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1 Pearl Building

Guide for consultants


Version 1 November 2010
Introduction to Estidama
Estidama, which means ‘sustainability’ in Four pillars of estidama
Arabic, is the initiative which will transform
Abu Dhabi into a model of sustainable
urbanization. Its aim is to create more

tal eco
sustainable communities, cities and global
enterprises and to balance the four pillars of
Estidama: environmental, economic, cultural
en
and social.
m

no
The aspirations of Estidama are incorporated into Plan

e ron
2030 and other Urban Planning Council (UPC) policies
such as the Development Code. Estidama began two years

mic
ago and is the first program of its kind that is tailored to
the Middle East region. In the immediate term, Estidama

i
is focused on the rapidly changing built environment. It

v
is in this area that the UPC is making significant strides
to influence projects under design, development or

n
construction within the Emirate of Abu Dhabi.

The Pearl Rating System for Estidama is one of the


key tools for driving and determining sustainable
development. The completion of the Pearl Rating System
for Communities, Buildings and Villas marks a critical step
estidama
in the progression of Estidama by providing a suite of
tools that will be the basis for sustainable development
from master plan to plot.

cu
al

l
ur

t
i
soc al
Introduction to Estidama
the pearl rating system for estidama estidama for buildings
The Pearl Rating System for Estidama aims to address As of September, 2010, all new buildings in Abu Dhabi will
the sustainability of a given development throughout its have to achieve a minimum 1 Pearl Rating. This means that
lifecycle from design through construction to operation. design teams will have to demonstrate that each of the
The System provides detailed requirements for rating a required credits of the Pearl Building Rating System will be
building’s potential performance in relation to the four achieved. These required credits are as follows:
pillars of Estidama.
IPD-R1: Integrated Development Strategy
The Pearl Rating System is organized into seven categories IDP-R2: Tenant Fit-Out Design & Construction Guide
that are fundamental to more sustainable development. IDP-R3: Basic Commisioning
NS-R1: Natural Systems Assessment
NS-R2: Natural Systems Protection
Integrated Development Process: Encouraging NS-R3: Natural Systems Design & Management Strategy
cross-disciplinary teamwork to deliver LBo-R1: Plan 2030
environmentally sustainable solutions for the built LBo-R2: Urban Systems Assessment
environment. LBo-R3: Outdoor Thermal Comfort Strategy
LBi-R1: Healthy Ventilation Delivery
Natural Systems: Conserving, preserving and LBi-R2: Smoking Control
restoring critical natural environments and LBi-R3: Legionella Prevention
habitats. PW-R1: Minimum Interior Water Use Reduction
PW-R2: Exterior Water Monitoring
RE-R1: Minimum Energy Performance
Livable Buildings: Ensuring quality of outdoor RE-R2: Energy Monitoring & Reporting
and indoor spaces. RE-R3: Ozone Impacts of Refrigerants & Fire Suppression
Systems
Precious Water: Reducing water demand and SM-R1: Hazardous Materials Elimination
encouraging alternative water sources. SM-R2: Basic Construction Waste Management
SM-R3: Basic Operational Waste Management
Resourceful Energy: Promoting energy
conservation through passive design measures, In addition to the 20 required credits, the Rating System
energy efficiency and renewable sources. includes 66 optional credits. By pursuing these credits,
building development teams can elect to pursue a voluntary
Stewarding Materials: Reducing the impact of rating as high as Five Pearls. Government-funded buildings
building materials extraction, manufacturing, are required to achieve a minimum 2 Pearl Rating. The
transportation and disposal. detailed requirements of the required and optional credits
are listed in the Pearl Building Rating System, available for
Innovating Practice: Encouraging innovation download at www.estidama.org.
and cultural expression in building design and
construction to facilitate market and industry The Pearl Building Rating System applies to all non
transformation. residential buildings and multi residential buildings of more
than three stories above grade.

4
How to use this guide
This 1 Pearl Building Guide is intended to complement
the Pearl Building Rating System, which is the primary
reference document for Estidama compliance. This PEARL QUALIFIED
document provides guidance to a project team for achieving PROFESSIONAL
the required credits. Key features of the document
organization are highlighted below.

ENGINEER

CONTRACTOR

ARCHITECT
The members of the
project team responsible
for requirements
discussed on the page
are highlighted on the right.
OWNER
P - Pearl Qualified Professional
E - Engineer
C - Contractor
A - Architect
O - Owner
X - Commissioning Agent
COMMISSIONING
S - Other Specialist AGENT

OTHER SPECIALIST

5
6
The Manual

7
1.0 Organise team + work Related Credits: IDP-R1: Integrated Development Process

Before beginning the design and development process, the team should be organized in a way that integrates the contribution of different trades
and specialities. This coordination, called an Integrated Development Process (IDP) in the Pearl Rating System, is simply a framework to support the
development of holistic, creative, and efficient design solutions. The Pearl Rating System requires an IDP to extend throughout the project life cycle
from inception to design, construction and commissioning.

Approach Process
An IDP can be the foundation of a successful project team, As the project team organizes its schedule, an IDP framework should be incorporated into the
bringing out the best input of each member. In particular, development process. This framework can be broken down into four steps, which are detailed on the
once the project team has been assembled, it facilitates the
following pages.
development process by:

12 3 4
• Defining a Sustainability Framework with a clear vision
and objectives and specific indicators and targets to monitor
ongoing performance. By establishing goals early and hold regular develop an
assemble establish
holding themselves accountable to these, the project team
can meet ambitious goals more efficiently and avoid any integrated initial vision, design implementation
incidental slippage in project performance. development objectives workshops for strategy for
team and targets collaboration continuity
• Enabling true Collaboration within the project team. By
discussing project goals early on and meeting face-to-face
as a single group, the project team will be able to coordinate
work smoothly and make decisions more rapidly. This is
especially valuable as new members join the development
team.

• Ensuring Continuity between work packages or project


stages can be achieved through effective communication
and contractual arrangement. System Thinking
• Promoting System Thinking when developing strategies
and solutions. By considering the synergistic solutions, the
project team can deliver a high performing building more
creatively, and without expensive technological “add ons.”

8
1.1 Assemble integrated development team
The Integrated Development Process (IDP) aims Example 1.1a building operations
to foster creativity and coordination in the project
maintenance requirements
design and development. Therefore, an IDP should
involve all members of project team, especially structural design
Commissioning
the client/owner or financial decision maker. efficient designs
Agent vision
A building project team in its simplest form will comprise building systems
passive designs
of an Owner, an Architect, an Engineer, a Contractor, and
modelling Architect
a Commissioning Agent. Typically the Contractor will be Engineer layout
responsible for all subcontractors. Specialists may also be ecology
brought onboard to undertake specialized work in areas
such as, landscape architecture, interior design, ecology or location
Owner Contractor
energy modelling. vision suppliers
A Pearl Qualified Professional (PQP) is required to integrate
Pearl
targets cost
the collective inputs of all team members, facilitate the Qualified
budget Professional constructability
rating process and provide quality assurance to submissions.
operations coordination
The project team should consider several points as it
organizes its work: system thinking
performance assessment
1
Each member of the team should become familiar
with Estidama and the One-Pearl requirements under innovation
the Building Rating System. This is available on the Example 1.1b: Team structure
Estidama website (www.estidama.org).
Role

2
The IDP process should be coordinated by a member Pearl
Comissioning Qualified
of the design team who is qualified as a PQP. It is not Owner Architect Contractor Engineer
Agent Professional
necessary that this person be a dedicated sustainability
Building Design X X X X
consultant. He or she could be any member of the
design team. More information about becoming a PQP Landscape Design X X X
is available at www.estidama.org.
Structural Engineering X X

3
Every member of the project team should contribute Skills
to the design. In order to develop more integrative MEP Engineering X X X
ideas, team members should consider themselves
collaborators in the design, even before the Architect Construction X X X
puts pen to paper. Although the Contractor is typically Operations &
involved later in the process, they should be involved Maintenance X X X X X
as early as possible.

9
1.2 Establish initial vision + objectives + targets
The most important aspect of an IDP is a shared vision and Example 1.2 Narrative summarizing vision, objectives, targets (partial)
targets established to achieve it. These targets should be
developed early in the design process and be aligned with
the minimum 1 Pearl requirements. The development team

Vision
will benefit substantially by understanding and targeting the
required credits early in the process.
“The office building will be a modern high-tech
workspace that will avoid wasteful resource use”

1 Develop a vision for the building project. This should be


a general, aspirational target that will give coherence to
the design process.
Objectives Provide sensors and controls to reduce unnecessary
lighting

2 Establish objectives for achieving the vision. These


should be more specific goals. Targets (credits) “Reduce lighting loads per square meter 20%
below a typical office building”
(RE-R1 Minimum Energy Performance)
3 Establish specific and measurable targets for achieving
the objectives and vision. These will form a framework
for the design process. Solutions Architect: Strategic window placement and shading
Engineer: Automatic daylight-dimming of lights

4 Develop solutions for reaching the targets. Identifying


practical, cost effective, integrated solutions will be the
outcome of the design and development process.
occupancy sensors and automatic shut-off when
rooms are unoccupied

10
1.3 Plan & hold regular design workshops
After a kick-off workshop and establishing the vision,
objectives, and targets, it is important to continue Example 1.3a: Workshop documentation
holding multidisciplinary design workshops to foster
creativity and collaboration. Workshops help ensure 

everyone is aware of important decisions throughout 



 
the development process.
 


Schedule regular multidisciplinary workshops at the 



outset of project planning. These should include the  
following topics, at minimum: 

• site and ecology 

• orientation and climatic response 

• energy, water   

• waste management 

• indoor comfort 

• sustainable materials specifications. 



Additional workshops can also be scheduled on an as- 

needed basis. 




Document the occurrence of meetings through 



submission of meeting minutes. 




• 
• 
• 
• 
• 




Example 1.3b: Process chart 



Pre-Planning Design Construction Submissions 

11
1.4 Develop an implementation strategy
A strategy for implementing the sustainability goals of a
building should be developed to ensure that sustainability
targets established during design are met during
construction and occupancy. This can be assisted through
the selection of suitable design team members at project
inception to fulfill the Clients requirements.

Engage all members of the development team early in the


process, including the contractor and commissioning agent
(who will verify the performance of building systems). If
possible, the contractor should be involved in the whole IDP
implementation
process.
between project stages:
Ensure that the specification documents contain the
sustainability targets and solutions established during the
Specifications Design
IDP workshops. The requirements are to clearly stated as
being mandatory and where alternative solutions provided
these must meet or exceed the original intent to achieve
compliance with all the mandatory Estidama credits.
Commissioning Construction
Ensure that the future developers and tenants will receive
a fit-out design & construction guide. This will provide
Fit-Out Guide
Occupancy
instructions on how to address sustainable design and
construction in the tenant space.

