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School of Management MSc Knowledge & Information Systems Management Student Handbook 2009/10 This booklet can

School of Management

MSc Knowledge & Information Systems Management

Student Handbook 2009/10

This booklet can be found at: www.management.soton.ac.uk/booklets

Contents

1. General Information

Page 3

2. Programme Information

Page 8

3. The Learning Process

Page 10

4. Academic Integrity

Page 13

5. Assessment

Page 17

6. Your Dissertation

Page 23

7. Module Outlines

Page 25

Appendix A

MSc Regulations

Page 47

Appendix B

Guidelines on the Use of Language

Page 48

Disclaimer

Force Majeure The University will not be held liable for any loss, damage or expense resulting from any delay, variation or failure in the provision of programmes of study, services or facilities arising from circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control, including (but not limited to) war or threat of war, riot, civil strife, terrorist activity, industrial dispute, natural or nuclear disaster, adverse weather conditions, interruption of power supplies r other services for any reason, fire, boycott and telecommunications failure.

In the event that such circumstances beyond the reasonable control of the University arise, it will use all reasonable endeavours to minimise disruption as far as it is practical to do so, provided such endeavours do not undermine the University’s Quality Assurance requirements.

This booklet is issued on the condition that it does not form part of any contract between the University and any students. The information given has been made as accurate as possible at the time of going to press, but the University reserves the right to modify or alter, without any prior notice, any of the contents advertised; it may not be possible to offer all degree programmes or components of a degree as described in the booklet in each academic session.

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1.

General Information

Index

1.1

The School of Management

1.8 SSLC (Staff/Student Liaison Committee)

1.2

Key Staff in the School

1.9

Requests for Letters

1.3

Dates

1.10 English Language Support

1.4

Subscribing & Enrolling

1.11

Security & Safety Services Offered by the University

1.5

ID Card

1.12

1.6

Computing Facilities

1.13

Equal Opportunities

1.7

Tutor System and Programme Director

1.14 Sundry Information

1.1

The School of Management

Welcome to the School of Management at the University of Southampton. The School is in the Faculty of Law, Arts and Social Sciences (LASS) and encompasses a wide range of management subjects such as Accounting, Finance, Management Sciences, Information Systems, Marketing, Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management, Strategy and Entrepreneurship. We have over 350 undergraduate and 600 postgraduate students registered in the school on a variety of degree programmes reflecting the wide range of research.

The School is located primarily in Building 2 but also in Building 58a on the Highfield Campus.

Further information can be found on our website: http://www.man-net.soton.ac.uk/

1.2

Key Staff in the School

Professor Terry Williams Professor Stephen Ward Dr Lorraine Warren

Dr Ian Harwood Senior Tutor

Dr Christophe Mues

Mrs Louise Roberts School Manager

Mrs Lesley Adams Mrs Maureen Tyler tba

Miss Frances Grundy Examinations Officer

Director of the School Deputy Head of School

Director of Postgraduate Education

Programme Director for MSc in Knowledge & Information Systems Mgt

Deputy School Manager, Postgraduate Education Postgraduate Coordinator (MSc) Postgraduate Programmes Administrator for the MSc in KISM

1.2.1 How to Contact Staff

If you have any questions or concerns, your first point of contact should be the School of Management

Reception in the north foyer on level 2 of Building 2.

someone who can. Reception is open between 8.30am and 4.30pm, Monday to Friday every week except on Bank Holidays and University Closure Days. Occasionally Reception may be closed for staff meetings.

If the staff there cannot help you, they will contact

Telephone Number: +44 (0)2380 597677

Email: pgsom@soton.ac.uk

1.3

Dates

Autumn term

1 October 2009

-

11 December 2009

Spring term

4 January 2010

-

19 March 2010

Summer term

19 April 2010

-

18 June 2010

Semester 1

1 October 2009

-

30 January 2010

Semester 2

1 February 2010

-

19 June 2010

Examinations will be held in:

Semester 1

18 January 2010

-

29 January 2010

Semester 2

24 May 2010

-

12 June 2010

 

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1.4

Subscribing and Enrolling

All students must subscribe and enrol at the University. Hopefully you have completed this prior to coming to the University but if not, this must be one of the first things which you do.

Please go to

http://www.soton.ac.uk/enrol/

1.5 ID Card

If you have already supplied photographs of yourself, your ID card will be available for collection at the start of term. Otherwise you must apply for an ID card as soon as possible in order to use University facilities.

Blank Smart I.D. application forms and payment forms can be found via:

http://www.soton.ac.uk/international/Induction_2009/home.html or at the Student Services Centre and at the School Office.

1.6 Computing Facilities

‘iSolutions’ are responsible for all computing/information technology in the University. If you have subscribed and enrolled, you will already have a University email account. Please check this account frequently.

If you need to improve your computing skills, self study courses are available.

Full details of iSolutions Services can be obtained on the following website:

http://www.soton.ac.uk/iSolutions

iSolutions public work stations can be found throughout the campus, such as on Level 2 in the Library and

in the Murray Building (B58). This part of iSolutions has a separate ground floor entrance opposite Building

2. There is 24 hour access for the Murray Building work stations in term-time.

1.7 Tutor System and Programme Director

Personal Tutor You will be assigned a personal tutor by the end of the first week of term. They are there to give advice on matters concerned with your programme of study and University life generally. If you feel particular issues/problems may affect your performance on your programme, you should discuss this with your personal tutor. Personal tutors can also provide information on the range of support services available to students in the University.

You should endeavour to meet with your personal tutor at least once per term. Please check your email frequently for communication from your personal tutor.

Senior Tutor The Senior Tutor has overall responsibility for student related issues and personal tutorial arrangements. If, after visiting your personal tutor, you have any unresolved areas of concern the Senior Tutor is available in Room 3019 by appointment – please contact Management Reception.

Programme Director Your Programme Director has overall responsibility for your Programme. The Programme Director is available to discuss any areas of academic concern which you do not feel able to resolve with your personal tutor or the Senior Tutor. The Programme Director also welcomes discussion of areas of concern which impact the Programme as a whole or suggestions for improvement of the Programme.

Advisors for International Students Dr Melanie Ashleigh and Dr Yue Wu are the advisors for international students in the School of Management and are available in rooms 4014 and 4009 respectively, again by appointment.

1.8 SSLC (Staff/Student Liaison Committee)

SSLC, chaired by the Senior Tutor, consists of student representatives and members of staff from the School of Management. It provides a forum for an exchange of views between students and staff, in order to seek improvements in the processes and structures within the School of Management, resolving specific student-related problems, and generally improving cooperation and understanding. Each Programme is required to send a representative so if you are interested in this role, please speak to the Programme Director.

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1.9

Requests for letters etc.

Requests for letters and documentation must be made on the appropriate forms available at the Reception Desk. The School will provide on request and without charge:

1 certificate of attendance/registration per term

1 letter for opening a bank account

1 letter confirming the completion of the taught (diploma) part

1 transcript on completion of the taught (diploma) part

1 letter confirming submission of dissertation and expected Graduation date

1 Diploma Supplement (with grades and/or marks) at the end of the MSc award process

1 letter confirming an award

Additional documents can be requested, the scale of charges is shown below:

Subsequent certificates of attendance/registration in the same term - £10

Subsequent letters (various as above) - £10

All other transcripts requested before final award confirmed - £10

1.10 English Language Support

If English is not your first language, English language support is available for you from the English Language Advising Service in the Language Resources Room (Room 3001 on Level 4, Wolfson Wing of the Hartley Library) and/or visit the following website: http://www.lang.soton.ac.uk/ and click on ‘International Students’.

Examples of such support are:

The Centre for Language Study offers a course in Academic Writing.

Individual tutorial help is provided by Centre for Language Study staff. You can book a 20 minute session every week (or less often) which will involve working individually with a member of staff on a particular problem with English (e.g. a difficult essay to write).

you want to work on developing your English on your own the Centre for Language Study offer

If

a

wide selection of language learning materials on multi-media resources.

The Centre for Language Study also offer a range of classes throughout the year covering areas such as grammar, preparing for exams, oral communication skills etc.

1.11 Security and Safety

It is important that you consider the safety of yourself and of others at all times when you are in the University. If you are concerned about any potential hazards please inform Management Reception.

University Security Officers regularly patrol the campus and can offer assistance if needed.

If you require First Aid, please contact Management Reception, any other general University office or one of the Security Officers.

Students are responsible for their own personal belongings whilst on the University campus. Neither the School of Management nor the University of Southampton will accept any liability for loss or damage of these possessions. You should also ensure that you have up-to-date personal accident insurance to cover your time at the School.

Students are also responsible for the safety of all equipment brought to the University and should regularly

check electrical equipment for any obvious signs of damage such as cracked cases.

should ensure that all electrical items. e.g. computers, laptops, mobile phone chargers etc, are safe to use in the UK. If you need further advice on the safety of your equipment, please contact Management Reception in the first instance.

In particular you

You should ensure that you are familiar with the emergency evacuation procedures for every building which

you are taught in.

building as quickly as possible by all available exits. Please note that all fire alarms are tested on a weekly basis and are rung for a very short time for this purpose. In this case only, the bell should be ignored. If you come across a fire, you should break the nearest red fire alarm box as you evacuate the building. The alarms are connected directly to the University’s Control Centre.

The fire alarm is a continuous ringing bell. On hearing this, you must evacuate the

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1.12

Services offered by the University

student services

careers advice

health care services

general advice and information

counselling and support

Well being Service specific learning advice and help for students with disabilities and difficulties

support for international students

Student services building (opposite the Swimming pool on University Road). ID card office; fees office; accommodation office; and general student services and enquiries. http://www.soton.ac.uk/careers/ http://www.UniDocs.co.uk/ (University Health Service) http://www.highfieldhealth.nhs.uk/ (Highfield Health) from the Student Advice and Information Centre, in the Students Union, which offers assistance to students on practical issues (e.g. finance, housing, legal problems, academic matters). an impartial and confidential service which can help with personal and emotional matters of all kinds (http://www.counsel.soton.ac.uk/index) This includes nightline, a confidential listening and information service run by students for students (http://nline.susu.org) (http://www.soton.ac.uk/study/studentservices/specialeducatio nneeds.html) including an advisor to dyslexic students and a disability coordinator. The Assistive Technology Centre at the Hartley Library is devoted to the use of library users with disabilities or dyslexia.

the University offers a range of services geared to international students. Full details can be obtained from the University website: http://www.soton.ac.uk/international .The Student Advice and Information Centre also has a full-time International Student Advisor who is available to give advice on any issue.

Further details of services offered by the University can be obtained from your personal tutor, the Student Advice and Information Centre, the Student Handbook (issued at registration) or by visiting the following website: http://www.studentservices.soton.ac.uk/studenthbk/

1.13 Equal Opportunities

The School and University are committed to a comprehensive policy of equal opportunities for students, in which individuals are selected and treated on the basis of their relevant merits and abilities and are given equal opportunities within the University. No student should receive less favourable treatment on any grounds which are not relevant to academic ability and attainment. The University is committed to a programme of action to make the policy fully effective.

