered is still in very good
years. This does not take vandalism into condition.
consideration.)

4. Fair. The tile is showing considerable More than 70% of the area covered is Replace the tile.
cracks marks and defects. showing discoloration, sagging, cracks and
marks. Cleaning and other restoration
processes are having minimal effect on the
tile. Repairs are needed often to correct
sagging, cracking, and denting. Less than
75% of the tile is in good condition.

5. Poor. The tile is showing serious and Most of the tile is sagging, dented, broken, The ceiling tile is over-due for replacement.
extensive discoloration and defects. chipped, cracked and disfigured. Extensive
marking and disfiguration detracts from the
appearance of the tile. Damage is
irreversible.

Replacement Directives

1. It may be necessary to replace an area, subject to considerable vandalism, with a product that is more resistant.
2. The addition of new space does not necessarily justify the replacement of ceiling tile in existing space.

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Replacement Standards Computer Hardware – MLS (Local Unit) Computers

All MLS (Local Unit) computers and printers will be replaced together on a five-year cycle. The stake
physical facilities representative works with the FM group during the fourth year of the computer’s life
so headquarters budget funds can be set aside to replace both the computer and printer during the fifth
year. See the Policy and Guidelines for Computers Used by Clerks for Church Record Keeping for
specific questions.

Computers that have hardware failures within the first three years of life are considered under warranty
by the manufacturer. If a computer malfunctions and is out of warranty but not yet scheduled for
replacement, the unit should contact the assistant stake clerk assigned to manage Church computers and
determine if the computer can be repaired for less than $150. If it can be repaired for less than $150, the
assistant stake clerk makes the necessary arrangements and codes the expense in stake MLS to “Other:
Authorized Computer Repairs.” These repair funds will be reimbursed to the stake. If the repairs will
cost more than $150, the stake physical facilities representative should contact the FM group to order a
replacement. The FM group will replace the computer using operational funds.

New Computer Hardware Standards

Current Requirements for all new computers as of 1 January 2008:


• Pentium Dual Core 1.8 gigahertz processor
• 2 GB of RAM
• 60 GB of Hard disk capacity
• DVD-ROM drive
• Network card
• Internal modem
• Windows XP Professional with service pack 2
• 6+ USB ports
• Stakes must have Symbol Technologies barcode reader scanner
• Laser Printer – HP Laserjet P2015d
• Church Communications Network equipment (where approved)
• 512 MB Flash drive
• Multimedia speakers attached to a 17” Flat Screen Monitor
• Mouse/Keyboard

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Replacement Standards Countertop (R&I #36)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled cleaning and preventive maintenance work can maximize the useful life of the
countertop.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The countertop is in new or The countertop has no chips, dents or Do not consider replacement under these
like new condition and functions as scratches. The finished surface is not worn conditions.
designed. or faded. There is no discoloration on the
surface. All corners and side pieces are
tight.

2. Very Good. The countertop is beginning The countertop may have some scratches or Do not consider replacement under these
to show wear. Regular cleaning keeps the small chips at this point. The surface is not conditions.
countertop in good condition. seriously dented or scratched. There is no
fading or discoloration present.
All corners and side pieces are tight.

3. Good. The countertop is showing The countertop may have some minor Replacement is not yet justified
defects, but is within acceptable limits. dents, chips and scratches. The finished Evaluate the countertop annually until
The countertop continues to serve its surface is beginning to fade and wear. replacement is required. Make necessary
purpose with regular cleaning and minor Some discoloration may be present, but the repairs and section replacements as needed.
repairs. countertop is still usable. Some of the
corners or side pieces may need to be re-
(It should be possible, with proper and adhered or replaced.
timely repairs and preventive maintenance,
to extend the life of the countertop in this
condition for many years. This does not
take vandalism into consideration.)

4. Fair. The countertop is showing The countertop has many scratches, dents Replace the countertop.
considerable wear and defects. It no longer and chips. The finish surface is faded and If only one section of the countertop is in
serves its purpose as originally designed. wearing thin. Discoloration is present and bad shape, try and get a match in materials
Colors may be outdated. side and corner pieces are loose or broken. and replace only that one part.

5. Poor. The countertop is showing serious The countertop has several scratches, dents The countertop is over-due for
and extensive discoloration and defects. and chips. The surface is severely faded replacement.
and discolored. Corner and side pieces are
broken or missing.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved consultants, specifications and/or details when replacing a countertop.
2. Wherever possible, continue to use existing sections or components that are in good condition, such as corner pieces, side pieces
or entire sections of countertop. This may not be possible if a color or design match cannot be made.

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Replacement Standards Doors with hardware, interior

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by
members of the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each component of the Interior Door
will maximize its useful life.

The replacement standard provides direction to facility managers for replacing the entire door or door system, not
individual components or parts of a system.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The door functions as The operation of the door is totally reliable. Do not consider replacement under these
originally installed. There are no signs of All components including glass, veneer, conditions.
sagging, chips, splintered areas, scratches, finish, locks, seals, frames and hardware are
warps or hardware that does not function intact and fully functioning with no visible
properly. defects.

2. Very Good. Necessary adjustments and The operation of the door is totally reliable. Do not consider replacement under these
minor parts replacement may be necessary. Adjustments and minor parts replacement conditions.
Only minor scratches and wear on the will maintain the integrity of door. 85%-
hardware and veneer are evident. The door 95% of the surface area of the door, door-
functions as originally installed. frame and hardware are in original
condition. The hardware is showing only
slight wear.

3. Good. The door continues to function The door functions adequately. Replacement of the entire door assembly
with intermittent component repairs, Some components have failed and have is not justified but should continue to be
replacements. been replaced. Others are approaching the evaluated annually. Make necessary
end of their useful lives. 85%-95% of the repairs and parts replacements as needed.
(It should be possible, with proper and surface finish of the door, door -frame and It is not yet time to replace the door.
timely repairs, maintenance and necessary hardware are still in very good condition.
replacements, to extend the life of the door The door may have a slight amount of warp.
for many years without replacement of the
entire door system.)

4. Fair. The door no longer functions as Hinges, locks and panic hardware no longer Make a cost analysis to determine
designed and will not without major repairs. function as original. Less than 75% of the whether to replace faulty, cracked,
surface finish of the door, door - frame and chipped, peeled, warped or otherwise
hardware are in good condition. The door failed components of the door assembly
shows some warp, but can still be adjusted or replace it entirely.
to latch properly

5. Poor. The overall door assembly is Door sags from hinge failure. Locking The door is over-due for replacement.
subject to constant breakdowns and delivers system is inoperable. More than 40% of the
inadequate quality. The appearance is no surface finish of the door and hardware
longer acceptable. shows evidence of peeling, scratches,
splintering, chips The door is warped to the
point that it cannot be adjusted to latch
properly. Panic hardware is inoperable and
new panic hardware is incompatible with
the old door.

Replacement Directives

1. Replace with equal veneer selection, stain colors and specifications as closely as possible.
2. When partial replacement occurs, maintain consistency in styles and ratings of doors and components.
3. When replacing door in entire building or building section, replace with church standard specified products.

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Replacement Standards Door, Storefront

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each component of the Storefront Door will
maximize its useful life.

The replacement standard provides direction to facility managers for replacing the entire Storefront Door System not individual
components or parts of a system.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The system functions as The system is totally reliable. Do not consider replacement under
originally installed. There are no signs of The door operates smoothly. All these conditions.
discolored or fading aluminum, cracked components including glass, locks, rubber
or broken glass, sagging doors, or seals, frames and hardware are intact. The
deteriorated weather stripping. door is functioning properly and is secure.

2. Very Good. Necessary adjustments The system is totally reliable. Do not consider replacement under
and minor parts replacement may be Adjustments and minor parts replacement these conditions.
necessary. Some fading of anodized will maintain the integrity of door system.
aluminum is prevalent. 75% or more of the anodized area, and
hardware surfaces, on a particular storefront
door assembly are still in excellent
condition.

3. Good. The system continues to The door functions adequately. Replacement of the entire door
function with intermittent component Some components have failed and have assembly is not justified but should
repairs, replacements. been replaced. Others are approaching the continue to be evaluated annually.
end of their useful lives. 75% of the Make necessary repairs and parts
(It should be possible, with proper and anodized area, and hardware surfaces, on a replacements as needed.
timely repairs, maintenance and particular storefront door assembly are still It is not yet time to replace the
necessary replacements, to extend the life in very good condition. The door is still Storefront Door.
of the Storefront Door for many years secure.
without replacement of the entire door
system.)

4. Fair. The Storefront Door no longer Hinges, locks and panic hardware are not Make a study and life cycle cost
functions as designed and will not functioning as originally designed. Minor analysis to determine whether to
without major repairs. glass chips and cracks may be evident. Less replace faulty, cracked or faded
than 75% of the aluminum anodized areas, components of the door assembly or
and hardware surfaces, are in good replace it entirely.
condition. It may not be possible to fully If the door cannot be secured it should
secure the door, be replaced.

5. Poor. The overall door assembly is Door sags from hinge failure. Locking The storefront door system is over-due
subject to constant breakdowns and system is inoperable. More than 40% of the for replacement.
delivers inadequate service. anodized areas and weather stripping is
gone. Panic hardware is inoperable and new
panic hardware is incompatible with the old
door.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only recommended professional glazing contractors when replacing an entire system.

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Replacement Standards Drapes (R&I #32)


This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled cleaning and repair work can maximize the useful life of drapes.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The drapes are new or like Drapes have no loose threads. Hems are Do not consider replacement under these
new condition and they function as secure and seams tight. If liners are present, conditions.
designed. the stitching is tight. There are no tears.
Hardware functions smoothly and has no
broken or missing parts.

2. Very Good. The drapes are beginning to Drapes have a slight amount of loose Do not consider replacement under these
show wear. Cleaning and repairs help keep threads. Hems are secure and seams tight. conditions.
the drapes in good working condition. If liners are present, stitching is tight. There
are no tears. Hardware functions smoothly
and has no broken or missing parts.

3. Good. The drapes are showing defects, Drapes have some loose threads. The Replacement is not yet justified
but are within acceptable limits. The drapes sunlight is starting to weaken the fibers in Evaluate the drapes annually until
continue to serve their purpose with regular the material. Hems are secure and seams replacement is required. Make necessary
cleaning and repairs. tight. If liners are present, stitching is tight. repairs and replace damaged or broken
There are no tears. Hardware functions hardware.
(It should be possible, with proper and smoothly and has few broken or missing
timely cleaning and repairs, to extend the parts.
life of the drapes in this condition for many
years. This does not take vandalism into
consideration.)

4. Fair. The drapes are showing Drapes have considerable loose threads. Replace the drapes.
considerable wear and defects. The drapes The sunlight has caused the material to If the liners are stained and the hardware is
no longer function as designed and will not become fragile and weak. Hems or seams bad, but the rest of the drapes are in good
without several repairs, to the point where are coming un-sewn or are loose. Liners condition, consider replacing only the liners
the repairs are noticeable and distracting. may be coming unstitched and stained and hardware.
(from condensation). There may be some
tears. Hardware does not function smoothly
and has some broken or missing parts.

5. Poor. The drapes are showing serious Drapes have several loose threads. Damage The drapes over-due for replacement.
and extensive discoloration and defects. in the form of holes and tears are present,
The drapes no longer serve their purpose. due to the fragility of the material. Hems or
seams are coming un-sewn. Liners may be
hanging loose. There may be tears.
Hardware does not function and may have
several broken or missing parts.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved contractors, specifications and/or details when replacing drapes.
2. Blackout drapes may need to be put in places where broadcasts are shown, such as in a stake center.

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Replacement Standards Fascia

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A program of scheduled preventive maintenance work can maximize the useful life of the entire building fascia.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The fascia is in new or like Fascia has no dents or loose sections. There Do not consider replacement under these
new condition and is functioning as is no discoloration. conditions.
designed.

2. Very Good. The fascia is beginning to Fascia is slightly dented, but has no loose Do not consider replacement under these
show slight signs of wear. Cleaning might sections. There is slight discoloration. conditions.
be necessary to keep the fascia in this
condition.

3. Good. The fascia is showing wear, but is Fascia has some dents and has a few loose Replacement is not yet justified
within acceptable limits. sections. There is some discoloration. Evaluate the fascia occasionally until
replacement is required. Make necessary
repairs and replace sections accordingly.