12
2.0 Understand site context
At the start of the design process, the project team should Management Strategy must be prepared to ensure the long • Environment Agency
(http://www.ead.ae)
find ways to understand and optimize the relationship term survival and management of the landscape and habitat
between the project site and its surroundings. areas. • Union for Conservation of Nature, IUCN,
(www.iucn.org)
A thorough understanding of the site’s natural and urban The project team will then be able to move on to the next
• Wild Flowering Plants of UAE, Environmental Research and Wildlife
context will help inform an optimal site layout. This step in the process: planning the site layout. Development Agency, 2002
understanding will also support many design objectives,
• Birds of Abu Dhabi - Checklist , Environmental Research and
including: Useful resources: Wildlife Development Agency, July 2001
• improved outdoor thermal comfort; • UPC Plant Information Database and UPC Coastal Development
• Vascular Plants of Abu Dhabi Emirate, Gary Brown and Sabitha
Guidelines
• energy use reduction; Sakkir, August 2004
(www.upc.gov.ae)
• water conservation; and • Regulation and Supervision Bureau (RSB)
• ecological enhancement. • Geographical information database for UAE (www.rsb.gov.ae)
(http://geoportal.abudhabi.ae)
Natural systems, such as existing habitat and topography, • Abu Dhabi Water and Electricity Authority (ADWEA)
• Google Map/Earth (www.adwea.com/en/index.html)
and urban systems, such as nearby community facilities,
can be examined in separate assessments or together. • EnergyPlus Weather Data • Abu Dhabi Water and Electricity Company (ADWEC)
Ultimately all site information should be integrated to (http:// apps1.eere.energy.gov) (www.adwec.ae)
identify opportunities and constraints associated with • Interpretation Manual of Major Terrestrial Natural and Semi- • Abu Dhabi Distribution Company (ADDC)
building on a particular site. natural habitat types of Abu Dhabi Emirate, Gary Brown and (www.addc.ae)
Benno Boer, Environmental Research and Wildlife Development • Al Ain Distribution Company (AADC)
The project team should ensure that they adhere to the Agency, September 2004. (www.aadc.ae)
vision set out in Plan 2030. Any significant or valuable
• Terrestrial Environment of Abu Dhabi Emirate, Environment Agency • Abu Dhabi National Energy Company (TAQA)
natural systems identified in the natural systems analysis Abu Dhabi, 2008 (www.taqa.ae/en/uae.html)
should be adequately protected. If protection is not possible (www.ead.ae)
and a strong rationale is given for development, the adverse • Abu Dhabi Transmission and Dispatch Company (TRANSCO)
• Handbook for Phase 1 Habitat Survey – a technique for (www.transco.ae)
impacts of development on natural systems must be environmental audit, JNCC, 2007
mitigated or compensated. A Natural Systems Design and (www.jncc.gov.uk)

STEP 1 STEP 2 STEP 3


Assess, Protect and Manage Natural
Systems Identify Design Outdoor
+
Assess Urban Systems Opportunities Spaces
+
Understand Plan 2030 regulatory
& Constraints
framework

13
2.1 Consider plan Abu Dhabi 2030 Related Credit: LBo-R1: Plan 2030

From the beginning of the design process Plan Al Ain 2030 Western Region
through to construction, the project team should Plan Al Gharbia 2030 is the central planning document
Plan Al Ain 2030 is the central planning document for Al Ain.
design, procure, and make decisions based on As an ancient oasis crossroads Al Ain represents cool respite for Al Gharbia. It is designed to aid in moving Al
the principles set out in Plan Abu Dhabi Vision and a rich cultural heritage for Emiratis. Al Ain is a special Gharbia toward the future with managed, responsible
documents developed by Abu Dhabi’s Urban place and its development must reflect this; Plan Al Ain growth. Respect for the environment, social health,
Planning Council. 2030 sets the scene for future development that respects cultural identity, and economic development all share
history and culture while encouraging sustainable growth. equal status and provide the opportunity to leverage
The Urban Planning Council was established by Emiri decree The diagram below illustrates the major topics covered in economic growth without sacrificing the cultural and
in 2007 to introduce a planning culture and new strong Plan Al Ain 2030 and how they come together. historic significance of the region.
guiding principles for future developments. The Vision
documents represent sound foundations for development in
the emirate and is an essential part of the planning process.
Adherence to Plan Abu Dhabi 2030 is included as part of
Estidama, but is also required as part of the Development
Review process by the UPC and therefore is an integral
part of the planning process. To satisfy the requirements
of Estidama, Designers and Project Team members must
consider one of three documents that relate to the location
Understand the Consider the Urban
of their project: Analyze the Economics
Plan Foundations Structure Framework
• Abu Dhabi City - Plan Abu Dhabi 2030 Plans
• Al Ain - Plan Al Ain 2030
• Al Gharbia - Plan Al Gharbia 2030 (not yet published)
PLAN ABU DHABI
All documents are found here: /AL-AIN/ AL-GHABIA Consider Overall
• (http://www.upc.gov.ae/) VISION 2030 Patterns
zoom back out...

Plan Abu Dhabi 2030
Plan Abu Dhabi 2030 is the cornerstone document defining
the future of development in the Capital City. All new Establish the Building Zoom in on the
Consider the Policy
developments are required to comply with the vision of Blocks Project Location
Plan Abu Dhabi 2030. Project teams should be familiar with
the document in its entirety and adhere to its principles.
The adjacent diagram illustrates the major topics in the
document and how they come together.

14
2.2 Assess natural systems Related Credit: NS-R1: Natural Systems Assessment

At the beginning of the design process - and before site clearance takes place, undertake an assessment of the natural The natural system assessment should cover:
systems in the context of the project site:
• the area of probable impact surrounding the project site; Topography, geology and soil conditions
• sub-regional scale; and Topography, geology and soil conditions are important
• regional scale. for understanding key view points, how building
foundations should be constructed, how different areas will
The assessment can be a combination of desk top studies and field surveys. As a minimum, a field survey, including a accommodate landscaping and how the site will drain both
Phase I Habitat survey, or similar, must be completed for the project site itself. A desk top study or similar would suffice for rainwater and irrigation.
the area of probable impact, sub-regional and regional analyses.
Hydrology and groundwater
Example 2.2a: Site plan showing natural systems Groundwater is a precious environmental resource.
Groundwater conditions and any groundwater abstraction,
hydrological conditions of the site should be identified
to determine the drainage strategy and susceptibility of
Prevailing Wind groundwater to pollution/contamination.

Waste & contamination


Any contamination on site by petrol, refuse, or other
chemicals and materials that could be harmful to human
health or the environment should be identified to determine
the need for remediation. If previously unreported
contamination is found or suspected, the site developers
should contact the relevant environmental agency to
determine further testing and remediation requirements.

Coastal conditions
The coastal environment requires careful management as
highlighted in the 2030 Plan. Many coastal areas contain
mangroves that are an important symbol for the city.
Sun Path Waterfront developments should consider a potential rise in
sea level+ and adapt designs accordingly.
Undisturbed High Ground

Mature Tree Planting


Archaeological features
Low-Lying Ponds Appropriate desk studies and consultations with relevant
Ancient Cliff government bodies such as Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture
In fill Sabkha and Heritage (ADACH) should be carried out to determine
Cemetery
the potential for archaeological features to be found on
site. During the field survey any notable features should be
Building and Construction
recorded.

15
Microclimate • Narrative (describing all the natural systems on the site, Maps and site photographs must clearly identify the extent
the area of probable impact surrounding the project site, of different habitats and other natural features.
Local site microclimate, including winds and shaded areas, sub-regional and regional scale)
should be evaluated to identify passive design features that The assessment must be carried out by a suitably qualified
can be incorporated into the design to improve thermal • Maps (highlighting different natural systems and areas to environmental professional trained to complete such
comfort. Abu Dhabi’s characteristic sun angles, diurnal be protected, enhanced and allocated for habitat creation/ analysis and assessment.
temperature swings, and relative humidity should be restoration)
considered. An east-west building orientation generally • Site Photographs
maximizes the opportunity for shading control.

Flora & fauna, priority species, habitats


and ecosystems
Example 2.2b: Narrative Extracts
Though most proposed sites in Abu Dhabi will contain
limited habitat, areas that contain priority habitats such
as mangrove, sea grasses etc are particularly important to • “Although sparsely vegetated, the proposed site identified or suspected on this proposed site.”
protect and preserve. includes two notable ecological assets, depicted in
• “The microclimate generally corresponds to Abu Dhabi
photos: a spiny-tailed lizard burrow and several ghaf
Attention should be paid to identify ‘significant assets’ and averages with some particularities, as follows:
trees.”
‘valuable assets’. ° High midday sun with marginal overshadowing
• “The existing ghaf trees, as a native species, are
‘Significant assets’ in Abu Dhabi include intertidal mudflats, from adjacent developments to the south.
valuable for both habitat and landscaping. They are pre-
mangroves, vegetated sandy beaches, marine (seagrass, established, non-invasive and, as a drought-resistant, ° High levels of solar radiation year-round
coral), wadis, sand sheets and low dunes, interdunal salt-tolerant species, will require less irrigation than
° Exposed on north and south sides,
plains and high dunes, alluvial plains and jebels, or any other species.”
other sensitve habitats identified. “Significant assets” ° Warmer southern winds prevailing during day
also includes protected species determined to be critically • “The soil of most of the plot has been found to be sandy
up to a depth of 35 cm with a more rocky substrate ° Cooler NW winds in mornings & E winds at night
endangered, vulnerable, threatened, near threatened or
sensitive. underneath. In the northwestern portion of the parcel, ° Site allows for optimized building orientation
soil contains more sandy load, in part in relation to the
‘Valuable assets’ are features of ecological value, including presence of the trees.” ° Existing trees on site provide shaded zones
healthy native trees or shrubs.
• “The site-wide masterplan included an inspection of ° Adjacent properties can break-up wind regime and
In addition, the assessment should consider the wider the site for potential contamination. As a previously introduce turbulence”
region, identifying any internationally, nationally or locally unutilized location, no contamination has been
protected areas and species.
Refer to the Plant Information Database on the UPC website
for species identification information.