In line with the University’s Equal Opportunities Policy, individuals are selected and treated on their relevant merits and abilities and are given equal opportunities within the School and University.

The aim of the policy is to ensure that no prospective student should receive any less favourable treatment on any grounds that are not relevant to academic ability and attainment. In particular the School does not place any restrictions on admission by disabled candidates. Every reasonable effort is made to ensure that disabled students are aware of and assisted in making use of the support provided by the University; to ensure access to lectures, classes, learning materials; and to ensure that where necessary appropriate variations to normal examining arrangements are made. For more details go to http://www.soton.ac.uk/about/raceequality and the students services website above.

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1.14

Sundry Information

The University is registered under the Data Protection Act and reserves the right to enter personal student data on its computer systems.

Presentations: The School can arrange for the photocopying of handouts and overheads for student presentations. However, these must be handed to the Programme Secretary at least 48 hours in advance.

Mobile phones should be switched to silent during lectures etc, in the Library and anywhere else that you see the ‘no mobile phone’ sign.

All buildings in the University are no smoking zones. We would also ask you not to smoke directly outside buildings as the smoke carries inside.

Eating and drinking is not permitted in Lecture Rooms, or study rooms/areas with the exception of water.

Payment of Fees: Fees for MSc and MBA students may be paid in two instalments on 5 th October 2009

and 4

th

January 2010. Fees for part-time MSc and MBA students are payable over two years.

Payments are accepted online, by cheque (payable to University of Southampton), bank draft, debit or credit card or by cash

1% discount on personal element of tuition fees if the University receives full payment by 5th October 2009 (certain conditions apply). http://www.soton.ac.uk/study/feesandfunding/feeshowandwhen.html

If you are unsure of how to pay your fees please contact the Student Services Centre (SSC) on ssc@soton.ac.uk.

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Section 2 Programme Information

Index

2.1

Programme Aims

2.4

Organisation of the Programme Weighting Scheme for calculation of results

2.2

Intended Learning Outcomes

2.5

2.3

Organisation of the Programme

 

2.6

Classification of Results

 

The Programme in Knowledge & Information Systems Management is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to follow different careers in the profession, industry or in the academic world.

2.1

Programme Aims

The aim of this Programme is to develop students’ existing skills in a wide range of disciplines by advanced study in information systems. It will provide an excellent basis both for those people who wish to have careers in information systems, use information systems in their own discipline or sphere of work and also for those wishing to research in information systems and related disciplines.

The central theme of the Programme is information systems development: methodologies, tools and techniques. The Programme will emphasise information systems practice as well as the theory underpinning it and will seek to provide education in information systems. In addition, students will have the choice of options which develop the management science, organisational, research or computing aspects of information systems.

2.2

Programme Intended Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the Programme, students will be able to:

$ Demonstrate an understanding of the principles, concepts and theories underpinning the practice of information systems development.

$ Evaluate the effective development and use of information technologies in organisations.

$ Appreciate the social and organisational aspects of information systems.

$ Understand the research methods appropriate to investigate information systems in organisations.

$ Appreciate the strategic application of information systems and the information systems strategy process.

$ Evaluate the implications of emerging technologies for the nature of work and competitive advantage.

$ Carry out independent research on a chosen topic, resulting in a substantial dissertation.

$ Demonstrate key skills in problem-solving, communication, use of communication and information technology, teamwork, analysis and research.

2.3

Organisation of the Programme

The full-time Programme involves nine months’ study for the Diploma. Subject to a sufficient level of performance in the Diploma, this period is followed by three months’ work on a dissertation for the MSc. The part-time Programme involves study for the Diploma over a period of twenty one months followed by six months’ work on a dissertation for the MSc. The scheme of study comprising the taught Programme requires students to take sixteen units (rated at 7.5 CATS points each), each comprising eleven hours of lectures or classes. Each single unit will be taught over three half-days, normally separated by a week (for example on consecutive Monday mornings). Double units are taught over six half-days, similarly spaced. Typically full-time students will take two units per fortnight with the remaining weekdays available for private study and coursework preparation during term time.

Part-time study involves an average of eight half-days’ attendance at the School of Management per month during term-time between October and May, in any convenient pattern consistent with a two-year completion period.

Students are encouraged to attend relevant seminars, organised by various Schools in the University. Seminars promote the development of new interests in addition to students’ existing specialisms.

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Successful completion of courses to a prescribed standard permits the award of the Diploma. Students who achieve a higher standard are allowed to undertake a dissertation, the successful completion of which permits the award of MSc. The dissertation should be completed by the end of the academic session in September.

MSc projects are undertaken by individual students under tutorial guidance and are relatively short but intense pieces of original work which can be chosen from any area relevant to the Information Systems Programme. Students are encouraged to choose projects in the research areas of members of staff, or in an area selected by a sponsor. Reports on projects must be written and submitted for examination in the form of a dissertation

2.5 Weighting Scheme for calculation of results

The weights for each module in the Programme are:

Introduction to Knowledge & Information Systems

1/16

7.5 CATS points

Web Applications

2/16

15 CATS points

Information Systems Management & Development

2/16

15 CATS points

Systems Thinking

1/16

7.5 CATS points

Information Systems Strategy

1/16

7.5 CATS points

E-Business & Human-Computer Interaction

2/16

15 CATS points

Knowledge Management and Expert Systems

2/16

15 CATS points

Qualitative and Quantitative Research

2/16

15 CATS points

Problem Structuring

1/16

7.5 CATS points

Options

2/16

15 CATS points

2.6 The classification for MSc results

Fail:

Average below 40% or failure (0-39%) in modules totalling 45 (or more) CATS points.

Diploma:

Average of 40% or above in the taught modules. Failure (0-39%) in modules totalling 40 CATS points condoned.

However, in the event of failure, the required average is increased by the amount:

(40 - mark achieved)*weight of module in CATS points/120

Diploma with permission to proceed to preparation of dissertation for MSc:

Average of 50% or above in the taught modules. Failure (0-39%) in modules totalling 40 CATS points condoned.

However, in the event of failure, the required average is increased by the amount:

(40 - mark achieved)*weight of module in CATS points/120

Diploma (Distinction) with permission to proceed to preparation of dissertation for MSc:

All modules passed at 40% and an average of 70% or above in the taught modules or all modules passed at 50% and at least half the total weighted modules (60 CATS points) with marks of 70% or above

MSc:

Diploma and 50% or more in dissertation.

MSc (Distinction):

Diploma (Distinction) and 70% or more in dissertation.

or Diploma at least 65% average and “High” distinction in the dissertation

The marking scheme for individual pieces of assessed work and individual modules is:

0-39%

Fail

40-49%

Pass

50-69%

Pass at MSc Level

70% and above

Pass at Distinction Level

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Section 3 The Learning Process

Index

3.1

Reading and Preparation

3.4

Key Skills The University Library

3.2

Attendance

3.5

3.3

Study Skills

3.1

Reading and Preparation

Tutors expect all students to come prepared for discussion and an active contribution in lectures/classes. You may be asked to give your views and critical comments on other students’ contributions at any time during lectures/classes.

3.2

Attendance

You are expected to attend on time all lectures and classroom sessions relating to the modules for which you have registered.

You are not expected to attend or receive handouts for any other modules. The School monitors attendance at modules and may require you to sign in each day for the modules you attend. Attendance at the modules you have registered for must be your highest priority. Other work, including completion and submission of your assignments, should be scheduled with this in mind. In particular do not skip module sessions in order to complete an assignment at the last minute. This is a sign of poor organisation of work on your part.

If you are unable to attend modules for exceptional reasons such as illness, personal mishap or domestic crisis, it is important that you notify your personal tutor at the earliest possible time. You should also, as a matter of courtesy, speak to the module lecturer. If your non-attendance is down to illness, you must submit a self-certified sickness absence note or letter from your doctor to the School as soon as possible.

If you miss all or part of a module it is your responsibility to acquaint yourself with the module material. Module lecturers will be able to advise you and make sure that you have all the relevant handouts. You may find it useful to talk to other students who attended the sessions you missed. Where there are exceptional reasons for missing module sessions, an appropriate extension of the time to complete any coursework will be considered by your personal tutor (not the module lecturer).

3.3

Study Skills

Formal study requires many of the comprehension and communication skills that most students need to exercise in their everyday jobs. However some additional skills and techniques will need to be developed to ensure an efficient and effective approach to study. You will have the opportunity to attend library skills sessions and how to prepare for examinations workshops during your first semester.

Among the skills students are expected to develop at Masters level are:

the ability to interpret, conceptualise and critically evaluate the literature, and to relate it to practice as appropriate;

the ability to synthesise ideas and research findings;

the ability to formulate and test new ideas from a variety of approaches and justify the foundation of those ideas;

the ability to test ideas including the application of models as appropriate, using a variety of research designs, methodologies, measurements and techniques of analysis;

the ability to present ideas and research findings in a well structured and convincing way, as oral presentations or written papers;

the ability to plan, execute and report a significant piece of research or creative work with at least some element of originality;

independent judgement and critical self-awareness;

the ability to identify, set up and use a variety of learning strategies such as interactive and group work.

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3.4

Key Skills

Many of the above study skills form the basis of key skills which you will need to acquire to be successful in your Programme. All of these will be transferable, in the sense of being of value in other spheres in which you may find yourself in the future. On each module outline in this booklet, you will find a list of the key skills which are especially important for that module.

A: Learning skills This refers to your ability to learn effectively, and to be aware of your learning strategies. This may include the ability to:

learn independently

use library services

find and organise information; filter, analyse and synthesise material

identify and evaluate personal learning strategies

use information technology (e.g. bibliographic searching, use of the internet)

B: Problem-solving This refers to your ability to identify the main features of a given problem and to develop strategies for its resolution. This may include the ability to:

analyse the key elements of a problem (e.g. identify key areas of economic theory)

use deductive skills

organise ways of thinking about a problem (e.g. apply economic theory to a situation)

think laterally about a problem

identify strategic options and evaluate alternative strategies (e.g. positive and normative economic thinking)

recognise constraints affecting the outcome (e.g. identify key assumptions, opportmoduley cost)

C: Numeracy and statistics This refers to your ability to use mathematical and statistical skills. This may include the ability to:

frame and use models that abstract from but imitate reality

use and analyse information that is presented in numerical form

interpret and present data in diagrammatic form

understand and interpret data presented in processed form (e.g. averages, correlations)

avoid being misled by data

recognise ambiguity in statistical results

evaluate empirical evidence (e.g. confront a theory with data)

D: Teamwork This refers to your ability to work productively as part of a team. This may include the ability to:

take responsibility and carry out agreed tasks

take initiative and lead others

negotiate, asserting your own views but respecting others

evaluate team performance

E: Communication This refers to your ability to express ideas, analysis and opinions with confidence and clarity. This may include the ability to:

use appropriate language and form when writing and speaking

present ideas using appropriate media (e.g. text, data, charts, mathematics)

listen actively and critically

persuade rationally

present data in an appropriate and clear manner using information technology appropriately

F: Self Management This refers to your ability to manage your own learning development. This may include the ability to:

clarify personal values and set personal objectives

manage time and tasks

evaluate your own performance

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3.5

The University Library

3.5.1 University Study Facilities – The Hartley Library

The Hartley Library is on the East side of the campus and during term time is normally open as follows:

Monday - Friday

9.00 a.m.

