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Allen City Council, Place 4


Description: Note: All Allen residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Ron Alexander

Biographical Info:
Name: Ron Alexander
Street Address: 1210 Thoreau Ln.
City/Town: Allen
State: Texas
Date of Birth: July 15, 1953
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (972) 579-1844
Home Phone Number: (972) 727-2016
Mobile Phone Number: (972) 951-6609
Fax Number: (972) 579-1891
E-mail Address: ron@oakgrovememorial.org
Campaign Web Site Address: www.ron4allen.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Bachelor of Science degree in Political Science from Dallas Baptist University
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 27 years. We Moved to Allen in 1983
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 30 years. Moved to Plano in 1980
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Sales and Office Manager at Oak Grove Memorial Gardens, Irving, TX.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Avid blood donor with Carter Bloodcare - have given 54 gallons (so far). On the Carter
Bloodcare Donor Council for Allen. Member of First United Methodist Church of Allen. Collin
County Election Judge.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Allen Parks and Recreation Dept. Board Member 2008-2010. Volunteer with Habitat for
Humanity. Precinct Chairman for PCT.40 Collin County.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Precinct Chairman - Pct. 40 Allen
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $590.00
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: J.J. Chapa, Rick Gaines, Wayne Baxter
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I have lived in Allen for 27 years, raised my family in Allen. I see some things that have
been completed in Allen that greatly benefits the residents of Allen, (i.e,- Parks,
Natatorium, Jogging Trails, Shopping, Resturants.) I feel that some of the ideas that are
facing our community may not be in our best interest (i.e, DART, Arts center) I feel that I
would provide a fresh view of some of these items. I work with another city's city council
on several different issues that impact my company, therefore I feel I have a great
understanding of how our city government operates.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1. Work to improve the outdated water delivery pipes and sewer pipes in the older
sections of Allen. Paid for by Bonds, staged over several years, starting in oldest sections

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of the city. 2. Revitalize Downtown Allen - have parks, trails, Sandwich shops, Playhouse
theater. Paid for by independent investors, and Parks and Recreation Dept. 3. Encouraging
small to medium sized businesses that promote family unity to move to Allen. Show these
businesses that we are truly a family community.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I have served Allen and Collin County as an election judge since 2000. I am a former
Precinct chairman of Pct.40 of Allen. I worked with the City of Irving's Planning and Zoning
dept. and the City Council of several issue that are related to my business. I see some of
the issues that face Irving are tha same ones that Allen will be facing in the near future.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Attracting commercial developments that promote family unity is very high on my
priority list. As the City of Allen nears buildout, I feel we need to be very mindful of our
residential communtities, we need to have neighborhoods of quality built homes for the
families just starting out and for the older couples that are looking to downsize.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: The demographic change I see happening in Allen is the young families that are moving
to Allen because we are so family friendly. We have an excellent school system, a great
parks system, and plenty of activities for children of all ages. we could always increase the
number of parks in our parks and recreation system.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Illegal means illegal - if you are in this country without the proper papers we should be
able to arrest you and have you deported. I have no problem with immigrants that enter
this country properly and want to fit into our culture, after all that is how most of us got
here.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I oppose a regional transit system that would come through Allen. I will work to keep
DART out of Allen.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: Transportation avenues in and out of this area of North Texas is and will become a
major concern as more families move to our area. I feel we have to work with Texas Dept.
of Transportation to open the existing roads that are now toll roads to all North Texas
residents.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: I feel that our city manager Peter Vargas and his staff do a great job in the delivery of
city services. As Allen ages some of the services will have to be updated, and I have
confidence that Mr. Vargas has already set the proper financial requirement in motion.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Again, I think Mr. Vargas and his staff have done an outstanding job in keeping Allen
ahead of an economic crisis. We need to work to bring more quality businesses into Allen,
this will increase the need for quality housing, and that should increase our tax revenue.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Do we really need DART? I don't think so.

Robin L. Sedlacek

Biographical Info:

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Name: Robin L Sedlacek


Street Address: 640 Autumn Oaks Dr
City/Town: Allen
State: TX
Date of Birth: June 13, 1962
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 640 Autumn Oaks, Allen, TX 75002 (972)
727-9591
Home Phone Number: (972) 727-9591
Mobile Phone Number: (214) 542-7113
E-mail Address: robin@robinsedlacek.org
Campaign Web Site Address: www.robinsedlacek.org
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Associates Degree, Accounting, Western IA Tech, 1983; Certified Public Accountant,
State of Texas, 1990-present
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 23 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 23 years
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: I am a Senior Manager with Accenture. I support a global executive team with business
analytics and forecast planning.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Allen City Council, Place 4 Advisory board member for Allen Community Outreach
Junior Achievement Volunteer City of Allen Finance/Audit Committee City of Allen Board &
Commissions Nominating Committee City of Allen Convention & Tourism Bureau
Committee Council liaison to Allen Library Board Member, Christ the Servant Lutheran
Church
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Treasurer, Christ the Servant Lutheran Church (2003-2007) Commissioner, Planning &
Zoning Commission (2001-2005) Event Co-Chair, AHS After Prom, (2003) Treasurer, AHS
Touchdown Club (1998-2003) Steering Committee, City of Allen Capital Improvement
Project and Bond Election (1999) Board of Directors, Allen Community Development
Corporation, (1996-2001) 4B Sales Tax Election Committee, (1996) Parks Chair, City of
Allen Capital Improvement Project, (1994) Executive Board, Allen Sports Association,
(1991-1997)
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Commissioner, Planning & Zoning Commission (2001-2005) Board of Directors &
Corporation President, Allen Community Development Corporation, (1996-2001)
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: My fundraising has just begun. I have a planned budget of $7,000
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: As of this submission, it is personal funds only.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No, I have not.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I have been an active volunteer in Allen for the past twenty years. My leadership and
volunteer experiences are varied, and range from being on my church leadership, past
president and treasurer of the Allen Sports Association, chairing City bond election
programs, serving on the Allen Community Development Corporation, and serving on
Allen Planning and Zoning Commission. These experiences helped prepare me for service
as a Councilmember, because I got to know Allen in many aspects. I have been a licensed
CPA since 1990, working in various industries as well as serving in management positions
for several years. I bring a deep financial background to assist in our City budget and
planning process. I am running for re-election to Allen City Council, Place 4 because I
know I add value to council decision making and I am a strong leader for our community. I
offer a balance to our council with my finance background and team management
experience.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: Fiscally sound budgets: Your Council must be prudent with all planning and yet not be

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afraid to take calculated risks where we have opportunities to better our community.
Convention & Tourism: We have made significant investments in development that depend
on tourism to support. I recognize programming at Allen Event Center will be critical to
maintaining viability of retail, restaurants & hotels and am working with staff on the most
effective marketing of Allen as a destination hub. Prudent use of hotel/motel tax or special
revenue fund accounts are two funding options to consider when helping to recruit big
name talent & working with our partners at AEC. Business Recruitment & Retention:
Coming out of economic downturn, I will remain proactive and aggressive. As capital frees
up, businesses will be looking to improve their current conditions. Economic incentives, no
state come tax, great schools, an outstanding park system, new cultural options and “The
Safest City in Texas” makes Allen TX very attractive to companies considering relocation.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: When Allen became our home 23 years ago, we made a decision to engage in our
community. Church, youth activities, and civic involvement became a way of life. I bring to
the council a great deal of Allen experience in parks, capital improvement project selection
and leadership with our CDC board and Planning & Zoning Commission. And my
involvement goes beyond City. Raising our two children here has allowed me to take active
roles in Allen Sports Association, Allen High Scholl booster clubs and After Prom activities. I
love Allen, Texas and am proud to call it my home. As is evident from my voting record in
May, local elections, I have been interested, supportive and concerned with leadership of
this community long before I chose to run for election. While my opponent has recently
been involved with the Parks Board, he does not, to my knowledge, have the length or
breadth of community and civic involvement, or leadership experience, which would
prepare him to address the issues which are confronted regularly by the City Council. I
am the candidate with proven leadership experience, I have made deep and long lasting
investment in our community, and a have the financial experience to ensure Allen remains
fiscally sound.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Allen’s success over the last few years has been incredible. With the opening of Watters
Creek, Villages of Allen, several new neighborhood parks, miles of new trails and most
recently, the Allen Event Center, we are adding the shop & play cards to our poker hand.
Providing shopping and entertainment, top-notch park facilities and cultural opportunities
add so much more to a community that has been fortunate to have an excellent school
system. We have a straight flush with regard to recruiting residents. We have patient
with our prime development areas and it has paid off in spades. In 2009, in addition to our
retail/restaurant openings, we were successful in the Cisco relocation decision. Andrews
Distributing is just breaking ground and we beat out American Airlines for the Stampede
Rodeo! The 121 corridor will be our next big opportunity to explore and develop. City
leadership and EDC will continue to be thoughtful and deliberate with this area.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Our community is aging and with that comes the desire for alternatives in home
products and more options with regard to health care. We have seen significant growth in
our health care options as more specialists & facilities open up. Shortly the development of
senior living facility will offer more alternatives to current home options.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: City of Allen and Allen Police Dept. will enforce current immigration laws, but illegal
immigration in and of itself is a Federal issue. It is my opinion that it would a costly
endeavor to Allen taxpayers to tackle this issue at the local level.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Let’s be clear, our participation in transit system would be decided by a vote of the
people. Once votes are tallied, I would work to that end. I support a regional transit
system, but must first clearly understand the transit authorities’ growth plans and
patterns. Allen has been working with legislators in Austin to allow for local options in order
to fund this type of project. In the most recent session, a bill sponsored by Sen. Corona
was not successful. In my position as a councilperson, I will continue to support these
efforts.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such

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issues?
A: The Arts of Collin County is a regional project that will enhance this region and add
quality of life options to our citizens. Recent reduction in construction prices have afforded
this project to possibly move forward - soon. As our partner cities work through budget
constraints, we should not lose site of the value this project will bring to our community.
As other regional opportunities arise, I am open to review the merits of each project to
determine the benefit to Allen and our region.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Our city staff is constantly looking for areas to cut costs without a negative impact to
customer service. Meeting citizen expectations is an important goal for all City leadership.
I am proud that our budget allows for reasonably priced user fees for our facility based
activities.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Our current budget is balanced, has healthy reserves and for the 17th consecutive year,
Council has reduced the tax rate. City of Allen is in a sound financial position. An effective
budget process should evaluate services, review staff utilization and effectiveness and plan
for current and future capital projects in every cycle, not just economic down turns.
Budgets should be built with flexibility to pull back discretionary spending when revenue
does not meet projections. Critical services such as fire and police cannot be cut at the
expense of public safety, but those areas are not off limits to program reductions.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Allen is growing up and filling in. The easier to develop acreage is becoming less
available and we are faced with in-fill development. With this often comes zoning issues.
Your Council will need to be firm in our stance of quality products, but open to working with
developers and neighbors in each, unique case.

Allen City Council, Place 6


Description: Note: All Allen residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Kevin Livesey

Biographical Info:
Name: Kevin Livesey
Street Address: 1206 Surrey Ln
City/Town: Allen
State: Texas
Date of Birth: 11/05/1969
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-678-2285
Home Phone Number: 972-678-2285
Mobile Phone Number: 972-832-0212
E-mail Address: klivesey@grandecom.net
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Business Management
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 6 years in the city of Allen
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: Same as above
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Project Manager for a software company
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: This election to City Council has been my first political involvement in the City of Allen.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: I am currently on a home owners association in my neighborhood. Other than
volunteering at church and my neighborhood association I have not been involved in the
community.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?

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A: None to this point


Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Myself
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am running for this office so that I can contribute to my city in the best way that I
know how too and that is actively engaging in the day to day business of Allen. I am a
family man that loves the community that we are blessed to live in and want to make sure
that this city keeps it's charm and financial strength. Although I may not have the political
experience, I do have the passion and common sense to help direct this city toward a
strong financial future while maintaining the cities small town feel.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: City Transportation - I would push for a privately owned transportation system to serve
the needs of the community. This would require little to no cost for the city and could
actually generate income in the form of business tax income. Highway 75 expansion
through Allen - Highway 75 through Allen during rush hour is ridiculous and I would work
with local, state, and federal agencies to improve the flow of traffic on I 75 through Allen.
Sports & Recreation - I would like to see more sports areas that can be used by the
community. For instance I know that there are a lot of citizens that like to play tennis and
volleyball so I would like to purpose a tennis, volleyball, & racquetball club club. The city
can charge admission based on residency and hopefully be financially self sufficient.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My opponent has done a good job thus far on the City Council. I really can't say
anything negative about him and appreciate his service to this city. The reason that I seek
to replace him on the City Council is because I feel that he has had his opportunity to serve
over the last 3 terms and I would like to have a chance to serve my community. I am a
hard working concerned citizen that wants to help out wherever I can and I feel that City
Council is a great place to start.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: I feel that it is vital to attract strong business to the city as we near our build out.
Attracting these businesses and the residential communities that will come with them will
determine how Allen weathers the current economic storm and position us correctly for the
years of prosperity to come. The City of Allen has done a very good job up to this point
and I hope to continue that in my term on the City Council.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: - no response -
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: The city should continue to deter illegal immigration by fining business that are found to
use illegal immigrants. This issue causes a huge burden on the economy of local, state and
federal governments and needs to be stopped. The only way to solve this problem is to
deter the illegal immigration by making sure that they cannot find employment within our
community causing them to move on to other areas. As a city we need to enforce the laws
of the land and make sure that we do our part not to encourage the breaking of our laws.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: If you are referring to DART in Allen as seamless then yes I oppose it. DART wants to
charge the city far too much for their services and I don't feel that the city needs to be
burdened with that cost. Mass transit here in Allen would be better served by a local
company serving the community of Allen yet having the ability to tie into the DART system
in Plano.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: Our city has and will continue to benefit from regional planning and cooperation. The

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new center in Allen benefits all of the surrounding communities with it's acts and sporting
events. The city will also be partnering with a few other communities to bring a performing
arts center to the region. I would definitely work with our surrounding communities to
encourage smart planning in order to benefit the region.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: I feel that the city has done a good job in delivering services and would like to have the
opportunity to examine the cost effectiveness of these services to see if there are any
way's to bring down the costs of these services and save the taxpayers money.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: The current leadership in Allen has done a great job in weathering the current economic
downturn. Balancing the budget is more difficult with less money coming in due to
foreclosure and businesses closing. Simply put the city needs to tighten its belt and make
sure that we identify every inefficiency and correct them so that no money is being wasted
on things that are not needed. The citizens deserve good roads and services and I don't
see the need for these services to be cut, but like any government we need to be smart
about how and when we spend the taxpayers money since ultimately we are accountable
to the people.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: I think that voters must confront that although we have doubled in size over the last 10
years our budget has tripled and we need to be mindful of the financial wellbeing of our
community.

Jeff McGregor
Biographical Info:
Name: Jeff McGregor
Street Address: 525 Cameron Lane
City/Town: Allen, Texas 75002
State: Texas
Date of Birth: 11/11/1959
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214.729.7913
Home Phone Number: 972.727.4166
Mobile Phone Number: 214.729.7913
Fax Number: 972.735.8422
E-mail Address: jmcgregor@verappraise.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: BBA Economics, Stephen F. Austin State University, 1983. DeSoto High School 1978
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 25 Years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 25 Years
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Real Estate Appraiser
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Sign Board 1995-1996. Planning/Zoning 1996-2002. Allen City Council Place 6
2002-Present
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Board member of ASA Baseball.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: 0
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: N/A
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: My past experience and leadership qualities make me qualified for the unknown

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economic conditions that may be ahead. Proven leadership in growth and development
along with my real estate backgrond give me an edge.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: Maintain fiscal responsibility, manage and balanced growth, and a plan for
transportation either regional or intra city.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I have proven that I can lead and make sound decisions. My eights years of council
service have prepared me for the uncertain economic times ahead. The experience on
Planning and Zoning has prepared me for the council position. As a long time resident, I
have seen the positive changes in Allen and want to continue that trend.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: The development of the SH 121 corridor will be key for Allen's future. That area will set
the tone for the last major development in Allen. With the ACC as the center piece, we
have an excellent opportunity for a special and unique blend of office and commercial
development.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: The population is getting older and we need to provide facilities/development for that
group. Applications for development of facilities that are specific to the 55+ are more
frequent now than ever in the past. Along with providing specific programs, proximity to
health care will also be key in future development.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: I think the current policies that we have in place have been successful. We do not have
a specific plan to "target" any segment of the population.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I Favor a regional system. A regional transit system seems to be a better option than
DART. I would want Allen to be a member of an organization that can provide quality
service along with prudent fiscal management. I want the citizens to have the final input
on what system we elect to participate.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: The Arts of Collin County will be a key attraction for Collin County and our North Texas
region. Corporations that want to relocate expect to have a variety of options available for
its personel. Affordability housing, large labor force, shopping, quality education and
access to the arts are key factors in their decision.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Yes, we have an excellent staff and are proactive in the service to our citizens. Water
and Sewer funds are sound and our Parks department cannot be beat. Our park system is
one of the best in North Texas.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Council and city staff have cut unnecessary spending and have projected minimal
growth in revenue in order to prepare for the uncertain economic times ahead. Our service
levels have not been diminished and we do not project service cuts in the future. Allen is a
proactive community and we have done a good job to prepare for the economic time
ahead.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: The council cannot lower the tax rate as much as we would like. After 17 years of
lowering the tax rate, the council would like to see a greater reduction than we have had
in the past. I will work for a greater reduction in the next 3 years.

Arlington City Council, Place 6


Description: Note: All Arlington residents may vote in this race.