The following items should be included in the Natural


Systems Assessment Report:

16
Example 2.2c: Site photographs Example 2.2e: Site plan showing protected features

Ghaf tree Spiny-tailed lizard burrow

Example 2.2d: UPC Plant Information Database

Undisturbed High Ground


Undisturbed High Ground
Mature Tree Planting
Mature Tree Planting
Low-Lying Ponds
Low-Lying Ponds
Ancient Cliff
Ancient Cliff
In fill Sabkha In fill Sabkha

Cemetery Cemetery

Building and Construction


Building and Construction

Spiney-Tailed Lizard Burrows

Protected Al Ghaf Tree

17
2.3 Protect natural systems Related Credit: NS-R2: Natural Systems Protection

After evaluating the natural assets of the site, design teams identified in the Pearl Rating System. These are summarised coastal conservation zone, must be protected, and 80% of
must build around existing natural assets and offset any in Table 2.3: valuable assets protected.
disruption caused by development.
If the Natural Systems Assessment clearly documents that If part of the project›s natural systems strategy included
Where significant and valuable assets are present, a Natural the site has no significant or valuable natural assets, the site mitigation or compensation, at least 70% of significant
Systems Protection, Mitigation and/or Compensation does not need protection or mitigation. Other credits will be assets and 50% of valuable assets must be protected. If
Strategy with supporting studies must be prepared by a achieved under the PBRS if the project provides landscaping mitigation occurs on-site, new habitat areas must equal the
suitably qualified ecological specialist. that consists of native species and uses minimal water. area of the lost assets. If on-site mitigation is impractical
and off-site compensation must be pursued, the new
The ecological features of the site can either be protected or All significant natural assets associated with a protected
habitat area must be twice the area of assets lost.
disturbance can be mitigated. Three strategies to do this are area, national park, a coastal park, ecological hotspot, or a

Table 2.3
Strategy Significant Valuable assets Maximum Max impact Mitigate/ Other requirement / comment
assets to be to be protected reclaimed land affecting the Compensate
protected on site on site (% of (% of land area) coastal edge (% lost habitat
(% of significant valuable assets) of coastal edge) at an area
assets) replacement
ratio of:
1 - Protection 100% 80% 25% 20% N/A • Retain and protect from damage and destruction sufficient to
maintain the features existing structure and function
2 - Onsite 70% 50% 25% 20% 2:1 • Provide an ecological corridor between site and mitigated area.
Mitigation
• Confirmation of the appointment of a management and maintenance
(UPC approval
organization (min 5 year contract).
required)
3 - Offsite 70% 50% 25% 20% 2:1 • Compensation site in Emirate of Abu Dhabi, a degraded area and
Compensation located outside Plan 2030 area.
(UPC approval • Confirmation of the appointment of a management and maintenance
required)
organization (min 5 year contract).

18
During the design of outdoor areas, project teams should lay • Continuous monitoring of success or failure of young
out buildings, roads, and public spaces on site to protect and plants
celebrate the presence of on site ecological features. These
• Management techniques to encourage establishment. This
features could form a theme for site-wide landscaping
should be adapted following any failures.
strategies.
The Compensation Strategy report should demonstrate
The natural systems strategy should outline any activities
options considered for off site compensation and the
that may cause damage to sensitive areas during the
selection criteria for the proposed compensation site.
operation and construction phases of the development.
The report should include measures to ensure flora
It should identify measures that have been designed into
establishment as outlined in the mitigation strategy and
the scheme and those that will be implemented during the
protection measures as outlined in the protection strategy.
operation to protect these areas / species, for example,
Consideration should be given to the habitat lost on the
limited access to mangrove areas and boardwalks provided
proposed site and the potential to provide enhanced habitat
for pedestrians to minimise damage to mangrove roots.
of a similar type to the habitat lost. The author of this
report should be a qualified ecologist who has experience
The protection strategy should include measures such as:
in habitat establishment for those particular habitats, for
• Design protection measures example, mangrove specialist.
• Ensuring that work compounds, access tracks etc are not
located in or adjacent to sensitive habitats
• Establish temporary fencing around protected areas to
restrict access
• Undertake any works near protected areas in a manner so
as to safeguard their integrity
• Undertake works considering any critical seasons for
protected species
Some of these measures could be included in the
Construction Environmental Management Plan if prepared as
part of IDP-3.
The Mitigation Strategy report should identify the areas
to be protected and measures adopted to ensure their
protection, as outlined in the Protection Strategy Report. It
should identify the mitigation areas and justification for the
appropriateness for mitigation including:
• Area calculations
• Identification of appropriate plant nurseries

19
2.4 Manage natural systems Related Credit: NS-R3: Natural Systems Design & Management Strategy

A Natural Systems Design and Management Low demand for resources


Strategy is required to ensure the long-term Plant selection should reflect the microclimate conditions
survival and prosperity of ecological assets. The of the area. Water efficient irrigation systems such as
strategy must cover all landscaped areas and drip irrigation should be adopted to minimise water
include the management of any on or off-site consumption.
protected, mitigated or compensated natural Example 2.4: Landscaping images
asset areas. The strategy should promote soil
protection and enhancement, low maintenance
requirements and low demand for resources.
The team should consider using only native
species, and landscapes that do not require
wasteful use of irrigation when developing the
landscaping strategy and Natural Systems Design
and Management Strategy. This will be rewarded
with additional points under options PBRS credits.
The Management Strategy should identify the
seasons during which each activity will be carried
out.
Soil protection
Plant selection should suit existing soils onsite. Where
soil enhancement is required this should be tailored to
the existing soil type. Where soils is brought on site,
this should be protected from erosion, pollution and
increases in salinity. Paths should be provided to avoid
pedestrian compaction of soil. Irrigation should consider the
topography of the site and soil erosion.

Low maintenance requirements


Landscaping should be a combination of hard and soft
landscaping, and should minimise the application of
fertilizers, pesticides and herbicides. Landscaping should
promote low maintenance requirements.

20
2.5 Assess urban systems Related Credit: LBo-R2: Urban Systems Assessment

An urban systems assessment details the urban context


around the project site, the type of neighbourhood the
Example 2.5a: Plan showing local urban systems
building will exist within, and how accessible and integrated
the building will be.
The analysis should be carried out at the start of the project,
before site clearance, to inform project programming,
neighbourhood connectivity and built form.
The end-product of this analysis is the Urban Systems
Assessment Report, and should include a narrative, maps,
and site photos. Site plans or diagrams should be provided at
the Local, Subregional, and Regional scales.
The content of the plans provided should be tailored to the
scale of the plan, i.e. local, sub-regional or regional. Where
facilities are to be provided in the future, this should be
indicated.
Plans provided should document the following at a
minimum:

1 Community facilities

2 Public interest areas, such as public beaches, cultural or


heritage landmarks

3 Street patterns

Utility corridor

4 Public transit facilities, bicycle and pedestrian paths


Bike Path

5 Utility plots and corridors, such as electricity, gas,


potable water and wastewater Pedestrian Path

6 Land uses, such as retail centres, food provision areas,


and areas of food production Transit Stop

7 Residential zones, centres of employment, and


education facilities
Existing Buildings

8 Solar orientation and shading patterns from surrounding


buildings should be shown at the local level.
Utility Building

Retail Centre

21
Example 2.5b: Plan showing sub-regional urban systems

(A regional scale assessment


will describe larger features
such as natural areas, etc.)

Major Road Corridor

Major Utility Corridor

Existing Buildings

Transit Stop

Community Facility

Cultural Landmark
Park Area

Residential Area

Public Beach

22
2.6 Identify opportunities + constraints Related Credits:NS-R1: Natural Systems Assessment

Contextual opportunities and constraints are important to


identify to allow the development to take advantage of Example 2.6: Plan showing opportunities + constraints
special site features and address site challenges effectively.
Information obtained in the Natural Systems Assessment
and in the Urban Systems Assessment informs the Views
formation of a complete opportunities and constraints
Pedestrian Link
analysis. An example study is shown to the right, illustrating
Infrastructure
how Opportunities and constraints can be used to inform
the design of a site. Main Traffic Route

The opportunities and constraints of the proposed site Prevailing Wind Local Traffic Route

will determine the areas that can be developed, the most Spiney Tailed Lizard
Burrows
appropriate type of development and issues that will
Protected Ghaf Trees
need to be addressed during the design, for example,
contamination and remediation strategies.
Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) should be prepared to
guide the design of the development based on the results
of the opportunities and constraints analysis. The KPI’s
should be measurable targets and cover soil, flora, fauna,
microclimate, topography, drainage, targets set to mitigate
identified constraints and areas of site to be protected,
maintained, created or restored.
Examples include:
• Percentage increase of protected species / priority
habitats on site through habitat enhancement
• Percentage of reuse of soils on site Sun Path

23
3.0 Design outdoor spaces
The impact of a building can be reduced significantly by and the effect the building will have in its surroundings.
decisions made early in the design process. The relative
The buildings plot landscape should be designed to protect
location of other buildings, windows, and outdoor areas
and link natural habitat around it. The building should also
ditectly impacts on the amount of energy, water and
be adequately linked to the adjacent streets to facilitate
materials required to keep a building comfortable.
pedestrian and vehicle movements. In particular, credit SM-
The buildings orientation and massing has to be planned R3 requires to provide access to waste collection vehicles.
in relation to its urban and natural environment. Building
Finally, the design of the building outdoor spaces should
should be designed to reduce internal heat gains and
meet credit LBi-R2 requirements to designate smoke free
harness daylight so that their energy demand will be
zones around sensitive areas of the building but also to
reduced. This can be achieved by using materials in the
allocate dedicated external smoking areas.
buildings envelope that comply with the minimum U values
specified in credit RE-R1 and also by careful selection the Useful resources:
glazing elements in the facade. When selecting building
• Abu Dhabi weather data from EnergyPlus
materials, the requirements of credit SM-R1 that forbids the
(http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/energyplus)
use of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated timber and
asbestos containing materials (ACM).
Related Credits
Buildings can also contribute to improve pedestrian comfort
by providing external shading and shielding pedestrians from • NS-R1: Natural Systems Assessment & Protection
• LBo-R3: Outdoor Thermal Comfort Strategy
prevailing hot winds hence contributing to the requirements • RE-R1: Minimum Energy Performance
specified in credit LBo-R3. Local weather data sets are • SM-R1: Hazardous Materials Elimination
available to analyse how the building elements will perform • SM-R3: Storage & Collection of Waste & Recyclables
• LBi-R2: Smoking Control

24
3.1 Building layout Related Credits: LBo-R3: Outdoor Thermal Comfort Strategy
RE-R1: Minimum Energy Performance

The layout of the buildings on the plot has many


implications later in the design process, especially with
regard to energy performance and external shading. The
Harmonious integration with
surroundings & pedestrian environments
6 Consider the need for mitigation of adverse wind
conditions within the public realm. Potential mitigation
strategies include, but are not limited to:
design team should carefully consider the following: Cool breezes can reduce heat build up in external areas as • canopies
well as freshen the air in externally accessible areas. Hot • wind screens
Optimize natural light but minimise solar winds cause unpleasant and uncomfortable conditions
• shelter belts
gains building up heat in external areas, increasing heat load on
• deployable structures
the building and increasing pedestrian thermal discomfort.

1 Utilize external shading devices to reduce solar gain,


whilst maintaining external views. For example by
providing horizontal shading on South orientation and
1 Understand local wind climate, identifying orientation,
timing and temperature of prevailing winds.

vertical shading on East and West orientations.


2 Consider position, form and orientation of nearby
buildings to understand wind movement and how the

2 Use shadows cast by surrounding buildings to provide


shade and reduce solar gains.
external environment is affected.

3 Place windows in shaded areas, recessed into the wall,


or facing North to provide light to indoor spaces.
3 Use building form and position to best use cool
breezes. This will help to reduce build-up of hot or
stagnant areas at pedestrian level.

4 Use rooflights sparingly as these significantly increase


solar heat gains. Consider using sunpipes or solar-
tubes instead.
4 Use building form to shelter pedestrian areas from hot
or high speed winds.