-

10.00 p.m.

Saturday

9.00 a.m.

-

5.00 p.m.

Sunday

9.00 a.m

-

10.00 p.m.

Service hours for loans, enquiries etc are less than those given above. In vacations the hours may be more restricted and students are advised to enquire at the Library for up-to-date information.

Law and Social Science books and periodicals are on Level 3. The Reserve Collection is on Level 2 near the main entrance. Photocopiers are available. Full details of Library services can be obtained on the following website: http://www.soton.ac.uk/library/services/index.html

3.5.2 E-resources which will help you to find Finance and Management information

All resources can be found in the Management Library webpages:

http://www.soton.ac.uk/library/subjects/management/index.html

To locate information in journals, use:

Web of Knowledge International index of thousands of journal articles on many topics. There are links to full-text provided the University subscribes to the journal.

IBSS (International Bibliography of the Social Sciences) This database is produced by the library at the London School of Economics and provides bibliographic references from 1951 onwards. Current data is taken from over 2400 journals and 7000 books each year and is updated weekly. This database is particularly strong in economics, sociology, anthropology and politics.

Scopus International coverage of thousands of journal articles on many topics. There are links to full-text provided the University subscribes to the journal.

Emerald Fulltext A library of full text management journals.

Key Management databases:

Bankscope Financial information about banks and banking. World-wide coverage.

Checkpoint Nearly 200 checklists on many aspects of management.

FAME Financial information for all registered companies in the UK and Ireland.

Lexis Nexis Executive Full-text, world-wide newspaper and magazine coverage. Also access to international company financials.

Mintel Marketing reports relating to many aspects of business and industry.

UK and International GAAP International accounting standards

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Section 4 Academic Integrity Statement

Index

4.1

What is academic integrity and why is it Important?

4.4

Breaches of Academic Integrity

4.2

Good Academic Practice

4.5

Academic Integrity Statement Acknowledgements

4.3

Further Advice and Assistance

4.6

4.1

What is academic integrity and why is it important?

 

4.1.1

The University is a ‘learning community’ within which students and staff learn from each other, from their peers, and through original research. All members of the University are expected to maintain high standards of academic conduct, and professional relationships based on courtesy, honesty and mutual respect. In maintaining this learning community the concept of academic integrity is fundamental.

4.1.2

Academic integrity means conducting all aspects of your academic life in a professional manner. It involves:

Taking responsibility for your own work;

 

Respecting the rights of other scholars;

Behaving with respect and courtesy when debating with others, even when you do not agree with them;

Fully acknowledging the work of others wherever it has contributed to your own (thereby avoiding plagiarism), (see section 4.6);

Ensuring that your own work is reported honestly;

Following accepted conventions, rules and laws when presenting your own work;

Ensuring that you follow the ethical conventions and requirements appropriate to your discipline;

If you are studying on a professionally-recognised/vocational programme, maintaining standards of conduct which are appropriate to a practitioner in that area;

Supporting others in their own efforts to behave with academic integrity;

Avoiding actions which seek to give you an unfair advantage over others.

As a member of the academic community in Southampton you are expected to work in accordance with these principles.

4.1.3

Acting with academic integrity enables you to demonstrate your own knowledge, skills and understanding of the subject, and then to receive feedback to help your progress. You will also be developing professional skills and values which are sought by employers. Conversely, failure to act in this way means that you will not be developing the skills which are essential in the longer term for your personal and academic growth. The feedback you then receive on your work will not help you to improve, as it will not be a genuine reflection on your knowledge and abilities.

4.2

Good academic practice

4.2.1.

A key element of academic integrity is understanding good academic practice in written work and creative practice. Understanding how to use the work of other scholars, including your peers, to develop your own insights into a subject and spark new ideas is an important professional skill. The skills you need to succeed in higher education in the United Kingdom may be different to those you have learned at School or College, or in your workplace, as you will be expected to follow professional academic conventions. Within the professional international academic community it is never acceptable to use the words of others or their creative output (whether published or unpublished, including material from the internet) without explicit acknowledgement. To do so would not be seen as a mark of respect but rather as plagiarism (see section 4.6).

4.2.2

When you take notes from sources, make sure you do so in ways which identify where you are recording your own observations based on the document you are reading, where you are paraphrasing and where you are recording direct quotations. This will be particularly important if you are taking notes over a long period and then reviewing them later.

4.2.3

Learn to plan your study time effectively, be aware of deadlines and leave plenty of time for writing, to avoid the need to take ‘short-cuts’ which could lead to bad academic practice.

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4.2.4

To demonstrate your knowledge and ability effectively in assignments, you need to ensure that you address the question you are asked. Including large amounts of acknowledged pasted material, or over- quotation from external sources is likely to detract from the quality and originality of the work and is therefore unlikely to secure good marks.

4.2.5

The purpose of assessment is to enable you to develop and demonstrate your own knowledge and understanding of the learning outcomes of a module or programme, or particular professional skills or competencies. It is entirely appropriate that your work should be informed by, and refer to, the work of others in the field, or to discussions with your peers, tutor or supervisor. However, such contributions must always be acknowledged in accordance with conventions appropriate to the discipline. This requires more than a mention of a source in a bibliography, which may be a practice you are used to at School or College. You should acknowledge each instance of another person’s ideas, works or words using the appropriate referencing conventions. It is important to make clear which are your words, ideas or works and which have been taken from others.

4.2.6

It is often helpful to discuss ideas and approaches to your work with your peers, and this is a good way to help you think through your own views. However work submitted for assessment should always be entirely your own, except where clearly specified otherwise in the instructions for the assignment. In some instances working in groups will be required, and there may be occasions when work is submitted from the whole group rather than individuals. In these instances the instructions will make it clear how individual contributions to the joint work should be identified and will be assessed. If you are in any doubt, check with the person setting the assignment. If you have worked with others you should make sure that you acknowledge this in any declaration you make (see below).

4.2.7

When you submit a piece of coursework you will be asked to declare (e.g. through use of a signed declaration or ticked box for electronic submission) that you are aware of the requirements of good academic practice, and the potential penalties for any breaches.

4.2.8

To support you in developing your understanding of academic integrity and academic good practice the School will provide you with:

Opportunities to participate in learning experiences to improve your understanding of academic integrity and academic good practice, appropriate to your level of study;

Advice and information about referencing conventions within your discipline, as appropriate to each level of study;

Information about sources of advice if you have particular learning needs

Advice as to what information in the discipline may be regarded as ‘common knowledge’ and therefore does not need to be referenced;

Information about copyright and intellectual property and when you need permission to reproduce figures or other printed material (including material from the internet);

Feedback on your work, to help you perform to the best of your ability;

Information, where applicable, about the use of electronic methods of plagiarism detection;

Information about the ways in which poor academic practice and breaches of this statement will be handled and the possible penalties which may be incurred.

4.3

Further Advice and Assistance

4.3.1

If you wish to improve your study skills, always seek advice sooner rather than later. Your personal tutor will be able to help you to identify sources of assistance. It is an important element of independent learning, and a normal part of academic development, to recognise when you need to seek advice, and to learn to benefit from it. This would not necessarily mean that you are ‘struggling’ with your work – you may feel you need additional advice to reach your personal potential. Specialist advice is available for students with disabilities or learning differences.

4.3.2

If in doubt about what is required in any particular assignment, what referencing styles are appropriate etc, always ask. Your tutor or supervisor will be able to point you in the direction of appropriate sources of advice and information.

4.4

Breaches of Academic Integrity

4.4.1

If you are to work with academic integrity there are a number of practices you must avoid, which are explained in section 4.6.

4.4.2

You are responsible for your own work and conduct, and for ensuring that you neither fall accidentally into poor academic practice in your written work nor engage in practices which breach academic integrity such as those outlined in section 4.6. Such practices are unacceptable whether they have been followed deliberately or through a lack of understanding.

14

As well as damaging your own development, failure to work with academic integrity is unfair to other students who complete work honestly and fairly. It can also potentially damage the relationship between staff and students which is at the heart of the University community, and relationships with other partners, e.g. business and the NHS. Ultimately, your results will not be a true reflection of your performance, which may potentially damage the academic standing of the University’s awards.

4.4.3

Should you have reason to believe that a fellow student is not working with academic integrity, you should speak in your confidence to the module lecturer. Your identity will not be revealed as part of any investigation; however no further action would be taken unless additional evidence is identified by the marker or module lecturer.

4.4.4

It is suspected that a student has not worked with academic integrity and used any of the practices outlined in section 4.6 this will be investigated. The University has defined procedures for undertaking such investigations, which may be found from the University Calendar. If a student is found to have followed one of these practices there are a range of penalties which may be applied. These penalties will always affect the mark you receive for the piece of work in question, and the most serious cases could lead to a reduction in degree classification or even termination of programme. There is likely also to be an impact on any future reference written from your School.

4.4.5

Any student involved in an investigation will have the chance to put their case forward. Students in this position are encouraged to seek support from the Students’ Union Advice and Information Centre. There is also provision to request a review of the outcome of any investigation.

4.5

Academic Integrity Statement

You must ensure that you avoid the following:

4.5.1

Plagiarism is the reproduction or paraphrasing, without acknowledgement, from public or private (i.e.:

unpublished) material (including material downloaded from the Internet) attributable to, or which is the intellectual property of, another including the work of students.

Plagiarism may be of written and also non-written form and therefore would also include the unacknowledged use of computer programmes, mathematical/computer models/algorithms, computer software in all forms, macros, spreadsheets, web pages, databases, mathematical derivations and calculations, designs/models/displays of any sort, diagrams, charts, tables, drawings, works of art of any sort, fine art pieces or artefacts, digital images, computer aided design drawings, GIS files, photographs, maps, music/composition of any sort, posters, presentations, and tracing. (This is not an exhaustive list).

Examples of plagiarism are:

Including in your own work extracts from another person’s work without the use of quotation marks and crediting the source;*

The use of ideas of another person without acknowledgement of the source;

Paraphrasing or summarising another person’s work without acknowledgement;

Cutting and pasting from electronic sources without explicit acknowledgement of the source of the URL or author, and/or without explicitly marking the pasted text as a quotation;

Submitting a piece of work entirely as your own when it was produced in collaboration with others, and not declaring that this collaboration has taken place (this is known as ‘collusion’).