4. Fair. The fascia is showing a Fascia has many dents and has some loose Replace the fascia.
considerable amount of wear. The fascia is sections. Discoloration is evident.
detracting from the appearance of the
exterior.

5. Poor. The fascia is showing serious and Fascia has several dents and has some loose The fascia is over-due for replacement.
extensive wear. sections. Discoloration detracts from the
buildings exterior appearance.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved specifications and details when replacing a building’s fascia.

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Replacement Standards Fencing and Gates: Chain Link (R&I #139)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work can maximize the useful life of the chain link fence.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The fence is in new or like Chain link fence is straight and tight, with Do not consider replacement under these
new condition. It functions at its original no sagging or bent mesh. All wire ties are conditions.
design level. present. Supporting posts are straight. All
slats in privacy fences are present and are
not cracked, broken or missing.

2. Very Good. The fence is beginning to Chain link fence is straight and tight, with Do not consider replacement under these
show wear. Necessary adjustments allow slight bending and / or sagging mesh. conditions.
the fence to continue its designed purpose. Supporting posts are straight. Privacy slats
are all in tact, but may be starting to crack.

3. Good. The fence is showing defects, but Chain link fence could be bent in some Replacement is not yet justified
is within acceptable limits. The fence areas due to cars, snow removal, or people Evaluate the fence annually until
continues to function with regular (climbing on it). Sections of mesh may replacement is required. Make necessary
maintenance and intermittent repairs. need to be replaced. Some privacy slats are repairs and replace parts as needed.
broken or missing. Supporting posts are
(It should be possible, with proper and still straight.
timely repairs and preventive maintenance,
to extend the life of the fence in this
condition for many years. This does not
take vandalism into consideration.)

4. Fair. The fence is showing considerable Chain link fence has bent areas of mesh. Replace the fence.
wear and defects. The fence no longer Many of the supporting ties are missing. If there are only a few sections of fence that
functions as designed and will not without Several privacy slats are cracked, broken, or are damaged, consider replacing only the
major repairs. missing. Supporting posts are bent from area of damaged mesh
cars running into them. Fence is no longer
tight or straight

5. Poor. The fence is showing serious and Chain link fence is no longer straight and The fence is over-due for replacement.
extensive discoloration and defects. The has several areas of bent mesh. Many
fence is continually breaking or damaged. supporting posts are bent and several wire
It is no longer useful and does not function ties are missing. Most of the privacy slats
as designed. are missing. Trees and bushes may have
grown into the fence, bending and distorting
the mesh. The fence no longer serves its
original purpose.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved consultants, specifications and/or details when replacing chain link fencing.
2. Wherever possible, use existing components that are in good condition, such as supporting posts. If the old fence does not have
privacy slats, and the new fence will have privacy slats, use a thicker gage steel support post, buried at least two feet deep.

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Replacement Standards Flooring: Carpet (R&I #14)

This replacement standard is to be applied by facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the verification team during
the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of cleaning and scheduled preventive maintenance work will maximize the useful life of the entire carpet.

A carpet replacement may include all the carpet in a meetinghouse, or the carpet may be replaced in homogeneous wear zones as preferred by the stake
leaders. Wear zones may be identified as:

1. Chapel and overflow


2. Cultural hall
3. Foyers, hallways and stairs
4. Classrooms and offices

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. Carpet is in new or like-new There is no permanent soiling, staining, or Do not consider replacement under these
condition. fading. There is no visible frizzing, fraying, conditions.
seam separation, bubbling, backing separation,
matting, or tearing.

2. Very Good. Carpet in the area being Slight matting or fading may be present in areas Do not consider replacement under these
inspected is only beginning to show wear. of heaviest traffic. Regular spotting and conditions.
cleaning have maintained the carpet’s attractive
appearance. Small repairs may have been made
to correct some snagging, or fraying. There is
no visible seam separation, bubbling, backing
separation, or tearing. 75% to 95% of the carpet
in the area being inspected is still in excellent
condition.

3. Good. Carpet is showing wear, but is within The areas of heaviest traffic are showing matting Replacement is not yet justified. Evaluate the
acceptable limits or fading. Regular spotting and cleaning have carpet annually until replacement is required.
kept the carpet looking attractive. Repairs have
(It should be possible with proper and timely been made to correct frizzing, fraying, seam
repairs and preventive maintenance to extend the separation, backing separation, bubbling, or
life of the carpet in this condition for many tearing. 75% to 95% of the carpet in the area
years.) being considered is still in very good condition.

4. Fair. Carpet is showing considerable wear. Many places are showing matting or fading. Replace this carpet.
Regular spotting and cleaning are having
minimal effect on appearance. Repairs are
needed often to correct snagging, frizzing,
fraying, seam separation, bubbling, backing
separation, or tearing. It is no longer possible to
eliminate all frizzing. Less than 75% of the
carpet is in good condition.

5. Poor. Carpet is showing serious and Most of the carpet is showing matting or fading. This carpet is over-due for replacement.
extensive wear. Frizzing is irreversible. Regular spotting and
cleaning has little or no effect on appearance.
Repairs must be made constantly to correct
snagging, fraying, seam separation, bubbling,
backing separation, or tearing.

Replacement Directives

1. New carpet colors have been designed such that the carpet does not prematurely trigger the replacement of other items. The color of the replacement
carpet should be chosen to compliment other existing meetinghouse components and not be a reason to replace them. Such components include
(but are not limited to) existing carpet, pew fabric, opera chair fabric, foyer furniture, chair color, counter tops, window sills, toilet partitions, or
portable partitions.
2. The addition of new space does not necessarily justify the replacement of carpet in existing space.
3. Relief Society Room carpet replacement should not be different from standard carpet in the meetinghouse.
4. If the wall base must be replaced, carpet wall base is the standard.

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Replacement Standards Flooring: Tile – Ceramic or Quarry (R&I #9)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled cleaning and preventive maintenance work can maximize the useful life of the tile
floor.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The tile floor is new or like The floor has no discoloration or worn Do not consider replacement under these
new condition. surface. There are no chipped, cracked, or conditions.
broken tiles. There are no loose or missing
portions. Grout is uniform in color and
appearance.

2. Very Good. The tile floor is beginning The floor has no discoloration or worn Do not consider replacement under these
to show wear. Regular cleaning and surface. There may be slight cracks, with conditions.
preventative maintenance keep no chipped or broken tiles. There are no
appearance clean and new. loose or missing portions. Grout is uniform
in color and appearance.

3. Good. The tile floor is showing The floor has no discoloration or worn Replacement is not yet justified
defects, but is within acceptable limits. surface. There may be some hairline cracks Evaluate the tile floor annually until
The tile surface continues to serve its or chips, but no tiles are broken. There are replacement is required. Make necessary
purpose with regular cleaning and no loose or missing portions. Grout may grout repairs and individual tile replacement
intermittent repairs. show variation in color or appearance. as needed.

(It should be possible, with proper and


timely cleaning, repairs and preventive
maintenance, to extend the life of the
floor in this condition for many years.
This does not take vandalism into
consideration.)

4. Fair. The tile floor is showing Floor has slight discoloration or worn Replace the tile floor. If only one section
considerable wear and defects. The floor surface present. There may be some cracks of tile has been damaged or worn due to
no longer serves its purpose. The or chips with no broken tiles. There are no heavy traffic, consider only replacing that
appearance of the tile is distracting. loose, broken or missing portions. Grout tile area. This may not be possible if a tile
may show some variation in color and match cannot be made.
appearance. A small amount of grout is
loose or missing.

5. Poor. The tile floor is showing serious Floor has some discoloration and a worn The tile floor is over-due for
and extensive wear and defects. The surface. There are cracks and/or chips replacement.
floor no longer serves its purpose. The present with some tiles broken. There are
appearance of the tile is severely some loose, broken or missing portions.
distracting. Grout shows obvious variation in color and
appearance. Some grout is loose or
missing.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved contractors, specifications and/or details when replacing a tile floor.
2. Wherever possible, find matching tile and only replace tile that is in fair to poor condition.
3. When replacing a tile floor, make sure to buy extra tiles and store them for future repairs and replacements.

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Replacement Standards Floors: Hardwood (R&I #11)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled repairs and preventive maintenance work can maximize the useful life of the
hardwood floor.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The floor is new or like Floor has no scratches, gouges, Do not consider replacement under these
new condition. Floor functions at discoloration, finish build-up. There is no conditions.
original design purpose. chipping or peeling of the finish. There are
no broken, loose or missing planks. Floor
has adequate finish in all areas.

2. Very Good. The flooring is beginning Floor has slight scratches, but no gouges, Do not consider replacement under these
to show wear. Cleaning and routine discoloration or finish build-up. There is no conditions.
maintenance keep the floor in good chipping or peeling of the finish. Finish is
condition. slightly worn in high traffic areas only.
There are no loose, broken or missing
portions.

3. Good. The flooring is showing Floor has some scratches and/or gouges. Replacement is not yet justified.
defects, but is within acceptable limits. It There is discoloration and finish build-up. Evaluate the floor annually until
continues to function as originally There may be some chipping and peeling of replacement is required. Refinish floor and
designed with regular maintenance. the finish. Finish shows some wear make any other necessary repairs.
throughout. There are no loose, broken or Hardwood floors can be sanded 3 to 4 times
(It should be possible, with proper and missing portions. before they need to be replaced.
timely repairs and preventive
maintenance, to extend the life of the
floor in this condition for many years.
This does not take vandalism into
consideration.)

4. Fair. The flooring is showing Floor has considerable scratches gouging is Replace the floor.
considerable marks and defects. Floor is present. There is discoloration and finish The floor may last a few more years by
extensively worn. The surface no longer build-up. There is chipping and peeling of making the necessary repairs and plank
functions as designed and will not the finish. Planks have been sanded several replacements as needed.
without major repairs. times and are wearing thin. Water damage
may be present, causing the planks to cup
and buckle, which causes uneven sections.
Separation of planks has caused many areas
to squeak when stepped on.

5. Poor. The flooring is showing serious Floor has extensive scratching and a The floor is over-due for replacement.
and extensive discoloration and defects. considerable number of gouges are present.
Floor is extremely worn. There is obvious discoloration and finish
build-up. There may be considerable
chipping and peeling of the finish. There
may be some loose, broken or missing
portions. Finish shows extensive wear
throughout. Planks are cracking and
separating. Boards are thin from sanding
and refinishing.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved consultants, specifications and details when replacing an entire wood floor.
2. When replacing a cultural hall floor, take off the basketball rims in order to prevent people from playing on the floor too early.

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Replacement Standards General Site: Trees

• The replacement standard is to be applied by the Facility Manager during the R&I needs identification inspection
and by members of the verification team. A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive
maintenance work to each tree will maximize its useful and sustainable life.

• Selective removal of trees as they reach maturity is justified if they are no longer meeting the design criteria or
maintenance and replacement standards established by the original or modified planting plan. Consult with the
authorized Landscape Architect designated by the Regional FM Manager to assist in this evaluation. .

• Each tree should be inspected and recommendations reported annually to the verification team by the experienced
certified arborist or assigned specialist selected to maintain the tree. Replacement should be evaluated against the
following criteria:

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The tree is in a thriving, The tree is generally undamaged or Do not consider replacement under
healthy condition. marred by poor maintenance practices, these conditions.
natural forces or insects.
2. Very Good. The tree has sustained Poor maintenance practices, natural Do not consider replacement under
some damage, but generally is in a forces or insects/pests have damaged these conditions. Provide preventative
healthy condition. the tree. measures of maintenance as directed by
the certified arborist’s annual report.
3. Good. The tree is showing Growth and development of the tree is Replacement of the tree is not
improvement from previous damage continuing though hindered by poor justified but should continue to be
sustained earlier in its life. maintenance practices, natural forces or evaluated annually. Follow the
insects/pests that affected its earlier recommendations presented by the
growth. Most damage has been stopped certified arborist’s annual report.
or altered enough to extend the life of
the tree.
4. Fair. The tree is showing 30%-50% of the limbs have died or Determine whether continued
considerable signs of deterioration. show considerable signs of altered upkeep can extend the life of the tree.
growth. Extensive damage to the Only perform corrective
growth areas of the tree has occurred maintenance to those areas that may
due to insects/pests infestation or other result in possible life or safety
natural forces. situations. If the tree cannot be saved
and the analysis justifies replacement,
do not repair any damaged areas.
Follow recommendations presented by
the certified arborist’s annual report.
5. Poor. The tree is showing serious 50%-75% of the tree has died. This tree should be replaced.
or extensive wear and/or damage. Deterioration and/or poor growth has
caused concern for safety and
protection of surrounding plants,
surfaces, buildings, etc. Messiness and
cleanliness are significant concerns.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved specifications and details when replacing trees on site.
2. Schedule replacement during cool or dormant seasons so that there is not a significant impact on the tree during
installation.