5 Consider the use of external building features as well


as building form and massing to minimize adverse
impacts from wind on the public realm. Features to be
considered include, but are not limited to:

• shading devices, e.g. brise-soleil, mashrabiya, etc.

• overhangs

• breaks in facade continuity

• podiums

• openings

• permeable features

Potential adverse impacts include downwash, corner


accelerations and local wind direction changes amongst
other effects.

25
3.2 Outdoor thermal comfort Related Credits: LBo-R3: Outdoor Thermal Comfort Strategy

The building orientation in relation to local winds and The following example shows different strategies of how
sunpath as well as the influence of surrounding buildings the required levels of shading can be achieved using
and other landscape elements should be considered to adequate building layouts, natural elements or some
provide an adequate outdoor space that improves the additional construction elements.
building’s exterior microclimate and achieves adequate
pedestrian comfort. Example 3.2a
In particular for shading, it is required to check that the Building orientation will provide
shading percentage required by credit LBo-R3 is achieved shade to required areas
on the equinox (21st of March) and the summer solstice
(June 21st ) at 1.00pm over the following elements:
• Exterior Surface Parking with more than 10 spaces,
including parking on exposed roof car parks

• Public Open Spaces, including privately owned

• Pedestrian walkways

• Cycle tracks

• Playgrounds

The checks can be done using sun altitude and azimuth


data (For Abu Dhabi, the summer solstice alt = 81.4º,
azi =-94.6º and for the spring equinox alt = 64.2º, azi
Provide external
= -161.6º) or an appropriate software such as 3D CAD
overhangs
software, e.g. Ecotect, or free 3D tools, such as Sketch up. Use trees to provide
shading to pathway
Shading can be provided by mature trees or by structures,
such as canopies. If structural elements are used, their outer
surfaces must have a minimum Solar Reflectance Index
(SRI) of 29. The SRI is a measure of the roofs ability to
reflect solar heat, and the higher it is, the better the surface
is a reflecting heat. High SRI can be achieved with light or
reflective materials and/or finishes, e.g. some concretes,
light aluminum cladding.
The guidelines in the UPC Urban Street Design manual
can be used for designing the outdoor spaces around the
building. The manual can be downloaded from
http://www.upc.gov.ae/guidelines/urban-street-design-
manual.aspx.

26
Example 3.2b: Outdoor shading plan

PARK

PLAYGROUND

CANOPY

BUILDING
BUILDING
BLOCKS

PLAZA

CANOPY

CANOPY

PARKING

27
3.3 External waste and recycling storage
The central waste and recycling storage room is typically
located in the building’s ground floor or basement and
should be easily accessible from street level by collection
Example 3.3b
vehicles. It is typically air conditioned, enclosed and located
near loading docks or bays and has doors at least 1.8 m
wide to facilitate material movement and pick up as shown
in examples 3.3a and 3.3b. The room must be sized to
allow for the storage and movement of waste containers.
Additional footprint
To reduce the volume of waste and recyclables, and allowance for storing bins
associated space requirements, compactors or balers are
typically used. Particular attention has to be paid to turning
radii of collection vehicles and vertical and horizontal
clearances required for vehicle manoeuvring. Vehicle
Additional movement
reversing should be avoided if possible. When compactors Double set of doors. allowance for
are deployed in basements, a minimum local clearance of Minimum width of 1.8m transporting bins
typically 5.5 m is required as shown in example 3.3c.

Related Credits
• SM-R3: Basic Operational Waste Management

Example 3.3a Example 3.3c


Local height clearance
of typically 5.5m

Collection route from


building to waste room
and loading bays/docks

Storage room located near


loading bays/docks

28
3.4 External building materials Related Credits: RE-R1: Minimum Energy Performance
SM-R1: Hazardous Materials Elimination

As the building and plot areas take shape, it is important Thermal mass
that the appropriate materials are selected for external
structures and facade. There are several requirements to Place concrete elements adjacent to the occupied spaces, to
consider when specifying these materials. buffer thermal energy and provide a cool surface feel for the
occupant.
U- values
Vapor barrier
The materials that comprise the structure and facade of the
building will form its thermal envelope – the main barrier Provide a barrier to restrict ingress of moisture through the
to external heat and solar energy. Keeping the occupied building walls, floor and roof. This is a critical protective
space cool and comfortable is an easier task with a high consideration given the high humidity in the coastal area of
performance envelope. the UAE.
The U-value is a measure of how much heat passes through Exterior Surface finishes
a given material (i.e. how much insulation the material
provides). The project team should specify and build the Use light colors to reflect sunlight and reduce absorption of
building envelope to achieve the lowest possible U values solar energy. This will reduce heat build up and gain through
and in any case achieve the minimum U-value requirements the walls and roof.
outlined in RE-R1 which are defined by ASHRAE Standard
90.1-2007, Section 5. For the UAE the relevant climate Glazing design
zone is zone 1.
Glazing design is important for overall building energy usage,
The following practices can be used to achieve the required because windows bring light and heat into occupied spaces.
values: Credit RE-R1 details the requirements for both windows
• Provide insulation between the earth and concrete floor insulation, e.g. U values, and radiative heat gain, e.g. solar
slab to reduce heat from the ground warming the rooms. heat gain coefficient (SHGC). The U value requirements will
generally require double glazing coatings while the SHGC
• Insulate above the roof slab and apply an external finish in requirements can be achieved with tinted glass or reflective
a light color to reflect solar heat. factory applied coatings.
• Include sufficient insulation in the building walls. These factors can be specified to the glazing manufacturers;
In addition to the basic U-value heat transfer reduction the a wide range of suitable, compliant products are available
following factors can also benefit the energy and internal within the UAE.
environment:

29
3.5 Smoke free zones & dedicated external smoking areas
There are several requirements that need to be fulfilled to devices to meet this requirement. For example, locations
comply with LBi-R2 Smoking Control which include: at grade near to unrestricted high pedestrian traffic public
right of ways should consider wall mounted devices
• Establish smoke free zones around sensitive areas of the
whereas campus type facilities with restricted public access
building;
can install free standing devices. In any event the external
• Provide dedicated external smoking areas with Smoking Rear Entrance
smoking area must not be located directly within public or
Zone
associated facilities; and high use pedestrian thoroughfares.
• Train security staff to enforce smoking policy. Posters (for example wall, board or bench mounted) or other
suitable media, such as through leaflet stands must also be
Smoke Free Zones provided listing the negative health impacts of smoking and
BUILDING
provide details on where to seek assistance for those aiming Air Intake
The design team must first identify the locations of
to stop smoking.
entrances, openable windows and air intakes of the project Openable Openable
building, but also of any adjacent existing building that Main Entrance
Residential Window Window
may be similarly affected. Each of these areas will require
protection by establishing smoke free zones within which People who own or rent apartments within a residential
people must not be allowed to smoke at any time. building can smoke within their apartments, therefore
Care should be taken to accommodate the horizontal dedicated external smoking areas may not always be
width of each item, for example an air intake, as this can needed. Where such facilities are to be included, design
be substantial and will determine the extent of the smoke teams must follow the guidance detailed above.
free zone. Example 3.6 is an example of how project teams
Related Credits:
should establish the extent of smoke free zones by plotting
loci (shown in red) to the extent required by the Pearl • LBo-R3: Outdoor Thermal Comfort Strategy
Building Rating System. These plans or figures can be used
to communicate the extent of the smoke free zone when
training security staff.

Dedicated External Smoking Areas


After plotting the smoke free zones, the design team can Example 3.5: Smoke free and smoking
look to establish suitable locations for dedicated external
smoking areas. Care must be taken not to encroach upon zones
the air intakes, entrances or openings associated with any
adjacent building. Where space is constrained, typically in a
dense urban setting, sharing smoking zones with adjacent
buildings can be considered.
All dedicated external smoking areas must have appropriate
and suitable facilities for collecting ash and cigarette ends.
Consider the nature of the location when deciding upon
whether to install free standing or secure wall mounted

30
3.6 Hazardous materials Related Credits: SM-R1: Hazardous Materials Elimination

It is also important to ensure that selected materials do not


contain hazardous components excluded by credit SM-R1. Example 3.6a: Extract from
The design team should be aware of these requirements specifications
while designing exterior spaces.
The prohibition of hazardous materials should also be In compliance with the Pearl Building Rating
written into the project specification documents during System for Estidama, credit SM-R1 Hazardous
the design stage and followed by the contractor during the Materials Elimination, the following materials shall
construction stage. not be used:

1 Specify that materials, including walls, insulation, and


interior materials, will not contain asbestos and that all
asbestos containing materials have been removed from
1. Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM)
2. Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated
refurbished buildings. timber, where timber is used for external
structures subject to frequent and intimate

2 Specify that wood materials exposed to the outside contact. These materials include, but are
and within human reach – such as shading structures, not limited to, shading devices, playground
playgrounds, and decking – will not be treated with equipment and handrails”
chromated copper arsenate (CCA).

31
Example 3.6b: Summary of outdoor strategies

No Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) is used Use of external building materials that
and no Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) achieve required U-values provide thermal
treated timber is used on external structures mass, provide vapour barrier, and have light
colour finishes

Glazing that maximises daylight whilst


minimizing heat gains

Reflective (SRI>29) overhangs to provide


additional shading to walkways

Dedicated external smoking area away from


air intakes and openings

Shaded entrance not aligned with prevailing


hot winds for pedestrian comfort
Vehicular access on secondary road

Waste storage at ground level provides


enough space for vehicle manoeuvering

32
4.0 Design indoor spaces
There are many factors to consider when planning the Credit LBi-R2 requires residential units or apartments to be
layout of spaces inside a building. These factors relate to: appropriately sealed to eliminate or minimize exposure of
building occupants to the harmful effects of tobacco smoke
• energy consumption
from neighbouring apartments. This should be done with
• visual and thermal comfort adequate seals and weather-stripping.
• ventilation
• daylight useful resources:
• materials emissions • ASHRAE Standard 55-2004. Thermal environmental conditions for
human occupancy
Some factors may conflict with others, for example, a space • International Mechanical Code 2009, International Code Council
designed for excellent day lighting may be detrimental to (http://publicecodes.citation.com/icod/imc/2009/index.htm)
• ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007, Ventilation for Acceptable
energy consumption as a result of poor facade decisions.
Indoor Air Quality
Occupant comfort is an important consideration, this • Centre of Waste Management, Abu Dhabi. (www.cwm.ae)
• Cabinet Resolution No. 39 of 2006 Concerning Prohibiting Import,
includes understanding visual and thermal comfort and as Production and Utilization of Asbestos Boards
well as ensuring sufficient fresh air provision. The project
team should also look to reduce the source of material Related Credits:
emissions through low VOC products.
• SM-R1: Hazardous Materials Elimination
It is important, therefore, to develop a project with the right • SM-R3: Basic Operational Waste Management
blend of carefully considered solutions. • LBi-R1: Healthy Ventilation Delivery
• LBi-R2: Smoking Control
• RE-R1: Minimum Energy Performance
Approach
The layout and position of internal spaces within the
building to suit daylight and ventilation have to be
considered at this stage as per credit RE-R1. It is also
necessary to specify glazing correctly to ensure optimal
trade-off between light ingress and solar transmission.
This design should be done bearing in mind credit LBi-R1,
which requires that all spaces must be ventilated according
to the requirements of the ASHRAE 62.1 2007, or local
code, whichever is more stringent. The consideration of
ventilation strategy is an important factor for both RE-R1
and LBi-R1 credits as they are both affected by natural and
mechanical ventilation system performance.
As in previous steps, materials forbidden by credit SM-R1
(asbestos and chromated copper arsenate treated wood)
should not be specified for indoor spaces. All decisions
affecting the design of the building indoor spaces must be
part of the Integrated Development Strategy.