Submitting appropriated imagery or creative products without indicating the source of the work.

As one means of detecting plagiarism, the School of Management use software to check assignments for evidence of plagiarism.

4.5.2

Cheating is any action before, during of after an assessment or examination which seeks to gain unfair advantage or assists another student to do so. Examples of cheating are:

Gaining access to or using unauthorised notes or other material relating to an assessment;

Introducing any information, including electronically stored information into the examination room,

(whether belonging to yourself or to another person) unless expressly permitted by the examination or programme regulations;

Communicating during an examination with any person outside the examination room, or with other students within the examination room;

Copying the work of another student with or without their knowledge or agreement, whether in examinations or in other assessments;

Allowing another person to impersonate you, or impersonating another person, with the intention of gaining an unfair advantage for yourself of the other person;

15

Ghosting, that is submitting as your own work, a piece of work produced in whole or part by another person on your behalf, (e.g. the use of ‘ghost writing’ services), or deliberately seeking to make available material to another student with the intention that the other student should present the work as his or her own (Note: this does not include the use of an amanuensis in examinations, or legitimate input from University study skills tutors and/or mentors).

4.5.3

Falsification is an attempt to present fictitious or distorted data, evidence, references, experimental results or other material and/or knowingly to make use of such material. Examples of falsification are:

Presenting data based on controlled investigations, experiments, surveys or analysis falsely claimed to be have been carried out by you;

The invention of references and/or false claims;

Including data etc in your work which you know to be false or incorrect, whether or not this has been created by you;

In connection with programmes leading to a professional qualification, falsely claiming to have completed non-academic requirements such as hours in practice, or to have achieved professional competencies.

4.5.4

Recycling is where a piece of work which has already been used in one context is used again (without declaration) in another context. Examples of recycling are:

Re-submitting work which has already been assessed and marked in full or in part for another assessment in the same or in a different course:

Failure to disclose that a piece of work was submitted for assessment and has been or will be used for other academic purposes;

Publishing essentially the same piece of work in more than one place, without declaration.

In some instances it may be acceptable to use work previously submitted for a written assignment as the basis for an examination answer, or to further expand and develop such work at a higher level e.g. developing the ideas formulated in your third year undergraduate dissertation into a Master’s level thesis. Such situations would be governed by the specific regulations of the appropriate programme of study.

There may be other breaches of academic integrity which are not specifically referred to here and some breaches may fall into more than one category.

4.6

Acknowledgements

Definitions and specific examples are largely taken from Edinburgh College of Art Academic Misconduct Policy Approved November 2004 Section 1 Definitions and examples. http://www.eca.ac.uk/foi/files/AcademicMisconduct.pdf The University of Southampton may however have associated these specific examples with different types of breaches of academic integrity.

Definitions and examples also based on: University of Kent A guide to Academic Integrity and Good Practice http://www.kent.ac.uk/registry/quality/guidance/plagiarism.htm

Approved by AQSC 31 May 2006 and Senate 21 June 2006.

The Academic Integrity Statement for Students is also accompanied by the documents ‘Encouraging academic integrity – Procedures for Handling Possible Breaches of Academic Integrity’ and ‘Using the Academic Integrity Statement for Students – Guidance for Schools’.

16

Section 5: Assessment

Index

5.1

How will I be Assessed?

5.4

Examinations Special Considerations Complaints/Appeals procedure

5.2

Standards Expected

5.5

5.3

Coursework Assignments

5.6

5.1

How will I be Assessed?

Most modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and examination, some are assessed wholly by coursework, and a few are assessed wholly by examination. Assessment will emphasise the development of investigatory research skills and the application of concepts in a problem context. The nature of coursework assignments will vary between modules, for example, some being individual pieces of work and others prepared as a small group.

The Programme Regulations are given in Appendix A

 

5.2

Standards Expected

The marking scheme used at postgraduate level is:

0-39%

Fail

40-49%

Pass

50-69%

Pass at MSc level

70% and above Pass at Distinction level

Specific guidance on what is expected in assessed work for individual modules will be given by the module tutors. However, the following characteristics are offered as a general guide:

Distinction (70%+) and over Comprehensive knowledge and clear understanding of the subject area and its principles, concepts and terminology; evidence of extensive additional reading; highly accurate work with no major errors or omissions. Extremely well presented and structured work; convincingly developed arguments using well- chosen supporting evidence; excellent concise logic. High level of critical and analytical ability; capacity to select, question, synthesise and evaluate material; originality of thought; ability to make interdisciplinary comparisons.

(Good) Pass MSc level (60 - 69%) Considerable knowledge and good understanding of the subject area and its principles, concepts and terminology; evidence of wide additional reading; accurate work with few errors or omissions. Very well presented and structured work; relevant arguments well developed and supported by evidence. Considerable critical and analytical ability; clear insights and competent evaluation of material, some evidence of abilities to select and synthesise.

Pass MSc level (50 - 59%) Satisfactory knowledge of the subject area and its principles, concepts and terminology with clear evidence of additional reading; mainly accurate work. Well structured work with some clearly presented supporting material. Good appreciation, application and critical ability; some thoughtful discussion of material.

Diploma level (40 - 49%) Some knowledge of the subject area and its principles, concepts and terminology, with some evidence of additional reading; reasonably accurate work. Reasonable structure and clarity; assertions supported by some appropriate evidence. Some appreciation, application and critical ability.

Fail (39% or less) Minimal knowledge of the subject area, lack of relevant material with limited or no evidence of additional reading; inaccurate work with significant errors or omissions. Poor structure, hard to follow; assertions not supported by appropriate evidence. Little or no critical appraisal of material.

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5.3

Coursework Assignments

5.3.1 Details of all coursework assignments will be given out by the module lecturers so that you know what is required and the date by when the piece of work must be submitted.

5.3.2 The time you are expected to spend on an assignment may be indicated on the Course Assignment Form. However some students may spend more or less time than this. Often students are inclined to spend more time on assignments in order to submit work of good quality and obviously there is a temptation to always try to submit the best possible piece of work. However, this will often not be possible, particularly if there is other work to do. Part of managing your time is the allocation of available time to tasks. We appreciate that deadlines can operate to curtail time spent on a particular task, but they are essential to the effective operation of any Masters Programme.

5.3.3 Unless otherwise stated, essays and reports require a full answer in good English. The use of headings and sub-headings is often helpful in structuring an answer. Separate paragraphs should be employed for discussion of each new point.

Essays are usually set in such a way that they cannot be satisfactorily answered by paraphrasing standard textbooks or papers. Attempts to treat essays as paraphrasing exercises will attract minimal marks and run the risk of penalties for plagiarism (see below). Essays invariably require a certain amount of reading, both of recommended references and consideration of lectures and class discussions. While references to the literature are expected, you should develop properly argued answers in your own words rather than present a mere patchwork of other people's thoughts/interpretations/words. This is the only way to understand a subject fully, and demonstrate to tutors that you have a grasp of the subject.

5.3.4 Referencing All references/sources used in your work must be cited wherever appropriate. Failure to comply with these directions means that you run the risk of penalties for plagiarism.

For example:

When you consciously refer to, or legitimately borrow an idea from an author's work, you must always acknowledge this. The most convenient way of doing this is: "Ansoff (1984; p73) "

suggests that

strategy (Ansoff 1984)."

or "these four components together form the common thread concept of

Direct quotations must be placed in quotation marks followed by a clear indication of the source.

All references cited should be listed in full in alphabetical order at the end of your work in the following style:

Books: Watts, R.L. and Zimmerman, J.L. (1986) Positive Accounting Theory, Englewood-Cliff, N.J: Prentice Hall.

Articles: Christie, A.A. (1990), "Aggregation of Test Statistics: An Evaluation of the Evidence on Contracting and Size Hypotheses", Journal of Accounting and Economics, January, pp. 15-36.

5.3.5 Submission of Assignments/Coursework

Assignments must be word-processed:

Use A4 paper; leave an adequate left hand margin and staple papers firmly together. Please do not use paper clips, plastic binders or pvc covers.

Attach as the top sheet for each assignment, the appropriate Course Assignment Form (available from the School Reception) with the top section completed in print.

5.3.6 Plagiarism Detection Service You must submit your assignments into the Plagiarism Detection Service via Blackboard prior to submission of the hard copy to the Management Reception unless notified otherwise. Students must record the digital receipt number on the Assignment Submission and Student Feedback form. Management Reception will not accept assignments where the digital receipt number is missing.

Instructions for submitting Assignments/Dissertations into the Plagiarism Detection Service via Blackboard can be found at www.man-net.soton.ac.uk

18

5.3.7

Handing in Assignments Assignments must be submitted to the Management Reception by 3:30pm on the deadline date. Assignments handed in after this time will be recorded as ‘late’. Lecturers will not accept assignments direct as all assignments must be formally receipted by Management Reception.

5.3.8

Late assignments The School of Management operates a standard penalty system for assignments submitted late without prior permission. The following scale operates and is based on weekdays as working days after the deadline date.

(1)

Work handed in from 1 to 5 working days late - loss of 5% per day (e.g. for a piece of work handed in 3 working days late graded at 67%, less penalty of 15% - mark recorded 52%).

(2)

Work handed in after 5 working days will receive zero marks.

Work submitted late on the due date will be counted as one day late.

5.3.9

Extension of Deadline

In

exceptional circumstances, an extension may be permitted in respect of specific assignments. The

School cannot accept telephone requests for extensions or requests submitted on or after an assignment deadline. Requests will be considered by your personal tutor/programme director (not the module lecturer).

You must complete a coursework extension request form which is available from Management Reception and pass this to your personal tutor for consideration. If the extension is approved, the personal tutor will complete the form and return it to you. Students should then return the form to Management Reception where the extension will be formally recorded. The form will be returned to the student and students should attach the slip at the bottom of the form marked ’Extension Granted’ to the top of their assignment when it is submitted on the newly agreed date.

must be the student's responsibility to ensure that any request for an extension is submitted in time to obtain the necessary endorsement. General pressure of other work will not normally be grounds for an extension.

It

5.3.10

Feedback on assignments Feedback on assignments is given via comments and marks shown on a copy of your assignment front sheet. Please note all marks given are provisional and subject to approval of external examiners and the School’s Examination Board.

Occasionally you may have some queries about the feedback from lecturers in respect of assignments,

in

which case you are encouraged to discuss the mark with the relevant module lecturer.

5.3.11

Portfolios of assignments

In

accordance with normal University practice the School has appointed external examiners who oversee

the assessment process on the Diploma and Masters programme. The external examiners are concerned with not only the examinations, but also with the nature and quality of continuous assessment. Accordingly all coursework for each student is retained by the Examinations Officer.

A

copy of the assignment/coursework cover sheet with comments and the mark recorded will be

returned to students via Reception.