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Candidates (choose 1):

Lila Friedlander

Biographical Info:
Name: Lila Friedlander
Street Address: 5509 Lansingford Tr.
City/Town: Arlington
State: TX
Date of Birth: 01-03-92
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: None
Home Phone Number: None
Mobile Phone Number: 817-412-1431
Fax Number: None
E-mail Address: lila.marisa@yahoo.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.voteforlila.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: I am a homeschooled student and I will graduate in June 2010. I am a National Merit
Commended Scholar. I am currently taking a dual credit class at Tarrant County College.
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: I have lived in Arlington for 13 years.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: Same as length of residency in Arlington.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Student
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: I currently serve as a volunteer at the Lake Arlington library. I have been doing so for
two years. For the past five years, I have been a member of the Teen Library Council. I
also volunteer at the Arlington animal shelter.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: During 2004, I was involved in Arlington politics by campaigning against use of eminent
domain and a tax increase for the Cowboys Stadium. In 2005, I volunteered at the
Eastern Star Home, which was temporarily reopened to house victims of Hurricane
Katrina. I also have worked with Kittico, a Dallas organization, to have stray cats in my
neighborhood spayed and neutered. I am a certified Red Cross Lifeguard. I worked in that
capacity for the City of Arlington Parks and Recreation department during the summer of
2008. My academic achievements include becoming a National Merit Commended Scholar
and placing third in a Shakespeare monologue competition held at the Lake Arlington
library.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $424.16
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Lila Friedlander, Glenda Friedlander, Alvin Friedlander
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: None
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I have been interested and involved in Arlington politics for as long as I can remember.
So it's only natural that the first thing I wanted to do when I turned 18 was run for city
council. Arlington is a wonderful city, but I want to help make it even better. I'm here to
listen to the citizens of Arlington. And though I might not have all the answers or the most
experience, as a city councilwoman I promise I will learn everything I can about every
issue that comes before the council. I will look at both sides of the issue and strive to do

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what's right. We need people on city council who will listen. There are many good ideas
that need to be heard. I come as a fresh slate and want to hear everyone’s ideas to make
Arlington better.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: The three most important actions I would take if elected actually would not require
spending any extra money. First, I would start by really listening to the people of
Arlington. Their opinion is something the current city council doesn’t seem to value. At
every city council meeting, residents come forward to voice their concerns, but they are
ignored. The current council doesn’t even seem to hear them. I believe our citizens have
valuable ideas that can make Arlington better. Arlington needs to be stricter on the gas
companies with regards to drill sites. I will do what I can to make that happen. We need to
enforce the regulations already in place, and not routinely grant every variance sought by
the gas companies. In the newspaper recently, there was an article about our city council
members taking suite tickets for events at the Dallas Cowboys’ stadium. I want to find a
way to use these suite tickets for the benefit of the city rather than for entertainment of
our council. An idea would be selling them off and letting the city use the funds. These
three actions are very simple, but they would make a big difference for our city.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: The biggest issue in this race is accountability. I have major concerns about the present
council listening and being accountable to citizens. A great example is gas drilling. Citizens
come before the council at every meeting to protest because the gas companies want to
drill in their neighborhoods, at times within 200 feet of people's homes. The city has laws
about that, but the council doesn't listen. They say yes to everything the gas companies
want. I will work to enforce the laws we have and consider creating stricter ones. Recently,
a newspaper reported our City Council representatives have taken suite tickets from the
Dallas Cowboys for events at the new stadium, in some cases worth more than $10,000.
My opponent did not include any of these gifts on his financial disclosure, despite being
required to report all political contributions. This is a perfect example of the lack of
accountability in our government. I will not compromise my ethics by accepting gifts from
those the city is doing business with. As a city council member, I will listen and I will be
accountable.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: I am in favor of creating stricter laws dealing with gas drilling. At the very least, we
need to enforce the laws we do have. The law prohibits drill sites from being located within
600 feet of people’s homes. However, our council approved the Matlock Yu drill site
(SUP09-1) which is within 200 feet of residences. I also believe that we should consider
putting a halt to gas well permits until we have a chance to study the environmental
effects of gas drilling further. Given time and study, we can create regulations to make gas
drilling less harmful.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: The development of the Highlands and the increasing population point to Arlington’s
ability to attract both business and residents. We need to continue to make this one of our
priorities. Revitalizing the downtown area is an ongoing project that should be among the
city council's priorities. Bringing new businesses to a visitor-friendly downtown can only
help economically and enhance the value of Arlington's existing attractions. While the plan
currently in place has yielded some results, the council must make sure the results are
worth the costs.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Our city is becoming more diverse every day. According to DFW International
Community Alliance, almost 30% of Arlington residents do not speak English. We are home
to large Asian and Hispanic communities. We need to reach out to get these people more
involved in our city and its government. One of the many reasons I am running for city
council is to demonstrate that our government is open to all citizens.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: As much as this is a sensitive issue with many people, this is more of a federal issue
than something that can be handled at the city level. Cities that have attempted to put

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restrictions on illegal immigrants, such as Farmers Branch, have had those restrictions
overturned by federal courts.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: As I listen to citizens, the need for public transportation comes up again and again. We
need a workable, efficient, well-researched plan with widespread support before it is put
on the ballot again. Rail is one possible solution, but we need to consider all our options.
And whatever mass transit plans are proposed, they must not overshadow maintenance
and improvements to Arlington's existing streets.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: Transportation issues and major events, such as the Super Bowl and NCA Final Four,
certainly require a large degree of regional cooperation. Other issues , such as animal
control, can also benefit from greater teamwork among the cities of our region. I will work
to keep communication open between our governments to find ways we can help each
other.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Arlington’s services are some of the best in the area. Our parks and recreation and our
libraries, especially, are excellent. But there is always room for improvement. If elected, I
will thoroughly study our budgets to find ways to make our services more efficient.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: While Arlington has held up better than most of the country during the recession, it has
still had some struggles. One of the city’s largest employers, General Motors, experienced
layoffs and a temporary shutdown of its plant. The city government laid off some of its
employees, including the majority of its health inspectors. There is not one solution. All of
the issues are tied together. For example, revitalizing downtown and bringing in more
business can help increase our tax revenue. More efficient operation of city services can
save us money.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: One uncomfortable truth that has not received much attention but we need to confront
is the problem of the stray animals in Arlington. As a volunteer at the animal shelter, I
know many stray animals are euthanized there every day. The shelter is trying to deal
with the hundreds of strays on the streets in the only way they know how. However, this
method is not only inhumane, but it is also not working. For each stray that is euthanized,
many more are born. The best way to reduce the stray animal population would be to
have a free spay/neuter clinic in Arlington. People could trap and bring in strays to have
them spayed or neutered. This would cut down on the animal population by reducing the
number of strays born. This would actually save money, because euthanizing animals is
costly. Other cities, such as Dallas, have programs like this. Arlington needs one, too.

Robert Shepard

Biographical Info:
Name: Robert P. Shepard
Street Address: 503 East Border Street
City/Town: Arlington
State: Texas
Date of Birth: October 7, 1958
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (817) 861-1000
Fax Number: (817) 469-1000
E-mail Address: robert.shepard58@gmail.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: BBA University of Texas at Arlington – 1980, JD St. Mary’s University – 1983

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Q: Length of residency in the city:


A: 27 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Attorney
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Arlington City Council - District 6
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: 1999 Citizens Bond Election Committee, 1999 Central Sector Leadership Committee,
Arlington Public Library Board (1998 – 2001), 2000 Arlington Subdivision Rewrite
Committee, Arlington Planning and Zoning Commission (2001 – 2007)(Chair – 2004 –
2007), 2007 Arlington Impact Fee Stakeholder Group, 2007 City of Arlington Volunteer of
the Year, and AISD Futures 2010 Boundary Committee
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Arlington City Council - District 6
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: None for the current campaign.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: To continue to represent the citizens of Arlington. My legal background and my
experience in running a small business make me the most qualified candidate in this race
and most prepares me to serve in this office.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: I would continue to work to find funding for public safety and grow the tax base in
Arlington through continued economic development efforts.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My past experience in public service and experience as a small business owner.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: Unfortunately, cities are very limited in the role that they can take in regulating oil and
gas drilling, which is preempted by state law. However, at the insistence of the Arlington
City Council, city staff is currently taking steps to revise the current gas well drilling
ordinance to improve the process of gas well drilling in Arlington. I believe that Arlington is
doing, and will do, everything legally permitted by state law to ensure the safety and
protect the interests of its citizens.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: I believe that attracting higher end residential development as well as commercial
development should continue to be a priority for the City of Arlington. Obviously with the
opening of Cowboys Stadium, the development and expansion of The Arlington Highlands
and the recent approval of plans for the Veridian project in North Arlington, I think the city
has done a very good job recently in attracting this type of development to the city.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: I believe that any demographic changes that are occurring in the City of Arlington are
very similar to those changes occurring throughout the North Texas region. I believe that
the City of Arlington should continue to monitor such changes and attempt to be responsive
each of its citizens’ needs.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Illegal immigration is a State and/or Federal issue. As a result of this fact, the City of
Arlington should continue to lobby Austin and Washington, D.C. for real reform and change
with respect to our current immigration laws. The City’s police department should continue

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to utilize all of the tools available to it in checking the residency status of persons when
such action is warranted.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I support rail service for the North Texas region, and hope that Arlington can be a part
of this service.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: I believe that the North Texas region and the City of Arlington have cooperated well on
many issues including the NBA All Star Game recently hosted in Arlington (with many of
the NBA events occurring outside of Arlington) and the 2011 NFL Super Bowl game which
will be hosted in Arlington with many events occurring outside the City of Arlington.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: I don’t believe that as a general rule any government can provide any service as cost
effectively as the private sector. I am constantly reviewing the possibility of privatizing any
function of the City of Arlington that can be accomplished more efficiently and at less cost.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: I believe that the current leadership has done an excellent job in weathering the current
economic storm. The City of Arlington has enjoyed the benefit of Cowboys Stadium, the
Arlington Highlands, and other recent investments in the city to assist in bolstering what
would otherwise be declining sales tax revenue. I think the city must always be on the
lookout for ways to privatize services and functions that can be more efficiently and cost
effectively delivered by the private sector.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Unfortunately, crime remains one of the primary issues of concern facing Arlington as it
continues to grow and develop. Overall Arlington’s violent crime statistics are clearly
moving in the right direction. However, property crime has increased. Arlington should
continue to invest in additional sworn officers. As our tax base continues to grow, our city
must prioritize our public safety staffing to stay current with changing trends in our
community. In the meantime, the city should look at ways to fund over-time pay for our
current officers to ensure that we are doing everything we can to reduce property crimes.

Arlington City Council, Place 7


Description: Note: All Arlington residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Jimmy Bennett

Biographical Info:
Name: Jimmy Bennett
Street Address: 2310 Autumn Oaks Trail
City/Town: Arlington
State: Texas
Date of Birth: 11/17/60
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 817.461.0523
Home Phone Number: 817.640.3336
Fax Number: 817.299.0296
E-mail Address: jbennett@bencpa.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.votejimmybennett.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: University of Texas at Austin, 1984, BBA in Accounting
Q: Length of residency in the city:

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A: Arlington resident since 1988.


Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: Resident of District 7 since 1988.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: CPA-CPA practice.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: City Council Involvement: Committee member of Regional Policy and Municipal
Infrastructure, Fiscal Policy, Community and Neighborhood Development, Arlington
Housing Finance Corporation, Arlington Convention Center Development Corporation
Community Involvement Board member of: Boys and Girls Club of Arlington, Girl Scouts of
Texas-Oklahoma-Plains, Forest Hills Homeowners Association, Arlington Chamber of
Commerce Board of Directors. Member of Lamar Baptist Church, North Arlington Rotary.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Board member of: Arlington Museum of Art, Arlington Zoning Board of Adjustments,
Arlington Human Service Planners, H.O.P.E Tutoring Centers. Graduated from Leadership
Arlington. Past member of Arlington Star-Telegram Editorial Review Committee. Former
member of Arlington Chamber of Commerce Executive Committee, Small Business
Council, and Government Relations Council, A+ Arlington Scholars program with AISD.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Currently serve as City of Arlington Council Member, District 7 At-Large. Elected in
2008.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: Through March 28, 2010, I have raised $5,070.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Maurice Barksdale. John & Kay Di Palma. Peggy & Rick Merritt.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am seeking re-election to the Arlington City Council, District 7, to continue my original
quest of bringing financial expertise and business experience to work for the citizens of
Arlington. They, and I, deserve the best value for taxes we pay. Since moving to Arlington,
I have worked as an advocate for the needs of children, non-profits, schools, and
businesses. I work alongside many who seek to make Arlington a terrific community for
all. As a CPA and business owner, I understand how to make hard choices.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: Redevelopment: the city must encourage new ways for redevelopment through
incentives and providing businesses with relevant information such as customer and retail
potential. Small business: the city must do more to help facilitate business growth and
success. City hall must help our local businesses learn more about opportunities and where
they can be found. Youth/schools: the city must continue to strengthen its partnership with
school districts, working as we already have to find ways to support their programs,
especially for literacy. Budget: the city must continue to look for ways to provide services
at a high value to citizens.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My opponents appear to have very good motive for getting involved in city government.
However I am not aware of their specific qualifications or previous community activity so it
is inappropriate to make a comparison. One is able to examine my public record and will
find that I have been a committed servant to the community for many long years. My
accomplishments also speak to an ability to get things done.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: City Council continues to look at ways in which we can improve safety with gas drilling.
I support exploring continued evaluation of drill sites. I also strongly support penalties
against drillers who do not obey agreements and regulations.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: This is a high priority personally not just because of my background as a businessman
but because of the importance development has on a community's quality of life. Arlington

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has been very successful in this area without question. Continuance of the aggressive
stance should be continued.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: As a growing urban community, Arlington is continuing to emerge as a strong and
diverse city. Another strength of Arlington is its recognition of its own diversity. However,
we must continue to make substantial efforts to be more inclusive of our diversity.
Personally, I am involved in reaching out to small and minority businesses through
community meetings. These meetings are designed to provide not only information about
opportunities for them but also for the city to learn more about needs.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Police and public safety should continue to enforce the laws and ordinances of this city.
As we currently do, when possible violations of federal or state laws are detected, the
appropriate referrels are made. We should continue to do this.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I have not ben presented with a plan for rail service that I can support at this time. I
will be open to discuss anything that is brough forward for consideration.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: Opportunities exist for municipal entities to expand cost savings measures between
them. This would include sharing of expenses where appropriate and the elimination of
redundant services. Arlington is a leader in the Metroplex and its City Council Members are
obligation to be involved throughout the region. This is certainly occuring and I am a
strong participant in this effort.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Arlington delivers its services effeciently but can always improve. When I first began
serving on City Council, I helped lead an effort to increase awareness in looking for
opportunities to outsourcing city services. This has been very successful and continues.
Arlington has the lowest sales tax rate in the region and one of the lowest property tax
rates. Arlington is also not facing the types of budget deficits being seen in most
neighboring metroplex cities. Approval ratings from citizen surveys have also indicated a
high level of satisfaction in this area.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Arlington has been fortunate with its financial situation. Previous leaders have been
very wise in establishing good cash reserves as well as not becoming overly burdened by
unnecessary spending. We have also been in the envious position of not needing to make
material cuts in city services in order to meet budget. Nevertheless, it is incumbant on us
now to be even more deligent in meeting the future needs of the community.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: We lack a succession plan for leadership in our churches, civic groups, as well as city
leaderhsip. Young, creative people must be engaged so that they can take their place as
leaders. We need them now and we will need them later. It is up to the current leadership
to find ways to engage these people. There are also many others who feel disconnected
from the community. They too must be included. The differences that exist are in fact a
potential strength. As a city, we must embrace these differences and use them to help
position us as a preferred destination for families not just now but in the future.

Chris Dobson

Biographical Info:
Name: Chris Dobson
Street Address: 2708 Buffalo Dr.
City/Town: Arlington

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State: Texas
Date of Birth: 10\28\1978
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 8176026061
Mobile Phone Number: 8176026061
E-mail Address: sonodob@hotmail.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: I graduated from Arlington High School in 1997, then attended TCU and graduated with
a bachelors of science in Political Science, with a minor in history, in 2002. I also attended
the Lauterstein-Conway Massage school in Austin and became certified to practice
massage in 2004.
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: My family moved here in 1979.I moved back to Arlington in 2007 after living in Fort
Worth.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: three years
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Massage Therapy
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: none
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: none
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: I have previously gathered ballot petition signatures for the 2008 12th Congressional
district election and the 2009 City Council district 8 election.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: My campaign works outside the taint of money in politics. I have neither sought nor
received any monies for my campaign. I use word of mouth advertising as conversation
with residents is the actual job of a representative in government.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: I've got no strings on me.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: In the year 2000, I received two class C misdemeanors in the State of Kentucky for
possession of Cannabis under two ounces and paraphernalia. It was a chivalrous act, one
I'm glad I made. The police officer was a nice guy doing his job, but it just showed me that
the main purpose of drug laws were to create revenue and an underclass of victimless
criminals.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am running for this office due to the absolute lack of political candidates for City
offices. Last year Gene Patrick ran unopposed, as are Mel Leblanc and Sheri Capehart this
year. In a city of 370,000 residents its unfathomable to me that there exists this dearth of
candidates. The younger generations are missing in our body politic and I aim to represent
them and encourage their inclusion in the politics of the day. I have a three year old son
whose moral capacity seems to be in line with the city councils and I have to constantly
remind him not to take things that don't belong to him and also to listen, share and take
turns. Conversely I have learned to listen to him and to try things different ways, to help
him form associations and help put words and actions to his ideas.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: First I'd like the Luxury boxes the city owns to be available to all city residents in a $10
raffle for a set of two tickets for all events. These boxes belong the to the people who paid
the taxes not to those that levied them. The revenue from this should far exceed any costs
associated. Secondly, I'd like to direct the police chief to make cannabis his lowest police
priority, and to treat simple possession only as a ticket able offense. This action also saves
the city money. Thirdly I'd like to create a Non-profit Bank of the City of Arlington with all
residents of Arlington as shareholders, electing an independent board of trustees. This
bank would operate in the interests of the residents of Arlington, along the lines of the
North Dakota State Bank. 2% mortgages; 5% saving accounts; 6% credit card and vehicle
loans. Again, this proposition I believe to e a revenue maker but the initial costs should not
constitute more then a few million dollars
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the