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Replacement Standards General Site: Shrubs & Groundcovers

• The replacement standard is to be applied by the Facility Manager during the R&I needs identification inspection
and by members of the verification team. A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive
maintenance work to each plant will maximize its useful and sustainable life.

• Selective removal of shrubs and ground covers as they reach maturity is justified if they are no longer meeting the
design criteria or maintenance and replacement standards established by the original or modified planting plan.
Consult with the authorized Landscape Architect designated by the Regional FM Manager to assist in this
evaluation.

• Each shrub and area of ground cover should be inspected and recommendations reported annually to the verification
team. Replacement should be evaluated against the following criteria:

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The shrub or The shrub or groundcover is generally Do not consider replacement under
groundcover is in a thriving, healthy undamaged or marred by poor these conditions.
condition. maintenance practices, natural forces or
insects/ pests.
2. Very Good. The shrub or Poor maintenance practices, natural Do not consider replacement under
groundcover has sustained some forces or insects/pests have slightly these conditions. Provide preventative
damage, but generally is in a healthy damaged the shrub or groundcover. measures of maintenance as directed by
condition. Long-term effects are negligible. this section of the Management Plan.
3. Good. The shrub or groundcover is Growth and development of the tree is Replacement of the shrub or
showing improvement from previous continuing though hindered by poor groundcover is not justified but
damage sustained earlier in its life. maintenance practices, natural forces or should continue to be evaluated
insects/pests that affected its earlier annually. Follow the
growth. Most damage has been stopped recommendations presented in this
or altered enough to extend the life of section of the Management Plan.
the shrub or groundcover.
4. Fair. The shrub or groundcover is 30%-50% of the limbs have died or Determine whether continued
showing considerable signs of show considerable signs of altered maintenance can extend the life of
deterioration. growth. Extensive damage to the the tree. If the shrub or groundcover
growth areas of the shrub or cannot be saved and the analysis
groundcover has occurred due to justifies replacement, do not repair any
insects/pests infestation or other natural damaged areas. Replace the plant.
forces.
5. Poor. The shrub or groundcover is 50% or more of the shrub or This shrub or groundcover should be
showing serious or extensive wear groundcover has died. Deterioration replaced.
and/or damage. has caused concern for safety and
protection of surrounding plants,
surfaces, buildings, etc. Neatness &
cleanliness are significant concerns.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved specifications and details when replacing shrubs or groundcover on site.
2. Schedule replacement during cool or dormant seasons so that there is not a significant impact on the shrub or
groundcover during installation.

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Replacement Standards General Site: Lawns

• The replacement standard is to be applied by the Facility Manager during the R&I needs identification inspection
and by members of the verification team. A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive
maintenance work to each lawn area will maximize its useful and sustainable life.

• Selective removal of lawn areas as they reach maturity is justified if they are no longer meeting the design criteria or
maintenance and replacement standards established by the original or modified planting plan. Consult with the
authorized Landscape Architect designated by Headquarters to assist in this evaluation. .

• Each lawn area should be inspected and recommendations reported annually to the verification team by the
authorized Landscape Architect or assigned specialist selected to evaluate the lawn areas. Replacement should be
evaluated against the following criteria:

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The lawn area is in a The lawn area is generally undamaged Do not consider replacement under
thriving, healthy condition. or marred by poor maintenance these conditions.
practices, natural forces or insects/
pests.
2. Very Good. The lawn area has Poor maintenance practices, natural Do not consider replacement under
sustained some damage, but generally forces or insects/pests have damaged these conditions. Provide preventative
is in a healthy condition. the lawn area. measures of maintenance as directed in
this section of the Management Plan.
3. Good. The lawn area is showing Growth and development of the lawn Replacement of the lawn is not
improvement from previous damage area is continuing though hindered by justified but should continue to be
sustained earlier in its life. poor maintenance practices, poor soil evaluated annually. Follow the
conditions, natural forces or recommendations presented in this
insects/pests. Most damage has been section of the Management Plan.
stopped or altered enough to extend its
life.
4. Fair. The lawn area is showing 30%-50% of the lawn has died or Determine whether continued
considerable signs of deterioration. shown considerable signs of altered maintenance can extend the life of
growth. Extensive damage to the the lawn. If the lawn area cannot be
growth areas of the lawn has occurred saved and the analysis justifies
due to insects/pests infestation or other replacement, do not repair any
natural forces. damaged areas. Replace the lawn.
5. Poor. The lawn area is showing 50% or more of the lawn has died. This lawn area should be replaced.
serious or extensive wear and/or Deterioration has caused concern for
damage. safety and protection of surrounding
plants, surfaces, buildings, etc.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved specifications and details when replacing lawn areas on site.
2. Schedule replacement during cool or dormant seasons so that there is not a significant impact on the tree during
installation.

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Replacement Standards General Site: Irrigation Systems

• The replacement standard is to be applied by the Facility Manager during the R&I needs identification inspection
and by members of the verification team. A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive
maintenance work to each component of the system will maximize its useful and sustainable life.

• The replacement standard provides directions for replacing an entire system and not individual components or parts
of a system. Replacement should be evaluated against the following criteria:

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The system functions The system is totally reliable. Do not consider replacement
at fully adequate levels. Sprinkler heads are at proper levels. under these conditions.
All turf and planting areas are
evenly watered (no dry spots).
2. Very Good. Necessary The system is totally reliable. Do not consider replacement
adjustments and minimal head Adjustments may need to be made to under these conditions. Provide
replacements keep system maintain the system. preventative measures of
functioning at fully adequate levels. maintenance as directed in this
section of the Management Plan.
3. Good. The system continues to Turf and planting areas are Replacement of the entire
function with intermittent adequately covered. Some irrigation system is not justified,
component repairs, replacements components have failed and have but should continue to be
and minor system improvements (it been replaced. Others are evaluated annually. Make
should be possible, with proper and approaching the end of their useful necessary repairs and parts
timely repairs, maintenance and lives. Adjustments need to be made. replacements as needed. It is not
necessary replacements, to extend A small number of components need yet time to replace the irrigation
the entire irrigation system for many replacement. system.
years without replacement of the
entire system).
4. Fair. The system no longer A lack of coverage due to low Make a study and life cycle cost
functions adequately and will not pressure caused by leakage and or analysis to determine whether to
without major alterations. extensive expansion of the system. replace faulty components of the
20% of the system does not function irrigation system, retrofit the
adequately due to: existing system, or replace the
• Poor coverage. system entirely.
• Blocked pipes.
• Inadequate pipe sizes.
• New Landscape layouts.
• Additions to Buildings.
• Change in water
pressure/quantity/quality
5. Poor. The overall irrigation Complete lack of coverage to turf This irrigation system is over-due
system is subject to constant and plantings due to low pressure for replacement.
breakdowns and delivers inadequate caused by leaks, worn and broken
quality. sprinkler heads, and extensive
expansions of the system.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only approved specifications and details when replacing irrigation system components.

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Replacement Standards Gutters and Downspouts (R&I #160)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled repairs and preventive maintenance work can maximize the useful life of a gutter
and/or downspout.

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The gutters and There are no leaks, loose joints, cracks or Do not consider replacement under these
downspouts function at original design splits in the material. Gutters are not bent conditions.
levels. or loose. All seams are tight.

2. Very Good. The gutters and There a few areas that leak and have loose Do not consider replacement under these
downspouts are beginning to show wear. joints, but are not split or cracked. Gutters conditions. Make necessary repairs and
are not bent or loose. replacement of parts as needed.

3. Good. The gutters and downspouts There are some areas that leak and have Replacement of the gutters and
function with regular maintenance and loose joints. Some areas are split and/or downspouts is not justified but should
intermittent repairs. cracked. Sections of gutters are bent or continue to be evaluated annually. Make
loose. necessary repairs and parts replacements as
(It should be possible with proper needed.
preventive maintenance and timely
repairs, to extend the useful life of the
gutters and downspouts for many years.)
4. Fair. The gutters and downspouts no There are many areas that leak and have Replace the gutters and downspouts.
longer functions as designed and will not loose joints. Many areas are split and/or
without major repairs. cracked. Many sections of gutters are bent
or loose.

5. Poor. The gutters and downspouts no There are several areas that leak and have The gutters and downspouts are over-due
longer function as designed. loose joints. Several areas are split and/or for replacement.
cracked. Several sections of gutters are
bent or loose.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved consultants, specifications and details when replacing gutters and downspouts.

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Replacement Standards HVAC: Air Cooled Condensing Units

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The building zone is The condensing unit is new or operates Do not consider replacement.
cooled effectively. with near new reliability.
2. Good. The building zone is cooled Some components may need to be Do not consider replacement.
effectively with regular maintenance repaired or replaced. Refrigerant leaks
and intermittent repair of the may need to be repaired. The
condensing unit. condensing unit is reliable provided
that annual inspections reveal potential
failure of the individual components to
allow timely repair.
3. Poor. The condensing unit breaks The condensing unit is unreliable. Refrigeration piping should be
down during operation. Parts and technology are obsolete. reviewed for proper installation by a
professional consultant.
Replace the condensing unit only
after it has been determined that the
refrigeration piping is correct and
does not contribute to pre-mature
compressor failure.

Replacement Directives

1. Church approved guidelines, drawings, specifications and details should be used when replacing air cooled
condensing unit components.
2. Professional mechanical engineering consultants should be used when replacing air cooled condensing unit
components.

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Replacement Standards HVAC: Air Handling Unit with Coils

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The blower section The air handling unit is new or operates Do not consider replacement.
delivers heating and cooling air at near new reliability.
effectively to the building zone.

2. Good. The blower section delivers Some components may need to be Do not consider replacement.
heating and cooling air adequately to repaired or replaced. The air handling
the building zone with regular unit is reliable provided annual
maintenance and intermittent repair to inspections reveal potential failure of
the blower and coil sections. individual components to allow timely
repair.

3. Poor. The air handling unit fails The structural frame and/or the steel Replace the air handling unit.
during operation. sheet metal cabinet frame is failing
because of corrosion or operational
stress.

Replacement Directives

1. Church approved guidelines, drawings, specifications and details should be used when replacing an air handling
unit.
2. Existing duct work and other parts that are still in usable condition should be re-used whenever possible.
3. Professional mechanical engineering consultants should be used when replacing an air handling unit.

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Replacement Standards HVAC: Chiller

Chiller:

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The chiller generates The chiller is new or operates with Do not consider replacement.
sufficient chilled water to cool the near new reliability.
building zone.
2. Good. The chiller generates Some components may need to be Do not consider replacement.
sufficient chilled water to cool the repaired or replaced. The chiller is
building zone with regular reliable provided that annual
maintenance and intermittent repair. inspections reveal potential failure of
individual components to allow timely
repair.
3. Poor. The chiller breaks down The chiller is unreliable. Parts and Perform an engineering evaluation
during operation. technology are obsolete. to determine the feasibility of
replacing the chiller with individual
air cooled condensing units for each
of the zone air handling units or
replace the chiller.

Distribution Piping:

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. Chilled water is The piping and control valves do not Do not replace the piping.
delivered effectively to all air coils for leak. The pumps function with routine
each building zone. maintenance. Water treatment is
current.
2. Good. Chilled water flow to all air Minor leaks need repair and some parts Replace terminal control valves if
coils is adequate to cool each building need replacement over time. Water obsolete or not functioning. Replace
zone. treatment is current. pump seals and gaskets if leaking.
3. Poor. Chilled water is delivered Water treatment is not current. Pipe Replace piping, pumps, and all other
inadequately to air coils and the wall thickness is near failure piping accessories.
building zone is not cooled adequately. (measured by cutting open the pipe
section at an elbow).

Replacement Directives

1. Church approved guidelines, drawings, specifications and details should be used when replacing a chiller or
distribution piping.
2. Professional mechanical engineering consultants should be used when replacing a chiller or distribution piping.