33
4.1 Ventilation strategy Related Credits: RE-R1: Minimum Energy Performance
LBi-R1: Healthy Ventilation Delivery

An observational survey of the building site and its


immediate surroundings shall be conducted to determine Example 4.1
site air quality conditions and local contaminants from
the surrounding environment. The outdoor air quality
investigation shall be documented and reviewed with
building owners or their representative. Vent chimneys from combustion
appliances and equipment Cooling tower exhaust
All exhausts shall discharge outside the defined public
realm or as defined by local code, whichever is more Cooling tower intake
stringent in order to maintain air quality. Discharging above
a public realm space can be achieved if vertical separation min. 5m
min. 5m
is provided, which typically would be a minimum of one min. 7.5m
storey above the public realm space.
Minimum fresh air rates to ensure good air quality (for
breathing and removing air contaminants) shall comply
with the minimum thresholds set out in ASHRAE 62.1:2007
using the ventilation rate procedure or local code, whichever
is more stringent.
The shortest distances between outdoor air intakes Car park exhaust
(including doors and windows required as part of a
natural ventilation system) and any exhausts or discharge
points should comply with ASHRAE 62.1.2007 or local
code whichever is more stringent. This will avoid cross
contamination and provide good air quality. min. 5m
Garage entry
Refer to example 4.1 Ventilation Strategy for a graphical
representation of a typical building with associated min. 5m
minimum air intake seperation distances. min. 5m

min. 7.5m

Automobile loading area


Thorough fare with high
traffic volume
Public realm Garbage storage +
pick-up area

34
4.2 Smoking Control Related Credits: LBi-R2: Smoking Control

Smoking within a building is only permitted


for occupants within ‘residential units’, or
apartments. No smoking is permitted within any
and all common areas of the building including car
parks.
To comply with the requirements, each residential unit
must be sealed with impermeable deck to deck partitions
along the whole perimeter of the unit (walls) and vertically
between units (ceilings and floors). All penetrations within
these walls, including those for wiring, pipework, ductwork,
switches, electrical outlets, recessed fixtures and risers
must be fully and appropriately sealed. Examples of sealing
processes include caulking or spray foam application. Whilst
the designer should identify suitable materials for sealing
gaps, contractors must ensure that the sealing of gaps is
carried out adequately.
All doors leading from a residential unit to a common area,
such as a corridor, or between residential units must be
weather-stripped. To achieve effective weather-stripping,
the architect must design and the contractor must ensure
that gaps around doors are not so large that weather
stripping cannot provide an adequate seal.

35
4.3 Internal waste and recycling storage
Waste and recyclables generated by activities undertaken
in a building is known as operational waste. The amount of
this material generated depends on the building use, (e.g.
5 Describe the logistics of materials movement within
the building to ensure the residents maximum carrying
distance is less than 30 m and is optimised for every
Example 4.3: Depictions of storage room
connection
office, residential) and should be managed proficiently. This building user.

6
can be achieved by following the “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle”
Describe how waste and recyclables will be collected
principle to minimise economic costs and environmental
by external collection vehicles for transportation to
impacts.
adequate treatment or disposal facilities.
A building-level management strategy for waste and
Waste and recyclables generated in the building should be
recyclables should be created by the design team and
stored on each building floor before being taken to a central
implemented by the facilities management team to achieve
storage facility for the whole building. From there it will
the minimum requirements of the Pearl Building Rating
be collected for transport to the appropriate treatment or
System. The strategy must:
disposal facility.

1 Estimate the quantities anticipated using the building


waste calculator tool available from the Estidama web
site.
The floor transfer rooms should be clearly indicated, well
ventilated, easy to clean and located near service lifts
or waste chutes, in common areas of the buildings but

2 Review the existing and planned materials collection


and treatment infrastructure for the building location by
contacting, the Centre of Waste Management (www.
separated from them. Each room should be sized according
to:
Waste and recyclables storage area (externalconnection)
cwm.ae)
1 Expected generation on each floor. This can be worked
out by apportioning the total building waste and

3 Document the intended waste collection company or recyclables generation to each floor area.

2
companies and the recycling or disposal facilities
Container type. Typically these have capacities of 120

4 Provide enough space to segregate waste into: to 240 litres;

3
• Green container for recyclable plastics, glass and
Collection frequency to the central storage room. This
metals;
will be defined by the building’s facilities manager and
• Blue container for recyclable paper and cardboard;
it is typically daily or even more often.
• Black container for non recyclable and non
compostable waste; and
• An optional container may be provided for Related Credits
compostable organic waste (if there is suitable
• SM-R3: Basic Operational Waste Management Waste and recyclables storage area (internal connection)
treatment available)
Where the above recycling measures meet the
mandatory requirements for landfill and incineration
diversion, the remainder residual waste can be
allocated to landfill and incineration.

36
5.0 Design building systems
The lighting, shading and ventilation strategies established early in the design process will reduce
the requirements for building systems. Careful detailing of systems to provide cool, comfortable and
efficient performing indoor spaces can further reduce the buildings environmental impact.
Approach Materials and Waste
For credit LBi-R1, the building must comply with ventilation SM-R3 requires waste generated in the building to be
requirements set out in ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007, or stored on each building floor before being taken to a central
local code, whichever is more stringent. waste storage for the whole building from where it will be
collected to the appropriate treatment or disposal facility.
Energy Credit IDP-R1 requires decisions regarding the design of
MEP and waste to be agreed on in integrated development
The design of the building HVAC and lighting systems is workshops.
driven by the requirements outlined in ASHRAE Standard
90.1- 2007. Compliance with RE-R1 is achieved by a 12% Credit RE-R3 specifies that only refrigerants and fire
improvement in Proposed Design Energy Performance when suppression systems with an ozone depletion potential
compared with the Baseline Design Energy Performance. (ODP) of zero can be used for any purpose onsite.
This improvement is demonstrated through dynamic
simulation modelling to simulate energy performance useful resources
as outlined by the Performance Rating Methodology in
• ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals 2009.
Appendix G of ASHRAE 90.1-2007.
• ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air
Credit RE-R2 requires energy submetering, whereby Quality/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1 – 2007: Energy Standard for Buildings
installed meters are to be clearly labeled and provided Except Low- Rise Residential Buildings.
in easily accessible locations. They must measure, • UNIFORM PLUMBING CODE of Abu Dhabi Emirate 2009,
Environment Agency Abu Dhabi.
as a minimum, 90% of the estimated annual energy
consumptions of each fuel type (electricity, gas, etc)
Related Credits
for all energy end use categories, in both Landlord and
Tenant areas. Metering is also required for all onsite energy • LBi-R1: Healthy Ventilation Delivery
• LBi-R3: Legionella Prevention
generating systems and large plant items.
• PW-R1: Minimum Interior Water Use Reduction
• PW-R2: Water Monitoring
Water • RE-R1: Minimum Energy Performance
• RE-R2: Energy Monitoring & Reporting
Efficient water fixtures and metering are covered by credits • RE-R3: Ozone Impacts of Refrigerants & Fire Suppression Systems
PW-R1 and PW-R2. Estidama requires specific flows rates • SM-R3: Basic operational waste management strategy
for water fixtures, fittings, and appliances. As with energy
meters, water meters must be easily accessible and clearly
labeled, to sub-meter the building’s external water use.
These must have a pulsed output and be capable of remote
monitoring.

37
5.1 Energy system Related Credits: RE-R1: Minimum Energy Performance
LBi-R1: Healthy Ventilation Delivery

Air conditioning and mechanical ventilation In addition to reducing the energy consumed by lighting
systems, good use of controls and sensors can increase
Table 5.1
Although the cooling requirements of a building will be
reduced by minimizing heat gain through windows and energy savings and reduce the cooling load required.
other external surfaces, energy must also be used to Examples of lighting controls include:
condition spaces in Abu Dhabi’s climate. Efficient system • Occupancy sensors
performance is therefore a critical factor in achieving • Daylight sensors
reductions in energy usage. • Dimmable controls
• Programmable time controls
For most buildings the performance of the air-conditioning
system is based upon: External lighting is also restricted on the basis of power
use, either per unit area or per linear meter as defined by
• The efficiency of energy conversion from electricity Standard 90.1-2007 for various functions. Furthermore
to cooling, typically provided by localized units, central external lighting should be controlled to ensure that it is not
chillers or district cooling operational during daylight hours, which will reduce energy
• The effectiveness of the fans providing air to the wastage.
spaces, both fresh and recirculated air
• The selection of appropriate sensors and controls for Renewables
various system elements in different zones The use of onsite renewable energy sources to contribute
• The response of the system to variation in thermal towards the building load is encouraged. Renewable
loads and occupant requirements technologies should be designed to integrate with proposed
building design, HVAC systems and lighting.
• The inclusion of energy recovery, performance
modulation and other efficiency measures.

There are requirements for all aspects of system


performance outlined by ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007.
However in order to achieve the target performance
required by credit RE-R1 it will be necessary to demonstrate
improvement beyond the levels defined in Standard 90.1-
2007.

Lighting
Good lighting design can reduce energy usage internally and
externally. Internal lighting energy is restricted on a basis of
power used per unit area. Power allowance is based on the
building type or the space type classification as outlined in
Standard 90.1-2007. Example performance for the building
type classification is shown in table 5.1.

38
5.2 Energy metering Related Credits: RE-R2: Energy Monitoring & Reporting

Metering facilities should be provide to allow the energy


performance of the building to be recorded. This monitoring Table 5.2a
will provide an understanding of the use in energy
within the building as well as providing scope for future
improvements. RE-R2: Energy Monitoring & Reporting has
the following requirements:

1 All meters provided are to be clearly labeled and easily


accessible

2 90% of estimated annual energy consumption of


each fuel type to be monitored. For office, retail and
multi-residential buildings, the equipment and systems
described in Table 5.2a should be submetered

3 Separate meters to be provided for plant exceeding the


loads shown in Table 5.2b

4 Written commitment from building owner to supply all


energy monitoring data if requested by Estidama

5 Capability to provide hourly, daily, weekly, monthly


and annual energy consumption for each end-use and
compare consumption for the different time frames
Landlord and Tenant areas to be separately metered as well
as any on site energy generating systems. All metering
requirements are to be documented within the tenant Table 5.2b
guidelines as part of IDP-R2 Tenant Fit-Out Design &
Construction Guide.
For Tenant spaces, the following metering categories are to
be followed:
• Non-Residential: tenant area metering requirements for
office;
• Residential (spaces used primarily for living and/or
sleeping): tenant area metering requirements for multi-
residential. Guidance

Schools are assumed to be solely landlord controlled and GIL 65: Metering Energy Use in New Non-Domestic Buildings
therefore there are no additional requirements for tenant CIBSE TM39 2009: Building Energy Metering
areas.