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best choice?
A: I think the range of my ideas separates me, specifically the the use of the stadiums, but
more broadly the overreach of the city council vis-a-vis the citizens of Arlington. Likewise I
fail to see long term planning in the special use permits for gas well drilling issued in
rejection of the planning and zoning committee's recommendations. I think the lack of
representation can be scene even in the council make up. We should redistrict into single
member districts so that all residents have easy access to the channels and corridors of
representation.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: The city council has failed to listen to the planning and zoning commission and overrode
their recommendations relating to special use permits for gas wells. I believe we need a
moratorium on new wells while we seek independent testing for emissions. Also the recent
earthquake swarms in Burleson in the 2-3 Richter scale range shows that we do not
understand all the effects gas well drilling is having. Further we need to insure that the
groups managing wells have funds for reclamation of the land after the productive life of
the well is done.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Rather then attracting commercial development, we as residents should be more
focused on developing commercial activity amongst ourselves. My proposal for a city bank
provides just such a mechanism for the development of local business and rather then
providing tax breaks for businesses coming to our city, this plan makes more funds
available and preferable interest rates for residents.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Our city is making use of Eminent Domain at an alarming rate removing people from
their land by force. While these people are statistics demographically the city needs to stop
taking residents land for private development. With the influx of residents in SE Arlington
we must redistrict the city into single member districts to insure equal representation.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: The concept of an illegal human is a pretty ridiculous, if we catch them we should fine
them with citizenship, taxation, and representation.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I don't necessarily agree with seamless regional transit, but Arlington should and could
develop a mass transit system. Though a number of votes have been taken the turnout
has yet to constitute a majority of voters, so in light of conversation with residents on the
campaign trail, witch overwhelmingly changed along class lines, I believe we should
develop multiple modes of transportation.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: The levels of pollution from corporations in the region including the cement kilns and
gas wells need to be addressed for all regional residents. Further more regionally it would
be advantageous to create gray water systems to reduce demand on drinking water and
overall water consumption. The partnership aspects come about by people realizing the
mutually beneficial aspects of engaging others around us in conversation. So I'll be
listinening
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: The city council needs to realize the potential revenues from what it considers the perks
of the job. The Luxury boxes at the professional sports stadiums which the residents of
Arlington along with other metroplex residents, to a lesser degree, paid the sales tax and
hotel tax deserve access to the facility. With 81 Rangers home games and 20-30 events at
the Cowboys stadium the city could gain $30 million from people paying into a raffle for
tickets. That new revenue could help to pay off old debt increasing the amount of principal
we pay each year. If we can improve services without increasing taxes then we have
achieved far more cost-effectiveness. It might even provide the funding to provide tickets
in other sections of the game depending on the will of the people to reclaim their
government.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do

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you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: The current leadership has failed to trim the fat from the perks of the job and instead
has sought to reduce services and trim departmental budgets. While the ratio of cost to
increased revenue of Cowboys stadium has not yet been determined we must take steps
so that the city does not become strangled by the debt taken on and can improve the
services provided to residents.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: We must confront the fact the majority of Arlington is composed of Idiots, deriving from
the Greek 'idiotes' - one who declines to take part in self government. We need to reach all
ages of residents and communicate the importance of not just voting but taking part in the
control of our city. Please consider running for city council: it either costs $100 dollars or
approximately 55 validated signatures from Arlington residents. You can be a city council
member. Its worthwhile furthermore there are a number of committees you can serve on,
I haven't done it but I hear its nice even if the city council overrides your recommendation.

Cedar Hill City Council, Place 3


Description: Note: All Cedar Hill residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Michael Quildon

Biographical Info:
Name: Michael Quildon
Street Address: 1516 Bosher Dr
City/Town: Cedar Hill
State: TX
Date of Birth: August 14, 1972
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-924-5019
Mobile Phone Number: 214-924-5019
E-mail Address: michaelquildon@yahoo.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: BS in Mathematics from Morehouse College
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 7 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Software Engineer
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Cedar Hill Independent School District, School Board Trustee High Pointe Public
Improvement District, Director, Former President
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Cedar Hill Independent School District, School Board Trustee
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $1000 as of April 3, 2010.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: MetroTex Association of Realtors
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: I have never been arrested nor involved in a criminal suit. I have had to engage an
attorney to settle a card credit debt dispute.

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Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am committed to making Cedar Hill a better place. When I first moved to the city, I
had no interest in community involvement. But, Cedar Hill is a special place where citizens
get involved. I have learned to give back, through my time on neighborhood
organizations, the Cedar Hill ISD School Board and now I want to continue that with the
City Council.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: Stronger Neighborhoods - Cedar Hill is blessed to have countless citizens prepared to
make their city a better place. Many of our citizens regularly meet with little fanfare, but
there are some neighborhoods that lack the experience and the leaders to get orgnazized.
I would push to make sure our Police and Community Together organization and
Neighborhood Services department target those areas. Partnering - Cedar Hill has
successfully partnered with neighboring cities and with our own ISD to complete projects.
For example, our Government Center, which houses both City government and ISD offices,
is one of a kind in the state of Texas. Building this new facility jointly, saved the citizens of
Cedar Hill millions of dollars. In these lean economic times, we need to continue looking at
ways to form positive partnerships with the ISD to save more and be more efficient. As
our population increases, I plan to have both entities sit down to look for ways we can
work together to save money, as we need additional park, library, housing and food
services for the needy. Information - We have a great, updated website and the city sends
information in the water bill and other formats. Yet, many people continue to be unaware
of what is going on in our city's government. I plan to spread the word by attending HOA,
crime watch, and similar events. These actions will benefit the city greatly and are geared
towards saving, not spending the taxpayer's money.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My involvment with the ISD is a clear benefit to the city. Our city's future is tied to the
quality of education. Plus, its reputation and its opportunities to involve the community our
keys to becoming a premier city. I think that is the key difference that makes me a great
choice for the council. Getting the Council, ISD and community working together is one of
my key areas of focus.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: The city established a gas well steering committee in 2009. The purpose of the
committee is to update gas drilling ordinances. The committee has made important
recommendations to the city council, including requiring a conditional use permit, fair and
equitable application fees and setbacks from sensitive areas. The council should continue
providing key support to the committee.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: The city has done wonders in this area. Our new mall, Uptown Village, is doing quite
well. Downtown Cedar Hill has been revitalized with a new restaurant. Our Economic
Development Corporation has done an excellent job attracting quality stores and
restaurants to our area. However, some businesses have chosen to leave their current
location to relocate in Uptown Village. I would work with the EDC to understand what is
being done to attract businesses to the strip malls with higher vacancy rates. I would lend
any support I could in this area to encourage movement into those facilities.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Cedar Hill remains one of the fastest growing cities in North Texas. What most people
do not realize is that our growth has been so racially and economically diverse. We have
seen our numbers swell for middle income and high income residents. Our numbers have
also increased significantly for those with lower incomes. We have witnessed additional
need for services at our Food Pantry and our school district has started a summer feeding
program and breakfast program during the school year. I think Cedar Hill needs to be
pro-active in addressing these needs and the needs for free and safe parks and other
recreational facilities.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?

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A: I do not believe the city of Cedar Hill or our police department need special instructions
to handle illegal immigration. There laws existly already and should be enforced.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I absolutely favor the idea. I do question whether it is doable at this time. Our cities are
in different stages. Most would struggle to provide the finances or the personnel to make
this happen. But, I think we must. A regional commission focused on regional transit, with
representatives from all sectors of North Texas, needs to get moving so we can proactively
address our long term transit hopes, before it is too late.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: Along with regional rail, our city would be well served to partner with the neighboring
cities of the Best Southwest for any areas to share service. We have successfully partnered
with our neighbors to build a new fire station, animal shelter and police dispatch services.
We should look for other opportunities, such as recreational services and the future of
Southwest Center Mall.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: The city has done a great job of doing more with less, in these difficult economic times.
Despite making budget cuts, our key public services have not experienced a drop in
service. In fact, our police and fire department response times have improved. I think the
city has slowly, but surely, started using technology more effectively. Through our new
website and use of social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, we have many more
options to pay bills, register for events, and learn about the city. Special thanks to the
council and the city's IT and public relations departments.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Current officials have done a great job. Like most Americans, we have been forced to
do more with less. The mayor promised years ago to not raise taxes unless absolutely
necessary and he has kept his promise. With that in mind, and with potential budget cuts
looming, we will continue to expect city administration to find areas to cut costs. This well
include delaying the creation of new positions, not backfilling jobs after someone retires or
leaves the city and taking money from the reserve fund, when necessary.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Our city is only as good as our school district. More specifically, we are only as good as
the reputation of our school district. I think all city leaders have an obligation to get
involved in the schools to improve quality, expectations and reputation.

Wallace Swayze
Biographical Info:

Questions:
Q: Education
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: - no response -
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most

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qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: - no response -
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: - no response -
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: - no response -
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: - no response -
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: - no response -
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: - no response -
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: - no response -
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: - no response -

Cedar Hill ISD, Place 2


Description: Note: All residents living within Cedar Hill ISD may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

James Charles

Biographical Info:

Questions:
Q: Education
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in district:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: - no response -
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?

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A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you attended any school board meetings? If so, what have you learned from
them?
A: - no response -
Q: What is the role of a school board member? How should a board member initiate
policies?
A: - no response -
Q: What schools in your community have done the best in getting every child up to grade
level in reading and math? What can the district learn from them?
A: - no response -
Q: Many Texas districts are confronted with the challenge of closing an achievement gap
between Latino students and Anglo students. What ideas do you have for closing this gap?
A: - no response -
Q: Is the district doing enough to lower the number of dropouts? What would you do to
address the dropout problem?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the ingredients that make for a successful high school and middle school?
A: - no response -
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about local public schools that voters and taxpayers
must confront?
A: - no response -
Q: Is technology being used effectively in classrooms? Give us examples. Also, should the
future emphasis be on laptops or textbooks?
A: - no response -
Q: How would you get more parents involved in schools?
A: - no response -
Q: Should teacher pay and student performance be linked? If so, how?
A: - no response -

Douglas Heyerdahl
Biographical Info:
Name: Douglas Heyerdahl
Street Address: 808 Hidden Creek Court
City/Town: Cedar Hill
State: TX
Date of Birth: January 11, 1958
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-741-3905
Home Phone Number: 972-291-9310
Mobile Phone Number: 214-676-0940
Fax Number: 214-741-4315
E-mail Address: daheyerdahl@aol.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.DougHeyerdahl.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: MBA in Finance - The University of Texas at Austin (1985) BS in Accounting - Indiana
University (1980) Former Certified Public Accountant
Q: Length of residency in district:
A: 21 Years
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Chief Financial Officer of Blanks Printing & Imaging, Inc., the seventh largest printing
company in the DFW marketplace

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Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:


A: Cedar Hill Chamber of Commerce Texas Scholars Program, in conjunction with the
Education Foundation and the Chamber of Commerce Board of Director and Treasurer -
Printing Industries of MidAmerica
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Church Leader - Hope Lutheran Church, located on Old Straus Road in Cedar Hill.
Church leadership roles included four separate terms as President of the Church Council,
and chairperson of the Pastoral Call Committee Participant in various community activities
and events, such as Cedar Hill Food Pantry, Head for the Hill Bike Rally, National Day of
Prayer, Cedar Hill Katrina Relief efforts, etc.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $1,070
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Doug & Jill Heyerdahl, Lisa & Bobby Lee
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: Criminal Proceedings - None Civil Proceedings - 8 years ago, a Human Resources
related lawsuit against my Company. The case was "dismissed" at Summary Judgement by
the Judge, and therefore never went to trial.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: My family has been blessed by this school district. My wife, Jill, and I have two
daughters who have progressed through the district from Bray Elementary, Lake Ridge
Elementary, West Intermediate, Permenter Junior High, the Ninth Grade Center, and
Cedar Hill High School. Now I want to work strategically and collaboratively as a school
board member to build on the progress of the past three years. I want to encourage active
parent involvement as we help each child dream of their future and the possibilities
brought about by a creative, rigorous and diverse education. I believe my personal
experiences in the district, my education, and my work experience, prepare me to serve in
this office.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1. Focus on the empowerment of effective principals on their respective campuses 2.
Support the rollout of new, updated and proven curriculums with the need to address not
only new state testing standards, but also the development of college and/or career ready
students 3. Evaluate recommendations from the community Strategic Planning Process
Action Teams, and encourage implementation and funding strategies for selected
programs Each of the above actions should be funded from the General Fund
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My personality reflects an individual that works effectively in a collaborative and
deliberative manner, which is what a school board needs. My corporate experience,
including both strategic and financial analysis, is also a comparative strength. I also benefit
from being a son of a Superintendent. My father, now retired,enjoyed a 32 year career as
a public school Superintendent, including service in five school districts.
Q: Have you attended any school board meetings? If so, what have you learned from
them?
A: I have attended several school board meetings and recently a budget workshop
directed by the Superintendent. I understand the relationships between the School Board,
the Superintendent and the school administrators. I have witnessed the process of setting
policies, investigating strategies, and analyzing results, as presented by the
Administration. It is also important for the school board to clearly communicate with the
interested public attending the meetings, by setting expectations, recognizing
achievements, and building confidence in the strategic direction of the District. The budget
workshop increased my understanding of the budget process and specific issues that are
facing the District for 2010-2011.
Q: What is the role of a school board member? How should a board member initiate
policies?
A: The role of a school board member is one of working strategically and collaboratively
with the other members of the Board to direct and assist the Superintendent in establishing
district goals, strategies and policies. The School Board must also creatively allocate
resources through the budget process, to achieve the goals of the District. In terms of

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initiating a new policy, a board member should build support for the policy with the other
board members and the Superintendent. This process should consider best practices for
this type of policy, legal considerations, impact on the students, parents, teachers and the
community. School Board members should also be active in the community, building trust
relationships with city leaders, business leaders, church leaders, neighborhood association
leaders, and of course, parents.
Q: What schools in your community have done the best in getting every child up to grade
level in reading and math? What can the district learn from them?
A: All of the schools are doing a good job with one or another aspect of these difficult areas
of learning. For example: Plummer Elementary is effective with a three tier reading
evaluation program. This program determines how many hours per day each child is
focused on reading development activities. Plummer teachers also utilize a proactive
writing program, starting in the first grade. Bray Elementary is very effective with a
proactive after school program for tutoring and interactive student activities, such as the
Robotics Club. Speaking of Robotics Clubs, these clubs have become very popular with the
kids, and have been started on several campuses, from Elementary to the High School.
These clubs emphasize application of math and analysis skills in a creative environment.
Q: Many Texas districts are confronted with the challenge of closing an achievement gap
between Latino students and Anglo students. What ideas do you have for closing this gap?
A: This is a growing demographic in this District. Emphasis should be placed on:
Increasing the number of teachers with ESL (English as a Second Language) certification
Developing magnet classes and/or schools at each grade level that include a strong ESL
emphasis, but still integrated with the rest of the children Improving parental online
access to ESL curriculum resources Encourage and incentivize parents of ESL students to
participate in after school tutoring and events, and the PTA
Q: Is the district doing enough to lower the number of dropouts? What would you do to
address the dropout problem?
A: The dropout rate is way too great, especially in certain demographics. More flexible
programs and opportunities need to be developed to keep "potential" student dropouts
from making that poor choice. An alternative classroom experience, perhaps with different
teaching curriculum, flexible hours or varying schedules, may allow a potential dropout to
also hold a daytime job, or at least keep them engaged in their need to complete a high
school education. In addition, the District needs to improve tracking and locating each
dropout student, and determine why they have left, and what opportunities there are to
re-engage both the student and their parents.
Q: What are the ingredients that make for a successful high school and middle school?
A: 1. An empowered principal and staff, who are truly engaged with the student body in a
positive context 2. Teachers that are certified in their subject and are motivated to teach
in a positive atmosphere 3. Development of a curriculum that is creative, rigorous, but
focused on career and college readiness 4. Investment in technologies that better engage
the student in a creative environment 5. Respect for diversity in the student body and the
teaching staff 6. Development of strong extra-curricular programs in a wide range of
sports, music and the fine arts 7. Maintenance of a safe and supporting learning
environment
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about local public schools that voters and taxpayers
must confront?
A: Schools need consistent growth in resources. Everyone wants better teachers, better
technology, better classroom facilities, better fine arts, better sports facilities and better
opportunities for students to succeed. After the collective role of parents,the community,
as respresented by the voters, determines the quality of the schools. Each school board
member must play a critical role in building support in the community for the school
district. Given the impact of lower property values in the community and state budget
deficits, this will be a major issue for years to come.
Q: Is technology being used effectively in classrooms? Give us examples. Also, should the
future emphasis be on laptops or textbooks?
A: Technology investment in the District is under-funded. As a result, implementation of
newer technologies and applications, such as computer integrated "smart boards" is
slowed. The District has surveyed student households, and determined that 93% of
students have access to the internet at home. As a result, the District is increasingly
providing online access to textbooks, teacher assignments, online tests, and other
educational resources. The future emphasis may lean toward laptops, with the
tremendous access of information world-wide, but the technology infrastructure costs,
potential student distractions, and other unintented consequences need to be carefully
analyzed.
Q: How would you get more parents involved in schools?

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A: The District should improve incentives for parents to track their student's progress,
monitor assignments and tests, on a weekly basis via the CHISD online web portal "Family
Access." I really think more parents will engage with their son or daughter's progress if
they spend ten minutes a week online, keeping up-to-date. Hopefully, this activity will
generate more interest in discussions with teachers, proactively impacting the student. The
District has determined that 93% of students have internet access at home, so the parents
have "Family Access."
Q: Should teacher pay and student performance be linked? If so, how?
A: Teachers should be recognized and rewarded through the student achievement of
Campus Plan grade specific and class specific goals. These goals should include both
quantitative and qualitative measures that encourage the teacher in a positive
environment to bring the best effort from each child. Adjustments must take into account
the mix of student demographics and the impact of new students entering the District. This
is a complicated issue, full of unintended, and sometimes under-funded consequences.