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Replacement Standards HVAC: Cooling Tower


Cooling Tower:

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The cooling tower The cooling tower is new or operates Do not consider replacement.
functions effectively to ensure reliable with near new reliability.
chiller operation.
2. Good. The cooling tower functions Some components may need to be Do not consider replacement.
adequately to ensure reliable chiller repaired or replaced. The cooling
operation with regular maintenance tower is reliable provided that annual
and intermittent repair. inspections reveal potential failure of
individual components to allow timely
repair.
3. Poor. The cooling tower breaks The cooling tower is unreliable. Parts Replace the cooling tower. This
down during operation. and technology are obsolete. assumes that the existing chiller
remains in service.

If the chiller is being replaced with a


new chiller, an engineering
evaluation should be performed to
determine capacity match. If the
existing cooling tower capacity
matches the new chiller, then the
cooling tower should remain.

If the complete chilled water plant is


abandoned, then the cooling tower
should be abandoned.

Condenser Water Piping:

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. Condenser water is The piping and control valves do not Do not replace the piping.
effectively delivered to the cooling leak. The pumps function with routine
tower to allow reliable chiller maintenance. Water treatment is
operation. current.
2. Good. Condenser water is Minor leaks need repair and some parts Replace terminal control valves if
adequately delivered to the cooling need replacement over time. Water obsolete or not functioning. Replace
tower to allow reliable chiller treatment is current. pump seals and gaskets if leaking.
operation.
3. Poor. Condenser water is delivered Water treatment is not current. Pipe Replace piping, pumps, and all other
inadequately to the cooling tower and wall thickness is near failure piping accessories.
does not allow reliable chiller (measured by cutting open the pipe
operation. section at an elbow).

Replacement Directives

1. Church approved guidelines, drawings, specifications and details should be used when replacing a cooling tower or
distribution piping.
2. Professional mechanical engineering consultants should be used when replacing a cooling tower or distribution
piping.
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Replacement Standard HVAC: Digital Thermostat

Condition Definition Action


1. Good. All features and functions are The thermostat is new or operates Do not consider replacement.
operational. with near new reliability.

2. Poor. One or more functions fail The thermostat does not reliably Replace the thermostat.
intermittently or continuously. activate the heating and cooling
equipment or maintain settings.

Replacement Directives

1. Replace only with the thermostat found in the O&M Specifications.

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Replacement Standards HVAC: Duct Furnace

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The furnace The furnace is new or operates at Do not consider replacement.
generates sufficient heat to near new reliability.
effectively heat the building zone.

2. Good. The furnace generates Some minor components such as Do not consider replacement.
sufficient heat to effectively heat controls, wiring and gas valve may
the building zone with regular need to be repaired or replaced.
maintenance and intermittent repair. The furnace is reliable provided
annual inspections reveal potential
failure of individual components to
allow timely repair.
3. Poor. The furnace breaks down The furnace is unreliable, parts and Replace the furnace.
during operation. technology are obsolete. Measured
carbon dioxide levels may indicate
a potentially dangerous cracked
heat exchanger.

Replacement Directives

1. Church approved guidelines, drawings, specifications and details should be used when replacing a duct
furnace.
2. Existing duct work and other parts that are still in usable condition should be re-used whenever possible.
3. Professional mechanical engineering consultants should be used when replacing a duct furnace.

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Replacement Standards HVAC: Packaged Forced Air Furnace

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The furnace heats the The furnace is new or operates with Do not consider replacement.
zone effectively with regular near new reliability.
maintenance.

2. Good. The furnace heats the zone Some components may need to be Do not consider replacement unless
effectively with regular maintenance refurbished or replaced. The furnace is the heat exchanger has failed. If the
and intermittent repairs. reliable provided annual inspections heat exchanger has failed but the
reveal potential failure of individual other components are functioning,
components to allow timely repair. perform a life cycle cost analysis to
determine whether to replace the
heat exchanger or the entire furnace.
3. Poor. The furnace breaks down The furnace is unreliable. Parts and Replace the furnace.
during operation. technology are obsolete.

Replacement Directives

1. Church approved guidelines, drawings, specifications and details should be used when replacing furnace
components.
2. If add on cooling is existing or being considered as part of the upgrade or replacement, a professional mechanical
consultant should be used.

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Replacement Standards HVAC: Hot Water or Steam Boiler (R&I #199 & 200)

This replacement standard is to be applied by facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members
of the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

This standard is used to evaluate cast iron and steel boilers.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each component and part will
maximize the useful life of the boiler.

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The boiler functions at The boiler operates at designed hot Do not consider replacement under
the original design levels. water or steam outputs. these conditions.
2. Very Good. Necessary adjustments The boiler operates economically. Do not consider replacement under
keep the boiler functioning at the Through effective maintenance (water these conditions.
original design levels. treatment, thorough cleaning, small
leak repair, and scale removal) the
boiler is still producing at design
levels. Adjustments to boiler controls,
valves, burners, and safety devices
may be necessary to operate as
efficiently as possible. Operating
noise is not noticeable.
3. Good. The boiler continues to The boiler’s efficiency may be slightly Replacement of the furnace is not
function with regular maintenance and diminished, affecting the economy of yet justified. Continue to repair and
intermittent repairs. operation. The boiler’s structure and replace parts (including tubes, pups,
components are still in good and safe etc.) as needed. It is not yet time to
(It should be possible with proper condition. Some boiler parts have replace the boiler.
preventive maintenance and timely been replaced. Other original parts
repairs to extend the useful life of the may not be functioning at peak levels.
boiler for many years.)
4. Fair. The boiler no longer functions Operating efficiency and effectiveness Replace this boiler.
as designed and will not without major have declined. Water and/or steam Note: Steam boilers should be replaced
repairs. The technology may be pressure cannot be maintained with hot water boilers which will
outdated. consistently due to leaks or poor necessitate a complete system change.
component support. Heating tubes
may have deteriorated.
5. Poor. The boiler is subject to The boiler is old and undependable. This boiler is over-due for
constant breakdowns even during The technology may be out of date. replacement.
critical service periods and delivers Heating tubes have seriously corroded Note: Steam boilers should be replaced
inadequate levels of hot water or and/or are leaking. Operating and with hot water boilers which will
steam. repair costs may have become necessitate a complete system change
intolerable.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved consultants, specifications and details when replacing a boiler.

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Replacement Standards Irrigation System, Residential

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by
members of the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each component of the irrigation
system will maximize its useful life.

The replacement standard provides direction to facility managers for replacing an entire irrigation system not individual
components or parts of a system.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The system functions at The system is totally reliable. Do not consider replacement under
fully adequate levels. Sprinkler heads are at or below turf these conditions.
level.
All turf and planting areas are evenly
watered (no dry spots)

2. Very Good. Necessary adjustments The system is totally reliable. Do not consider replacement under
and minimal head replacements keep Adjustments may need to be made to these conditions.
system functioning at fully adequate maintain the system.
levels.

3. Good. The system continues to Turf and plantings are adequately Replacement of the entire irrigation
function with intermittent component covered system is not justified but should
repairs, replacements and minor system Components have failed and have been continue to be evaluated annually.
improvements. replaced. Others are approaching the Make necessary repairs and parts
end of their useful lives. Adjustments replacements as needed.
(It should be possible, with proper and need to be made. A small number of It is not yet time to replace the
timely repairs, maintenance and components need replacement. irrigation system.
necessary replacements, to extend the
entire irrigation system for many years
without replacement of the entire
system.)

4. Fair. The system no longer functions A lack of coverage due to low pressure Make a study and life cycle cost
adequately and will not without major caused by leakage and or system analysis to determine whether to
alterations. expansion exists. replace faulty components of the
20% of the system does not function irrigation system, retrofit the existing
adequately. system, or replace the system
entirely.

5. Poor. The overall irrigation system Complete lack of coverage to turf and The irrigation system is over-due for
is subject to constant breakdowns and plantings due to low pressure caused by replacement.
delivers inadequate quality. leaks, worn and broken sprinkler heads,
and extensive expansions of the system.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only professionally engineered specifications and details when replacing an entire system.
2. When modifying an existing system, utilize existing components that are in good condition, such as piping, risers
and sprinkler heads.

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Replacement Standards Lighting: Interior/Exterior

This replacement standard provides maintenance, repair, and replacement direction to the Facilities Manager for
interior and exterior lighting fixtures.

This replacement standard is to be applied by Facilities Managers during R&I needs identification inspection and
by members of the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled cleaning and preventive maintenance will maximize lighting
fixture life.

It is important that recommended lighting levels are met and maintained. Always consider the impact
changing of light fixtures will have on lighting levels. Lighting levels below recommendations make the
facility less inviting and usable. Higher lighting levels waste energy.

Lighting fixtures should be inspected and evaluated against the following criteria:

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The fixture is like Small repairs or component Do not replace fixture.
new or shows minor wear or replacement may be needed. (see notes 1 & 2)
damage. Operating noise is not distracting.

2. Good. The fixture is Minor repairs or component Replacement is not justified


showing some wear or damage. replacement may be needed. unless repairs approach the
Repair components are available. cost of replacing the fixture or
Operating noise is acceptable. repairs cannot be made. (see
notes 1, 2 or 3)
3. Poor. The fixture is showing Repairs either cannot be made or Replace fixture. (see note 3)
considerable wear, damage, or would be more costly than
is dangerous. The fixture is not replacement. Operating noise is
energy efficient. distracting.

Notes

1. Investigate if there are more efficient lamps available for the fixture which will save energy without
reducing light levels below recommendations or can be used to increase light levels if they are low.
2. If lighting levels are low, investigate options that will increase levels to recommendations by adding
fixtures.
3. If lighting levels are low, investigate options that will increase levels to recommendations with new
fixtures.

Replacement Directives

1. Church design guidelines, specifications, and details should be used for lighting fixture replacement.
2. Recommended lighting levels (average foot candles) are documented in the Lighting Design Table
of the Meetinghouse Electrical Design Guidelines. A good quality lighting meter and its proper
application are necessary for measuring and evaluating existing lighting levels.
3. Changes made solely for energy savings must show a payback of 4 years or less.
4. Maintain consistency of appearance within each space when replacing lighting fixtures.
5. Utilize a professional electrical engineering consultant when replacing lighting fixtures in the chapel,
cultural hall, or parking area.

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Replacement Standards Millwork: Under 12” in width (R&I #33)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by
members of the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled cleaning and preventive maintenance work can maximize the useful life
of the millwork.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The millwork is in new or The millwork has no chips, dents or Do not consider replacement under
like new condition and functions as scratches. The finished surface is not these conditions.
designed. worn or faded. There is no
discoloration on the surface.

2. Very Good. The millwork is The millwork may have some scratches Do not consider replacement under
beginning to show wear. Regular or small chips at this point. The these conditions.
cleaning keeps the millwork in good surface is not seriously dented or
condition. scratched. There is no fading or
discoloration present.

3. Good. The millwork is showing The millwork may have some minor Replacement is not yet justified
defects, but is within acceptable limits. dents, chips and scratches. The Evaluate the millwork annually until
The millwork continues to serve its finished surface is beginning to fade replacement is required. Make
purpose with regular cleaning and and wear. Some discoloration may be necessary repairs and section
minor repairs. present, but the millwork is still usable. replacements as needed. Millwork can
be sanded down and re-stained if
(It should be possible, with proper and necessary.
timely repairs and preventive
maintenance, to extend the life of the
millwork in this condition for many
years. This does not take vandalism
into consideration.)

4. Fair. The millwork is showing The millwork has many deep scratches, Replace the millwork.
considerable wear and defects. It no dents and chips. The finish surface is
longer serves its purpose as originally faded. Discoloration is present.
designed.

5. Poor. The millwork is showing The millwork has several deep The millwork is over-due for
serious and extensive discoloration and scratches, dents and chips. The surface replacement.
defects. is severely faded and discolored.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved consultants, specifications and/or details when replacing millwork.
2. Wherever possible, continue to use existing sections of millwork.

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Replacement Standards Organ: Electronic (R&I #74)

This replacement standard is to be applied by facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members
of the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

This standard is used to evaluate electronic organs. Each organ should be evaluated independent of all other organs.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled maintenance and necessary repairs to the organ will maximize its useful
life.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The organ is in new or The organ delivers high quality sound. Do not consider replacement under
like-new condition. There is no visual damage or problems. these conditions.

2. Fair. The organ shows signs of The organ may have key contact Replacement of the item is not justified
several years of usage, but is within problems. Capacitors and diodes are but should continue to be evaluated
acceptable limits. going bad, which causes different stops annually. Make necessary repairs and
to sound the same. Keys may be parts replacements as needed. A cost
chipped or discolored. Sound quality is analysis should be done in order to
diminishing. Several light bulbs may discover the cost effectiveness of repairs
be burned out. Case is starting to show or retrofits. It is not yet time to replace
some wear. the unit.