39
5.3 Refrigerant Related Credits: RE-R3: Ozone Impacts of Refrigerants & Fire

Refrigerant
Many of the refrigerants currently used in air conditioning
systems cause damage to the ozone layer. The ozone layer
protects the earth’s surface from damaging radiation. This
environmental impact can be reduced by the appropriate
selection of refrigerants and fire suppression systems with
a zero ozone depletion potential (ODP).
RE-R3 requires that refrigerants and gaseous fire
suppression systems installed within the plot have a zero
ozone depletion potential.
This would require avoiding refrigerants such as HCFC-22,
which even though will not be banned until 2015 within the
UAE, it is required that it is not used due to it still having an
ODP. Refrigerants with an ODP of zero are required such as
HFC-134a.

Table 5.3

40
5.4 Water fixtures Related Credits: PW-R1: Minimum Interior Water Use Reduction

Optimize interior water consumption To comply with PW-R1, a project must demonstrate that
the proposed buildings interior potable water consumption
Interior water consumption within a building is attributed is less than or equal to the baseline building interior potable
to fixtures and appliances such as taps, toilets, washing water consumption based on the flow rates detailed within
machines etc. Large water savings can be made by using the adjacent table. This must be demonstrated by utilizing
low flow fixtures and high efficiency appliances. the PBRS Water Calculator v1.1 available from www.
PW-R1 sets a minimum standard for fixture flow rates and estidama.org.
appliance efficiencies. These flow rates are as follows: The calculator allows the project to trade between flow
rates so that the efficiency of certain fixtures/appliances
Table 5.4 may be relaxed only if others are improved. This ensures
that the overall proposed building interior potable water
Fixture/Appliance Unit Rate consumption is less than or equal to the baseline.
Kitchen Taps liters/minute 6.0
The next few pages contain snapshots of the ‘PBRS Water
Bathroom Washbasin Calculator v1.1. This will help the design team select
liters/minute 6.0
Taps appropriate fixtures and demonstrate compliance with the
Toilets Dual Flush liters/flush 6.0/4.0 Estidama requirements.
Bidets liters/minute 6.0
Shower Head liters/minute 9.5
Ablution Fixtures liters/minute 6.0
Dishwashers liters/place setting 1.3
Washing Machines liters/kg of dry
8.5
load

41
Example 5.4: Building water calculator output

Fill in external water usage

Fill in internal water usage.

Fill in detailed
information on the
different building
uses such as office,
residential, etc.

Fill in detailed information on the water fixture uses in


the building and compare them with the baseline

Step 5 is the same as step 4 but with non-residential and


residential building types not included by default in the calculator

42
Fill in detailed information on the building plot irrigation,
water features, etc. and compare them with the baseline

Fill in detailed information on heat rejection equipment

Fill in information on the summed total of all


external water features and swimming pools

Summary of the different elements of the water balance

43
Summary of compliance with required credits
and number of points awarded in optional credits

Summary of water demand for different building uses

Graphical summary of water balance. Ideally building


waste water should balance with exterior demands.

Numerical summary of water demand Graphical summary of water demand


for different building uses for different building uses

44
5.5 Water metering Related Credits: PW-R2: Water Monitoring

Water metering Example 5.5: Diagram of water monitoring


PW-R2 requires easily accessible and clearly labelled water
meters to be provided and capable of monitoring all exterior
water consumption. The following must be seperately sub-
metered where present:
• Irrigation Systems
• Heat Rejection
• Swimming Pools
• Water Features
The meters are also required to have data logging capability
and be connected to a central monitoring system so that
the exterior water consumption may be recorded. This, and
a better understanding of both interior and exterior water
use will help determine areas of high water consumption,
identify leaks quickly, and pursue opportunities to save
water.

45
5.6 Legionella Related Credits: LBi-R3: Legionella Prevention

Legionnaires disease is a potentially fatal form of


pneumonia which principally affects those who are
susceptible due to age, illness, immunosuppression,
smoking etc.
HSE Approved Code of Practice (ACoP) L8: Legionnaires‘
Disease — The Control of Legionella Bacteria in Water
Systems applies to plant and water systems which may
present a particular risk potential by releasing a spray or
aerosol during operation or when being maintained.
Relevant water based systems include but are not limited
to:
• Water systems incorporating a cooling tower or an
evaporative condenser.
• Hot and cold water systems.
• Other plant and systems containing water which is likely
to exceed 20ºC and which may release a spray or aerosol
during operation OR during maintenance.
• Humidifiers.
• Air washers.
• Spa baths and Pools.
• Car / bus washes.
• Wet scrubbers.
• Fountains and Water features (Indoor and Outdoor).
• Sprinkler and hose reel systems.

Roles and responsibilities


The design engineers should support the Client in
developing guidance including design and operational intent.
HSE ACoP L8 requires the owner to appoint an operations
manager who should ensure that all responsibilities are
clearly defined and formally allocated. The owner is also
responsible to ensure that control procedures are carried
out to the standard required to prevent the growth of
legionella bacteria.

46
Legionella Management Plan
At all stages adequate measures should be implemented
to minimise the risk of contamination. A Legionella
Management Plan must be developed at the outset of the
project and should address the following:
1. Identify and assess the risk in the design and operation of
the building to assess the level of risk associated with water
systems. If the risks are insignificant, no further action
needs be taken, other than periodical reassessment in case
anything changes in the system.
2. Manage the risk: management responsibilities, training
and competence. If a risk is identified, proper controls
must be introduced and documented within the Legionella
Management Plan. Risks can be controlled by careful
planning, management policy, competent staff and
adherence to proper control strategies.
3. Prevent or control the risk from exposure to legionella
bacteria. Consideration should be given to:
• Ensure that the release of water spray is properly
controlled.
• Keep the system and the water in it clean.
• Avoid conditions that favour the growth of
legionella and other micro-organisms, water
stagnation and materials encouraging growth.
•Treat water to either kill legionella (and other
micro-organisms), limit their ability to grow or
biocidal treatment if applicable
• Continually monitor all water where sources of
legionella could occur.
• Easy access for inspection, draining, dismantling
and cleaning to all systems.
4. Record keeping of maintenance and documentation.
Records need to be kept of the scheme and who is
responsible for managing that scheme, these should also be
kept with the results of the routine monitoring.
5.Ensure that information from manufacturers, importers,
suppliers and installers provide guidance and include risks to
users.

47
48
Estidama design submission at building permit application
IDP-R1: Integrated Development Strategy
Team structure listing team members and their roles

Narrative summarizing initial vision, objectives and targets set jointly by the project team

Process chart for the IDP developed at project inception, listing design milestones and planned workshops

Methodology for ensuring appropriate stakeholders are involved, including construction team, commissioning agent, potential tenants, building operators and relevant
regulatory authorities and permit agencies

Meeting minutes, action items and team member responsibilities from key workshops held as part of the IDP

Implementation strategy for achieving transition between project stages and project packages

IDP-R3: Basic Commissioning


CV of Commissioning Agent

Contract with the Commissioning Agent

Commissioning Plan clearly indicating commissioning requirements for the project, including: Owner’s Project Requirements and Basis of Design narrative

NS-R1 Natural Systems Assessment


Natural Systems Assessment Report including: Narrative, Maps, Site photographs that must clearly identify the extent of different habitats and/or other significant natural
system features

Review of the site against Environmental Policy Statements included in Plan 2030

CV of appointed suitably qualified environmental professional

49
Estidama design submission at building permit application
NS-R2 Natural Systems Protection
Supporting calculations, summarizing total site area, protection area and/or mitigation area/compensation area in hectares

Construction strategy to protect sensitive habitats and protected species from construction impacts

Details of the appointed suitably qualified ecological consultant’s professional status, if different to the consultant details provided in NS-R1

Strategy 1: Protection Strategy Report which identifies the potential risks to the Natural Systems assets from development and inform setback requirements, including:

Narrative and maps which detail the boundaries of the assets

Extent of habitats and species to be protected

Limits of development, buffer areas and setbacks (Works areas must be clearly identified on an aerial photograph of existing conditions)

Any features of ecological value to be lost

Strategy 2: Mitigation Strategy Report which details the reasons for requiring mitigation for loss of habitat and includes:

Narrative and maps of the area of natural system assets to remain protected

The area and value of habitat to be lost to development

The area allocated for re-establishment

Limits of development, buffer areas and setbacks (Works areas must be clearly identified on an aerial photograph of existing conditions)

A strategy for habitat re-establishment, including source of plant stock and establishment of soil base

Five year strategy for on-going management and monitoring following completion of construction, including confirmation of management organization

Strategy 3: Compensation Strategy Report which details the reasons for requiring compensation for loss of habitat and includes:

Narrative and maps of the area of natural system asset to remain protected;

The area and value of habitat to be lost to development;

Limits of development, buffer areas and setbacks (Works areas must be clearly identified on an aerial photograph of existing conditions);

Details on the compensation area allocated for re-establishment, including site location and confirmation of approval to establish habitat;

50
Estidama design submission at building permit application
Strategy for habitat re-establishment, including source of plant stock and establishment of soil base; and

Five year strategy for on-going management and monitoring following completion of construction, including confirmation of management organization.