5.4

Examinations

5.4.1

Examination Preparation and Administration Examinations take place at the end of each semester. You are strongly encouraged to have a look at previous examination papers. These can be accessed at http://sussed.soton.ac.uk/cp/home/. Click on SRN and see Exam Past Papers listed under ‘Quick Links’.

Exam Timetable You will be issued with your exam timetable a few weeks before the examination period begins at the end of each semester. Please check this carefully and be aware of any revisions which may be issued subsequently. Ensure that you know where your exams will be held and at what time.

Behaviour You are only permitted to talk to the invigilator during any examination or class test. Talking to another student is likely to lead to your immediate exclusion from the Examination Room.

19

Calculators The only calculator permitted in Examination Rooms is the University endorsed calculator which is available in the Students Union Shop.

Mobile Phones Mobile Phones are NOT permitted in the Examination Room.

Rubric (the instructions to candidates on the front of the examination paper) Read the rubric carefully to make sure you answer the correct number of questions from the correct sections (if applicable). A common feature of fail scripts is that less than the required number of questions have been answered. Similarly, make sure you answer all the parts of a question.

Time Allocation Allocate your time roughly in accordance with the allocation of marks. Don’t forget to allocate some time to (a) a careful choice of the questions to be answered, and (b) planning your answers.

5.4.2 The Exam Paper

Question Answer the question that has been asked, and not:

the question you expected to be asked,

the question you wish had been asked or

the question you would have asked.

Regurgitation The aim is not to regurgitate what you think is the most relevant part of the lecture notes as accurately as possible but to answer the question that has been asked, using all that you have been taught in this and other modules, as well as knowledge from your own reading. There is nothing to be gained by memorising paragraphs of text (and mathematics) for regurgitation in the examination and may lead to charges of plagiarism.

Originality High marks will be awarded for original thought that is sensible (and hopefully correct) and for the use of information from additional reading. This is easily noticed by the examiner amongst a large amount of lecture note repetition.

Meaning Deciding what the question means is a key aspect of answering some questions. Good students are distinguished by their ability to correctly interpret the question. So part of your answer may sometimes involve some discussion of how the question can be interpreted, and why you have chosen to interpret it in the way you have.

Argument It is not enough to reproduce the relevant facts; you must use these facts in an argument that answers the question. Most students do not need to know a lot more to get higher marks. By just using what you already know in a better argument could get you substantially higher marks. You may think the facts you have written down speak for themselves and provide all that is needed for an intelligent person to answer the question but if you have not shown how they can be used to answer the question, you will not get very good marks. For example, the observation that apples fall to the ground is not the same thing as the theory of gravity.

Write It Down You only get marks for what you have written down, not what you could have written down, or what you meant to write down. For example, sometimes students miss out the word ‘not’, which has a dramatic effect on the meaning. More generally, students fail to fully explain their argument.

Relevance Strongly resist the temptation to stray off the point. You will get very few marks for irrelevant material, even if it is all correct. It demonstrates a failure to properly understand the question.

Correct Answer The examiner is often less interested in whether your answer to a question is Yes or No, but in how you have arrived at your answer. Indeed, either yes or no may be acceptable answers when properly justified by a well structured argument.

20

References You do not need to memorise (and quote in your answer) the names of the authors of a large number of journal papers etc. What is important is that you understand the contribution to knowledge a paper has made, and can make use of this knowledge, where relevant.

Diagrams They are easy and quick to draw, usually indicate an understanding of the problem, and often assist you in analysing the problem, leading to a better answer. Remember to label your axes and curves.

Handwriting and English You will only get marks for what the examiner can read, and will not get marks for illegible or incomprehensible material.

Mathematics In general, outside of mathematics/statistics modules, unless you are asked for a proof, substantial amounts of mathematics are not required or expected in answers. If you do use some mathematics, then briefly define your symbols.

Numerical Questions: Numerical questions versus essay questions? There is a risk return trade-off in making this choice - numeric questions tend to have a higher average mark, but also a much higher variance of marks.

Method.

Most of the marks are usually allocated for showing a correct and clear sequence of

calculations. A lucky guess of the correct numerical answer will get few marks. If your method is correct, showing your workings also means that if you make a slip in your calculations, you will still get good marks.

Omissions. You may think a piece of information is missing from the question. In this case, state clearly any assumptions you make. Examiners may omit some assumptions which are necessary to properly answer the question, but the deliberate omission of numbers necessary to answer the question is rare.

Length of Answers. Very short answers, e.g. Yes or No, will score very few marks.

Fuller Answers. Given the constraints that your answer is (a) legible, (b) clearly expressed in good English, (c) directly relevant to answering the question and (d) correct; then a fuller answer will usually score higher marks. However, repetition will not lead to higher marks.

Fundamental Mistakes. Lengthening your answer by making statements which demonstrate you do not understand fundamental concepts may lead to lower marks than if you had not written this material.

Conclusions Try to have a final paragraph which concludes your answer and summarises your main points.

5.4.3

Feedback on Examinations

Feedback to continuing and completing students on examinations is provided through:

a report from the internal examiner on the outcomes and what constituted good and weak responses. This report should be available as a handout or on a designated website after your examinations results are released.

Feedback to continuing students may also be provided through:

a group meeting provided by the internal examiner.

at the request of the student, an individual meeting with the internal examiner, or if appropriate, a personal tutor. A student may formally request individual feedback by the end of March for Semester 1 and by the end of July for Semester 2.

5.5

Special consideration

Students whose performance in assessments is adversely affected by special circumstances (medical or social) should consult their personal tutor as soon as possible. Where examination performance is likely to be adversely affected so that assessment of performance may warrant special consideration, you must follow the procedure below:

21

Students are required to complete a special considerations submission form which can be obtained from Management Reception. The completed form and supporting documents should be placed in a sealed envelope marked ‘Special Considerations’, addressed for the attention of the Examinations Officer and handed in to Management Reception before the end of the examination period for the semester.

5.6 Complaints/Appeals procedure

Students who have a complaint should see their personal tutor. The Senior Tutor is available if the student is unable to resolve the matter through their personal tutor. Information about the appeals procedures is available from the Deputy School Manager (Postgraduate Education) via Management Reception.

22

Section 6 Guidance on the MSc Dissertation

Index

6.1 Objectives of the dissertation

6.4

Supervision

6.2 Assessment criteria

6.5

Choosing a topic

6.3 Planning your work

6.6

Results

If you pass the taught section of the programme at the ‘masters’ level then you will be permitted to proceed to

the dissertation phase.

is given here for information.

A separate booklet will be issued to you about the dissertation so only a summary

6.1 Objectives of the dissertation

The dissertation stage of your master's programme involves an extended, independent investigation of a topic of your own choosing and the preparation of a 15,000 word dissertation describing your work. Successful completion of the dissertation leads to the award of an MSc.

Preparation of a dissertation requires you to:

Identify a suitable topic for study;

Design and undertake an appropriate investigation strategy;

Identify and access useful sources of information;

Plan and manage an appropriate schedule of work;

Liaise with your supervisor;

Write a well presented dissertation.

Essentially, the dissertation is a test of your ability to create, on your own initiative, a text which demonstrates a Masters level understanding of a particular management issue.

6.2 Assessment criteria

Your dissertation will be assessed according to the characteristics set out in this handbook. This means that you will need to:

State clear objectives for your study and ensure that the dissertation addresses these objectives.

Present a clear, logical, and coherent line of argument throughout your dissertation.

Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of your chosen topic and related conceptual literature, making appropriate reference to relevant sources of literature.

Draw on concepts/techniques/frameworks from one or more of your Diploma modules.

Ensure that your own ideas and analysis are a prominent part of your dissertation.

Provide in depth, critical reflection in your analysis and discussion of results.

Avoid superficial, simplistic analysis.

In addition to the quality of content, assessment will also depend on the quality of presentation.

6.3 Planning your work

It is very important that you plan your schedule of work for the dissertation to ensure that your time is managed efficiently and effectively, and that adequate time is allowed for the different activities needed to complete and submit your dissertation. In devising a plan, work backwards from submission, identifying all constraints, and be realistic about the time needed for different tasks. You are advised NOT to take any holidays during the period June – August!

Key dates:

Easter break – Decide on your topic and working dissertation title May - Students will be informed who their supervisor is after the Easter break. End of May – Submit a dissertation outline and research plan to your supervisor. 31st July - Supervision normally ends.

You must submit your dissertation by 17 September 2010 (Part-time students 31 December 2010, or first possible day in first working week in January).

23

6.4

Supervision

You will be allocated a supervisor by your Programme Director. Supervision is primarily concerned with advising you on:

The suitability of the title and scope of your dissertation;

The suitability of your methodology;

The adequacy of source materials;

The development of an appropriate dissertation structure.

Supervisors will not normally provide specific advice or guidance on pertinent sources of information or literature for your particular topic. This is your responsibility.

It is School of Management policy that supervisor's do not scrutinise and comment on detailed dissertation drafts except for one single chapter.

The time available for supervision will not normally exceed four hours in total. You should not expect your supervisor to be available for frequent and lengthy guidance. To get the most from supervision sessions make sure you arrive well prepared with a clear agenda of issues to discuss. Supervisors will expect to contribute their guidance at the beginning of your research in May and June, and to have completed their supervision by 31st July. Thus it is important that you make significant progress on your dissertation before the end of July. Failure to do this inevitably creates problems which surface at a later date. You are most unlikely to be able to consult your supervisor after the end of July except for the most unusual and serious problems that have arisen during your research. Staff often take their vacation at this time and access to your supervisor is not usually possible in August and September.

6.5 Choosing a topic and dissertation title

The best approach is to first identify a topic you are interested in, and then think about possible titles for your dissertation within this topic. Whatever your topic, it is essential that it is relevant to the subject matter of your programme. A good title is short, reasonably specific, and one that conveys an objective or hypothesis.

Generally, students are encouraged to undertake an applied dissertation based on a particular organisation context or related to a generic management issue. Students are particularly encouraged to write a dissertation that is of direct interest to a current or future employer. However, in such cases it is important to investigate the feasibility of possible topics (and titles) at an early stage with the appropriate organisation personnel and the potential supervisor or programme director. This helps to ensure that a study is appropriate for a dissertation and achievable in the time available.

Dissertations can take a number of forms, for example:

A critical review of an area of literature;

Theoretical development of a technique or issues;

Empirical work involving quantitative analysis of collected data;

A survey business practice in a particular context;

A case-study of a particular firm or industry;

Study of a particular problem in an organisation or industry.

Each of these types of dissertation requires a slightly different approach and advice should be sought from your supervisor on the most appropriate way to proceed in particular cases.

6.6 Results

Your supervisor and one other internal examiner will mark your dissertation. It may also be sent to an external examiner.

The level and nature of supervision provided will be reflected in the assessment. The examiners of your dissertation have four decisions are open to them: pass with distinction; pass; pass with minor corrections; fail with the right resubmission (first submission only), or fail with no right of resubmission.