3. Poor. The organ sounds bad and The organ no longer sounds good. The organ is over-due for replacement.
shows extensive outer-case damage Replacement parts are not available or
. are not cost effective to use. Several
service calls are being made due to
breakdowns. Wear on the case is
extensive.

Replacement Directives

1. Replace only with organs found in the Purchasing Reference Guide (PRG).

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Replacement Standards Partition Accordion, Folding

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each component of the folding partition will
maximize its useful life.

The replacement standard provides direction to facility managers for replacing an entire Folding Accordion Partition not individual
components or parts of a system.

Condition Definition Action

1.Excellent. The system functions at the The system is totally reliable. Do not consider replacement under these
original design levels. The door operates smoothly with all conditions.
components including panels, rubber seals
and hardware that are intact and fully
functioning.

2. Very Good. Necessary adjustments and The system is totally reliable. Do not consider replacement under these
minor parts replacement may be necessary Minor repairs, parts replacement and conditions.
adjustments may need to be made to
maintain the system.

3. Good. The system continues to function The door functions adequately. Replacement of the entire folding
with intermittent component repairs, Some components have failed and have partition is not justified but should
replacements. been replaced. Others are approaching the continue to be evaluated annually. Make
end of their useful lives. necessary repairs and parts replacements as
(It should be possible, with proper and needed.
timely repairs, maintenance and necessary It is not yet time to replace the folding
replacements, to extend the life of the entire partition.
folding partition for many years without
replacement of the entire door system.)

4. Fair. The folding partition no longer Track and rollers are 20%-30% less Make a study and life cycle cost analysis
functions as designed and will not without efficient than original. Locking mechanisms to determine whether to replace faulty
major replacements. do not function properly. Many panels are components of the folding partition or
scratched, cracked, or dented. More than replace it entirely.
10% of the rubber seals top and bottom are
missing.

5. Poor. The overall folding partition is Door does not glide properly on track. The folding door system is over-due for
subject to constant breakdowns and Locking system is inoperable. More than replacement.
functions inadequately. 40% of the panels are damaged. Rubber
seals, top and bottom, are missing.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only manufacturers recommended specifications and details or recommended supplier/installer, when replacing an entire
system.
2. Whenever possible, continue to use as many existing components that are in good condition, such as headers and wood trim.

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Replacement Standards Paving: Asphalt

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each part of the pavement will
maximize the useful life. This includes regular sweeping of the parking area, inspecting for damage, and sealing cracks.

Many meetinghouses are configured with more than one parking area. These areas should be inspected and
evaluated independently based on the following criteria:

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The pavement is in new or No cracks No repair necessary.


like new condition. No loss of surface material due to
weathering or traffic (raveling)

2. Very Good. The pavement is Few cracks Seal cracks.


beginning to show some wear and/or Oxidation starting (The asphalt color is
weathering. changing from black to gray.)
No raveling

3. Good. The pavement shows signs of Some cracks Seal cracks.


wear and/or weathering. Some alligator cracking Remove and replace alligator crack areas
No potholes with shallow or deep patch depending on
It should be possible with proper and Minor raveling the condition of the base and sub-base.
timely repairs and preventive Some oxidation If the pavement has been in this
maintenance to extend the life of the condition for more than 3 years, apply
pavement in this condition for many asphalt emulsion sealer and re-stripe.
years.

4. Fair. The pavement shows Numerous cracks Seal cracks.


considerable wear and/or weathering. Areas of alligator cracking Remove and replace alligator crack areas
Some potholes with shallow or deep patch depending on
Moderate raveling the condition of the base and sub-base.
Considerable oxidation Fill potholes.
Apply asphalt emulsion sealer and re-
stripe.

5. Poor. The pavement shows extensive Extensive cracks Plan for replacement in next funding
wear and/or weathering. Substantial Extensive areas of alligator cracking (more cycle and construction season.
areas of pavement have failed. than 50% of the surface area)
Extensive raveling As a part of replacement planning,
Severe oxidation evaluate permit requirements that may
include application of current standards
for storm water retention, parking stall
sizes, etc.

Maintenance, Repair, and Replacement Directives:

1. A professional consultant should assist with the pavement evaluation and related core testing when
a pavement requires replacement.
2. Pavement deficiencies such as poor drainage, ruts, corrugations, and settlement should be
evaluated and corrective action incorporated into pavement replacement.
3. Church approved specifications and details should be used for pavement maintenance, repairs, and
replacement. The asphalt mix specification should be modified for locally available materials. A mix
appropriate for low volume roads or freeway shoulders is most appropriate.

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Replacement Standards Paving/Sidewalks/Stairs/Curbs: Concrete

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The concrete is new Concrete is like new with a few Do not consider replacement
or like new condition. hairline cracks. under these conditions.

2. Good. The concrete is showing Cracks in concrete have spread and Replacement is not yet justified.
defects but is within acceptable widened. Evaluate the concrete annually until
limits. replacement is required.
The amount of chipping and
spalling has increased. Repair and/or replace any joint
sealant that has failed.
More than 75% of the surface is
without defects. Seal all cracks wider than 1/8”.

Grind trip hazards smooth in areas


of foot travel.

3. Poor. The concrete is showing Cracks in concrete are numerous, Replace the concrete.
serious and extensive defects. large and extensive.

Extensive spalling, chipping and


cracking have deformed the face of
the concrete making it rough.

More than 50% of the surface has


defects.

Replacement Directives

1. Church design guidelines, drawings, specifications and details should be used for concrete replacement.
2. When possible, it is prudent to wait until several adjacent slabs can be replaced at the same time.
3. Professional consultants should be used for concrete replacement.

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Replacement Standards Piano: Upright (R&I #76)


This replacement standard is to be applied by facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members
of the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

This standard is used to evaluate upright pianos and grand pianos. Each piano should be evaluated independent of all
other pianos.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled tuning and necessary repairs to each item will maximize its useful life.

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The piano is in new or The piano delivers high quality sound. Do not consider replacement under
like-new condition. There is no visual damage or wear. these conditions.

2. Very Good. The piano is beginning The piano delivers high quality sound Do not consider replacement under
to show signs of sight wear. with regular tuning. The outer case these conditions.
may be slightly scratched or marked
up.
3. Good. The piano continues to The piano delivers good quality sound Replacement of the item is not
sound good with regular tuning and with regular tuning. Bushings under justified but should continue to be
intermittent repairs. keys may need to be replaced and the evaluated annually. Make necessary
hammers resurfaced. The piano is still repairs and parts replacements as
(It should be possible with proper reliable but the outer case shows some needed. It is not yet time to replace
tuning and timely repairs, to extend the scratches, chips, and marks. the piano.
useful life of the unit for many years.)

4. Fair. The piano no longer produces The piano is hard to keep tuned, Replace the piano.
a quality sound as designed and will especially in the base strings, due to
not without major repairs. tarnish build-up on the copper coils.
The sound quality may not be
improved without several repairs. The
outer case shows considerable
scratching, chips, and marks. Ends of
keys may be chipped.

5. Poor. The piano loses tune quickly The piano no longer sounds good This piano is over-due for
and shows extensive outer-case because of damage. Tuning pins are replacement.
damage. striped and/or loose. The sound board
could be cracked and separating.
Some casters on the bottom of the
piano are knocked loose. The outer
case shows extensive scratching, chips,
and marks. Repairs are no longer cost
effective.

Replacement Directives

1. Replace only with pianos found in the Purchasing Reference Guide (PRG).

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Replacement Standards Roofing: Built-up Asphalt or Bitumen (R&I #156)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the Facilities Manager during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each roofing component will maximize the useful
life of the entire system. This program includes regular inspections of the roofing. Standard roofing industry recommendations are to
make thorough inspections of the roofing at least in the spring and the fall, and after serious weather trauma.

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The roofing appears to be in The roofing membrane shows no damage Do not consider replacement under these
new or like-new condition. or wear. There are no leaks. conditions.
2. Very Good. The roofing is beginning to The surface aggregate may be thinning due Do not consider replacement under these
show slight wear and/or damage. to traffic or erosion in some locations. conditions. Continue to inspect.
Ridges may have lifted due to expansion. Redistribute aggregate as needed. Keep
The roof is still water-tight. debris off roof.
3. Good. The roofing is showing wear The roofing asphalt is exposed in some Replacement of the entire roofing system
and/or damage. areas because of the loss of aggregate. The is not yet justified. Continue to inspect
material is begin to show buckling, fish- and repair as necessary. Evaluate
(It should be possible with proper mouthing, slight cracking at ridges, open annually until replacement may be
preventive maintenance and timely repairs, seams, punctures, splitting, tight bubbles, required.
to extend the useful life of single-ply and surface slippage, and/or wrinkling.
built-up roofing membrane for many Flashings, drip edges and flashed
years.) penetrations and minor leaks may have
necessitated repair.
4. Fair. The roofing is showing extensive The membrane is exposed in many areas Replace this roofing system. A
wear and/or damage. because of the loss of aggregate. professional consultant must be hired to
Blistering, buckling, alligator cracking, design and supervise application. Perform
ridge cracking, fish mouthing, open seams, necessary maintenance to keep moisture
oxidation, punctures, serious splitting, from the roof deck and the interior of the
cracked bubbles, surface slippage, and/or meetinghouse until the re-roofing work
wrinkling have damaged the membrane in commences.
excess of 30% of the surface. Some
damage to the roof deck, insulating
material, or the interior of the
meetinghouse may have occurred.
5. Poor. The entire roofing system is Most of the membrane is exposed, oxidized This roofing system is overdue for
showing serious and extensive wear and/or and cracked. The surface shows extensive replacement.
damage. blistering, buckling, cracking, fish-
mouthing, open seams, punctures, splitting,
surface slippage, ridging, and/or wrinkling.
Moisture has penetrated through the roof
insulating material damaging the roof deck
and/or the interior of the meetinghouse.

Replacement Directives

1. If roofing on a different wing or a different surface is in good condition, it may be retained only if doing so does not create an
unsightly appearance.
2. Only roofing replacement systems and details that are found in the standard Church specifications should be used.
3. Schedule replacement of the roofing well in advance so that the project can be developed and bid during the winter months. Time the
replacement of the roofing to avoid as much bad weather as possible.
4. Replacing the roofing system may need to be completed in conjunction with structural improvements to the meetinghouse, in
compliance with Church seismic criteria.
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Replacement Standards Roofing: Composition Shingles (R&I #151)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the Facilities Manager during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each roofing component will maximize the useful
life of the entire system. This program includes regular inspections of the roofing. Standard roofing industry recommendations are to
make thorough inspections of the roofing at least in the spring and the fall, and after serious weather trauma.

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The shingles are in new or The shingles show no damage or wear. Do not consider replacement under these
like-new condition. There are no leaks. conditions.
2. Very Good. The shingles are beginning Evidence of minor granule erosion may be Do not consider replacement under these
to show slight wear and/or damage. seen in the rain gutters. Minor lifting of conditions. Continue to inspect. Re-tab as
tabs may have occurred due to wind. The needed. Keep debris off roof.
roof is still water-tight.
3. Good. The shingles are showing wear The shingles are beginning to crack and/or Replacement of the entire roofing system
and/or damage. curl. Some granules may have been eroded is not yet justified. Continue to inspect
from the shingle’s surface. Some tabs may and repair as necessary. Evaluate annually
(It should be possible with proper have broken off. Flashings, drip edges and until replacement may be required.
preventive maintenance and timely repairs, flashed penetrations may require repair.
to extend the useful life of single-ply Minor leaks may have necessitated repair.
membrane roofing for many years.)
4. Fair. The shingles are showing The shingles have cracked horizontally Replace this roofing system. A
extensive wear and/or damage. and/or curled over more than 30% of the professional consultant may be hired to
surface, and numerous tabs may have help if necessary. Perform necessary
broken off. Leaking has required repairs. maintenance to keep moisture from the
Erosion of the granules may have exposed roof deck and the interior of the
shingle felt backing. Minor damage may meetinghouse until the re-roofing work
have occurred to the roof deck or the commences.
interior of the meetinghouse.
5. Poor. The entire roofing system is Most of the shingles are showing This roofing system is overdue for
showing serious and extensive wear and/or horizontal cracking or are badly curled. replacement.
damage. Many shingles are broken or are missing.
Granule erosion may have exposed the felt
backing on most of the shingles. Leaking
has likely damaged the roof deck and/or
interior of the meetinghouse.