NS-R3 Natural Systems Design and Management Strategy


Natural Systems Design and Management Strategy that includes:

Plans and drawings illustrating layout and design of landscaped and habitat areas

Details of soft and hard landscaped areas

Details and justification of plant selection (ensuring that only native and adaptive drought and saline tolerant species are specified for habitat areas)

Details of soil strategy for testing, protection, enhancement and maintenance

Irrigation strategy

Details of landscape maintenance procedures including fertilizer, herbicide and pesticide application

Details of specific establishment, maintenance and protection requirements for sensitive areas

Details of monitoring requirements

Details of the appointed suitably qualified environmental consultant’s professional status, if different to the consultant details provided in NS-R1

LBo-R1 Plan 2030


A letter from the UPC confirming that the proposed development is:

Located within an established Urban Growth Boundary

Did not require significant variance or special relief from Plan 2030, Development Code and/or Area Plan for approval

LBo-R2 Urban Systems Assessment


CV of the appointed suitably qualified professional

51
Estidama design submission at building permit application
Urban Systems Assessment report including:

Urban System Assessment report including narrative, maps and site photographs that must clearly identify the existing site conditions

LBo-R3 Outdoor Thermal Comfort Strategy


Plan and tabulated results showing achievement of % of shading of applicable spaces at 1:00pm clock time on the Equinox and Summer Solstice

Extracts from specifications relating to the SRI of all cover elements

Outdoor Thermal Comfort Strategy report highlighting all measures contributing to improving the building’s exterior microclimate including:

Narrative and drawings of the public realm spaces and priority shade areas

LBi-R1 Healthy Ventilation Delivery


Documentation of an observational study of local air quality including photographs of surrounding sources of pollutant emissions

Mechanical system drawings marked-up to clearly show distances between air intake points and exhaust air or other discharge points and the distances from the air
exhaust points to any defined public realm areas

Narrative describing how the mechanical design system meets the Credit Requirements, including description of mechanical ventilation system

Spreadsheet calculations of fresh air ventilation rates based on the ventilation rate procedure for all zones

LBi-R2 Smoking Control


Written commitment from the building owner/developer that there will be a no smoking policy operated within the building (or common areas for residential buildings or
additionally for school grounds) by inclusion in Contracts of Sale and Lease/Rent Agreements that smoking will be banned by future owners and tenants

Extracts from specifications and/or drawings indicating the locations of posted signage stating that the entire building is a no smoking environment and detailing the
negative health impacts of smoking installed in all dedicated external smoking areas

Drawings indicating the location of dedicated outside smoking areas and facilities for collecting ash and cigarette ends which clearly indicate their distance from
entrances, operable windows and air intakes

For residential units, provide specifications for weather-stripping of doors and drawings that highlight impermeable deck to deck partitioning

52
Estidama design submission at building permit application
LBi-R3 Legionella Prevention
Narrative and drawings of the air conditioning systems regardless of whether water-based cooling towers are present or not. The Narrative must explain the approach to
Legionella Management, or confirm no water-based systems are present

Narrative and drawings of the project’s other water-based systems

Legionella Management Plan for the treatment of Legionella in the project’s water-based systems

PW-R1 Minimum Interior Water Use Reduction


Building Water Calculator confirming that the building’s predicted interior potable water consumption will be no greater than the baseline building interior potable water
consumption using efficiency measures only

Brief narrative describing all proposed water conservation strategies

Extracts from specifications for all proposed fixtures and fittings indicating flow rates and flow regulation systems

PW-R2 Exterior Water Monitoring


Brief narrative describing how the requirements of the credit will be achieved

Extracts from specifications and MEP drawings clearly indicating the type, extent and locations of all metering, and central monitoring system

List of all exterior uses and corresponding metering equipment

RE-R1 Minimum Energy Performance


Energy Model Template summarizing the dynamic energy simulation, confirming that the minimum requirements of this credit will be achieved

RE-R2 Energy Monitoring


Brief narrative describing how the requirements of the credit will be achieved

Energy system schematics illustrating the proposed metering strategy confirming that the required level of metering will be achieved

Extracts from specifications and MEP layout design drawings clearly indicating the type, extent and locations of all metering, and the central monitoring system

53
Estidama design submission at building permit application
RE-R3 Ozone Impacts of Refrigerants & Fire Suppression Systems:
Brief narrative describing how the project meets the credit requirements

Specification extracts for all proposed refrigerants and gaseous fire suppression systems confirming ODP of each refrigerant and gas is zero

SM-R1 Hazardous Materials Elimination


Extracts from specifications indicating that no ACMs or CCA-treated timber are to be used in the project as per the Credit Requirements

Where portions of the project are reused from an existing building:

Results of a hazardous materials survey documenting the existence, if any, of ACMs in the building. It is recommended to follow internationally recognized standards
such as ASTM E 256-04 – Comprehensive Building Asbestos Surveys or similar standards

Where ACMs were found, Asbestos removal and disposal plan

SM-R2 Basic Construction Waste Management


CDWMP conforming to the Credit Requirements

Schedule of items to be recycled/salvaged

SM-R3 Basic Operational Waste Management


Operational Waste Strategy that includes:

A narrative summarizing options researched and selected to meet the diversion targets. The strategy must address waste minimization, storage, collection, and
treatment and links to private or municipal and regional infrastructure and programs

Calculations documenting projected waste quantities for the development during operation on an annual basis. Waste benchmarks may be obtained from the Centre
of Waste Management, waste audits of similar buildings or literature research. References must be clearly listed

Drawing(s) indicating location of the storage/disposal facilities and vehicle access areas designed to ensure adequate space for maneuvering delivery and waste
removal vehicles

Waste transfer inventory outlining the intended receiver of waste. This should include information indicating that the carrier, recycling and disposal facilities are
licensed

54
6.0 Build building Related Credits: SM-R2: Basic Construction Waste Management
RE-R1: Minimum Energy Performance

Once all the design has been completed, the process of useful resources:
constructing the building will start. This step covers the • Environment Agency of Abu Dhabi: Technical Guidance Document:
construction process from the potential demolition of Development of Construction Environmental Management Plan
existing structures to the completion of a new building. (CEMP) – Onshore.
• ISO 14000: 2004 Family of Standards on Environmental
During this process, it will be necessary to maintain management systems.
communication between the members of the design team, • Cibse TM 31. Building log building toolkit.
contractors, and developers, to ensure that the building
is built to the correct design specifications. This will be
facilitated by the IDP process and the implementation
strategy agreed at the beginning of the design process.

Approach
Estidama credit SM-R2 requires that 30% of the demolition
and construction waste be salvaged or recycled by weight.
This means the contractor needs to prepare a construction
and demolition waste management plan before demolition
begins. This plan is to be supported by the Building Waste
Calculator that is available from the Estidama website.
During construction, documents will need to be collected
by a designated responsible person from the contractor
who will work with the PQP to confirm the target has been
achieved.
Similarly, compliance with credit RE-R1 requires that
good quality materials performing according to design
specifications are used and that good construction practices
are followed to ensure the fabric and system performance
levels modeled are actually achieved.
Credit SM-R1 requires guaranteeing that hazardous
materials do not make their way into the project. There can
be no asbestos or exposed wood treated with chromated
copper arsentate.

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6.1 Construction waste management Related Credits: SM-R2: Basic Construction Waste Management

Before starting any demolition or construction, it is


necessary to develop a construction and demolition (C&D) Example 6.1a Schedule of items reclaimed/recycled
waste management plan. This should incorporate:
LANDFILLED C&D WASTE CALCULATION IN TONNES
1 Estimates of waste generation. The Building Waste
Calculator will help to estimate the type and amount
of waste expected for the project. This can be
Landfill material description
General waste March 2010
Landfill hauler or location
Al Dhafra Landfill
Quantity of landfilled waste
15
General waste April 2010 Al Dhafra Landfill 31
downloaded from the Estidama website.
General waste May 2010 Al Dhafra Landfill 70

2 A destination for each waste type leaving the site. For


example, specify that aggregates will be transported
to the municipal C&D recycling facility, or that fit-out
General waste June 2010
Pallets April 2010
Pallets May 2010
Al Dhafra Landfill
Al Dhafra Landfill
Al Dhafra Landfill
65
10
5
leftovers will be disposed to landfill. Pallets June 2010 Al Dhafra Landfill 15

3 Identification of materials to be salvaged or recycled.


At least 30% of the estimated waste generation by
weight has to be salvaged or recycled.
DIVERTED C&D WASTE CALCULATION IN TONNES
Diverted/recycled material description Diversion/recycling hauler or location
Quantity of diverted /
recycled waste

4
Concrete from demolition March 2010 Municipal C&D plant 150
A location for storing waste on-site during
Concrete from demolition April 2010 Municipal C&D plant 200
construction. This should be conveniently located near
the area where construction materials are delivered Metal March 2010 Local metal recycler 4
and has to be large enough to allow for separating at Metal April 2010 Local metal recycler 3
least aggregates and other waste streams. Metal May 2010 Local metal recycler 1
Metal June 2010 Local metal recycler 1
An example of the above is shown here. These elements
should be updated with information compiled during SALVAGED C&D WASTE CALCULATION IN TONNES
construction. Quantity of diverted /
Diverted/recycled material description Diversion/recycling hauler or location
recycled waste
Spandrel panels from façade June 2010 Reused in new building 15

Construction and Demolition Waste:


585 tonnes

Total waste generated: 585 tonnes


36.1%
Landfilled
Total waste landfilled: 211 tonnes (36.1%)
Salvaged/
Total waste diverted: 374 tonnes (63.9%) Recycled

63.9%

On-site waste segregation area

56
Example 6.1b: Building waste calculator
In step 1 enter project details and then follow these
Enter operational waste
instructions.
management procedures

Default capture rates can


Enter details of be overridden if required
existing building
(if applicable) Enter construction and demolition
waste management procedures.

Enter details of proposed


building. Use the “Mixed
use” option for buildings
with more than one use

Enter waste generation


details for the building
use. Default values can be
overridden if required

57
Summary of construction
and demolition as well as
operational waste estimates
and diversion from landfill
and incineration rates Summary of compliance with
required credits in the Stewarding
Material Section of the Pearl
Building Rating System

Summary of operational waste


estimates in numerical format

Summary of construction and


demolition waste estimates in
numerical format

Summary of construction and


demolition waste estimates in
graphical format

Summary of operational waste


estimates in graphical format

58
7.0 Verify performance Related Credits: IDP-R2: Tenant Fit-Out Design & Construction guide
IDP-R3: Basic commissioning

Finishing construction is not quite the last step in an


Estidama project. Key to ensuring sustainability is to
verify the building will perform according to the design
specifications. The performance of the structure and
building systems should be evaluated, and occupants should
be informed how to operate and maintain the building for
best results.

Approach
Credit IDP-R3 requires a Competent Professional to verify
the building performs as designed to protect occupant health
and provide comfort and ongoing building efficiency. Credit
IDP-R2 requires all the Integrated Development Strategy
created as part of the IDP-R1credit is clearly communicated
using a tenant fit-out design and construction guide. This
tenant fit out guide provides essential technical information
such as design requirements, materials for the fit out
design and construction and submittal for Landlord approval
to ensure that compliance with the requirements will be
checked by the developer. The envelope and systems should
comply with the requirements of credit RE-R1.
Information collected from the energy and water sub-
meters required by credits RE-R2 and PW-R2 credits can be
used to ensure optimum operation.
Although credit IDP-R3 is completed after construction,
it should be started earlier in the design process. Some
systems need to be tested before installation. Note that
the person who conducts the verification can be from a
company involved in the design process, but the individual
who verifies cannot be directly involved in the project for
any other purpose.