24

Section 7 Module Outlines

The module outlines are in MANG code order and commence on page 27

MANG Code

Core/Option

Title

MANG6037

Core

Systems Thinking

MANG6038

Core

Knowledge Management & Expert Systems

MANG6040

Option

Information Systems Strategy

MANG6045

Option

Consultancy Skills

MANG6049

Core

Problem Structuring

MANG6054

Option

Credit Scoring & Data Mining

MANG6091

Option

Business Ethics

MANG6119

Core

Introduction to Knowledge & Information Systems Mgt

MANG6121

Core

Information Systems Mgt & Development

MANG6122

Option

Simulation

MANG6129

Core

Qualitative & Quantitative Research

MANG6143

Option

Project Risk Management

MANG6144

Core

Human-Computer Interaction & E Business

MANG6180

Core

Web Applications

25

MANG6037

Systems Thinking

Level: M

 

Semester 1

Unit Coordinator:

Professor Con Connell

Email:

Connell@soton.ac.uk

Room: 4019

Prerequisites:

None

Co-requisites:

None

Aims of the Unit

This unit introduces systems thinking. In the context of management science, information systems, and related disciplines, systems thinking is a way of looking at the world and its complexity that emphasises holistic understanding rather than a reductionist approach. Many techniques and approaches have been influenced and informed by the systems movement. This unit introduces some of the basic systems concepts and ideas, and then discusses soft systems methodology (SSM), a systems-based approach to assist with complex problem-solving.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

1. Have acquired a basic understanding and appreciation of systems concepts and thinking.

Subject Specific Intellectual (Cognitive) Skills

2. Have developed an understanding of SSM, have the ability to use it effectively, and to

reflect on circumstances where its use might, or might not, be applicable. Transferable (Key/General) Skills 3. Have developed the following key skills: problem-solving; teamwork; critical thinking; communication skills.

Summary of content

The unit has two components: a general introduction to systems ideas and systems thinking, and a detailed treatment of soft systems methodology (SSM).

Summary of Teaching and Learning Methods

The unit is taught by a mix of lecture, workshop and discussion sessions.

Recommended Text

The following texts are useful and will be referred to in the unit, though none of them constitutes a unit text:

J.

Rosenhead & J. Mingers (2001) Rational Analysis For A Problematic World Revisited. Wiley.(2 ND Ed)

P.

Checkland & J. Scholes (1990) Soft Systems Methodology In Action. Wiley, Chichester.

R.

M. Flood & M. Jackson (1991) Creative Problem Solving. Wiley, Chichester.

D.

Patching (1990) Practical Soft Systems Analysis. Pitman, London.

Some articles on SSM can be found in the Journal of the OR Society.

Assessment

Type of assessment

Word Length or Exam Duration

Percentage of the overall assessment

What learning outcomes does this assess? (e.g. 1, 3 & 7)

Coursework (exercise using soft systems methodology in small group) Individual section

2500

words

60%

1, 2 & 3

1000

words

40%

1,2, & 3

CATS Points:

7.5

ECTS Points:

26

3.75

MANG6038

Knowledge Management and Expert

Level: M

Systems

Semester 2

Unit Coordinator:

Athanasios (Thanos) Papadopoulos

Email:

a.papadopoulos

@soton.ac.uk

Room: T.B.A.

Prerequisites:

-

Co-requisites:

-

Aims of the Unit

The course discusses the ways in which Information Systems can be used to explore and exploit organisational knowledge to support management decision making.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of the unit you will be able to:

1. Describe and analyse what decision support means

2. Comprehend the role of knowledge in decision-making

3. Discuss the capabilities and limitations of Information Systems in supporting decisions

Subject Specific Intellectual (Cognitive) Skills

On successful completion of the unit you will be able to:

4. Assess decision support requirements in organisations

5. Assess proposals for computer based decision support in organisations

Transferable (Key/General) Skills

By the end of the unit you will develop your ability in the following skills:

6. Report writing

7. Group work

8. IT

9. Presentations

Summary of content

● Meaning of decision support

● Models to support decisions

● Fundamentals of knowledge

● Codification of knowledge

● Expert systems

● Scenario management and case-based reasoning

● Group decision support systems

● Implementation of decision support systems

Summary of Teaching and Learning Methods

The unit consists of seminars, case studies, demonstrations and practical sessions (computer laboratory sessions). Computer facilities will be booked for use by this unit.

Recommended Texts

Turban, E., Aronson, J., Liang, T-P., & Sharda, R. (2007). Decision Support Systems and Business Intelligence Systems. New York: John Wiley & Sons. 8th Edition. Sauter V. (1997). Decision Support Systems, Wiley.

Further Readings

Arnott, D., and Pervan, G. (2005). A critical analysis of decision support systems research . Journal of Information Technology, 20, pp. 67 – 87 Brown, J. S. & Duguid, P. (1991) Organizational Learning and Communities-Of-Practice: Toward a Unified View of Working, Learning, and Innovating. Organization Science, 2, 1, 40-57. Cook, S. & Brown, J. S. (1999) Bridging Epistemologies: The Generative Dance Between Organizational Knowledge and Organizational Knowing. Organization Science, 10, 4, 381-400. Davenport, T. H., & Prusak, L. (1998) Working Knowledge: How Organizations Manage What They Know. Harvard Business School Press. Davenport, T.H., and Harris, J.G (2005). Automated decision making comes of Age. MIT Sloan Management Review, 46, 4,

83-89.

Eliashberg, J., Swami, S., Weinberg, C.B., & Wierenga, B. (2009). Evolutionary Approach to the development of Decision Support Systems in the Movie Industry. Decision Support Systems, in Press. Finnegan, P., & O’Mahony, L. (1996). Group problem solving and decision making: an investigation of the process and the supporting technology. Journal of Information Technology 11, 211-221 Lynch, T., & Gregor, S. (2004). User participation in decision support systems development: Influencing system outcomes. European Journal of Information Systems, 13, 286 – 301. March, J. G. (1991) Exploration and Exploitation in Organizational Learning. Organization Science, 2, 1, 71-87. Morton, A., Ackermann, F., & Belton, V. (2003). Technology-driven and model-driven approaches to group decision support:

focus, research philosophy, and key concepts. European Journal of Information Systems 12, 110-126 Nah, F.H., Mao, J., & Benbasat, I. (1999). The effectiveness of expert support technology for decision making: individuals versus small groups. Journal of Information Technology 14, 137 - 147 Nonaka, I. (1991) The Knowledge-Creating Company. Harvard Business Review, 69, 6, 96-104. Nonaka, I. (1994) A Dynamic Theory of Organizational Knowledge Creation. Organization Science, 5, 1, 14-37.

27

Polanyi, M. (1958) Personal Knowledge. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. Prusak, L. (1997) Knowledge in Organizations. Butterworth-Heinemann. Rowe, F. (2005). Are decision support systems getting people to conform? the impact of work organisation and segmentation on user behaviour in a French bank. Journal of Information Technology, 20, 103 – 116. Tsoukas, H. & Vladimirou, E. (2001) What is Organizational Knowledge? Journal of Management Studies, 38, 7, 973-93

Assessment

Type of assessment

Word Length

Percentage of the overall assessment

What learning outcomes does this assess? (e.g. 1, 3 & 7)

or

Exam

 

Duration

 

Coursework (Case Study project work)

T.B.A.

100%

All

CATS Points:

15

ECTS Points:

28

7.5

MANG6040

Information Systems Strategy

Level: M

 

Semester 2

Unit Coordinator:

Lisa Harris and Thanos Papadopoulos

Email:

l.j.harris@soton.ac.uk

Room: 3070

Aims of the Unit

To examine the debate on the role of IS in sustainable competitive advantage To assess critically the arguments that: a) IS has created a world that is flat b) IS is fundamentally not important, and c) IS separates information from its social context rendering it misleading To examine current trends in technology and their implications for organisational change

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of the unit you will be able to:

1. Discuss the key strategic issues facing managers seeking to deploy and exploit

computer-based IS systems

2. Discuss how IT strategic directions can be integrated with an organisation's business and strategic planning

3. Comprehend the limitations of strategic planning and be aware of current technological trends and their potential to impact

on strategic planning.

4. Appreciate the role of IT as an enabler of organisational transformation and in the delivery of value

5. Critically reflect upon the relative potential of strategic opportunities in the information economy.

Subject Specific Intellectual (Cognitive) Skills

On successful completion of the unit you will be able to:

6. assess critically the significance of IS in the broader context of the organisation in its competitive environment

Transferable (Key/General) Skills On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

7. prepare concise, pertinent and well structured written communications, using IT media as appropriate to support the preparation and presentation of data

Summary of content

Introduction to strategy

The relationship between business strategy, IS and IT

How IT can deliver value and benefits to the organisation

The management of IS – knowledge management, leadership and culture change

Outsourcing vs. in house computing

Data security, contingency planning and social media policies

Mobile and collaborative working

Trends in technology and the workplace of the future

Summary of Teaching and Learning Methods

You will learn from a combination of guided reading, lectures, group work, case studies, and, where possible, practitioner presentations. You will be encouraged to relate your learning to any relevant experience you may have in your current or prior work situations.

Recommended Reading

Boddy D., Boonstra, A., and Kennedy G (2005) Managing Information Systems: strategy and organisation. Prentice Hall

Carr, N.G. (2003) IT doesn’t matter, Harvard Business Review, 81:5.

Carr, N.G. (2008) The Big Switch, rewiring the world from Edison to Google, Norton Publishing Friedman, T.L. (2005) The World is Flat, Farrar, Strauss and Giroux.

Galliers, R., and Leidner, D. (2002). Strategic Information Management: Challenges and Strategies in Managing Information Systems. Butterworth-Heinemann.

Lacity, M.C., and Willcocks, L.P. (2001) Global Information Technology Outsourcing: In Search of Business Advantage, Wiley & Sons, Chichester.

Seely Brown, J., and Duguid, P. (2002) The Social Life of Information, Harvard Business School Publishing

Necessary preparatory readings will be included in the course pack.

29

Assessment

Type of assessment

Word Length

Percentage of the overall assessment

What learning outcomes does this assess? (e.g. 1, 3 & 7)

or

Exam

 

Duration

 

Examination

2 hours

100%

All

CATS Points:

7.5

 

ECTS Points:

3.75

 

30

MANG6045

Consultancy Skills

Level: M

 

Semester 1

Unit Coordinator:

Mr Graham Manville

Email:

g.manville@soton.ac.uk

Room: 4051

Prerequisites:

None

Co-requisites:

None

Aims of the Unit

This unit aims to introduce a range of skills required to successfully engage in management consultancy and to provide opportunities to apply particular skills.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

By the end of the unit students will be able to:

1. Understand and evaluate the range of skills required to successfully engage in management consultancy;

2. Apply certain skills in group work.

Subject Specific Intellectual (Cognitive) Skills

On successful completion of the unit you will be able to:

3. Critically analyse the different consultancy stages;

4. Develop a consultancy proposal.

Transferable (Key/General) Skills During this unit students will have the opportunity to develop a number of key skills including oral and written communication, working in small groups, critical thinking, problem analysis and presentation skills.