Replacement Directives

1. If roofing on a different wing or a different surface is in good condition, it may be retained only if doing so does not create an
unsightly appearance.
2. Only roofing replacement systems and details that are found in the standard Church specifications should be used.
3. Schedule replacement of the roofing well in advance so that the project can be developed and bid during the winter months.
Time the replacement of the roofing to avoid as much bad weather as possible.
4. Replacing the roofing system may need to be completed in conjunction with structural improvements to the meetinghouse, in
compliance with Church seismic criteria.
5. Always refer back to the warranty, and file a claim with the shingle manufacturer if premature aging or failure has occurred.

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Replacement Standards Roofing: Concrete Tile (R&I #154)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the Facilities Manager during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each roofing component will maximize useful life
of the entire system. This program includes regular inspections of the roofing. Standard roofing industry recommendations are to make
thorough inspections of the roofing at least in the spring and the fall, and after serious weather trauma.

Note: Faulty installation can lead to leaks in the underlayment or base sheet long before the failure of the tile. A common mistake has
been to leave out the necessary vertical cleats, and install only the horizontal cleats, which then trap water and cause leaks. This condition
may justify replacement or reinstallation of the roof.

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The roofing appears to be in The concrete tile shows no damage or Do not consider replacement under these
new or like-new condition. displacement. There are no leaks. conditions.
2. Very Good. The roofing is beginning to Fewer than 25 tile may have come loose or Do not consider replacement under these
show scattered damage. are broken. The roof is still water-tight. conditions. Continue to inspect. Re-
anchor any loose tile and replace any
broken tile as needed.
3. Good. The roofing is showing damage. Damage to tile due to traffic, fastener Replacement of the entire roofing system
failure, or the elements has become more is not justified but should continue to be
(It should be possible with proper widespread. A small percentage of tile evaluated annually. Continue to inspect.
maintenance and timely repairs, to extend may have come loose or are broken. Minor Re-anchor any loose tile and replace any
the useful life of concrete tile roofing for leaks may have necessitated repair to roof broken tile as needed. Remove tile, repair
many years.) deck and interior of building. underlayment, and restore tile as needed.
4. Fair. The roofing is showing extensive There is widespread damage to the tile Replace this roofing system. A
damage. and/or extensive damage to the professional consultant may be hired to
underlayment. A majority of the tile may design and possibly supervise application
be loose, missing, cracked or broken. The of a new roofing system. A life-cycle cost
underlayment is no longer watertight and analysis should be made to determine
the roof leaks in numerous locations. which roofing system should be specified
Various points of damage to the roof deck as the replacement. Perform necessary
or the interior of the building has occurred maintenance to keep moisture from the
due to leakage that cannot be prevented roof deck and the interior of the building
with repair or replacement. until the re-roofing work commences.
5. Poor. Most of the roofing system is Most of the concrete tiles are loose, This roofing system is over-due for
failing due to serious and extensive missing, cracked or broken, and/or the replacement.
damage. underlayment has buckling, cracking, open
seams, oxidation, punctures, ridging,
splitting, and/or wrinkling. Moisture has
penetrated through the roof damaging
extensive areas of the roof deck and/or the
interior of the building.

Replacement Directives

1. If tile can be matched, replace only those sections of a roofing system that need to be replaced. Roofing of different installation
years on different sections may not need to be replaced at the same time.
2. Only roofing replacement systems and details that are found in the standard Church specifications should be used.
3. Schedule replacement of the roofing well in advance so that the project can be developed and bid during the winter months.
Time the
replacement of the roofing to avoid bad weather as much as possible.
4. Replacing the roofing system may need to be completed in conjunction with structural improvements to the meetinghouse, in
compliance with Church seismic criteria.

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Replacement Standards Roofing: Metal Shingles (R&I #152)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the Facilities Manager during R&I needs identification inspection and by
members of the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each roofing component will
maximize the useful life of the entire system. This program includes regular inspections of the roofing. Standard roofing
industry recommendations are to make thorough inspections of the roofing at least in the spring and the fall, and after serious
weather trauma.

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The shingles are in new The shingles show no damage or wear. Do not consider replacement under
or like-new condition. There are no leaks. these conditions.
2. Very Good. The shingles are The shingles may show slight fading, Do not consider replacement under
beginning to show slight wear and/or denting or discoloration. The roof is these conditions. Continue to inspect.
damage. still water-tight. Keep debris off roof.
3. Good. The shingles are showing The shingles are beginning to show Replacement of the entire roofing
wear and/or damage. some dents or distortion. Shingle system is not yet justified. Continue
coating may be thinning and/or to inspect and repair as necessary.
(It should be possible with proper eroding. Some fasteners may have Evaluate annually until replacement
maintenance and timely repairs, to come loose. Minor leaks in the may be required.
extend the useful life of single-ply shingles and base sheet may have
membrane roofing for many years.) necessitated repair.
4. Fair. The shingles are showing The shingles are dented, distorted, Replace this roofing system. A
extensive damage. loose and/or missing over more than professional consultant may be hired to
30% of the surface. Shingle coating design and possibly supervise
may have worn off from most of the application of a new roofing system.
shingles. Leaking has required repairs. Perform necessary maintenance to
Minor damage may have occurred to keep moisture from the roof deck and
the roof deck or the interior of the the interior of the meetinghouse until
meetinghouse. the re-roofing work
commences.
5. Poor. The entire roofing system is Most of the shingles are dented, This roofing system is overdue for
showing serious and extensive distorted, loose and/or missing. replacement.
damage. Surface corrosion may have followed
the loss of shingle coating. Leaking
has likely damaged the roof deck
and/or interior of the meetinghouse.

Replacement Directives

1. If roofing on a different wing or a different surface is in good condition, it may be retained only if doing so does not
create an unsightly appearance.
2. Only roofing replacement systems and details that are found in the standard Church specifications should be used.
3. Schedule replacement of the roofing well in advance so that the project can be developed and bid during the winter
months. Time the replacement of the roofing to avoid as much bad weather as possible.
4. Replacing the roofing system may need to be completed in conjunction with structural improvements to the
meetinghouse, in compliance with Church seismic criteria.
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Replacement Standards Roofing: Single-ply Rubber Membrane


(EPDM) – Ballasted (R&I #157)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the Facilities Manager during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to this component will maximize useful life of the
entire system. This program includes regular inspections of the roofing. Standard roofing industry recommendations are to make thorough
inspections of the roofing at least in the Spring and the Fall, and after serious weather trauma.

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The roof appears to be in The ballast is undisturbed and evenly Do not consider replacement under these
new or like-new condition. distributed. There are no leaks. conditions.
2. Very Good. The roof is beginning to The ballast may be displaced due to traffic Do not consider replacement under these
show the effects of traffic or erosion. or erosion in some locations. The roof is conditions. Continue to inspect.
still water tight. Redistribute ballast as needed.

3. Good. The roof is showing effects of The membrane is exposed in some areas Replacement of the entire roofing system
traffic, erosion, expansion, oxidation and/or because of the ballast displacement. The is not justified but should continue to be
wear. membrane is beginning to show slight evaluated annually. Continue to inspect
cracking at ridges, open seams, punctures, and repair as needed.
(It should be possible with proper and/or splitting. Minor leaks may have
preventive maintenance and timely repairs, necessitated repair.
to extend the useful life of single-ply
membrane roofing for many years.)
4. Fair. The roofing is showing extensive The membrane is exposed in many areas Replace this roofing system. A
damage. because of ballast loss or displacement. professional consultant must be hired to
Buckling, ridge and surface cracking, open design and supervise application. Perform
seams, oxidation and/or punctures have necessary maintenance to keep moisture
damaged the roof membrane in excess of from the roof deck and the interior of the
30% of the surface. Some damage to the meetinghouse until the re-roofing work
roof deck, insulating material, or the commences.
interior of the meetinghouse may have
occurred.
5. Poor. Most of the roofing system is Large areas of the membrane are exposed, This roofing system is over-due for
failing due to extensive damage. and oxidized. The membrane is no longer replacement.
watertight due to buckling, extensive
cracking, open seams, punctures and/or
splitting. Moisture has penetrated through
the roof insulating material, damaging the
roof deck and/or the interior of the
meetinghouse.

Replacement Directives

1. If roofing on a different wing or a different surface is in good condition, it may be retained only if doing so does not create an
unsightly appearance.
2. Only roofing replacement materials and details that are found in the standard Church specifications should be used.
3. Schedule replacement of the roofing well in advance so that the project can be developed and bid during the winter months.
Time the replacement of the roofing to avoid as much bad weather as possible.
4. Replacing the roofing system may need to be completed in conjunction with structural improvements to the meetinghouse, in
compliance with Church seismic criteria.

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Replacement Standards Roofing: Single-ply Rubber Membrane


(EPDM) - Fully Adhered (R&I #157)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the Facilities Manager during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of
the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each roofing component will maximize
useful life of the entire system. This program includes regular inspections of the roofing. Standard roofing industry
recommendations are to make thorough inspections of the roofing at least in the spring and the fall, and after serious weather
trauma.

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The roofing appears to be The roofing membrane shows no damage Do not consider replacement under
in new or like-new condition. or wear. There are no leaks. these conditions.
2. Very Good. The roofing is beginning The membrane may show fading or Do not consider replacement under
to show slight wear and/or damage. discoloration due to sun and weather. these conditions. Continue to inspect.
Slight ridges may have lifted due to Keep debris off roof.
expansion. The roof is still water-tight.
3. Good. The roofing is showing effects The membrane is beginning to show Replacement of the entire roofing
of traffic and/or wear. buckling, slight cracking at ridges, open system is not justified but should
seams, oxidation, punctures, and/or continue to be evaluated annually.
(It should be possible with proper wrinkling. Minor leaks may have Continue to inspect, repair as needed,
preventive maintenance and timely necessitated repair. and keep debris off roof.
repairs, to extend the useful life of
single-ply membrane roofing for many
years.)
4. Fair. The roofing is showing The membrane is showing advanced Replace this roofing system. A
extensive damage. deterioration due to sun and weather. , professional consultant should be hired
Oxidation, lost adherence, open seams to design and supervise application.
and/or punctures have damaged the roof Perform necessary maintenance to keep
in excess of 30% of the surface. Some moisture from the roof deck and the
damage to the roof deck, insulating interior of the meetinghouse until the re-
material, or the interior of the roofing work commences.
meetinghouse may have occurred.
5. Poor. Most of the roofing system is Most of the membrane is oxidized and This roofing system is over-due for
failing due to serious damage. cracked. The surface shows cracking, replacement.
open seams, punctures. Moisture has
penetrated through the roof insulating
material, damaging the roof deck and/or
the interior of the meetinghouse.

Replacement Directives

1. If roofing on a different wing or a different surface is in good condition, it may be retained only if doing so does not create
an unsightly appearance.
2. Only roofing replacement materials and details that are found in the standard Church specifications should be used.
3. Schedule replacement of the roofing well in advance so that the project can be developed and bid during the winter
months. Time the replacement of the roofing to avoid as much bad weather as possible.
4. Replacing the roofing system may need to be completed in conjunction with structural improvements to the meetinghouse,
in compliance with Church seismic criteria.

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Replacement Standards Roofing: Standing Rib or Metal Panels (R&I #155)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the Facilities Manager during R&I needs identification inspection and by
members of the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each roofing component will
maximize the useful life of the entire system. This program includes regular inspections of the roofing. Standard roofing
industry recommendations are to make thorough inspections of the roofing at least in the spring and the fall, and after serious
weather trauma.

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The panels are in new or The panels show no damage or wear. Do not consider replacement under
like-new condition. There are no leaks. these conditions.
2. Very Good. The panels are The panels may show slight fading, Do not consider replacement under
beginning to show slight wear and/or denting or discoloration. The roof is these conditions. Continue to inspect.
damage. still water-tight. Keep debris off roof.
3. Good. The panels are showing The panels are showing some fading Replacement of the entire roofing
wear and/or damage. denting, and/or discoloration. Some system is not yet justified. Continue
(It should be possible with proper seams and/or fasteners may have come to inspect and repair as necessary.
maintenance and timely repairs, to loose. Minor leaks may have Evaluate annually until replacement
extend the useful life of single-ply necessitated repair. may be required.
membrane roofing for many years.)
4. Fair. The panels are showing The panels and seams (ribs) may be Replace this roofing system. A
extensive damage. dented, bent, discolored, corroded, professional consultant may be hired to
and/or loose over more than 30% of design and possibly supervise
the surface. Leaking has required application of a new roofing system.
repairs. Minor damage may have Perform necessary maintenance to
occurred to the roof deck or the keep moisture from the roof deck and
interior of the meetinghouse. the interior of the meetinghouse until
the re-roofing work
commences.
5. Poor. The entire roofing system is Most of the panels and seams (ribs) are This roofing system is overdue for
showing serious and extensive dented, bent, discolored, corroded replacement.
damage. and/or loose. Leaking has likely
damaged the roof deck and/or interior
of the meetinghouse.