59
7.1 Commissioning Related Credits: IDP-R3: Basic Commissioning

The Basic Commissioning aims to ensure that the building A commissioning plan should include the following
performs as designed to protect occupant health , provide
• Commissioning program overview
comfort and ongoing building efficiency. An independent
commissioning agent, reporting to the project owner, with • List of systems and assemblies included in
at least 2 years commissioning experience, should be commissioning process and activities
engaged as part of the project design team throughout the • Commissioning team and responsibilities
design stages.
• Management , communication and reporting of
The commissioning process must cover, at a minimum, the
commissioning process
following systems:
• Overview of commissioning process activities through
• Heating, ventilation, air conditioning, refrigeration
the design including:
• On-site energy generation (including co-generation)
• Building Management System - Design and construction document review
• Lighting and lighting controls - Basis of Design review
• Domestic hot and cold water systems
• On-site water treatment systems including swimming - Owner’s project requirements
pools (if applicable) - Submittals documentation and process
• Automated control features such as blinds
- Functional performance test development and
Within the building log book the following sections would implementation
be normally expected:
• Annual review & updates to the log book
• Purpose & responsibilities
• Links to other key documents
• Main contacts
• Commissioning, handover & compliance
• Overall building design
• Summary of areas / occupancy
• Summary of main MEP plant
• Overview of controls / BEMs
• Builder user information (requirement dependent on
building typology)
• Metering, monitoring & targeting strategy
• Building performance records
• Summary of maintenance requirements
• Major alterations
• Results of in-use investigations (requirement dependent
on building typology)
• Appendices - All relevant certificates / tests
(requirement dependent on building typology).

60
Construction Contractor
Completion
Documents Appointed

Detailed Construction
Construction Occupancy
Design Design

Appoint CX Agent Final commissioning report including:


Developer review commissioning plan inc: - Owners project requirements;
- Owners project requirements; and - Project commissioning specifications;
Client

- Basis of design narrative - Verification of installation; and


- Operation and maintenance manual
Review design and construction documentations and make
recommendations to the design team;
Review and approve the results of commissioned systems

Review and approve submittals from relevant subcontractors


Design Team

during construction:
- Visually review the results of selected commissioned
systems; and
- Review final commissioning documents, including but not
limited to the operations and maintenance manual(s) and
staff training materials
Contractor

Must employ an independant commissioning contractor to


commission the installed systems indicated on the previous page
and commence the development of a Building Log Book (BLB)

61
7.2 Fit out design and construction guide
This guide provides essential technical information for the Guidance
fit out design and construction and submittal for Landlord
• BCO Office Fit-Out Guide 2003 - http://www.bco.org.uk
compliance.
Estidama specifically requires the Integrated Development Related Credits
Strategy developed in IDP-R1 to be clearly communicated. • IDP-R2: Tenant Fit-Out Design & Construction Guide
This can be done using Estidama scorecard.
For example if a specific lighting efficiency has been
assumed or low VOC paint has been previously targeted in
the PRS, the guide should enforce these requirements and
provide guidance to the tenants.
The Owner of the development has to demonstrate that
common areas will be fitted out appropriately and that
there are procedures to verify that the tenant has complied
with the Tenant Fit Out Guide. This guide can supplement
the Agreement for Lease and/or Lease.
The tenant fit out guide should include the following as a
minimum:

• Design team information, company names, address
• IDP planned
• Project Vision including sustainability Vision and
• Objectives
• Landlord agreement Procedure
• Local authorities procedures
• Safety and Health Policy
• Interface with Landlord services
Technical specifications including performance
requirements:
• Mechanical services
• Electrical Services
• Public Health services
• Structural information
•Other specialists items, security,…
•Materials
•Specific Estidama requirements

62
Estidama construction submission at Certificate of Completion
application
IDP-R1: Integrated Development Strategy
Narrative showing an updated process chart of the IDP highlighting changes from the design stage and listing successes and challenges during construction stage

Updated implementation strategy

IDP-R2: Tenant Fit-Out Design & Construction Guide


Tenant Fit-Out Design and Construction Guide

IDP-R3: Basic Commissioning


List of all meetings attended by the Commissioning Agent through commissioning period and project handover, including dates

Final Commissioning Report, including:

Owner’s Project Requirements

Project commissioning specifications

Verification of installation

Operation & Maintenance Manual

NS-R2: Natural Systems Protection


Evidence that features of ecological value have been protected during construction; for example, a construction management plan and dated photographs of successfully
protected areas/features

Updated development map delineating the built limits of all proposed development and disturbance, setback zones, and buffer areas

Supporting calculations summarizing final total land area and protected areas

Confirmation of the appointment of a management and maintenance organization (with a contract running for at least 5 years), if management not to be undertaken by
the local municipality. The confirmation must contain details of individuals responsible and their duties in line with the strategy

63
Estidama construction submission at Certificate of Completion
application
NS-R3: Natural Systems Design and Management Strategy
Updated Natural Systems Design and Management Strategy including:

Reporting of any landscape/habitat design alterations or procedures

Report on any failures and rectification work undertaken

Confirmation of the appointment of a management and maintenance organization (with a contract running for at least 5 years), if management not to be undertaken by
the local municipality. The confirmation must contain details of individuals responsible and their duties in line with the strategy

LBo-R3: Outdoor Thermal Comfort Strategy


Updated outdoor thermal comfort strategy including narrative supported by as-built drawings and photographs of the applicable shade areas, highlighting all measures
contributing to improving the exterior microclimate, including planned or existing features

Evidence that all purchased and installed covers have compliant outer surface SRIs

LBi-R1: Healthy Ventilation Delivery


As-built mechanical system drawings marked-up to clearly show distances between air intake points and exhaust air or other discharge points and the distances from
the air exhaust points to any defined public realm areas

Narrative describing how the mechanical design system meets the Credit Requirements, including description of mechanical ventilation system

Commissioning results demonstrating compliance with minimum fresh air ventilation rate requirements

LBi-R2: Smoking Control


Updated written commitment (if relevant) from the building owner / developer that there is a no smoking policy operated within the building (or common areas for
residential buildings or additionally for school grounds) by inclusion in Contracts of Sale and Lease/Rent Agreements that smoking will continue to be banned by future
owners and tenants

Photos of posted no smoking and health impact signage and facilities for collecting ash and cigarette ends

As-built drawings indicating the location of dedicated outside smoking areas and facilities for collecting ash and cigarette ends which clearly indicate their distance from
entrances, operable windows and air intakes

64
Estidama construction submission at Certificate of Completion
application
Copy of training material for security staff

For residential units provide in addition to the above, purchase receipts of weather-stripping and the following photographic evidence:

Weather-stripping installation and impermeable deck to deck partitioning installation

LBi-R3: Legionella Prevention


Operations & Maintenance Manual (OMM)

Narrative and As-Built drawings of the air conditioning systems regardless of whether water-based cooling towers are present or not. The Narrative must explain the
approach to Legionella Management and how it integrates into the OMM, or confirm no water-based systems are present

Narrative and As-Built drawings of the project’s other water-based systems. The Narrative must explain the approach to Legionella Management and how it integrates
into the OMM

Legionella Management Plan for the treatment of Legionella in the project’s water-based systems

All Audit checklists associated with the Legionella Management Process including but not limited to plant installation and commissioning, testing, training and
competency and record keeping

PW-R1: Minimum Interior Water Use Reduction


Updated Building Water Calculator (if changed from design), confirming that the building’s predicted interior potable water consumption is no greater than the baseline
building interior potable water consumption using efficiency measures only Evidence that all purchased and installed covers have compliant outer surface SRIs

Brief narrative describing all installed water conservation strategies

Manufacturer information for all installed fixtures and fittings indicating flow rates and flow regulation systems

Manufacturer information for all installed appliances including information on their water use

Photographic evidence confirming installation of specified fixtures and appliances


Estidama construction submission at Certificate of Completion
application
PW-R2: Exterior Water Monitoring
Updated narrative describing how the requirements of the credit have been met

Manufacturer’s data and as-built drawings clearly indicating the type, extent and locations of all metering, and central monitoring system

Photographic evidence confirming installation of specified meters and central monitoring system

Written commitment from the building owner to submit all exterior water monitoring data to Estidama (if requested)

RE-R1: Minimum Energy Performance


Updated Energy Model Template summarizing the dynamic energy simulation, confirming that the minimum requirements of this credit have been achieved

RE-R2: Energy Monitoring and Reporting


Updated brief narrative describing how the requirements of the credit have been achieved

Energy system schematics illustrating the metering strategy confirming that the required level of metering has been achieved

Manufacturer›s data and as-built MEP layout drawings clearly indicating the type, extent and locations of all metering, and the central monitoring system

Photographic evidence confirming installation of specified meters and central monitoring system

Written commitment from the owner to submit all energy monitoring data to Estidama (if requested)

RE-R3: Ozone Impacts of Refrigerants & Fire Suppression Systems


Updated narrative describing how the project meets the credit requirements

Manufacturer’s information for all installed refrigerants and gaseous fire suppression systems confirming ODP of each refrigerant and gas is zero

SM-R1: Hazardous Materials Elimination


Evidence of purchase indicating that no ACMs or CCA-treated timber were used in the project as per the Credit Requirements

66
Estidama construction submission at Certificate of Completion
application
Where portions of the project are reused from an existing building:

Where ACMs were found, evidence of disposal at a hazardous waste facility

SM-R2: Basic Construction Waste Management


Calculations, supported with detailed receipts, summarizing final results of the CDWMP plus schedule of the recycled/salvaged items

SM-R3: Basic Operational Waste Management


Updated calculations documenting projected waste quantities for the development during operation on an annual basis

As-built drawing(s) and photographs indicating location of the storage/disposal facilities and vehicle access areas designed to ensure adequate space for maneuvering
delivery and waste removal vehicles

Updated waste transfer inventory outlining the contracted receiver of waste. This should include information indicating that the carrier, recycling and disposal facilities
are licensed
Estidama site inspection
IDP-R3: Basic Commissioning
Check that a commissioning agent is appointed and that the commissioning tasks are being carried out in compliance with the commissioning plan

NS-R2: Natural Systems Protections


Confirm that features of ecological value have been preserved or protected.

LBi-R2: Smoking Control


Check th at residential properties have been adequately sealed and their appertures towards common areas weather-stripped.

LBi-R3: Legionella Prevention


Check that the legionella plan is in place and that tests have been carried out during commissioning.

PW-R1: Minimum Interior Water Use Reduction


Check that the flow rates of water fixtures match those of the installed fixtures.

PW-R2: Exterior Water Monitoring


Check that the required external water meters are installed and that they operate correctly.

RE-R1: Minimum Energy Performance


Check that the manufacturer›s details of lighting, heating, cooling, heat rejection, pumps, fans, service water heating, and other plant equipment matches that of the
design specifications.

RE-R2: Energy Monitoring & Reporting


Confirm that the required energy sub-meters are installed and they operate correctly.

RE-R3: Ozone Impacts of Refrigerants & Fire Suppression Systems


Confirm manufacturers data for all proposed refrigerant systems, showing ODP of each refrigerant is zero.
Estidama site inspection
SM-R1: Hazardous Materials Elimination
Confirm that no ACMs or CCA-treated timber were used in the project

SM-R2: Basic Construction Waste Management


Check that the construction waste management strategy is implemented and that the waste is being trasported to the

specified treatment/disposal facility

SM-R3: Basic Operational Waste Management


Check that the operational waste management strategy is implemented and that the storage facilities are in place

69
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‫مجلس أبوظبي للتخطيط العمراني‬ Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council
62221 ‫ب‬.‫ص‬ P.O.Box 62221
‫ اإلمارات العربية المتحدة‬،‫أبوظبي‬ Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Tel: +971 2 409 6000
Fax: +971 2 443 9443
www.estidama.org

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