Summary of content

● Introduction & Trends in Consultancy

● Marketing & Selling/ Developing a Proposal

● Conducting Consultancy Assignment

Summary of Teaching and Learning Methods

The module will be taught through a range of methods such as lectures, class discussions, guided background reading, small group work followed by group presentations and discussions, exploration of case studies/papers and videos.

Recommended Text

Core Text:

Cope, M. (2003), The Seven Cs of Consulting: the Definitive Guide to the Consulting Process, Pearson Education Ltd. Other Readings:

Peter Block (2000), Flawless Consulting, Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer Publisher. Cockman, P., Evans, B. and Reynolds, P. (1999), Consulting for Real People – a client-centred approach for change agents and leaders, McGraw Hill. Gray, D.A. (1989), Profitable Consulting Business, Kogan Page. Czerniawska, F. (1999), Management Consultancy in the 21st Century, MacMillan Publisher.

Assessment

Type of assessment

Word Length

Percentage of the overall assessment

What learning outcomes does this assess? (e.g. 1, 3 & 7)

or

Exam

 

Duration

 

Group Assignment

5000 words

100%

1, 2, 3 and 4.

 

CATS Points:

7.5

 

ECTS Points:

3.75

31

MANG6049

Problem Structuring

Level: M

 

Semester 1

Unit Coordinator:

Dr Jonathan H. Klein

Email:

J.H.Klein@soton.ac.uk

Room: 3061

Prerequisites:

None

Co-requisites:

None

Aims of the Unit

This unit introduces the inter-related issues of defining, developing, exploring and working with ill-structured problems in an effective manner. Problems which present in a well-structured form are the exception rather than the rule. Most problems are messy: ill-defined, often vague and poorly expressed, and with as many subjective versions as there are people involved. Such problems rarely lend themselves in any obvious way to quantification or neat solution by the traditional methods of management science. In recent years, management scientists have become increasingly interested in approaches to problems which enable problem owners to define, discuss, explore and work with problems in a constructive way, without over-simplifying or distorting. This unit introduces a number of problem structuring methods (PSMs), and considers the issues associated with their use and development.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

By the end of this unit, you will have developed:

1. knowledge and understanding of the basics of a number of PSMs and

the issues associated with their use, and be able to use these approaches effectively;

2. knowledge and understanding of the soft management science approach.

Subject Specific Intellectual (Cognitive) Skills

By the end of this unit, you will have developed:

3. the intellectual (cognitive) skills required to use PSMs effectively;

4. the intellectual (cognitive) skills to work effectively with PSMs.

Transferable (Key/General) Skills

5. Qualitative problem-solving.

Summary of content

The unit consists of an exploration of issues concerned with problem structuring and soft management science, including the practical use of PSMs.

Summary of Teaching and Learning Methods

The unit is taught by a mix of lecture, workshop and discussion sessions.

Recommended Text

Most of the material in the unit is covered in the following text:

J. Rosenhead & J. Mingers (editors) (2001) Rational Analysis for a Problematic World Revisited: Problem Structuring Methods for Complexity, Uncertainty and Conflict. Second Edition. Wiley, Chichester, UK.

Assessment

Type of assessment

Word Length

Percentage of the overall assessment

What learning outcomes does this assess?

or

Exam

 

Duration

 

Examination

2 hours

100%

All

CATS Points:

7.5

 

ECTS Points:

3.75

 

32

MANG6054

Credit Scoring and Data Mining

Level: M

 

Semester 2

Unit Coordinator:

Dr Bart Baessens

Email:

bart@soton.ac.uk

Room: 3021

Prerequisites:

Basic understanding of statistics

Co-requisites:

T.B.A.

Aims of the Unit

The course will start by defining the concept of Knowledge Discovery in Data (KDD) as consisting of three steps: data preprocessing, data mining and post-processing. Next, we will zoom into the data mining step and distinguish two types of data mining: descriptive data mining (e.g. clustering, association and sequence rules) and predictive data mining (e.g. regression and classification). The course will then illustrate how KDD can be successfully used to develop credit scoring applications, where the aim is to distinguish good customers from bad customers (defaulters) given their characteristics. The importance of developing good credit scoring models will be highlighted in the context of the recently put forward Basel II guidelines. The theoretical concepts will be illustrated using real-life credit scoring cases and the SAS Enterprise Miner software.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

By the end of this unit, you will be able to:

1. understand the potential of KDD and data mining for developing scorecards.

Subject Specific Intellectual (Cognitive) Skills

2. Work with software to develop credit scoring solutions; develop a scorecard using very advanced data mining techniques.

Transferable (Key/General) Skills

3. Understand the practical difficulties that arise when implementing scorecards; Understand the cross-fertilisation potential to other business contexts (e.g. fraud Detection, CRM, …).

Summary of content

Introduction:

● Knowledge Discovery in Data

● The KDD process model

● Descriptive versus predictive data mining

● Credit scoring: problem statement, origins and objectives

● The Basle II regulation

● Risk management

● Consumer credit scoring, Behavioural Scoring, Collection Scoring, Bankruptcy Prediction

● Risk Based Pricing (customization of credit products)

● Customized scorecards versus generic scorecards

● Developing scorecards Data pre-processing:

● Selecting the sample

● Segmentation

● Example variables needed for application and behavioural scoring

● Oversampling versus Undersampling

● Credit scoring characteristics

● Application form characteristics

● Credit bureau characteristics

● Reject inference

● Definitions of good and bad

● Binary verus three-way classification (good, bad, and indeterminate)

● Outlier detection

● Missing values

● Nominal variables versus Ordinal variables

Data mining

● Basic concepts of classification

● Classification techniques (logistic regression, decision trees, neural networks)

● Overfitting versus generalisation

● Input selection (Filters, Wrappers … )

● Setting the cut-off

● Measuring scorecard performance (ROC curves, Lift, Gini, … ) Post processing

● Reporting

● Strategy curve

● Profit scoring

● Recalibrating scorecards

● Tracking scorecards

33

Summary of Teaching and Learning Methods

The course is delivered through pre-course reading and lectures. The various concepts will be illustrated using real-life credit scoring data and software.

Recommended Text

Baesens B., Van Gestel T., Viaene S., Stepanova M., Suykens J., Vanthienen J., Benchmarking State of the Art Classification Algorithms for Credit Scoring, Journal of the Operational Research Society, Volume 54, Number 6, pp. 627- 635, 2003. Jacka S., Hand D.J., Statistics in Finance, Edward Arnold, 1997. Thomas L.C., Crook J.N., Edelman D.B., Credit Scoring and Its Applications, SIAM Press, Philadelphia, 2002.

D.

Hand, H. Manila, P. Smyth: Principles of Data Mining. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2001.

J.

Han, M. Kamber: Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques. Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 2001.

T.

Hastie, R. Tibshirani, J. Friedman: The Elements of Statistical Learning. Springer, New York, 2001.

I.H. Witten, E. Frank: Data Mining: Practical Machine Learning Tools and Techniques with Java Implementations. Morgan

Kauffman, San Francisco, CA, 2000. www.kdnuggets.com www.defaultrisk.com www.cs.waikato.ac.nz/~ml/weka/

Assessment

Type of assessment

Word Length

Percentage of the overall assessment

What learning outcomes does this assess? (e.g. 1, 3 & 7)

or

Exam

 

Duration

 

Coursework

T.B.A.

100%

All

CATS Points:

7.5

 

ECTS Points:

3.75

 

34

MANG6091

Business Ethics

Level: M

 

Semester 1

Unit Coordinator:

Dr Denise Baden

Email:

dab@soton.ac.uk

Room: 4065

Prerequisites:

None

Co-requisites:

None

Aims of the Unit

This unit aims to provide a comprehensive and rigorous introduction to the main concepts of ethics, and their application to business. The unit will show how these concepts develop from the work of philosophers and the theories of economists and management thinkers

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

Having successfully completed this unit you will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

1. be familiar with the main ethical concepts and distinctions;

2. understand the rational basis underlying moral theory;

3. learn how expectations of business have changed over the years, and the influence of stakeholder theory;

4. through case studies, appreciate both short and long term consequences of ethical and unethical behaviour;

5. understand the factors that affect the ethical behaviour of organizations;

6. learn a method of analysis that will enable them to determine what is the ‘right’ course of action, and justify and present their reasons and conclusions to others in a systematic, objective way.

Subject Specific Intellectual (Cognitive) Skills

Having successfully completed this unit you will be able to:

7. identify moral dilemmas, i.e. to be aware of, to not let routine or habits or rules conceal, moral dilemmas and moral challenges;

8. analyze, i.e. to get some tools to deal with the moral dilemmas and problems by thinking through the economic, legal and ethical parameters of a managerial decision in a logical, structured way;

9. achieve ethical confidence through practice in applying a logical and structured form of ethical analysis to complex business issues.

Transferable (Key/General) Skills Having successfully completed this unit you will be able to:

10. your written communication skills;

11. your learning and research skills;

12. skills in presenting your conclusions to others;

13. analytical skills.

Summary of content

Week 1 Lecture 1: Introduction to Ethics: Is business ethics an oxymoron? Do we need ethics if we have the law? What is expected of business? Is it in business’s interests to be ethical? This session introduces students to the theory of the firm, stockholder and stakeholder theory. In this session we will engage in a number of group exercises such as seeing how the ‘prisoners dilemma’ works in practice, and applying the principles of game theory in practice. This session includes a film on Corporate Social Responsibility followed by a talk by the Film’s presenter Leo Martin, who advises and reports on firms ethical behaviour and corporate responsibility.

Week 2 Lecture 2: How to make ethical decisions and justify them. In this session students are introduced to some of the main ethical thinkers that have informed this field, and will gain practice in dealing with ethical issues and applying a method of ethical analysis. This session will involve a number of group activities where students will debate the ethical issues involved in a number of case studies and scenarios using what has been learned from the ethical thinkers. The skills learned from this form of ethical analysis will then be practiced by applying them to real-life business scenarios.

Week 3 Lecture 3: How a company integrates core values, such as honesty, trust, respect, and fairness into its policies, practices, and decision making. Drawing on several real-life case studies, this session discusses the kinds of factors that affect the ethical behaviour of organisations. Examples of unethical decisions are presented along with their consequences. Also positive examples of ethical behaviour are presented. In groups, students are invited to discuss what they would do in specific situations. Students are introduced to several ways in which ethical behaviour can be embedded into an organisation. At the end students take part in a fun prize quiz to determine who is the most ethical.

35

Summary of Teaching and Learning Methods

Weekly lectures includes guest speakers, film, quiz, other group activities and presentations.

Recommended Text

Hosmer, L. T. (2006). The Ethics of Management, McGraw-Hill. Crane, A. and D. Matten (2004). Business Ethics 92 nd ed), Oxford University Press.