DeSoto Mayor
Description: Note: All DeSoto residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Carl O. Sherman

Biographical Info:

Questions:
Q: Education
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: - no response -
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: - no response -
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: - no response -
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: - no response -
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal

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immigration?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: - no response -
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: - no response -
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: - no response -
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: - no response -

Carl L. Williams
Biographical Info:

Questions:
Q: Education
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: - no response -
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: - no response -
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: - no response -
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: - no response -
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: - no response -

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Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: - no response -
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: - no response -
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: - no response -
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: - no response -

DeSoto City Council, Place 3


Description: Note: All DeSoto residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Paul F. Benson

Biographical Info:
Name: Paul F.Benson
Street Address: 741 Regalwood Dr,
City/Town: Desoto75115
State: Texas
Date of Birth: 10\27\1955
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-274-1973
Home Phone Number: 972-274-1973
Mobile Phone Number: 214-676-0672
Fax Number: 972-274-1973
E-mail Address: mailstar@sbcgloble.net
Campaign Web Site Address: n\a
Questions:
Q: Education
A: HighSchool-Westwood-MPH-TN\Memphis Area Vocational school\C.H.Mason Bible
College[Tx-El-Centro\mountainview college-Dallas Baptist Unversity
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: twenty-one years-n-eleven months
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: twenty-one years-n-eleven months
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: substitue teacher\handy-man services
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: cop police department
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: same as above
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: city council place-3 candidatenot
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: nothing to report at this time
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: nothing to report at this time
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: no
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: To help be that all american city.I've work in service and understand their are some
things that need be address.I have been on a negotiation committee.

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Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: Why the rules are not enfource?excessive parking on the wrong side street.endecent
[sagging pants],loud music,get rid of student guest option,push and promot safty for
schools/community
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I am not just to be title holder.Commmincate with business in our area,HOA,etc.etc.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: I'm for bringing a commercial and maybe a type of intertainmet park
development.Questionable
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: n/a,questionable.I would research
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Those person are to be turn over to the immigration office.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: oppose
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: Encourage the Desoto area to be headquarters in the southern reigion
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: yes at this time
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: They have done ok.Need to to investigate all areas
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Wasted money on bying Nance Farm.Were is the tax benifit

Denise Valentine
Biographical Info:
Name: Denise Valentine
Street Address: 880 Windy Meadow Dr
City/Town: DeSoto
State: Texas
Date of Birth: October 5, 1955
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-230-3366
Home Phone Number: 972-230-7051
Mobile Phone Number: 972-979-3595
Fax Number: 972-230-8028
E-mail Address: dvalentine@ci.desoto.tx.us
Questions:
Q: Education
A: After completing some college hours, I began my career at the telephone company. I
retired after 27 years from Southwestern Bell, AT&T, & Lucent Technologies.
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: I have lived in DeSoto 16 years.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: I have lived in the Wildwood subdivision all of those 16 years.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: I own and operate Niecy's Naturals in addition to my retirement income from Lucent
Technologies.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Currently City Councilmember Place 3, member of Resource Conservation Council
(North Texas Council of Governments), DeSoto Chamber of Commerce, Dallas Black
Chamber of Commerce, Wildwood Homeowners Association, AIDS Arms Board Emeritus

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Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:


A: 2006 DeSoto Bobby Waddle Citizen of the Year, DeSoto Chamber Board of Directors,
DeSoto Dining and Dialogue - President, DeSoto Planning and Zoning Commissioner,
Member of DeSoto All America City Award Team, United Way Blueprint Advisory Board,
Mental Health Association Board, Leadership Southwest Graduate
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Incumbent DeSoto City Councilmember Place 3
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I have business experience from my 27 year career in leadership positions in corporate
America. I have shown my dedication to my community by my activities in different
capacities in a variety of civic organizations. I have demonstrated passion, service, and
commitment through the accomplishments resulting from my involvement in these
community organizations.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: My first is to promote DeSoto as a destination for arts and family entertainment. I
would expand my present efforts and push for higher quality, more variety, and larger
venues. Secondly, I want to increase the vitality and viability of our businesses. We need
to increase the number of jobs available in our industrial park through the attraction and
expansion of commercial businesses. Third, I will preserve the high quality of standards in
our neighborhoods. We need to tighten the linkage between our neighborhoods, the police
and our churches. I want to strengthen the program Uniting Clergy and Police.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I have been actively involved in boards, commissions, and civic organizations and linked
to individuals within the DeSoto city government for more than 7 or 8 years. I have
consistently demonstrated my leadership by leading DeSoto Dining and Dialogue for 3
years, chairing the Government Committee for the DeSoto Chamber of Commerce for 2
years, and serving on City Council for 3 years. I have proven my commitment to the
citizens of DeSoto by dedicating time to attending town hall meetings, homeowner
association meetings, and meetings to resolve citizen's issues. I attend meetings with city
staff and consultants to stay abreast of opportunities and concerns involving DeSoto ISD
and Economic Development.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: It is critical to our success that we attract development to our city. This will bring
employment while increasing the ratio of business property tax over residential property
tax. Our city could always do more to attract commercial business. We are not willing,
however, to sacrifice quality of life or environmental boundaries such as noise, pollution, or
aesthetics for financial gain.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: DeSoto's racial mix has changed over my 16 years. The diversification has been
addressed through the DeSoto Dining and Dialogue program. These events, hosted several
times throughout the year, offer neighbors a chance to exchange opinions and stories on
their backgrounds over dinner. The program has forged riendships and encouraged citizen
involvement in our city government. The city government has been a strong supporter of
this organization and the program was a cornerstone reason for Desoto's winning of the
2006 All America City Award. I would advocate more citizen involvement in activities that
encourage neighbors to interact with neighbors such as National Night Out, in which I
participate yearly.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Although illegal immigration has an impact on local resources, I think it is a federal

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government issue and should be dealt with on a federal level.


Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I support a transit study for our city. I want specific information to see if we could
support a connection to the transit system, such as a park and ride, if it does not require a
sales tax commitment. I am interested in the "lease for service" agreement that has
recently been discussed. I would like specific data on a system for an "on demand" transit
system for our seniors and and disabled persons in DeSoto or our Best Southwest Region. I
do not support major or mass transit bus service on residential streets in DeSoto.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: Environmental planning issues such as water conservation, recycling, hazardous waste
disposal, and mulching would be tackled more economically if we plan as a region.The Best
Southwest Region already has such a network organization in place and we in DeSoto are
represented. The North Texas Council of Governments is also a collaberating body and I
am a member of one of its' committees.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Our city delivers its services in a cost effective manner. More fuel efficient and green
practices need to be employed and incorporated.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Operating expenses have been held flat over the past 3 years by cutting expenses
wherever possible without cutting essential services and keeping abreast of essential
maintenance. In the future, a tax increase may be necessary to maintain the level of
essential service we need to remain safe and economically viable.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: The economic climate is not conducive to bringing in large new retail businesses.
Enticing commercial business into the industrial park is more economically viable and a
better long term option for our city.

DeSoto City Council, Place 6


Description: Note: All DeSoto residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

James E. Collier Jr.

Biographical Info:
Name: James E. Collier Jr.
City/Town: DeSoto
State: Texas
Date of Birth: 7/23/1946
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-207-2175
Mobile Phone Number: 972-207-2175
E-mail Address: carojam@sbcglobal.net
Campaign Web Site Address: www.jamescolliersupporters.ning.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Masters of Science Degree - Corrections and Criminal Justice, Chicago State University
1993
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 4 1/2 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: same as above

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Q: Occupation/main source of income:


A: Retired - Chicago Police Department
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Vice Chairman DeSoto Civil Service Commission, Vice President Westmoreland Home
Owners Association, National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executive, Precinct
Chair 3604
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: President - Northwest Austin Council, Men of Austin, Parliamentarian - Westside Police
Association,
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Candidate for Chicago Alderman
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: Unavailable
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Unavailable
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: I have never been arrested. As Chief of Police I was involved in law suits filed by two
former police officers that I recommened for terminated. Both termination were upheld on
appeal to circuit court.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am seeking election to this office to make a difference. I believe this is a critical stage
in the future development of our great city. I will take a fresh new, aggressive, and
visionary approach toward the changing demographics and demand of our population. My
educational, professional and lifetime experiences are the key differences between me and
my opponents. I have over thirty eight years of proven leadership in the field of criminal
justice and community policing. I served as Police Chief, Maywood, IL where I
implemented the Maywood Alternative Policing Strategy to bridge the massive gap that
existed between the community, city government and the police department. Other
leadership positions included: Watch Commander/Captain of Police Chicago Police
department; President Northwest Austin Council(64 square block organization);
Entrepreneur/business owner - Part owner, Dixie Kitchen Restaurant, Lansing IL. As a
experienced leader I posess the
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: The three most important actions I would take if elected are: (1) work tirelessly with
the council to lower the city crime rate, (2) encourage the council to pursue a more
aggressive economic development and (3) work towards a more sustainable community
development and growth. All three actions would require that the city council seek,
engage, and attract commercial or industrial business to DeSoto, in order to help lower the
tax burden on our residents and the community. I believe a positive outcome could be
achieved through community outreach forums or focus groups, town hall meetings and
printed/electronic media. Lowering the crime rate could consist of developing programs
that made the community more aware of their neighborhood surroundings. Aggressive
economic development and community sustainability development would involve utilizing
the incentives that are currently available to city government. Sustainability can be
achieved by taking a more global, future oriented approach to community growth and
development..
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My educational, professional and lifetime experiences are the key differences between
me and my opponents. I have over thirty eight years in the field of criminal justice and
community policing: Police Chief, Maywood, IL , where I implemented the Maywood
Alternative Policing Strategy to bridge the massive gap that existed between the
community, city services and the police department; Watch Commander/Captain of Police,
Chicago Police department; President Northwest Austin Council (64 square block
organization); Entrepreneur/business owner - Part owner, Dixie Kitchen Restaurant,
Lansing IL. In my previous and current community based experiences, I have fully
demonstrated successful managerial and leadership skills, and possess the ability to
recognize a need for change when change is needed.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?

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A: Attracting residential and commercial development ranks very high on my list of


priorities. To date, the city of DeSoto has made a commendable effort to attract residential
and/or commercial development. We must however, continue to challenge ourselves in
seeking new areas of interest that will help move our city towards its sustainability goals.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: The city of DeSoto has experienced a demographic shift to a population that is
comprised of a majority of the residents being minority. In 2006 DeSoto was named an "All
american City". The city has wonderful citizen based programs which includes "DeSoto
Dining & Dialogue" and "Citizen Police Academy" to namw two, that were developed to
involve members of the community. However, there are some residents in the community
who do not feel a connection with the city. I have spent my life engaged and involved with
the community. I will develop and implement result drived programs to improve
community participation. Sometimes you have to take the programs to the people.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: The city and police department should enforce the current laws that address illegal
immigration.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Yes, I support a collaborative effort between cities and municipalities to explore ways to
develop a regional transit system. If after extensive input from the residents of DeSoto
and the surrounding communities (town hall or focus group meetings), such a transit
system is found to be needed, I would request that DeSoto residents be given the
opportunity to vote on any proposals that will impact their quality of life. I am currently
opposed to any tax on DeSoto residents to fund this transit system
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: The city of DeSoto must think beyond our borders. We must engage in meaningful
diologue with other north texas cities to plan for regional transportation, regional housing,
as well as regional entertainment venues.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: From what I am able to discern, the city has done a good job of providing services in a
cost effective way. City staff must however remain vigilant in order to insure the city is
providing services in a cost effective manner. I would suggest that city council continue to
examine its vehicle fleet and pursue a more aggressive Green initiative with an eye
towards the future growth and development of our city.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: The city management has been forward looking in the budget process, building reserves
that are now being utilized to offset certain unanticipated or unfunded expenditures. I’m
confident city management has explored many avenues of reducing expenditures or
reallocating monies to balance the budget. I will ask city to double its efforts to continually
look for ways to provide needed services in light of any reduced revenue.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Approximately seventy percent of the makeup of DeSoto is residential housing Taxes
may have to be raised if we do not continue to increae our industrial tax base and retail
sales tax through desirable, community accepted developments.

James Zander

Biographical Info:
Name: James Zander

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Street Address: 925 West Pleasant Run Road


City/Town: DeSoto
State: TX
Date of Birth: April 23, 1952
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-269-3030
Home Phone Number: 972-223-0602
Mobile Phone Number: 972-740-2436
Fax Number: 214-269-3040
E-mail Address: jzander@jzainsurance.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.zanderfordesoto.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Ohio University, M.A. University of New Haven, B.A., Distinguished Alumni Award 2006
American College, CLU
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 20 Years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 20 Years
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Insurance Broker
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: DeSoto Enonoimc Development Corporation, Chair Audit Committee DeSoto Dining
and Dialogue, Chair Host Committee DeSoto Chamber of Commerce
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: DeSoto ISD Education Foundation DeSoto City Charter Review Committee Chair of
DeSoto Beer and Wind Campaign
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $8,350
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Robert and Belinda May Ruffis Johnson James Zander
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I truly care about DeSoto, I have spoken often at DeSoto City Council meetings and at
Planning and Zoning Meeting for DeSoto Citizens. Desides being an Entrepreneur for 27
years, I have served on DeSoto Boards, Commissions and Committees that deal with
issues specific to DeSoto and its citizens. I bring a experienced background in both private
and public service.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1. Enonomic devleopment: As a Council member I will continue the work I have done
on DEDC which included expanding industrial infrustructure, provide creative economic
incentives and promote the location and quality of life of DeSoto. 2. Safety: Safety starts
with communication between citizens and law enforcement and continues with code
enforcement. 3. Jobs: Help DeSoto Citizens secure quality jobs with a partnership with
local employers, churchs, city of Desoto, State of Texas, DeSoto School District and
colleges.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I have lived in DeSoto longer then my three opponets combined. I have served on on
Boards, Commissions and Committees for DeSoto longer then my three opponets
combined. I have a long successful history of private and public service to Desoto Citizens,
and will use this experience to make life of DeSoto Citizens better.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Attracting Commercial Development has been my mission for years as a Board Member
of the DeSoto Economic Development Corporation, as a member of the DeSoto Chamber
of Commerce and as Chair of the DeSoto Beer and Wine Committe. Given the current

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Economic invironment, the City and DEDC had done a good job of attracting commercial
development. Much more is needed as the enviorment continues to change.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: As a Founding Director of DeSoto Dining and Dialoque, my wife Linda and I have open
our home and assited in providing an open forum 12 times in the past five years to a large
number of DeSoto citizens. These diners gave the Citizens an opportuntiy to voice their
concerns and hopes regarding the City of DeSoto amd its public school system.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: The City is limited in legal authority and resources to enforce immigration law. The
primary responsibility of enforcement is Federal an State authority.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: We must move toward establishing a greater regional public transportation presence to
meet the future needs of an expanding population. Meeting this future need through
highway system expansion alone is neither practical nor financially viable. Some form of
tax will be required to fund transportation and I support the local option tax for that
purpose.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: Over the next 10 years the City of DeSoto will move toward a more mixed use
development particularly in areas of the city in need of redevelopment. There will be
increased demand for housing for senior living, pedestrian access, public tranporation and
"green" energy effieiant construction. These changes enable by zoning changes, catalyist
projects, public/private cooperation projects, and capital improvment projects. Regional
cooperation will become incresingly important.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: DeSoto is a well run city and effectively delivers services to its citizens.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: The City Manager and his capable staff have done an outstanding job of managing the
revenues and expenses of DeSoto, with the guidng input from the Mayor and City Council.
DeSoto has had the same total budget for the past three year and actually had a tax rate
reduction, with no loss of services.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: 1. Upper income flight, i.e. the exodus of high net worth citizens, 2. Continuing decline
of residential property values 3. Lack of employment opportunities outside of the
Government and School system

DeSoto City Council, Place 7


Description: Note: All DeSoto residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Jerry A. Edgin

Biographical Info:
Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/v/none&hl=en

Questions:
Q: Education
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: - no response -
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: - no response -

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Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:


A: - no response -
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: - no response -
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: - no response -
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: - no response -
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: - no response -
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: - no response -
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: - no response -
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: - no response -

John Gault
Biographical Info:

Questions:
Q: Education
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: - no response -
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: - no response -

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Q: Previous public offices sought/held:


A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: - no response -
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: - no response -
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: - no response -
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: - no response -
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: - no response -
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: - no response -
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: - no response -

Duncanville City Council, Place 4


Description: Note: Only Duncanville residents living in Place 4 may vote in this race.
Click here to find your district.

Candidates (choose 1):

Charles A. Card
Biographical Info:

Questions:
Q: Education
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:

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A: - no response -
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: - no response -
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: - no response -
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: - no response -
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: - no response -
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: - no response -
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: - no response -
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: - no response -

Grady W. Smithey Jr.


Biographical Info:
Name: Grady W. Smithey, Jr.
Street Address: 1806 Cedar Hill Road
City/Town: Duncanville
State: Texas
Date of Birth: August 28, 1942
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-298-2775
Home Phone Number: 972-298-2775
Mobile Phone Number: 972-345-2909
Fax Number: n/a
E-mail Address: grady-judy@sbcglobal.net

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Campaign Web Site Address: Don't have one


Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/v/None&hl=en

Questions:
Q: Education
A: Duncanville High School 1960 BA North Texas State University 1964 MPA North Texas
State University 1975
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 60 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 32 years
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Retired from US Department of Agriculture with 33 years of service. Duncanville Council
Seats are uncompensated and nonpartisan.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: I am in my 20th year on the Duncanville City Council and my 20th year as Secretary of
the Dallas Regional Mobility Coalition. I am the sole remaining founding member of the
DRMC.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Coached Little League football-4 years Coached Little League Girls Softball-5 years
Established the Duncanville Tennis Association-1973 Duncanville Park and Recreation Board
6 years-3 as Chairman Duncanville Rotary Club-17 years First President of the Duncanville
Community and Economic Development Corporation Represented the Best Southwest
Cities(Duncanville, DeSoto, Lancaster and Cedar Hill) on the Regional Transportation
Council-13 years Member of The First Baptist Church of Duncanville since 1952
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Duncanville City Council place 4-Served 10 terms(20 years) Mayor-Lost race to banker
who had loaned everybody in town money-including me.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: None so far.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: None so far.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: Twenty years of experience in this office with a proven record of making sound decisions
for the city. The year I spent working on Capitol Hill as an American Political Science
Association Fellow in Congressional Operations gave me invaluable insight into the political
decision making process. Extensive experience in transportation policy groups and two
gubernatorial appointments to State wide transportation policy study groups are of benefit
to my service to Duncanville. Also of benefit are the many close personal working
relationships I have developed with local, state and national officials in the last 26 years.
Finally, my long history of living in Duncanville helps me explain many existing situations
to council members who weren't here when crucial decisions were made that caused those
situations to exist.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: As a first tier suburb Duncanville is greatly affected by decisions made in Dallas. I work
very hard to maintain good working relationships with Dallas City Council members and
have lobbied successfully for several transportation projects in Dallas affecting Duncanville
commuters. I will continue to lobby for extension of mass transit to Duncanville and
propose financing methodologies acceptable to Duncanville voters. Protection of the
integrity of our neighborhoods and the value of our homes is extremely important to my
constituents. Our codes will be strictly enforced.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: Education, Experience, Long Time Community Involvement, Influence with Key Decision
Makers and a Track Record of Sound Decisions are the main differences between me and
my opponent who has never been active in local politics.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?