Replacement Directives

1. Only roofing replacement systems and details that are found in the standard Church specifications should be used.
2. Schedule replacement of the roofing well in advance so that the project can be developed and bid during the winter
months. Time the replacement of the roofing to avoid as much bad weather as possible.
3. Replacing the roofing system may need to be completed in conjunction with structural improvements to the
meetinghouse, in compliance with Church seismic criteria.

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Replacement Standards Roofing: Wood or Shake Shingles (R&I #153)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the Facilities Manager during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of
the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each roofing component will maximize the
useful life of the entire system. This program includes regular inspections of the roofing. Standard roofing industry
recommendations are to make thorough inspections of the roofing at least in the spring and the fall, and after serious weather
trauma.

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The shingles are in new or The shingles show no damage or wear. Do not consider replacement under
like-new condition. There are no leaks. these conditions.
2. Very Good. The shingles are The shingles may show fading or Do not consider replacement under
beginning to show slight wear and/or discoloration due to sun and weather. A these conditions. Continue to inspect.
damage. few shingles may have broken, Repair as needed. Keep debris, moss,
splintered, come loose, and/or are mold and fungus off roof. Apply linseed
missing. The roof is still water-tight. oil and graphite mix when necessary.
3. Good. The shingles are showing wear Wear due to the elements has caused Replacement of the entire roofing
and/or damage. slight warping and/or thinning of the system is not yet justified. Continue to
exposed portion of the shingles. Damage inspect and repair as necessary. Evaluate
(It should be possible with proper to shingles has become more widespread annually until replacement may be
preventive maintenance and timely due to elements, fastener failure, or required. Apply linseed oil and graphite
repairs, to extend the useful life of traffic. Many shingles may have mix when necessary.
single-ply membrane roofing for many cracked, loosened or broken. Minor
years.) leaks may have necessitated repair to the
shingles and/or base sheet.
4. Fair. The shingles are showing Wear due to the elements has caused Replace this roofing system. A
extensive wear and/or damage. serious warping and/or thinning of the professional consultant may be hired to
exposed portion of the shingles. The help if necessary. Perform necessary
shingles are cracked, loose, broken maintenance to keep moisture from the
and/or are missing over more than 30% roof deck and the interior of the
of the surface. Leaking has required meetinghouse until the re-roofing work
repairs. Minor damage may have commences.
occurred to the roof deck or the interior
of the meetinghouse.
5. Poor. The entire roofing system is Most of the shingles are cracked, This roofing system is overdue for
showing serious and extensive wear warped, eroded, broken and/or missing. replacement.
and/or damage. Leaking has likely damaged the roof
deck and/or interior of the meetinghouse.

Replacement Directives

1. If roofing on a different wing or a different surface is in good condition, it may be retained only if doing so does not create
an unsightly appearance.
2. Only roofing replacement systems and details that are found in the standard Church specifications should be used.
3. Schedule replacement of the roofing well in advance so that the project can be developed and bid during the winter
months. Time the replacement of the roofing to avoid as much bad weather as possible.
4. Replacing the roofing system may need to be completed in conjunction with structural improvements to the meetinghouse,
in compliance with Church seismic criteria.

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Replacement Standards Seating: Non-upholstered


(R&I #046, #042, #049, #052, #333, #337)

This replacement standard is to be applied by facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by
members of the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

This standard is used to evaluate non-upholstered pews, side chairs, folding chairs and stacking chairs.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each pew or chair will
maximize useful life.

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The pew or chair is There is no visible damage or wear. Do not consider replacement
in new or like-new condition. The structure is sound with no under these conditions.
wobble.

2. Very Good. The pew or chair is Small repairs may have been made Do not consider replacement
only beginning to show wear. to correct the loosening of under these conditions.
structural connections. There may
be slight mars in the wood or
finish.
3. Good. The pew or chair is Repairs have been made to correct Replacement of the pew or chair
showing wear, but is within loose structural connections. There is not yet justified. Continue to
acceptable limits. are noticeable mars in the wood or repair as needed. Evaluate the item
finish. annually until replacement is
(It should be possible with proper required.
preventive maintenance and timely
repairs (such as the replacement of
chair feet) to extend the useful life
of the item for many years.)
4. Fair. The pew or chair is Serious mars may show in the Replace this pew or chair.
showing considerable wear and wood or finish. Structural
use. connections may be failing.

5. Poor. The pew or chair is Repairs can no longer restore the This pew or chair is over-due for
showing serious and extensive pew or chair’s frame to useable replacement.
wear and/or damage. condition. Many deep mars are
obvious in the wood or finish.

Replacement Directives

1. Replace chairs in reasonable groups to maintain continuity of appearance.

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Replacement Standards Seating: Upholstered


(R&I #041, #042, #043, #044, #045, #048, #050, #051, #053, #054, #254, #338)

This standard is to be applied by facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the verification team
during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work to each pew, chair, and sofa will maximize the useful
life of these furnishings.

Condition Definition Action


1. Excellent. The item is in new or like- There is no permanent soiling, staining, or Do not consider retrofit or replacement
new condition. fading of the fabric. There is no visible under these conditions.
damage or wear. The structure is sound
with no wobble.
2. Very Good. The item is only beginning There may be slight thinning of the fabric Do not consider retrofit or replacement
to show wear. on arms, corners or edges. Regular under these conditions.
spotting and cleaning have maintained the
upholstery’s attractive appearance. Small
repairs may have been made to correct
some snagging of the fabric or loosening of
structural connections. There may be slight
mars in the wood or finish.
3. Good. The item is showing wear, but is Thinning of fabric on arms, corners and Retrofit or replacement is not yet
within acceptable limits. edges may be obvious. Regular spotting justified. Continue to clean and repair.
and cleaning have kept the upholstery Evaluate the item annually until retrofit or
(It should be possible with proper and looking attractive. Repairs have been made replacement is required.
timely repairs, preventive maintenance, and to correct snags, tears in the fabric and/or
necessary replacement of parts (such as loose structural connections. There are
chair feet) to extend the useful life of noticeable mars in the wood or finish.
upholstered seating for many years.)
4. Fair. The item is showing considerable The fabric is visibly worn in many Retrofit or replace the item.
wear and use. locations. Regular spotting and cleaning If structural integrity can be maintained,
does little to add to the appearance. Many perform a life cycle cost analysis to decide
repairs have been needed. The structure whether to retrofit (reupholster) or replace
may not be sound. Mars in the wood or the item.
finish may have become objectionable.
If the item has serious marring or structural
failure, and/or high retrofit costs then
replace the item.
5. Poor. The item is showing serious and Fabric has worn clear through on some This item is over-due for replacement.
extensive wear and/or damage. arms, corners or edges. There may be
thinning or tearing of the fabric on the seat.
Regular spotting and cleaning are having
minimal effect on appearance. There may
be some permanent soiling, staining, or
fading. Repairs are needed often to correct
snagging and fraying. Serious mars may
show in the wood or finish. Structural
connections may be failing. Many deep
mars are obvious in the wood or finish.

Replacement Directives

1. Retrofit all of the items only in homogeneous seating areas that qualify by this standard.
2. Use only church approved upholstery fabrics.
3. Always consider replacing padding, especially in cushions where retrofitting an upholstered item.

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Replacement Standards Soffits (R&I #158)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by
members of the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A program of scheduled preventive maintenance work can maximize the useful life of the entire soffit area.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The soffit area is in new All panels are in perfect shape with no Do not consider replacement under
or like new condition and is functioning dents, holes or bent panels. these conditions.
as designed.

2. Very Good. The soffit area is All panels are in near perfect condition. Do not consider replacement under
beginning to show slight signs of wear. There are slight areas of dents, holes or these conditions.
Cleaning might be necessary to keep bent panels.
the soffit in this condition.

3. Good. The soffit area is showing Some panels may be dented, bent or Replacement is not yet justified
wear, but is within acceptable limits. may have holes. A panel or two may Evaluate the soffit occasionally until
be out of place, due to a windstorm. replacement is required. Make
(It should be possible, with proper and The majority of the soffit is still in very necessary repairs and replace panels
timely repairs and preventive good condition accordingly.
maintenance, to extend the life of the
wall covering in this condition for a
few more years.)

4. Fair. The soffit area is showing a 30% to 40% of the panels are bent, Replace the soffit.
considerable amount of wear. The have holes, and/or have dents.
soffit is detracting from the appearance
of the exterior.

5. Poor. The soffit area is showing 50% or more of the panels are bent, The soffit is over-due for
serious and extensive wear. have holes, and/or have dents. replacement.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved specifications and details when replacing a soffit area.

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Replacement Standards Stall, Toilet: Partitions (R&I #81)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work can maximize the useful life of a stall partition.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The partition is in new or like The partition has no dents, rust or broken Do not consider replacement under these
new condition. It is fulfilling its designed hardware. The partition walls are securely conditions.
purpose. anchored to the wall(s) and floor. Door on
partition swings and locks with ease.

2. Very Good. The partition is beginning to The partition has no dents, rust or broken Do not consider replacement under these
show slight signs of wear. Necessary hardware. The partition walls are securely conditions.
adjustments to the hardware help the anchored to the wall(s) and floor. Some
partition serve its purpose. bolts or screws may be loose and there may
be a few scratches on the walls.

3. Good. The partition is showing wear but Some of the hardware may need to be Replacement is not yet justified
is within acceptable limits. The partition tightened or replaced. Rust may be present, Evaluate the partition occasionally until
functions properly with regular maintenance but not enough to cause structural damage replacement is required.
and intermittent repairs. to the walls or door. Partition walls may be
coming loose from floors and wall(s).
(It should be possible, with proper and There may be some dents or marks visible
timely repairs and preventive maintenance, at this point.
to extend the life of the wall covering in this
condition for a few more years.)

4. Fair. The partition is showing a The partition hardware is in bad shape and Replace the partition.
considerable amount of wear. The partition needs to be replaced. Some replacement
no longer functions as originally designed parts are no longer available. Rust is
and will not without major repairs. beginning to crumble the bottom and sides
of the partition walls. The walls are
becoming less stable due to a rusted bottom
and screws that are coming out of the wall.

5. Poor. The partition is showing serious Doors on the partition no longer close The partition is over-due for
and extensive wear. The partition no longer and/or lock. There are many dents and replacement.
functions as designed. scratches due to vandalism. Rust has taken
over parts of the walls, which has also made
the partition unstable structurally. Parts are
no longer available for the partition.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved specifications and details when replacing a bathroom partition.
2. It may be necessary to replace an area, subject to considerable vandalism, with a product that is more resistant, such as a hard
plastic.
3. Stall partition replacements should be coordinated with bathroom renovations, especially when floor or wall tile is being
replaced.

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Replacement Standards Wall covering, Sisal


This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work can maximize the useful life of the entire area covered
by sisal.

Sisal replacement may include all of the sisal in a meetinghouse, or the sisal may be replaced in homogeneous wear zones as preferred by
the stake leaders, Wear zones may be identified as:

1. Chapel and overflow


2. Cultural hall
3. Foyers, hallways and stairs
4. Classrooms and offices

Condition Definition Action


There is no permanent soiling, staining or,
1. Excellent. Sisal is new or like new fading. There is no visible frizzing, fraying, Do not consider replacement under these
condition. seam separation, bubbling, sagging, or conditions.
tearing

2. Very Good. Sisal in the area being Slight fading may be present in areas of Do not consider replacement under these
inspected is only beginning to show defects. direct sunlight. Spot cleaning and minor conditions.
repairs to prevent sagging, separating,
bubbling and fraying have been made to
maintain the condition of the sisal. 75% to
95% of the sisal in the area being inspected
is still in excellent condition.