Assessment

Type of assessment

Word Length

Percentage of the overall assessment

What learning outcomes does this assess? (e.g. 1, 3 & 7)

or

Exam

 

Duration

 

Group Presentation in Class

15 minute

20%

2,6,8,910,12

 

verbal

 
 

presentation

Coursework Essay

2000 words

80%

1-5, 7, 10,11,13

 

CATS Points:

7.5

 

ECTS Points:

3.75

36

MANG6119

Introduction to Knowledge and

Level: M

Information Systems Management

Semester 1

Unit Coordinator:

Dr Christophe Mues

Email:

cm1@soton.ac.uk

Room: 3009

Prerequisites:

None

Co-requisites:

None

Aims of the Unit

This module provides an appreciation and understanding of the subject area of knowledge and information systems management. It acts as an introduction to the Knowledge & Information Systems Management (KISM) Diploma/MSc programme. It provides an overview of the field, introducing the fundamental concepts of knowledge and information systems and their management, thereby emphasising the particular perspectives adopted by the programme. The module makes reference to the structure and content of the programme as a whole.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding By the end of this module, you will have developed:

1. Knowledge and understanding of the nature and scope of contemporary knowledge management (KM) and information systems (IS);

2. Knowledge and understanding of the relationship between the current nature of the KM and IS fields and their history and development;

Subject Specific Intellectual (Cognitive) Skills

3. The intellectual (cognitive) skills required to identify and characterise some of the main current practical and theoretical debates in the fields;

4. The intellectual (cognitive) skills to relate your own aims and objectives to the KISM programme.

Transferable (Key/General) Skills

5. Critical thinking

6. Bibliographic

Summary of content

The unit covers, at a broad level, the following topics: the nature of information systems; data, information and knowledge; information systems and their organisational context; information systems, hardware and software; knowledge management; information communication; electronic commerce; ERP, DSS and other systems; ethical issues.

Summary of Teaching and Learning Methods

The unit is taught by a mix of lecture and discussion sessions.

Recommended Text

There is no course text for this unit. Appropriate readings will be identified in the lectures.

Assessment

Type of assessment

Word Length

Percentage of the overall assessment

What learning outcomes does this assess? (e.g. 1, 3 & 7)

or

Exam

 

Duration

 

Coursework

2000 words

100%

All

CATS Points:

7.5

 

ECTS Points:

3.75

 

37

MANG6121

Information Systems Management

Level: M

and Development

Semester 1

Unit Coordinator:

Athanasios (Thanos) Papadopoulos

Email:

a.papadopoulos@soton.ac.uk

Room: T.B.A.

Prerequisites:

-

Co-requisites:

-

Aims of the Unit

The aim of this unit is to discuss the role of Information Systems as a fundamental construct of the organisation. It has two main aims:

● Broaden the technology centred view of Information Systems into seeing them as socio- technical systems;

● Highlight the issues relating to developing and maintaining Information Systems to create business value from both the theoretical underpinnings and a pragmatic approach to problem solving.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

At the end of this unit you will be able to:

1. Discuss the importance of seeing Information Systems as socio-technical systems and distinguish them clearly from information technology;

2. Describe the different types of systems in organisations

3. Comprehend the recent trends in Information Systems development.

Subject Specific Intellectual (Cognitive) Skills

At the end of this unit you will be able to:

4. Describe how the social and political context influences the effectiveness of Information;

5. Investigate emerging concepts and technologies by extending appropriately from established conceptual models;

6. Analyse complex real world situations by applying conceptual models to obtain insights beyond what common sense might suggest;

7. Critically analyse the process of Information Systems development;

8. Compare, contrast and select appropriate techniques and methodologies for

Information Systems development Transferable (Key/General) Skills 9. This unit will help you develop your written and oral communication skills, problem solving, critical thinking and your ability to work in a group environment

Summary of Content

The curriculum will be divided into three broad areas:

● Understanding Information Systems and their importance to the organisation as socio- technical systems:

- Information Systems domain;

- Information Systems from operational and decision-making perspective;

- Information Systems from knowledge creation and management perspective.

● Managing Information Systems:

- Strategic framework for Information Systems planning;

- Information Systems outsourcing;

- Information Systems evaluation and management of benefits;

- Successes and failures of Information Systems projects;

- Anticipated future of the Information Systems.

● Information Systems Development

- Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC)

- Organisational, engineering, people, modeling, external, software themes;

- Holistic, data, process, people techniques;

- SSADM, XP, Agile methods, Multiview methodologies;

- Comparative review and issues in methodologies.

Summary of Teaching and Learning Methods

The unit will be taught through lectures and case studies. The structure of the teaching/learning strategy will be as follows:

● Introduce a subject area;

● Discuss how it relates to the theme of the unit;

● Understand the theoretical content;

● Explore the theory-practice link through case studies;

● Eliminate ambiguities through discussion.

Recommended Text

Information Systems Management reading list -Turban, E., Leidner,D., Ephraim McLean, and Wetherbe, J. (2007). Information Technology for Management. Transforming Organisations in the Digital Economy. Wiley & Sons.

38

-Laudon K.C. and Laudon J.P. (2008). Management Information Systems: Managing the digital firm. Pearson

-Ward, J., and Peppard, J. (2002). Strategic Planning for Information Systems, 4 th edition, Wiley.

Information Systems Development reading list:

Avison, D. E. & Fitzgerald, G. (2006). Information Systems Development: Methodologies, Techniques and Tools. 4 th Edition. McGraw-Hill.

Further Readings

Brynjolfsson, E., and Hitt, L. M. (1998). Beyond the productivity paradox. Communications of the ACM 41, 8, 49-55 Elbanna, A. R. (2008). Strategic systems implementation: diffusion through drift. European Journal of Information Systems, 23, 89-96 Farbey, B, Land, F., and Targett, D. (1999). The moving staircase: Problems of appraisal and evaluation in a turbulent environment. Information Technology & People, 12, 3, 238-252. Fitzgerald, G., and Russon, N. (2005). The turnaround of the London Ambulance Service Computer-Aided Despatch system (LASCAD). European Journal of Information Systems, 14, 244-257 McAfee, A., and Brynjolfsson, E. (2008). Invest in IT that makes a competitive difference. Harvard Business Review, July- August, 98-107 Oshri, I., Kotlarsky, J. and Willcocks, L.P. (2008). Outsourcing Global Services: Knowledge, innovation and social capital, London: Palgrave. Oshri, I., Kotlarsky, J., and Willcocks, L. (2007). Managing Dispersed Expertise in IT Offshore Outsourcing: Lessons fromom Tata Consultancy Services. MIS Quarterly Executive, 6, 2, 53-65.

Assessment

Type of assessment

Word Length

Percentage of the overall assessment

What learning outcomes does this assess? (e.g. 1, 3 & 7)

or

Exam

 

Duration

 

Coursework(Individual assignment – report)

5000words

50%

Related to Information Systems management

-

Examination

2 hours

50%

Related to Information Systems Development

CATS Points:

15

 

ECTS Points:

7.5

 

39

MANG6122

Simulation

Level: M

 

Semester 1

Unit Coordinator

Professor Sally Brailsford

Email:

s.c.brailsford@soton.ac.uk

Room: 3029

Prerequisites:

Quantitative Methods

Co-requisites:

None

Aims of the Unit

The aims of this unit are to provide an introduction to the theories and techniques of simulation. The first part of the unit covers Monte Carlo simulation and role-playing simulation for staff training, focussing on practical applications of simulations in a variety of contexts. The second part of the unit is an introduction to discrete event simulation and system dynamics. The former is an extremely important technique, used in industry and the Public Sector, to model the behaviour of queueing systems. Examples of such systems are production lines, hospital department and transport systems. System dynamics is a powerful technique with wide applications. The unit aims to equip you with the necessary skills to be able to apply simulation usefully in your future employment.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

Having successfully completed the course/unit, you will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

1. the principles underlying Monte Carlo simulation;

2. the basic statistical techniques (e.g. sampling from distributions, replications, and variance reduction) underlying the methodology of simulation;

3. the theory and methodology of role-playing simulations;

4. the principles and uses of system dynamics;

5. the principles and uses of discrete event simulation;

6. how to experiment with simulation models to meet objectives.

Subject Specific Intellectual (Cognitive) Skills

Having successfully completed the course/unit, you will be able to:

7. apply the methods and techniques of Monte Carlo simulation to a range of problems, including inventory systems and project management;

8. create and run Monte Carlo simulations using commercial spreadsheet add-ins;

9. analyse the use of role-playing simulation in crisis management;

10. create discrete-event models in commercial DES software;

11. create system dynamics models in commercial SD software.

Transferable (Key/General) Skills Having successfully completed the unit, you will have practiced and developed your skills in numeracy, IT, problem-solving, quantitative and qualitative modelling, written communication and self-management.

Summary of content

● Monte Carlo simulation

● Random numbers

● Simulation in project management

● Sampling from distributions

● Confidence intervals

● Number of repetitions

● Simulation of inventory problems

● Experimentation

● Choosing Distributions

● Business games

● Queuing systems

● Events, activities and queues

● Activity diagrams

● The modelling process

● Modelling methodologies

● Sampling in DES and how this is incorporated in simulations

● Choosing distributions

● Simulation software and the needs of users

Graphical output and interaction

● Model validation

Experimentation

● The future of simulation

Summary of Teaching and Learning Methods

Lectures, practical exercises, computer workshops, private study.

Recommended Text

Michael Pidd, Computer Simulation in Management Science, Wiley, 1998. Les Oakshott, Business Modelling and Simulation, Pitman Publishing, 1997. Kleijnen and Van Groenendaal, Simulation: a statistical perspective, Wiley 1992 Stewart Robinson, Successful Simulation, McGraw Hill, 1994. Simulation and Gaming Journal (any issue, in Library).

40

Wayne L. Winston, Operations Research, Applications and Algorithms, Duxbury, 1993, Chapter 23. Eppen, Gould, Schmidt, Moore and Weatherford, Introductory Management Science, 1998, Chapter 11.

Assessment

Type of assessment

Word Length

Percentage of the overall assessment

What learning outcomes does this assess? (e.g. 1, 3 & 7)

or

Exam

 

Duration

 

Coursework

N/A*

100%

All

*As this is mainly computer-based the word limit is not relevant

CATS Points:

15

ECTS Points:

41

7.5

MANG6129

Quantitative & Qualitative Research

Level: M

 

Semester: 2

Unit Coordinator:

Dr Ian Harwood

Email:

iah@soton.ac.uk

Room: 3019

Prerequisites:

None

Co-requisites:

None

Aims of the Unit

This unit aims to provide you with an opportunity to develop an appreciation of management research in theory and practice. There are two broad objectives: (1) to enhance your knowledge of the research process and enable you to be aware of the problems associated with research, and (2) to prepare you to carry out your own research, in most cases your dissertation.