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A: We have a limited amount of undeveloped land in Duncanville for new development. We


are concentrating on retail businesses which generate sales tax revenues as well as ad
valorem value. By judicious use of the one half cent State allowed and voter endorsed
sales tax(4b) we have added a number of great businesses including Pappadeaux's,
Memphis Red Hot and Blue, the Hilton Garden Inn, Toshios, Sabor and the Tortillo Factory,
Best Western, CostCo, Bobby Knight Fieldhouse, the expansion of Ben Franklin Pharmancy
and Kitchen's Deli, et. al. In summation, we have done a good job in recent years of
expanding our tax base.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Lots of change in our city in the 60 years I have been here. We have established a Multi
Cultural Committee to examine, highlight and celebrate our various cultures as well as
those things all our cultures have in common--our heritage as Texans, for example. I think
our city has exemplified in many ways how people of varied backgrounds can live and
work together and stress their commonalities. I would not do anything differently. My
district is probably the most diverse in the city. I try to represent all my constituents
vigorously and well.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Illegal immigration is a national issue which Congress must address.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I favor such a system, but the Devil is in the details. For example, the successful mass
transit systems in this country are all heavily subsidized with fare box receipts contributing
only about 15 to 18 percent of their operating costs. All of these systems are heavily
subsidized by sales taxes since they are recognized, rightly so I believe, as another form of
public utility. We polled our citizens and over 70 percent said they would vote for an
additional one half cent sales tax for commuter rail--60 percent said they would go for a
full cent for light rail. At over 80 million dollars per mile, light rail is not in our future. We
will at some point in time get commuter rail service to Duncanville, Cedar Hill and
Midlothian on the BS&SFE rail line. The questions remaining are cost and payment
methodology.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: The North Central Council of Governments does a pretty good job of regional planning
currently. However, southern Dallas County cities were not represented until I persuaded
County Judge Lee Jackson to give us a multi-city seat on the Regional Transportation
Committee in 1989. Consequently, much of NCTCOG's planning was done without our
area's representation. I've worked to remedy that with some success, but not nearly as
much as we deserve. I have participated in many issues to obtain regional consensus on
projects. All too often, regional consensus has meant doing what's good for northern Dallas
County and for Collin County. Currently, it seems to focus on what's good for Tarrant and
Denton Counties. This is a source of great frustration for us in Southern Dallas county and
Ellis County as well. True regional reguires this to change.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Yes I believe we are among the best managed cities in the DFW Metroplex. I get few
complaints about city services. We have the lowest number of city employees per
thousand population in Dallas County. Most of the complaints I get involve noncompliance
with our animal leash ordinance. We are working on better enforcement of that ordinance.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Our annual budget runs close to 23 million each year. Last year we cut 1.2 million from
our operating budget which hurt in some areas. We kept the tax rate the same at 69.6
cents per $100 of evaluation providing most residents with a tax cut since their appraisals
went down. This year we have some money from paying off debt that will be able to be
used for operations. Our trouble on holding the line on taxes will come in 2013 and 2014 if
the economy doesn't recover by then. We have done a good job of infrastructure
construction and upkeep up to now.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: At some point in the near term future we may have to raise the ad valorem tax rate or
cut city services to the point where citizen will feel an unacceptable level of aggravation

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and discomfort.

Farmers Branch City Council, Place 1


Description: Note: All Farmers Branch residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Tim Scott

Biographical Info:
Name: Tim Scott
Street Address: 3008 Eric Lane
City/Town: Farmers Branch
State: TX
Date of Birth: 1-15-1971
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-989-4940
Home Phone Number: 972-488-9118
Mobile Phone Number: 972-989-4940
E-mail Address: scott.timothy1@tx.rr.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.electtimscott.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Bachelors of Business Administration, Harding University, 1993
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 13 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Family & Children's Minister
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: I have extensive experience in the non-profit, community service sector. I am the
Board Liaison to both Senior Adult Services and Metrocrest Social Services, both
outstanding organizations assisting people in need in our community. And, after decades of
volunteering, last year I joined the ministry full time, as Director of Children’s Ministry and
Programs at The Branch, a growing, vibrant multi-site church, with campuses in Farmers
Branch (Farmers Branch Church of Christ) and Carrollton (The Branch at Vista Ridge),
where over 400 kids come every weekend to learn about living a life dedicated to God,
and to serving others. Most importantly, I have served the citizens of Farmers Branch for
the past three years as a City Councilman. I enjoy outstanding relationships with our
fantastic city staff - who make our city run efficiently and effectively for all our citizens -
and have a deep, first-hand knowledge of the issues, challenges, and opportunities before
us.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: I served on the Farmers Branch School/Community Relations board, and the Branch
Revitalization Task Force, prior to my election to the City Council in 2007.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am uniquely qualified to serve the citizens of Farmers Branch on the City Council.
First, I have extensive experience in the corporate world, holding management roles at
multiple Fortune 500 companies, including Yum Brands/Pizza Hut, Trane, and Dr
Pepper/Seven Up. I understand business: how deals are made, what drives corporate
decision-making, and how important planning and growth are to organizations. Second, I
have extensive experience in the non-profit, community service sector. I am the Board
Liaison to both Senior Adult Services and Metrocrest Social Services, both outstanding

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organizations assisting people in need in our community. And, after decades of


volunteering, last year I joined the ministry full time, as Director of Children’s Ministry and
Programs at The Branch, a growing, vibrant multi-site church, with campuses in Farmers
Branch (Farmers Branch Church of Christ) and Carrollton (The Branch at Vista Ridge),
where over 400 kids come every weekend to learn about living a life dedicated to God,
and to serving others. And third, I have extensive experience serving the citizens of
Farmers Branch through city government. I served on the Farmers Branch
School/Community Relations board, and the Branch Revitalization Task Force, prior to my
election to the City Council in 2007. I enjoy outstanding relationships with our fantastic city
staff - who make our city run efficiently and effectively for all our citizens - and have a
deep, first-hand knowledge of the issues, challenges, and opportunities before us. My
combination of experience in corporate, community service, and city government make
my uniquely qualified to continue to represent the citizens of Farmers Branch.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: For the past three years, I have worked diligently to help our city build on its rich
history and values to shape a vibrant, growing, sustainable community that we all are
proud to call home. I feel great about what we have accomplished, and want to build on
the work we have done - and the work that was done before me - to keep our
redevelopment, revitalization, and beautification momentum going forward! Farmers
Branch is headed in the right direction: in a difficult economy, meaningful redevelopment
activity is occurring in the Four Corners and DART rail station, businesses are relocating to
Farmers Branch at a healthy and encouraging pace - including Weir’s (150 jobs and $8MM
in business personal property) and SoftLayer Technologies ($80MM property investment
and $200MM in business personal property) - and every part of the city has been touched
by our beautification efforts, all while we have maintained a balanced budget and
increased the size of our emergency reserve fund. I will continue to maintain our current
conservative fiscal practices, our commitment to increased business development, and to
complete current and future projects in the Four Corners and DART Rail Station areas.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My opponent's campaign will be one of “No!” “No” to new ideas about redevelopment,
“No” to continued beautification across our town, “No” to our efforts to recognize and honor
our Nation’s veterans and their commitment to our liberty, “No” to the idea that our
immigration laws must be enforced...essentially, “No” to our city becoming all it has the
potential to become.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Redevelopment and revitalization are the top priorities in Farmers Branch. We have
been able to attract businesses and development projects in one of the toughest
economies in memory, primarily because of our creativity, tenacity, and commitment to
action. The speed with which this council and staff work to complete development deals is
unparalleled in the DFW area, and is a distinct competitive advantage.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Farmers Branch has a rich history, and an high percentage of residents that have called
it home for decades. These citizens want to remain in Farmers Branch, and need the types
of housing options that meet their changing needs in their golden years. We are working
hard to bring more of those types of housing options to our city, providing our long-time
residents with the housing options the desire, and opening up housing stock for the next
generations of Farmers Branch residents.
Q: Would you have done anything differently in the city’s expensive legal battle over its
anti-illegal immigration ordinance? What is your view on that issue going forward?
A: I would do nothing different, and voted for Ordinance 2952. The voters of Farmers
Branch have spoken loudly in support of the ordinance, and until I hear differently from
them, my position will not change.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: We participate in the Federal Government's 287(g) program, and work hand-in-hand
with ICE to enforce our Nation's laws as effectively as possible.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I'm excited about the DART Green Line coming to Farmers Branch this year, and am

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very open to ideas on how to integrate DART with other transit systems, but not if it
means raising taxes on Farmers Branch residents.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: - no response -
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: - no response -
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: The City of Farmers Branch has maintained a balanced budget, resurfaced our major
roads, maintained all service levels in the city, increased our emergency reserve fund
balance, and cut property taxes to our senior citizens, during the worst economic downturn
in my lifetime. In addition, our bond rating has been increased. We will maintain this
course, our city is in fantastic fiscal condition.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Farmers Branch is poised for a breakout in redevelopment and revitalization. We must
stay the course, and continue to act aggressively to bring the types of renewal projects our
citizens deserve.

Matt Wenthold

Biographical Info:
Name: Matt Wenthold
Street Address: 3033 Primrose Lane
City/Town: Farmers Branch
State: TX
Date of Birth: February 19th, 1957
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214 789-9009
Home Phone Number: 972 247-2950
Mobile Phone Number: 214 789-9009
Fax Number: 972 484-4350
E-mail Address: mattwenthold@yahoo.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.mattwenthold.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Bachelors of Science Degree in Accountancy University of Central Oklahoma May 1983
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 17 years, 9 months
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 17 years, 9 months
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: SW Region Controller Bunzl Distribution
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: church volunteer, Boy Scout Ass't Scoutmaster, quarterly blood donor, Friends of the
Library
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Library advisory board member, Sister City host family
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $1,200.00

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Q: Who are your top three contributors?


A: Clyde James, George Grimmer, Mary Jane Stevenson
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: I have never been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings. I was named once
in a civil suit by a billboard lawyer who dropped the suit before the trial. Neither I nor my
insurance company paid out any money in the way of a settlement.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: As a nation we are currently experiencing the worst economic crisis since the Great
Depression. The most important issue before the voters of Farmers Branch in this election
is fiscal responsibility. The spending of the current council on vanity projects, real estate
speculation and federal lawsuits is hurting the fiscal health of our community. The council
disregarded the results of last May's bond election defeat and issued $10 million dollars in
long term debt despite the will of the voters.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: I would vote against all real estate speculation spending. I would defer all spending on
"vanity" projects to the end of the fiscal year using money left over after bread and butter
necessities had been funded. I would work to focus on projects that brought traffic to our
Four Corners area that would encourage businesses to locate at this intersection.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My opponent has voted to raise taxes twice in three years. My opponent lacks focus in
that he has supported projects randomly scattered around town in such a way that the
projects do not build people traffic in our Four Corners area. If the pet adoption facility,
new fountain, rose garden, patriotic memorial and skate board park had been located at
the Four Corners we would be building traffic at that key intersection without going into
debt to revitalize the area.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Farmers Branch has spent more than $10 million dollars acquiring real estate in the
Dart Light Rail station area. The city council has now spent more than $7 million dollars to
buy one corner of the Four Corners area. We cannot find a developer who can keep their
promise to build at the Dart light rail station, even after offering land for a bargain price.
The mayor has said it would be five years before the Four Corners land would be
developed. We have wasted a great deal of taxpayer money on land acquisition that will
probably greatly disappoint the public when small apartments are built on these parcels of
land.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Farmers Branch is experiencing the same demographic changes that the rest of North
Texas is experiencing. As a council member I would work to end the current acrimonious
climate and atmosphere of divisiveness taken too far.
Q: Would you have done anything differently in the city’s expensive legal battle over its
anti-illegal immigration ordinance? What is your view on that issue going forward?
A: The federal government has made it clear three times now that it is not going to share
the power to enforce immigration laws with Farmers Branch. Farmers Branch has sent it's
message and now is the time to end the federal lawsuits. More than three million dollars
has been spent on legal fees. The mayor promised the citizens of Farmers Branch that
insurance would pay for the city's legal defense but that has not happened. It is Einstein's
definition of insanity to keep doing the same thing over and over again expecting a
different result.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: The police department should work within the appropriate federal programs to deport
illegal aliens who are arrested and taken to the Farmers Branch jail.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I do favor a regional rail system and local option elections to raise new transportation
revenue.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater

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regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?


A: Regional cooperation is our only hope to solve water, road and education issues.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: I grew up in Oklahoma City which has allowed drilling for oil and gas within city limits
for more than 90 years. If appropriate safety measures and environmental monitoring are
done this is both a safe and economically beneficial activity. We all like using these fuels
so we are going to be called upon to coexist with these activities in the future.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Farmers Branch has first class city services of both an emergency and routine nature.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Our present city leadership has wasted money on real estate speculation in an economy
where no one can borrow money to get projects built. Our present city leadership has
scattered projects around town in such a haphazard fashion that we are not realizing any
economic gain in increased traffic that would attract more private sector businesses.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: The present city council has spent a great deal of money in a scattered fashion on
disparate, widely separated projects, federal court lawsuits destined for failure and
"vanity" projects that have necessitated a tax increase that have undermined our citys
fiscal health and positive successful image.

Farmers Branch City Council, Place 4


Description: Note: All Farmers Branch residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Brenda Brodrick

Biographical Info:
Name: Brenda Brodrick
Street Address: 13531 Rawhide Parkway
City/Town: Farmers Branch
State: Texas
Date of Birth: 5-1-59
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-241-8058
Home Phone Number: 972-241-8058
E-mail Address: BrendaBrodrick@gmail.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.BrendaBrodrick.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Associate of Arts, Liberal Arts, Rochester College
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 15 years.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 15 years.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Real estate investor.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Strong supporter of Senior activities, Farmers Branch Chamber of Commerce, Farmers
Branch Woman’s Club, Friends of Farmers Branch Manske Library, Rose Garden volunteer,
Community Together, and Friends of Farmers Branch Historical Park.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Sunday-School teacher, Bible-study teacher, Enrichment Classes of Carrollton teacher,

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Life-team leader at Covenant Church/Carrollton, Helped my son receive a full-tuition


scholarship at SMU through Suzuki Piano Studio involvement.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Precinct Chair, Precinct # 1503 from 2000-2010. State Convention Delegate from
2000-2010.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $4,000
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: George Brodrick, Ben Robinson, Bob Phelps
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: Election to the city council is a promise to represent what the people want. I will pursue
a framework of openness. The citizens have expressed to me dissatisfaction with increased
debt, the circumvention of a bond election, and forced beautification projects. I will listen
to the people and act accordingly. I have been a strong supporter of Senior activities. I
am a proud member of: FB Chamber of Commerce, FB Woman’s Club, Friends of FB
Manske Library, Rose Garden volunteers, Community Together, and Friends of FB Historical
Park. I: know this city very well. have made a real effort to listen. have personally
knocked on the doors in many neighborhoods. have visited with a very large number of
citizens. Conclusion: I believe that I am very qualified to know what the citizens want.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: The three most important actions I would take are to: 1) ensure the continuation of our
excellent, essential city services; 2) exercise fiscally conservative management; and 3)
use good judgment. Our city needs to live within our financial means.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I stand for fiscally conservative government, adherence to the rule of law, and visibility.
To make myself available to the citizens, I am starting a “Concerned Citizens Talk to
Brenda” session, on Friday nights. It will begin on April 16, 2010. Come by my home,
13531 Rawhide Parkway, anytime between 7:30-8:30pm.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: I am very anxious to see Farmers Branch as a vibrant commercial area while
maintaining its historic inheritance. Our city truly is a city within a park and it’s something
special that the citizens of Farmers Branch have come to love and enjoy. I will work to see
that preserved. To achieve this balance, I will work to ensure that inputs from the
citizenry, local business owners, community leaders, and outside specialists will be brought
before the city council.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Farmers Branch and the entire state of Texas is seeing changes in their demographics.
Our city police force regularly reports monthly that an average of 12% of its arrests turn
out to be persons who are in the country illegally. I am against illegal immigration and
believe that in these difficult economic times, illegal aliens are taking jobs that should be
available to the unemployed legal citizens. Since I am not presently on the council, I have
not had the benefit of the legal advice that is being provided the city and therefore do not
have enough of the legal facts available to make an informed judgment regarding the
illegal immigration issue. I do look forward to being elected and having the opportunity to
become better schooled in the legal alternatives that must be considered by council.
Q: Would you have done anything differently in the city’s expensive legal battle over its
anti-illegal immigration ordinance? What is your view on that issue going forward?
A: My answer to the question above pretty well sums up my feelings on the matter. I do
look forward to being elected to council and having the opportunity to hear the city’s legal
team present the possible consequences of either appealing the recent court decision or
any other action that might be brought to the council.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: We have a superior law enforcement police force. Our police should continue to do with

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what they are charged with doing . . . protecting the citizens of Farmers Branch from any
and all illegal activities.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I favor this system, but only so long as Farmers Branch is treated equally with all other
areas. I would work with our DART representative and follow closely the actions taken by
DART and other transportation agencies to ensure equal treatment in terms of finance and
services.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: There are many issues common to all areas in North Texas, as identified by, among
others, the North Central Texas Council of Governments. These issues include a united
front to our federal elected representatives to reach a just and meaningful solution to
illegal immigration, problems of drugs and gangs, environmental concerns, and
maintenance of infrastructure.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: Ordinance # 2946 was passed on March 18, 2008, which deals with natural gas drilling.
The Ordinance is very tight and has strict rules. I believe that the city is doing enough to
ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Our city does an exemplary job in delivering services to its citizens.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: The people of Farmers Branch want leaders who will maintain the historic close-knit
family friendly environment that has characterized us for years. Our citizens want
commercial activity to be part of that environment, but not replace it. The way for the city
to balance its budget is to spend less than it brings in.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: This is a question that each voter and each citizen must confront for themselves, for this
is a personal issue.