3. Good. Sisal is showing defects, but is The areas of heaviest sunlight are showing Replacement is not yet justified
within acceptable limits. fading. Regular spot cleaning has kept the Evaluate the sisal annually until
sisal attractive. Repairs have been made to replacement is required.
( It should be possible, with proper and correct frizzing, fraying, seam separation,
timely repairs and preventive maintenance, bubbling, sagging and tearing. 75% to 95%
to extend the life of the sisal in this of the sisal in the area being considered is
condition for many years. This does not still in very good condition.
take vandalism into consideration.)

4. Fair. The sisal is showing considerable Many places are showing fading, sagging, Replace the sisal.
wear marks and spots. and marks. Regular cleaning is having Defects that detract from the overall
minimal effect on the sisal. Repairs are appearance may be replaced in a specific
needed often to correct sagging, fraying, area.
and seam separation. Less than 75% of the
sisal is in good condition. Visual defects
such as L shaped tears may detract from the
overall appearance.

5. Poor. The sisal is showing serious and Most of the sisal is fraying, bubbling, The sisal is over-due for replacement.
extensive wear and defects. separating, tearing and sagging. Extensive
marking detracts from the appearance of the
sisal. Damage is irreversible.

Replacement Directives

1. New wall covering colors have been designed such that the sisal does not prematurely trigger the replacement of other items. The
color of the replacement sisal should be chosen to compliment other existing meetinghouse components and not be a reason to
replace them. Such components include, but are not limited to, existing sisal, carpet, pew fabric, opera chair fabric, foyer
furniture, chair color, counter tops, window sills, toilet partitions, or portable partitions. The Standard Color Scheme Guide on
CD will assist in the selection of coordinating colors.
2. The addition of new space does not necessarily justify the replacement of sisal in existing space.

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Replacement Standards Wall Coverings: Vinyl / Fabric (R&I #19)

This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled preventive maintenance work can maximize the useful life of the entire area of wall
coverings.

Wall covering replacement may include all of the wall coverings in a meetinghouse, or the wall coverings may be replaced in homogeneous
wear zones as preferred by the stake leaders, wear zones may be identified as

1. Foyers and hallways


2. Classrooms and offices
3. Chapel and overflow
4. Cultural hall

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The wall covering is in new or Wall covering is not torn or frayed. Seams Do not consider replacement under these
like new condition. are tight. Wall covering is not stained or conditions.
discolored.

2. Very Good. The wall covering is Wall covering has no tears. Material may Do not consider replacement under these
beginning to show slight signs of wear. be slightly frayed. Seams are tight. There conditions.
is no discoloration or stains.

3. Good. Wall covering is showing wear Wall coverings may have slight tears. Replacement is not yet justified
but is within acceptable limits. There may be some fraying. There may be Evaluate the wall covering annually until
scuff marks or gouges present. Seams may replacement is required.
have slight sections coming undone. No
stains are present. There is no
discoloration.

4. Fair. The wall covering is showing a Wall coverings may have some tears and Replace the wall covering.
considerable amount of wear. gouges. There may be a considerable
amount of fraying. Seams have sections
coming undone. Some stains may be
present with slight discoloration. A match
of materials cannot be found for repairs.

5. Poor. The wall covering is showing Wall coverings have a considerable amount The wall covering is over-due for
serious and extensive wear. of tears and gouges. There is extensive replacement.
fraying. Seams are coming undone.
Considerable stains are present with some
discoloration.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church specifications and details when replacing wall coverings.
2. When replacing a wall covering with a painted surface, please consult church specifications.

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Replacement Standards Wall Tile: Ceramic (R&I #17)


This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by members of the
verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled cleaning and preventive maintenance work can maximize the useful life of the tile
wall.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The tile wall is new or like The wall has no discoloration or worn Do not consider replacement under these
new condition. surface. There are no chipped, cracked, or conditions.
broken tiles. There are no loose or missing
portions. Grout is uniform in color and
appearance.

2. Very Good. The tile wall is beginning to The wall has no discoloration or worn Do not consider replacement under these
show wear. Regular cleaning and surface. There may be slight cracks, with conditions.
preventative maintenance keep appearance no chipped or broken tiles. There are no
clean and new. loose or missing portions. Grout is uniform
in color and appearance.

3. Good. The tile wall is showing defects, The wall has no discoloration or worn Replacement is not yet justified
but is within acceptable limits. The tile surface. There may be some hairline cracks Evaluate the tile wall annually until
surface continues to serve its purpose with or chips, but no tiles are broken. There are replacement is required. Make necessary
regular cleaning and intermittent repairs. no loose or missing portions. Grout may grout repairs and individual tile replacement
show variation in color or appearance. as needed.
(It should be possible, with proper and
timely cleaning, repairs and preventive
maintenance, to extend the life of the tile
wall in this condition for many years. This
does not take vandalism into consideration.)

4. Fair. The tile wall is showing Wall has slight discoloration or worn Replace the tile wall. If only one section
considerable wear and defects. The wall no surface present. There may be some cracks of tile has been damaged, consider only
longer serves its purpose. The appearance or chips with no broken tiles. There are no replacing that tile area. This may not be
of the tile is distracting. loose, broken or missing portions. Grout possible if a tile match cannot be made.
may show some variation in color and
appearance. A small amount of grout is
loose or missing.

5. Poor. The tile wall is showing serious Wall has some discoloration and a worn The tile wall is over-due for replacement.
and extensive wear and defects. The wall surface. There are cracks and/or chips
no longer serves its purpose. The present with some tiles broken. There are
appearance of the tile is severely distracting. some loose, broken or missing portions.
Grout shows obvious variation in color and
appearance. Some grout is loose or
missing.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved contractors, specifications and/or details when replacing a tile wall.
2. Wherever possible, find matching tile and only replace tile that is in fair to poor condition.
3. When replacing a tile wall, make sure to buy extra tiles and store them for future repairs and replacements.

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Replacement Standards Windows and Skylights (R&I #680)


This replacement standard is to be applied by the facility managers during R&I needs identification inspection and by
members of the verification team during the R&I verification inspection.

A conscientious and consistent program of scheduled cleaning and preventive maintenance work can maximize the useful life
of the window.

Condition Definition Action

1. Excellent. The window is new or Glass, window frames and mechanisms Do not consider replacement under
like new condition. have no cracks, chips, or missing, loose these conditions.
or broken parts. Mechanisms operate
and do not grind, rub or squeak.

2. Very Good. The window is Glass, window frames and mechanisms Do not consider replacement under
beginning to show wear. have slightly loose parts with no chips, these conditions. Make necessary
cracks or missing parts. Mechanisms repairs
operate and may slightly grind, rub or
squeak.

3. Good. The window is showing Glass, window frames and mechanisms Replacement is not yet justified.
defects, but is within acceptable limits. have some loose parts and may have Evaluate the window annually until
slight chips with now cracks, broken or replacement is required. Make
(It should be possible, with proper and missing parts. Mechanisms operate and necessary repairs and part
timely repairs and preventive may have some grinding, rubbing or replacements.
maintenance, to extend the life of the squeaking. Rubber seals are
floor in this condition for many years. weathered and are cracking. The glass
This does not take vandalism into is starting to haze over.
consideration.)

4. Fair. The window is showing Glass, window frames and mechanisms Replace the window.
considerable wear and defects. have slight cracks, some chips, loose or
broken parts with no parts missing.
Mechanisms operate with considerable
grinding, rubbing and / or squeaking.
Rubber seals have sections missing.
Hazing in glass is prominent.

5. Poor. The window is showing Glass, window frames and mechanisms The window is over-due for
serious and extensive defects. have some cracks, chips, and missing, replacement.
loose or broken parts. Mechanisms
may or may not operate and may have
extensive grinding, rubbing, or
squeaking. Most of the rubber seals are
gone. Hazing in glass has severely
affected the transparency of the glass.

Replacement Directives

1. Use only Church approved specifications and details when replacing windows.

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Improvement Standards Building Interior:


Reconfigure Space or Change Room Use (R&I #272)

Reasons for reconfiguring or changing the use of a room:

1. Upgrading a space for compliance to ADA codes and regulations.


2. Over-occupancy of a space according to the meetinghouse’s core feature requirements.
3. Creating a new office or classroom out of an existing space.
4. The addition or removal of countertops, shelves or closets in a room.
5. Seismic upgrades on a building.

Improvement Directives:

When considering the reconfiguration of a space or the changing of a room’s use, please consider the
following:

• Use an architect, engineer, or project manager in the design processes in order to make sure that
all changes will not affect the building’s structural integrity. This is also a good way to make
sure that all changes are in compliance with local and national building codes. Choose a
professional that will stay consistent with the original building type and design.

• Make sure that the proposed changes follow the guidelines found in the Meetinghouse Building
Adequacy Standards.

• When changing the function of a space or adding additional space to a building, take into
consideration the other areas that are affected by the change. During the planning phase,
consider how future additions and remodels will be affected by the design choice of the current
project at hand.

• There should be a consistency in appearance and quality with the original building style when a
room is remodeled or if an addition is being constructed.

When reconfiguring areas of a meetinghouse, a life cycle cost analysis should be made (with the help of
a qualified consultant) to determine what the most cost effective design and construction may be.

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Improvement Standards General Site:


Landscaping Replacement or Upgrade (R&I #281)

Reasons for replacing or upgrading landscaping:

• Replacement of dead or dying plants and trees


• Removal and replacement of old or overgrown shrubs, bushes or trees
• Re-seeding/sodding of a grass area.
• Removal of landscaping that is damaging church property and/or bordering adjacent properties
• Improving the drainage slope of the site/landscape
• Other site improvements such as: Additions to Buildings, Parking Lots, Recreation Property &
Improvements, etc.
• Proper soils and drainage of soils on the site.
• Inefficient irrigation systems.
• Infestation of insects/pests/rodents.

What are some common mistakes that are made when replacing or upgrading landscaping?

• Failure to properly prepare the site for final finish grading.


• Failure to add proper soil amendments, fertilizer & pre-emergent to newly developed areas.
• Failure to install irrigation valve boxes properly as per standard details & specifications.
• Failure to provide or update the laminated irrigation control drawings.
• Failure to provide proper slopes and drainage through shrub and lawn areas.
• Planting trees too deep.
• Failure to properly remove burlap or containers from the root ball of plant materials.
• Failure to properly install mulch and weed barriers for shrub/groundcover areas.
• Failure to provide appropriate separation of shrub and lawn areas.
• Failure to properly stake trees when required as per details and specifications.

What else should FMs know or consider before they replace or upgrade landscaping?

• Follow the Replacement Guidelines to ensure that the plants and irrigation systems need
replacement.
• Consult w/ local Landscape Architects and Arborists to determine the best methods and
schedules for Tree and Shrub pruning so that plant materials are not replaced pre-maturely.
• Make sure that the plant replacements meet this guideline- “Plant the right plant in the right place
the first time.” This requires knowledge of soil conditions, plant growth characteristics and
natural beauty without extensive maintenance for each location.

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Improvement Standards HVAC: System Upgrade

Air conditioning (cooling) may be added in the following areas of existing meetinghouses that may not
already have air conditioning:

1. Chapel
2. Cultural Hall
3. Large multipurpose rooms which include Relief Society and Children’s meeting rooms
4. Stake suite
5. Bishops and clerks offices
6. Family History and Name Extraction rooms
7. Nursery

(Although these seven areas are listed, prioritize the list and consider installing the new cooling in
phases, over a period of years.

Improvement Directives:

When considering an upgrade of the HVAC of a meetinghouse, consider the following:

• All HVAC improvements should be done with the help of a qualified consultant. When adding
cooling to any area with an existing heating/ventilating system, consider the following two
options:

1. Addition of an indoor evaporator coil (with outdoor condensing unit) installed inside the
existing heating/ventilating system. Evaluate the existing heating/ventilating fan capacity
and air duct distribution system to ensure that it is capable of handling the additional air
flow required for cooling. Existing ductwork may need to be replaced with larger
ductwork and the fan may need to be replaced with a larger fan. If this option is not
possible, consider option 2 below.

2. An auxiliary heat pump independent of the existing heating/ventilating system. This


option is only to be used for Stake President’s, Bishop’s, clerk’s offices, family history or
name extraction rooms, and nurseries.

• When adding cooling to areas of a meetinghouse without an existing heating/ventilating system,


a life cycle cost analysis should be made (with the help of a qualified consultant) to determine
what the most cost effective installation may be.

• If the existing thermostat does not handle cooling, then replace it with the current Church-
approved thermostat.

O&M-PS-0003 Date Revised: 17 April 2008 Page 59 of 59

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