David Koch

Biographical Info:
Name: David B. Koch
Street Address: 3243 Brincrest
City/Town: Farmers Branch
State: Texas
Date of Birth: May 17, 1961
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (972)241-3204
E-mail Address: davidkochfb@flash.net
Campaign Web Site Address: www.electdavidkoch.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: High School - Jesuit College Preparatory School Undergraduate - Bachalor of Business
Administration, University of North Texas Post Graduate - Washington & Lee University
School of Law
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: Approximately 39 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: Approximately 39 tears
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: - no response -
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:

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A: Farmers Branch City Council Farmers Branch Rotary Club Farmers Branch Chamber of
Commerce Metrocrest Hospital Authority Board of Directors Jesuit Alumni Association
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Farmers Branch Rotary Club Farmers Branch Chamber of Commerce Jesuit Alumni
Association
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $1,350, plus approximately $2,000 on hand from 2007 election cycle.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Sam Aceves, Ed Bonneau, Ernie Tiller
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: As a private citizen, I have been the plaintiff in two civil lawsuits, one involving an
automobile purchase and the other involving a swimming pool renovation contract. As a
City Council Member I was named as a defendant in a lawsuit against the City.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I was born and raised in Farmers Branch so the state of the City is very important to
me. I am running for Farmers Branch City Council because I want to help make it one of
the best places to live, work and play. I want Farmers Branch to be a place my children
enjoy now and remember fondly when they are raising their own children. Voters should
conside me the most qualified because I have three years experience on city council during
which time we have reduced overall spending, maintained balanced budgets, maintained
service levels, kept our property tax rate one of the lowest in the metroplex, increased the
senior citizen's property tax examption, enhanced police and fire safety facilites and
equipment, added a new animal adoption center, community garden and skate park,
completed multiple beautification projects, created a healthy business environment that is
attracting new businesses, and much more. Overall, I believe I have helped improve the
quality of life in Farmers Branch; however there is much more that can still be
accomplished. As for experience, being one of eight children growing up in a blue collar
family here in Farmers Branch, I learned how to cope with chaos, to function in a group, to
share and to stand and fight for a position. While obtaining a Bachelor of Business
Administration degree from the University of North Texas with an emphasis on real estate
and finance, I gained a basic understanding of the business world and the processes
involving budgeting and finances. My law school education at the Washington & Lee
University School of Law and my practice as a trial lawyer over the last 20+ years handling
corporate, real estate, development and contract matters have given me the ability to
analyze matters and make sound decisions, even in circumstances surrounded by emotions
and in instances where fortunes and futures are in the balance. As a sitting city council
member I have gained a solid understanding of the demands and responsibilities of the
office, the structure of the City government and the current business and economic
environment necessary to help lead the City through one of most challenging economic
times in our lifetimes. Through my work and City Council experience, I know that the right
decisions aren’t always the easiest or most popular decisions. I also know first and
foremost that decisions have to be grounded in reason and logic supported by the best
available information, and that the decisions can’t be driven by emotions or personal
ideology, and certainly not at the expense of the rule of law.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: The first most important action is to continue the City's drive for economic
development. In this challenging and uncertain economic environment retaining existing
businesses and attracting new businsses will be critical to the City's ability to generate
revenues and maintain the current level of services without a tax increase. The primary
ways to achieve this is through economic development incentives and strategic use of
non-General Fund revenues. The second most important action is to continue the push for
residential and commercial revitalization. Revitalization is esential to the City's abilty to
prosper, to provide and enhance services and attract new families. Achieving this will
require a combination of incentives, abatements and, as needed, City funds. The third
most important action would be to continue the pursuit of anti-illegal immigration
measures. The City should continue its participation in the CAP, 287(g), and Secure
Communities programs sponsored by the Federal Government and aimed at combatting
issues associated with illegal immigration. In addition, the City should not abandon its
efforts on the rental ordinance. The cost of these efforts is generally covered by the

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General Fund, which the citizens have largely supported by their continued backing of the
Council in elections and communications.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: There are three key differences that make me the better choice for Farmers Branch City
Council Place 4. First, I have three years of experience on City Council. In these very
challenging economic times, I am already prepared to meet and to respond to the
challenges and opportunities that we will be encountering. I understand the responsibilities
and demands of the position. There won't be any lost time or opportunities due to
on-the-job training. Second, through work, church, social and childrens' activities, I have
developed an extensive and diverse network of relationships and contacts with business
professionals and civic leaders that allow me to promote the City and help develop the
plans and programs to make Farmers Branch one of the best places to live and work.
Third, I consider myself a visionary. I see where we are and where we could be. As I move
around in Farmers Branch, the metroplex and other areas around the country, I look for
opportunities and new ideas that could benefit Farmers Branch, whether it be on a financial
basis or to make it a better place to live, work or play. Some ideas work and some never
get off the drawing board, but I am not afraid to raise them. An example of an idea that
has worked well is the Farmers Branch Community Garden. The Garden has provided
citizens a chance to mingle, exercise, provide for themselves and give something back to
the community.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Attracting residential and commercial development is one of my and the current City
Council's top priorities. The proof of the City's success is in the recent economic
development announcements and permit issuances. Even in the face of national and global
economic woes, our City Manager and his staff have worked tirelessly and with marked
success ushering in residential and commercial development and in fostering an
environment that is attractive to residential and commercial development.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Farmers Branch is not unique in the demographic changes it is experiencing. One of the
most significant issues the City is wrestling with is the needs of the senior citizens. On hand
the City provides unsurpassed support through the Senior Center. On the other hand, the
City is trying to help solve senior living arrangements so that seniors can continue to live in
Farmers Branch and remain healthy, active and involved.
Q: Would you have done anything differently in the city’s expensive legal battle over its
anti-illegal immigration ordinance? What is your view on that issue going forward?
A: I would not have shied away from the issue because it is one that needed to be
addressed. The City provided substantial opportunites for the people, both citizens and
outiders, to express their opinions and views before it undertook any actions. My view
going forward is that we should continue our efforts. We have had good success in our
efforts in the Federally sponsored 287(g)Program, Criminal Alien Program and Secure
Communites Program. The legal battle should also continue. We knew at the outset that it
would be a protracted and expensive battle, and that it would almost certainly involve
appeals. On the campaign trial three years ago, we talked with the citizens about the
potential costs of the legal battles. Comparing the potential legal costs against the cost of
doing nothing, the citizens overwhelmingly supported the City's actions. There is little
evidence to indicate that the support has wained.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: We should allow our Police Department to continue to partner with the Federal
Government in the Immigration and Customs Enforcement programs including the
Criminal Alien Program, the 287(g)Program and the Secure Communities Program.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: The ability to move smoothly from one transit mode to another with limited hassles is a
nice vision. However, we have not seen enough of the light rail systems come on line to be
able to judge the long term value and effectiveness. I would like to see more effort made
in creating crosstown connections on the light rail system like the Cotton Belt Rail Line. I
am troubled by the proliferation of tollroads. The purported lack of funds is an issue that
needs to be
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater

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regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?


A: North Texas needs a better long term plan for water supply and conservation.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: At this point, I see no basis for changing the existing ordinances regarding natural gas
drilling. Presently, drilling for gas is prohibited in the vast majority of the City. The only
area where drilling could take place is on the west side of town in the Mercer Crossing area
(west of Ih 35/Stemmoms Fwy). To date there has not beem any drilling in the City, but
there is real potential for it in the future. When it happens it will have little or no impact on
the citizens because of the location of the potential actities and the restrictions in the
ordinances.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: The City of Farmers Branch does an excellent job of delivering services.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: The current City Council and City staff have done a very good job weathering the
economic storm. We recognized the economic downturn early and started planning and
making adjustments long before things got as bad as they are now. Cost cutting alone
won't be enough to balance budgets in the future if our elected officials in Washington DC
don't do a better job addressing and solving our to problems that have lead to our
economic woes. A the city level we will have to be innovative and aggressive in our
economic development efforts to help generate new revenues that can help offset drops on
other revenues.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: The current economic environment will challenge the City's ability to maintain and
expand services.

Flower Mound Mayor


Description: Note: All Flower Mound residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Melissa Northern

Biographical Info:
Name: Melissa Northern
Street Address: 4601 Portmouth Court
City/Town: Flower Mound
State: Texas
Date of Birth: August 10th
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-514-5479
E-mail Address: melissa@melissanorthern.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.melissanorthern.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Mount Vernon Nazarene University – B.A. in Business and Economics
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 8 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 8 years
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Former business executive, now active community volunteer.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Executive Director, Flower Mound Home Owners Association Coalition Treasurer, Flower

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Mound Community Development Corporation (CDC). Appointed by Town Council; Elected


Treasurer by peers. CDC allocates 4B sales tax funds for community park projects.
Member, Wellington HOA Finance Board Member,Wellington HOA Oil and Gas Committee
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Membership in Chamber of Commerce and Rotary in Ohio Volunteer work with: Youth
Prison Education Ministries, Special Olympics Ohio, and church outreach ministries
including homeless support, food pantry, computer skills training, elderly visitation and
home maintenance and repair support.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: none
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: Approximately $13,000.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: I will be personally funding much of my campaign. My other contributors are family and
friends. I have not and will not take money from gas companies, developers, or special
interest groups.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No, other than many years ago I was a party in an amicable divorce.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: Our community is at a crossroads, facing tough economic and even identity challenges.
Flower Mound needs new leadership to rehabilitate our town’s image, and to successfully
manage the multiple stakeholders in our community with a priority to being the voice of
our residents. It is essential that we strike a balance to preserve our unique country
atmosphere, heritage, and quality of life while cultivating a dynamic economic
environment. My background includes leadership roles in the fields of corporate finance,
cost accounting, IT, and commercial loan audit and risk, for Fortune 100 companies
including General Electric, and J.P. Morgan Chase. With an extensive managerial
background and a track record of delivering measurable results I have earned a reputation
of being a skilled problem-solver. In addition, I am also well versed on the issues facing
our community having served as the treasurer of a town board, as the Flower Mound HOA
Coalition Leader and on the Finance Board and Oil and Gas Committee of a large Flower
Mound HOA. While I believe the full breadth of business skills I’ve acquired will be put to
good use, my corporate experience in problem solving, best practice implementation, and
analysis will be especially helpful as we address current issues and ensure future decisions
are based on appropriate due diligence to ensure the best long term outcome.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1. STRENGTHEN OIL AND GAS ORDINANCE. I support a moratorium on new drilling
applications to allow a thorough review and update of our Oil and Gas Ordinances. 2.
IMPROVE BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY. Despite significant investment over a
decade ago by the Town, Lakeside DFW remains undeveloped. Portions of Parkers Square
and the Riverwalk, our town's showcase multi-use development, are in foreclosure.
Developments within Flower Mound need a revitalization plan that only new leadership
along with new ideas can bring. Greater due diligence upfront on these types of projects is
necessary to insure taxpayer’s investments on the infrastructure is protected. Projects
must be designed to be successful throughout the entire economic cycle. Once we define
elements of project success we should not deviate from them to enhance developer
profitability at the expense of our community. We can also leverage our growing medical
community (the planned hospital, the planned rehab center and medical suppliers) with a
development strategy that attracts world-class medical services and associated industry.
This approach brings with it jobs and economic stability. It also is of benefit to the residents
who can utilize such services. 3. IMPROVE RESPONSIVENESS TO CITIZENS. Our public
hearings have become a check box instead of an opportunity to truly gauge the pulse of
the community. The fact that over 6000 of our citizens felt compelled to pursue a petition
for a moratorium, that our seniors have endured empty promises, and roads are extended
or widened with little documented necessity and against the wishes of our taxpayers, is
indicative of a Town Council that has lost touch with its constituents. I would promote a
true partnership between the residents and the Town, always being respectful of differing
opinions and transparent in decision making.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: NEW PERSPECTIVE AND ACCOUNTABILITY. I will bring fresh ideas to the issues and

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opportunities of our community. By now, the senior center should be built, not just
promised. Blaming the economy instead of a flawed business development strategy for
Lakeside being undeveloped, Parker Square and Riverwalk in financial trouble
demonstrates excuses not results or accountability. I will take our community in a new
direction. One measured on results, not empty promises. BUSINESS EXPERIENCE. What
differentiates me from my opponent is financial acumen, best practice implementation
experience, analysis and due diligence skills all honed in a corporate environment but
applicable to the challenges and opportunities facing Flower Mound CITIZEN ADVOCACY.
My opponent has shown deference to gas companies and developers in her leadership of
Flower Mound. I am not at all conflicted, financially or personally, about where my priority
needs to lie. The citizens of Flower Mound must come first.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: I will advocate putting a gas drilling permit moratorium in place while a thorough
review of the Oil and Gas Ordinance is conducted. Among the specific areas I would like to
review are onsite water recycling, vapor recovery, and variances. My opponent
frequently talks about our Oil and Gas Ordinance being one of the strongest in the state.
That may have been true when originally written; however other communities have since
strengthened their ordinances too. I would launch a thorough review of their best practices
to ensure we continue to lead in this critical area. We also need to revisit variances. All but
one of the pad sites in Flower Mound sought and received a variance to our Oil and Gas
Ordinance. Touting the strength of the ordinance, when we know we have allowed
variances to it in almost every case, may be good politics but it is not good governance.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Attracting the right development to Flower Mound ranks high on my list of priorities.
Over 80% of the Flower Mound tax burden is on the residents. I would like to see more of
Flower Mound’s income coming from commercial development. The key is bringing in the
“right” development that has an appropriate return on investment, fits our community’s
character and enhances, not detracts from, resident quality of life. Development in
Flower Mound has been on a pendulum. Years ago some accused Flower Mound of being
unfriendly to developers. There were those who believed this reputation hurt Flower
Mound’s ability to attract good projects. Since that time the pendulum has swung too far
the other way. While we have made progress in making it easier to do business in Flower
Mound, we have not been selective. The result is a series of failed projects and the
industrialization of our town. Our “Town Center”, Parker Square, has many of the buildings
in foreclosure. The Riverwalk, Flower Mound’s showcase mixed-use project has 120 acres
of the 158-acre project in foreclosure. The town sunk almost $13 million of taxpayer
money into Lakeside DFW, a large development effort for Campus Commercial; it
continues to sit undeveloped with no return on investment on our taxpayer dollars. In the
meantime we have approved variances to the oil and gas ordinance for all pad sites but
one, and put in zoning that paves the way for a centralized facility for the by-product of
hydraulic fracturing, just over a mile from thousands of homes and several schools. We
also have developers pushing Council to allow thousands of high density apartments. We
need a balanced strategy that cultivates the right development not all development. We
need to market our community in a targeted way, be thorough in our due diligence and
incentivize selectively when we find a good fit.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Flower Mound is growing, although at a slower pace than we saw during the 1990’s
development boom. Currently, we have around 64,000 residents with the median age of
34. Our average annual household income is $142k and the average home value is
$284k. Demographics are shifting nationally. I look forward to reviewing the 2010 census
data so we can understand Flower Mound's trends and plan appropriately.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: This is currently not a large issue in Flower Mound. I would expect Flower Mound police
will continue to collaborate with immigration officials as appropriate.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Regionally, I am open to looking at mass transit options however they need to be
options favored by Flower Mound’s citizens. Our community has not previously supported

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mass transit options. As congestion increases and air quality becomes more impacted, we
should continue to explore options but always with a focus on what will work for Flower
Mound. I support exploring the feasibility of non-diesel shuttle bus options to other nearby
stations , such as DFW airport, Carrollton, or Lewisville as was recommended during the
last Transportation Master Plan update. Although your question was regionally focused I
would like to take a moment to talk about local transportation alternatives. I would
encourage “Complete Streets” in specific areas of our community. Complete streets are a
balanced transportation system that includes integrating sidewalks, bike lanes, transit
amenities, and safe crossings. It can bolster economic growth and stability by providing
accessible and efficient connections between residences, schools, parks, offices, and retail
destinations. They also improve the overall health of communities who adopt them as
apart of their transportation plans.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: I plan to take a leadership role in creating venues for collaboration across North Texas
towns and cities on best practice oil and gas ordinances that safeguard our shared air,
water and soil interests.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Review of town services and their efficiency is not something I would speculate about
without a thorough understanding of service delivery methodology and processes. Flower
Mound has a dedicated and responsible staff that I expect is doing a fine job. One of the
first things I would do as Mayor is a review of service delivery with the Town Manager. My
expectation of Town staff would be that they are translating what works well throughout
the town, continuously improving internal processes and searching for and implementing
best practices from throughout the region and the country.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: In the past few years our reserve fund has shrunk from 27% to 17%. This trend
continues in the 2009-2010 budget cycle with expenditures exceeding revenues once
again. With the expectations of a reduction in sales tax revenues, residential appraisal
values, and a decrease in Commercial and business property tax revenue we need to be
very conservative in our spending. It would be prudent to hold off on non-critical projects
funding only those projects with the strongest value proposition. I intend to work closely
with town staff to identify cost cutting initiatives that maximize return without an impact to
our services. The other equally important side of the equation is revenue maximization.
We will be looking at short-term incentives and abatements when they will support
long-term stainable businesses in our community and its associated tax revenue growth.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: I’m not sure it has to be “uncomfortable” but a truth we must accept is our homes are
on the Barnett Shale. When choosing to move to Flower Mound few seek out our town to
be near gas wells, yet we live on top of a great natural resource and mineral right owners
have the right to realize a return on their asset. While some minerals are owned by
outside interests, many mineral right owners also have homes in Flower Mound. Whether
residents own their minerals or not, they all have a common interest in the health and
welfare of their families. While resident focus is on the impact to their families, gas
companies are for-profit enterprises. Their stockholders expect extraction of the gas
efficiently and with the highest return possible. While gas companies may make voluntary
concessions for good public relations, they are obligated to do no more than the law
requires. This is why a local government committed to appropriate set-backs, air quality
monitoring and enforcement, and best practice approaches like produce water recycling is
a necessity to protect the health and welfare of our citizens.

Jody A. Smith
Biographical Info:
Name: Jody A. Smith
Street Address: 3705 Sarah Springs Trail
City/Town: Flower Mound
State: Texas, 75022
Date of Birth: 03-14-56
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-874-6070
Home Phone Number: 817-430-3047
Mobile Phone Number: 817-991-7800

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Fax Number: 972-724-9706


E-mail Address: mayor@flower-mound.com
Campaign Web Site Address: http://mayorjody.com/
Questions:
Q: Education
A: BS Business Administration/International Business
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: Twenty Six Years.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Partner, co-owner CornerStone Staffing, Accounts Payable Manager since June 1991
American Airlines International Flight Attendant since 1986
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Mayor Community Development Corporation Board Flower Mound Chamber of
Commerce Lewisville Center Advisory Board Super Bowl 45, Mayors Committee Regional
Transportation Commission Board Alternate Rotarian Friends of the Flower Mound Library
Lewisville Education Foundation CCA Communities in Schools Children's Advocacy Center
Cloud Nine Charities YMCA Flower Mound Citizens Police Academy/CERT Training Denton
County Friends of the Family
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Mayor Community Development Corporation Board Flower Mound Chamber of
Commerce Lewisville Center Advisory Board Super Bowl 45, Mayors Committee Regional
Transportation Commission Board Alternate Rotarian Friends of the Flower Mound Library
Lewisville Education Foundation CCA Communities in Schools Children's Advocacy Center
Cloud Nine Charities YMCA Flower Mound Citizens Police Academy/CERT Training Denton
County Friends of the Family KFMB Adopt a Spot
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Mayor 2004-2010 Town Council Candidate 1991
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: 100.00
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Marc Moffett, Denton, Texas
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: After serving Flower Mound as Mayor successfully for six years, I was overwhelmed by
the amount of constituent support I have received to run for another term as mayor. One
of the main reasons was the great success that Flower Mound has had in surviving the
financial recession. NO PROPERTY TAX INCREASE, NO CUT IN SERVICES, and at the same
time accomplishing the following: Strong Fiscal Decisions: Cut Debt, Retained and
Increased Excellent Bond Rating. New Roads and Road Improvements Two New Fire
Stations and 26 new firefighters Two New Police Beats and new offices to staff them
Community Activity Center with Senior Golden Lounge and Water Park First Time Ever
Parks Master Plan including new items such as Free Standing Senior Rec Center, Equestrian
Trail Head Park, Additional Tennis Facilities, Skate Park, Expanded Water Park, and the
Wilson Carmel Park including outdoor Amphitheater, Arboretum, Japanese Gardens, Coy
Pond, Dog Park, All Inclusive Playground and much more. Economic Development brining
to our residents places to work, shop, and enjoy family and friends. The upcoming years
budget needs the experienced leadership that I have brought to the Town of Flower Mound,
using the assets of our Town Manager and his Executive Team to successfully navigate the
recession and the need to meet the need of residents and employees as well. This
experience along with the skill of helping lead our personal business to eighteen straight
years of profit gives me the background and experience to successfully lead Flower Mound
through the next two years and continue to layout a pathway to fiscal responsibility and
success that will lead to a future property tax decrease.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: Many actions that I will take if re-elected could be cost neutral. More government if not
always better! My main action will be to continue the Economic Development initiative that
was my main goal in my first mayoral campaign. We have positioned ourselves as a

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medical community with the opening of THR Presbyterian Flower Mound Hospital later this
month, with numerous specialty physician offices, medical supply and medical service
companies, and the list goes on. Recently a virtually empty three story office building was
approved to be home to a rehabilitation hospital. I regularly meet with "medical"
professional as well as hospital executives to keep p Flower Mound on their expansion
plans. This not only crease a strong tax base, but brings more high level, high paying jobs
into Flower Mound. Retail is also an important part of Flower Mounds future. A mixed sue
ordinance has been created allowing applicants the opportunity to develop areas that
would crease jobs, restaurants', shopping ,entertainment and living opportunities to our
town. The Riverwalk will be a perfect example. One hundred, sixty--eight acres of a
nixed-use Central Business District in the center of Flower Mound, anchored by the THR
Presbyterian Hospital. We have also been in the market for a resort conference center,
hotel, and Fortune 100 Companies. Market Street Grocers plans a future store in Flower
Mound and we are working with Whole Foods to sell them on our community for a future
location. A second important action will be to create an environmental sustainability
program that goes from the individual homeowner to the way the town of Flower Mound
operates as a municipality, and the future looks exciting. Some components will be
environmental policies for the town, increase recycling programs, programs for re-sure
water, possible compost, gardening, and recycling areas. Our Senior populations is an
active, important, growing and vibrant part of our community. We need to continue our
efforts to build a free standing Senior Citizen Rec center in the near future, no later than
completed in the next five years. Funding will come from different sources including cost
savings from existing programs, re-allocation of existing budget expenditures, grant
monies, and general fund revenues. If this is not possible, we will go the voters for a bond
election We will also keep our eyes open for local and regional opportunities to maximize
our resources for out Seniors in Motion Program.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: Experience, Proven results, and experienced leadership. I have worked with and
established success relationships with our sister cities, Denton and Tarrant County officials,
legislators in Austin and Washington , Chamber of Commerce's, the business community
and our residents to maximize our dollars and deliver to the residents of Flower Mound.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: I will continue to push for further, regular, and extensive testing and studies of the air,
soil and water in relation to natural gas drilling facilities. The council and I have directed
staff to deliver to us an action plan that continues our testing programs throughout the
town and throughout the year, as well as permanent testing facilities located strategically
throughout our town. Further collaboration with state health and environmental testing
agencies as well as the federal groups including the EPA, will keep Flower Mound on the
leading edge of environmental testing and standards. Part of the action plans also include
the safety measures that we currently require of drilling facilities, as well as the available
enhancements that are available for the drill site and related equipment. We will keep gas
drilling operations to these standards and enhancements and not vary from them. This will
also become an integral part of our environmental sustainability policy and programs.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: As mentioned earlier, successful Economic Development has helped us to survive a
recessionary period and still offer more projects, improvements and services without a
property tax increase. As Smart Growth helped manage high residential growth in the late
1990's and early 2000's, our emphasis on a highly skilled Economic Development Director
and staff has made us successful in attracting commercial development to Flower Mound.
Teamed up with my efforts, council's support, an Executive Development Team, working
with the Flower Mound Chamber of Commerce, we have positioned ourselves ready to
capitalize on the market as the recession fades. Recently we had an update of our Master
Land Use Plan, Smart Growth Plan, and created a Mixed Use Ordinance that will add to our
toolbox for balancing our existing constituents needs with our future development. All of
these processes were public processes with many, many planning meetings and public
hearings. Flower Mound has an exciting future when it comes to attracting new business,
as we have natural beauty, great schools, great communities, new roads and infrastructure
to accommodate future growth.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would

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you do differently?
A: Years ago, it seemed as though Flower Mound was a community of young families as
the majority. Now many of us have stayed and have brought family into the area. This
shift has brought many parents, and our population aged, thus creating a larger and
growing senior group. This has brought several needs forward, senior living and
recreation. We have and are acting on the Seniors in Motion program and rec center, but
now are focusing on the different housing needs of an aging population. Many empty
nesters want a nice size home, but want less yard to care for, some want smaller homes
and yards, and others look for independent living. Also need are senior care centers,
including assisted, Alzheimer's/dementia care as well as nursing. We have been actively
pursuing these type of products and will continue to work at attaining a good balance of
products to meet the needs of our constituents.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: The Town of Flower Mound standards in hiring employees and personnel issues require
US citizen status and we follow that. I feel that the Town and it's Police Department follow
the US immigration laws and nothing further need be done at a Town level.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: As a member of the Regional Transportation Commission, I support a seamless
Regional Transit system. We support the DCTA as well with a representative on their
board. My active involvement with our sister cities, Denton County, RTC and state elected
officials keeps Flower Mound supporting local and state initiatives for transportation and
funding.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: As a member of the Regional Transportation Commission, I support a seamless
Regional Transit system. We support the DCTA as well with a representative on their
board. My active involvement with our sister cities, Denton County, RTC and state elected
officials keeps Flower Mound supporting local and state initiatives for transportation and
funding.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Q 3 (Quality People + Quality Service=Quality of Life) is a new management initiative
enacted by our Town Manager. At Flower Mound, with the success that we have had in
deliver quality service with quality people, effectiveness has been a large component. My
motto has all been "effectiveness" and "efficiency". We continue to analyze our practices,
using technology to help deliver at a cost savings, and implement programs to affect
efficiency. A recent resident survey helped us to realize where are strengths and services
are. Our report card was good and we are very excited that much was done with limited
budgets but use Quality People with Quality Service to deliver Quality of Life. We are
implementing microfiche to better manager records and correspondence. I will continue to
work with the council and the town manager to always strive for effectiveness and
efficiency.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Q 3 (Quality People + Quality Service=Quality of Life) is a new management initiative
enacted by our Town Manager. At Flower Mound, with the success that we have had in
deliver quality service with quality people, effectiveness has been a large component. My
motto has all been "effectiveness" and "efficiency". We continue to analyze our practices,
using technology to help deliver at a cost savings, and implement programs to affect
efficiency. A recent resident survey helped us to realize where are strengths and services
are. Our report card was good and we are very excited that much was done with limited
budgets but use Quality People with Quality Service to deliver Quality of Life. We are
implementing microfiche to better manager records and correspondence. I will continue to
work with the council and the town manager to always strive for effectiveness and
efficiency.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: An uncomfortable truth about Flower Mound today is that it has been taken over by
negative politics and publicity. We must work as a team as we have and get back to the
job of serving our constituents and businesses, all of them! We are in this world and life
together.

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Flower Mound Town Council, Place 2


Description: Note: All Flower Mound residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Al Filidoro

Biographical Info:
Name: Albert Filidoro
Street Address: 3213 Augusta Drive
City/Town: Flower Mound
State: Texas
Date of Birth: June 21, 1952
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (972)768-1146
Home Phone Number: (972)539-2145
Mobile Phone Number: (972)768-1146
Fax Number: (972)539-2181
E-mail Address: AskAl@AlFilidoro.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.alfilidoro.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: JD, Texas Wesleyan University School of Law MBA, LeTourneau University BBA,
Cleveland State University Associate Professor, Graduate Programs University of Phoenix
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 20 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 20 years
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Attorney at Law
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: FM Town Council – Place 2 FM Community Development Corporation FM Fire Control,
Prevention and Emergency Medical Services District FM Crime Control and Prevention
District Leadership Flower Mound – 2010 Summit Club – President FM Rotary Club (Paul
Harris Fellow) Denton County and Flower Mound Bar Associations
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Chairman, FM Planning and Zoning Commission Chairman of Economic Development
Committee, FM Chamber of Commerce Chairman and member, Civil Service Commission
Summit Club FM Rotary Club (Paul Harris Fellow) Denton and Flower Mound Bar
Associations
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: County Auditor (sought) Flower Mound Town Council (sought/held)
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $6,000
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: My top three contributors are family members and a close friend.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: Petition for divorce. I have never been arrested or involved in any criminal
proceedings. As a practicing attorney at law, I am constantly involved in lawsuits as a
representative of my clients.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am running for re-election to town council because I truly care about Flower Mound. It
is my home and has been for over 20 years. I should be considered the most qualified

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because my education, professional experience, and community service give me the


background to navigate this community through increasingly rough waters. In addition, my
skills as a successful mediator qualify me to sit at the table and give our community a
strong presence as part of our negotiation team. I also have over 20 years of executive
management state and local government experience. I was the CFO [Director of Finance]
of a major state agency with over $1.5 billion in annual revenues. I understand the
intricacies of town government. (Flower Mound has a $90 million annual budget and over
$400 million in assets). While some treat town elections as a popularity contest, I believe
running the town is analogous to running a business. Town council should act as a board of
directors with the best training, background, and experience available in order to manage
tax dollars wisely. Finally, I firmly believe that every council decision should give priority
to the health, safety, and welfare of our children and residents. I remember this every day
that I serve our residents as your Town Council Member.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1. Perform a complete review of our Oil and Gas ordinances to protect the health,
safety, and welfare of our residents while respecting the rights of mineral owners. 2. Work
to leverage our new Community Hospital in an economic development “Medical
Community” to bring new and stable high paying jobs and quality medical services to our
community and the Southern Denton County region. 3. Preserve and protect our
SMARTGrowth and Master Plan development process and guard against an onslaught of
new high density apartments in currently designated high potential commercial
development locations, such as the Lakeside Business District and the FM 2499 business
corridor.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I encourage the residents of our community to perform their due dilligence before
casting their vote in this crucial election that will determine the direction of our community
for many years to come. I also encourage them to examine the records of each
candidate. Residents should ask questions and get definitive answers. They will find that
other candidates for town council have an undeniable personal financial interest in gas
drilling in Flower Mound. Two members of town council have already recused themselves
from important votes due to their conflict of interest during this past term. With the
opportunity to benefit personally, candidates with conflicts cannot participate in the
relevant legislative process due to their conflicts of interest. This will not serve the interest
of the community well at a time when a vast majority of residents want a major revision of
our gas drilling ordinances. A key question our residents will inevitably be asking
themselves as they cast their ballot on May 8th is, "Who Do They Trust?" I do not have a
financial or personal conflict of interest in gas drilling activities.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: The main issue with increased gas drilling is risk to the quality of life of our residents.
Citizens tell me they do not want gas wells within 300-500 feet of their backyards and they
are unhappy with the gas drilling variances adopted in 2005 and 2007. They tell me that
they want the ordinance that they had before it was weakened in 2005 and 2007. I
advocate a complete review our gas ordinance to manage the new problems that have
come to light by the recent advent of urban gas drilling. Land owners have a right to
capitalize on their assets, including surface and subsurface rights. Our key focus must be to
manage gas drilling in a responsible manner without impacting the health and safety of the
rest of the community. I believe we can accomplish this balance with a complete review of
our gas ordinances.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: I support a diversified tax base and am committed to continuing to attract the right
types of quality commercial development and design to our business districts. Lately,
developers represented by a former member of council, are advancing development plans
that feature high density apartments in what they call “mixed use” developments. Clearly
the term “mixed used” is the new term for high density apartments. Developers are
preparing to submit plans that call for zoning changes that will allow for thousands of new
high density apartments. This community does not support high density apartments and
should not allow zoning changes that squander our commercial corridors. Too often the
apartments are built first and the commercial part of the development is abandoned. This
is not the type of commercial development that will lead to a health and vibrant tax base

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diversification. Lately we have not been as successful in terms of our development activity
as evidenced by the foreclosure of the River Walk project and Parker Square, both
developments that consumed huge work and manpower efforts by our town. Many other
communities are also struggling to attract healthy commercial development in our current
weak financial climate but history has shown us that the economy is cyclical. Short sighted
planning will lead to long term unwanted consequences. High density apartments, though
easy to develop, are not the answer for this community.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Flower Mound is a stable community and there are no demographic changes.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Illegal immigration is not an issue in Flower Mound.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Regional transit is not an issue in Flower Mound.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: Many of our communities are wrestling with the issues raised by urban gas drilling and
the effects in their neighborhoods. A great many share the same issues and concerns in
protecting their residents. Texas, as a gas and oil state, never envisioned urban drilling
and have not adequately made provisions to take it in effect. We should get together and
compare notes of those communities affected by urban gas drilling. This gathering should
not be influenced by gas drillers or their biasedly organized regional gas councils. Much can
be gained by communities in sharing experiences, issues and best practice solutions. We
could all benefit from consistency across communities and sharing of experiences as there
is a huge body of information across our country detailing community experiences with gas
drilling in our residential areas.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Our town actually does a very good job of delivering town services to our residents
given the current financial climate. However, as our community is starting to see the
downward trend of tax revenue, we must be more diligent and perform town service
audits to drive out any current inefficiencies in order to more effectively use our tax
revenues and still maintain our current level of town services. The next council must
sharpen their pencils and conduct a detailed review during the next budget season. That is
why we need members of council that have a strong, detailed financial background to
understand and drive out those inefficiencies.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Our town staff has done a tremendous job in this economic downturn. But, there are
more challenges ahead. As sales tax collections trend downward with a projected loss of
12% annually, we need new leadership and a new majority comprise of financial
professionals that can bring their education and corporate experiences to the table and
work in a cooperative manner with our town staff to weather the upcoming economic
storm. Town staff should not be afraid to bring innovative ideas forward to Town Council
and department heads should not have to look over their shoulder or fear for their jobs.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: The "uncomfortable truth" is that gas drilling operators and the small subset of the
lease-holders they recruited to influence neighbors with mineral rights are willing to
sacrifice the core values that have made Flower Mound the desirable place that we all were
attracted to when we chose to move here and raise our families just for financial gain with
no real benefit to the community. This group is small but well organized and funded by the
gas drilling companies. They are the first to cry “politics” despite the fact that they
themselves attempted to pressure council to adopt adverse gas drilling practices without
public scrutiny. This group has tragically divided our community. I am committed to
getting gas drilling challenges behind us in a responsible manner and bringing our town
back together to once again enjoy the quality of life that we expect in Flower Mound.

Gerald Robinson
Biographical Info:
Name: Gerald Robinson

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Street Address: 6920 Hidden Valley Road


City/Town: Flower Mound
State: Texas
Date of Birth: 3/25/1947
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 817-717-4400
Home Phone Number: 817-430-8757
Mobile Phone Number: 817-896-2744
Fax Number: 817-755-4840
E-mail Address: gerald@electgeraldrobinson.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.electgeraldrobinson.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: BBA University of North Texas 1971
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 19 years 8 months
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Independent Certified Financial Planner
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: District Chair Rotarians for Fighting Aids, Past President of The Flower Mound Rotary
Club, Vice-Presdient of The Summit Club of Flower Mound
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Open Space Board 2002-2005 (Chair 2004-2005). Environmental Conservation
Commission 2005-2008 (Chair all years). Citizen Budget Partners 2004-2005 and
2006-2007. Master Plan Steering Committee 2005-2006. Mixed Use Committee
2007-2008. Denton County Transportation Committee 2008-2009. Flower Mound Chamber
2004-2008.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $1550
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Friends, Family, and Neighbors.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: Flower Mound is a very special place with a unique character that I would like to assist
in preserving. I am very concerned about the direction of the Town and the direction of the
Town Council due to the divisiveness and lack of civility towards each other that is
currently being displayed. I am the most qualified candidate based on my experience
serving the Town and my professional experience in solving challenges in a respectable and
civil manner. I was Chair of the Open Space Board that became the Environmental
Conservation Commission for four years. The commission was instrumental in the
establishment of our 2 Conservation Developments as well as greatly strengthening our
Tree Ordinance. I served on the Citizen Budget Partners for 2004-2005 and 2006-2007. In
2006 I was appointed to the Master Pan Update Steering Committee and in 2007-2008 on
the Mixed Use Ordinance Development Committee. Both of these committees provided for
numerous public meetings and many differences of opinion. I utilized my skills on both
committees in reaching consensus that improved our Town. In the past 8 years I served
our Town, I developed a good working relationship with Town Staff, the Mayor and Council.
I believe these relationships and my dedication to a respectful and civilized debate of
issues makes me the most qualified candidate to serve in Place 2.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1) Support high quality development in properly Zoned areas of town to continue
diversification of our tax base while striking the correct balance of preservation and
growth. 2) Support and work to strengthen the Town’s strong Oil and Gas drilling
Ordinances while also supporting citizen’s ability to capitalize on their mineral rights as long
as the procedures are very safe and environmentally sound. I would support greater
monitoring of the ambient air in and around the well sites. 3) Support expansion of the

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Town’s efforts to become more green and environmentally responsible. These efforts
would include establish a steering committee to create a Town-wide Environmental
Sustainability Strategy. The strategy would contain goals and objectives to address
consumption, safety and protection as well as programs to encourage energy and water
conservation, utilization of alternative energy sources, green building standards and
development incentives, and other areas of environmental sensitivity and responsibility. In
addition the Town should continue to progress in utilizing Conservation Development
techniques and working toward the Town Goal of 35% Tree Canopy coverage for the Town.
I would utilize my relationships with Staff and Council to assist in providing a framework
for achievement of the above 3 in a financially responsible manner. Paying for future town
objectives is very dependent on the achievement of goal #1.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I am a consensus builder and develop relationships with people built on trust and
respect. I have the entirety of Flower Mound citizen’s interests to support, not just that of a
single-issue special interest group like my opponent. Over my 8 years of Town Service, I
have developed great relationships with many of our Town leaders who I know and
respect. These individuals have been my mentors and friends that have taught me the
importance of being respectful and civil, as well as a Love for Flower Mound. In addition to
my numerous town commissions and committees, I am currently Vice-President of the
Summit Club and have 10 years perfect attendance as a Rotarian with the Flower Mound
Rotary Club of which I am a past President. I serve our Rotary District as the
representative for Rotarians for Fighting Aids.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: This is the single-issue my opponent has been heavily involved with in our Town. I
believe our ordinances are among the strongest in the North Texas area, but as technology
improves, so must our ordinances. I would support establishing a committee made up of
all town interests to improve our ordinances so that all of our town citizen’s can live with
safe air, water, and soil. The committee should also address any safety concerns from the
increased truck traffic from the additional well pad sites. All this should be done while
allowing mineral rights owner’s reasonable access to their minerals and insuring that gas
drilling companies and the contract firms are responsible firms operating in a practical,
prudent, and safe manner. To date the town has updated the natural gas drilling ordinances
in 2007 and the pipeline ordinances in 2010. I feel the committee should provide
recommendations to council to improve our 2007 ordinances.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: As you could determine from my answer to a previous question, supporting high quality
development in properly Zoned areas of town to continue diversification of our tax base
while striking the correct balance of preservation and growth is one of my most important
priorities. I believe as a Town this is also a top priority as evidenced by the tremendous
growth of residential and commercial development in the past decade. I also feel that the
single-issue action group is providing a significant amount of negative image factors for our
Town. Getting a reasonable resident, business, or development to want to locate to Flower
Mound in the face of all this “Stop Mentality” negativity being generated can be a
significant challenge. Up till now our town has done an excellent job of attracting
development, but we have much more to do to properly diversify our tax base.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: While our Town is still a predominantly young family town, the number of older citizens
wishing to stay in Flower Mound is increasing each year. The town is addressing the growth
of our senior population. The addition of new medical facilities attracted to our Town, not
only helps all of our citizens, but especially our senior population. I am supportive of our
seniors, as long as we can accomplish their needs in a financially responsible manner. I
also feel we must begin to address the living needs of our seniors by utilizing more cluster
residential developments as well as other residential alternatives.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: I believe immigration is a Federal matter and no changes in local laws are needed to
address this issue.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what

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steps would you take to make it happen?


A: Flower Mound voters declined participation in the Denton County Transportation
Authority (DCTA) by not approving the sales and use tax referendum on September 13,
2003. I support the decision of our voters in 2003. As the regional system develops, Flower
Mound may need to find ways of providing shuttle services for some of our citizens to rail
transfer stations or to DFW Airport. The details and funding of such service for this
alternative would have to be considered by Town Council at that time.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: North Texas and Flower Mound could benefit from greater regional cooperation on
transportation planning, air and water quality, water conservation, waste management,
recycling, and emergency management. In addition to participation in the North Central
Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG), I would encourage greater cooperation with our
sister cities in southern Denton County.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: I had the pleasure of serving on the Citizen Budget Partners review of the Town budget
for 2004-2005 and again in 2006-2007. I learned that a lot of our budgets are preordained
based on historical trends and comparative city analysis. While I believe our town is
operating in a cost-effective manner compared to other cities of a comparable nature, I do
think we have room for budget reductions utilizing a needs-based approach rather than a
comparative analysis approach. I would work with Town Council and staff to begin to
identify processes that would improve how we deliver services to our citizens, as well as
possibly being more cost-effective.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Past Leadership of Flower Mound has done a fine job of putting us in a sound financial
position heading into the economic storm. As stated earlier, one of my top priorities is
supporting high quality development in properly Zoned areas of town to continue
diversification of our tax base while striking the correct balance of preservation and
growth. While I believe our town is operating in a cost-effective manner compared to other
cities of a comparable nature, I do think we have room for budget reductions utilizing a
needs-based approach rather than a comparative analysis approach. I would work with
Town Council and staff to begin to identify processes that would improve how we deliver
services to our citizens, as well as possibly being more cost-effective. I oppose any
increase in the property tax rate in Flower Mound.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: While our traffic situation is improving with existing and planned expansions. Our
SMARTGrowth program requires a “Level of Service” of “C” or better to approve new
developments. Many of our levels are currently below “C”. While the improvements on FM
2499 and FM 1171 will help, we will also begin to experience more residents of other cities
flowing through our Town. The only feasible way out of this problem is to increase
connectivity, add additional lanes, and build more roads to meet the traffic demand.

Flower Mound Town Council, Place 4


Description: Note: All Flower Mound residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Steve Lyda

Biographical Info:
Name: Steve Lyda
Street Address: 3128 Sheryl Dr.
City/Town: Flower Mound
State: Texas

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Date of Birth: August 17, 1972


Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-355-8346
Home Phone Number: 972-355-8346
E-mail Address: asksteve@stevelyda.com
Campaign Web Site Address: http://www.stevelyda.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: I have a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of Texas at
Austin (1994).
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 12 years. My wife and I bought our first home in Flower Mound and have lived here
ever since.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: I am a principal software development engineer for Current Group
(www.currentgroup.com). I develop new embedded software products for use in smart
electrical grids. “Smart Grid” is a revolutionary technology which enhances the
transmission of electricity more efficiently and without disruption from suppliers to
customers.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: I am currently the Chair of the Flower Mound Transportation Commission. I also am
Chair of the Wellington Homeowners Association Finance Committee and Treasurer of the
Summit Club of Flower Mound, which is Flower Mound's oldest fraternal service
organization. I am a member of the Wellington Elementary School PTA and I volunteer
with the Religious Education Program at my Church.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Vice-Chair of Flower Mound Transportation Commisson (2009) Member, Institute of
Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Representative to the Student Engineering
Council, the University of Texas at Austin. President, Moore-Hill Residence Hall Association,
the University of Texas at Austin Eagle Scout, Boy Scouts of America
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: I ran for Flower Mound Town Council in 2009 and lost by 29 votes.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: To date, about $6,000.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: The only contributions I have accepted, and will accept, are those from individuals. I
have not, and will not, accept any contribution from an oil or gas company, lobbying
organization, or PAC.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I think service to the community and the ability to listen and represent people is very
important. My family has a long tradition of community service and I am no stranger to
taking up a cause on behalf of the people. I believe our local government has the most
influence in our everyday lives, and we as individuals working together, can easily bring
change to our Town Council. I understand what people expect of someone on Town Council
and am ready to strongly represent the people I am elected to serve. Personally, I strive
to maintain a high standard of ethics for myself. I am active in the community with several
organizations and have been chosen, by my peers, to lead many of those groups. Also, as
an Eagle Scout, I am sworn to continue to live by Scouting’s core values, tenants, and
moral codes. On Town Council, I will be honest and fair in the decisions I make for the
Town. Professionally, I work for a small engineering company. I am very detail oriented, a
quick but careful decision maker, and always mindful of budgetary restraints. Working with
small companies has taught me the value of hard work and how to best serve my
customers. I believe this experience directly applies to serving our residents when on
council.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: First, Flower Mound is facing one of the toughest annual budgets in the upcoming year. I
would work with the Town's CFO and begin to look at the comprehensive budget for next

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year, so we can maintain quality services for our Town, but not be forced to raise taxes.
Next, I would work to have a comprehensive review of our current oil and gas ordinance.
Based on significant feedback from our residents, I feel it is necessary to review the
variances on setbacks from drill sites. In particular, I also want to re-address the addition
of zoning for drilling wastewater collection facilities in our Town's agriculturally zoned
areas. Council needs to ensure that we have the proper and best drilling practices in place
to address the needs of our community. Finally, I would work with my fellow members of
council to review our immediate transportation concerns in the community and would seek
to expand the role of the Transportation Commission. Similarly to the way we have
worked to complete roads with the City of Lewisville, I would also move forward in
addressing needed regional transportation solutions with the cities of Grapevine and
Coppell.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My background is in engineering and business. If elected, I will bring a unique set of
skills to the Council. In my work experience, I have taken on large projects with
complicated issues and laden with budgetary constraints. I have also had to learn about
new things and solve problems in a very limited amount of time. I have lived in Flower
Mound for twelve years and remember the effects that uncontrolled growth had on our
roads, schools, and other infrastructure. I understand the value of the SMART Growth
ordinance, how it protects our infrastructure and what it means to our quality of life. Given
my length of residency and community service, I also understand the Town’s organization,
structure, and what is required to operate it on a day to day basis. These are key skills
required for a councilperson. I am open, honest, and fair. I have not entered into any
agreement, personally or professionally, which would compromise my ability to ethically
represent the citizens of Flower Mound. By not putting myself in compromising situations, I
will not have to remove myself from debate when matters that are important to the
people come before council.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: The purpose of Flower Mound’s oil and gas ordinance is to adequately protect our
residents from the effects of oil and gas exploration. If elected to council, I would call for a
complete and comprehensive review of all oil and gas ordinances annually. I will seek to
halt the encroachment of oil and gas development into our residential community by
reviewing variances on setbacks and re-evaluating the zoning changes that allow for
centralized collection facilities in agriculturally zoned areas. In addition to submitting
requests for increased vigilance by our oil and gas inspectors, I would also seek to
establish true air quality baselines and standards for pipeline monitoring. I will also
continue to work with our residents to address their concerns when it comes to natural gas
drilling, something which the current council leadership has lost sight of. I would continue
to work with the Texas Department of Health and Safety, the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality, and the Texas Railroad Commission to ensure that drilling in our
area is kept to the highest standards and that all environmental and safety practices are
being followed. I would also work with our Town’s environmental staff to keep our
residents informed on drilling activities in Town and the possible impact it will have on their
homes. Lastly, I would work with members of our state legislature to assure that no new
state law is put in place that will affect Flower Mound’s safety practices and local control
over its oil and gas regulation.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Attracting high quality commercial development to Flower Mound will be one of my top
priorities when serving on the Town Council. By attracting high quality retail and
commercial development, we attract businesses that help keep our sales tax dollars in
Town and offset some of the property tax burden for our residents. I am currently not
satisfied with the job the Town is doing in attracting commercial development that fits the
character of our community. Our current town leadership continues to enter into
agreements to build new retail space, but does nothing to ensure that the development will
attract quality tenants that people will frequent. This causes the Town to end up with a lot
of empty retail space that does not generate any sales tax revenue. The Town needs to
work with developers on projects that will best enhance our community and provide the
greatest opportunity for our residents. The Council should limit economic development
incentives to companies that have a proven track record of success. I would also look to
our SMARTGrowth standards and the Town’s master plan as a guide to new development in

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our town.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Flower Mound is currently not undergoing any significant demographic changes. It will
be important to stay abreast of the current population of our community, especially noting
the changes in our population as a result of the 2010 census. This data will help us plan and
prioritize the construction of new Town facilities that best fit the needs of our community.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Flower Mound has not had a major issue with illegal immigration, and with the addition
of more police beats in Flower Mound, we have seen a reduction in crime. The Town
Council should continue to work with our police department and Town staff to ensure that
illegal immigration does not become a concern. If illegal immigration becomes an issue,
the Council must work with the police department to address concerns and add resources
as needed.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Flower Mound’s citizens have typically been against regional transit systems. However,
as the level of traffic increases in our area, and with the continued rise in gasoline prices,
the citizens of Flower Mound may look to a regional transit option. As the current chairman
of the Flower Mound Transportation Commission, I have asked to continue receiving
reports from the Denton County Transit Authority and the Regional Transportation Council
of the North Central Texas Council of Governments. If the residents’ needs change in the
future, we want to be prepared to quickly offer transit solutions. A connection to transit
and light rail systems in Lewisville and Grapevine would be simple due to Flower Mound’s
proximity to these cities. Until Flower Mound has the citizen interest and funds available we
do not want to force this system on the residents. In the meantime, I would continue to
work with our regional partners to make sure Flower Mound’s needs are adequately
addressed. If on council, I would work with the Transportation Commission to make sure
transit options continue to be studied and planned.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: The Town’s staff has always made use of inter-local agreements. By joining with our
sister cities to increase Flower Mound’s buying power, our Town has been afforded the
ability to save money when making big purchases. Flower Mound also works well with our
county government to help fund road and infrastructure improvements in our Town. I
would continue to encourage the use of these regional arrangements.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: The staff of the Town has always been focused on its customers, the citizens of our
Town. Our Town has excellent police and fire response times, as well as a good master
plan for building our roads, water, and sewer systems. As an engineer who works in small
business, I believe there is always a way to improve the process in a more cost effective
manner. To that end, I would work with the Town Manager and the heads of various Town
departments to review their processes and ask what the council could do or what tools
they could provide to help make their departments work more efficiently. I would prioritize
process improvements based on the greatest cost savings to the Town.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: I participated in the Town’s public presentation on the budget this year and understand
the challenges that will be faced by the Council when it comes to the fiscal budget for the
next planning year. The Council should start now to prioritize its spending and prepare for
challenges. I would work to organize our Town’s spending so we can avoid raising taxes or
cutting back on our Town’s services. I would also encourage Town staff to continue to seek
regional funding sources to help complete projects in Town and offset some of the costs to
our taxpayers.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: In a city of over 65,000 people, with over 30,000 registered voters, only about 3,000
(5%) citizens vote in local elections. By voting, we assure that the council is doing the will
of the people. By not voting, we are putting our needs and desires into someone else’s
hands. I would like to see more citizens participate in the election and have their voice
heard through the democratic process. I am hopeful that the outcome of this years’ local
election will have an increased voter turnout. With the unprecedented citizen concern

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addressing oil and gas drilling activities in our Town, and with our citizens working to
complete a successful petition drive to change the ordinances in our Town, I feel our
citizens now realize that taking an active role in voting for Town Council should not be
taken for granted. I applaud our residents for their hard work, and would be honored to
represent them on the Town Council.

Bryan Webb

Biographical Info:
Name: Bryan Webb
Street Address: 4112 High Rd
City/Town: Flower Mound
State: TX
Date of Birth: June 2, 1957
Home Phone Number: 817.961.0180
E-mail Address: bryan@electwebb.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.electwebb.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: BS Business Administration – Finance Franklin University, Columbus OH
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: October 2005
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Credit Risk Manager
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Planning & Zoning Commission, Flower Mound Summit Club
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Flower Mound: Board of Adjustment / Oil and Gas Board of Appeals, Transportation
Commission Lewisville: Planning and Zoning Commission - Chair, Blue Ribbon Bond
Committee - Chair, 4b Corporation Board - Secretary, Zoning Board of Adjustment,
Transportation Commission
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: N/A
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: Modest
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Friends and Family
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I believe Flower Mound is the best place in DFW to live and raise a family. It is why my
family moved here and I want to insure that it remains that way. Today’s level of discourse
in Flower Mound is doing great harm to the Town’s reputation. We need a return of reason,
respect, and responsibility.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: Build a coalition of council members to: 1.Add a full time, technically trained and
certified, gas safety engineer to the Town’s staff to conduct weekly VOC emission testing at
every gas operation site within our town. 2.Implement regular Air Quality Testing at all gas
operation locations to monitor and track changes in air quality. 3.Institute a series of
community seminars on topics of interest. As an example, experts in the fields of
environmental safety, environmental links to cancer, gas drilling would be invited to give
informative presentations to the community. This could be accomplished for a minimal

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expense. I would propose to pay for initiatives 1 and 2 by imposing an annual fee on all
new pad sites, wells and production facilities. To the extent legally allowed, I would also
seek to have this fee assessed to existing operations. An operator could apply for a fee
waiver with the installation of 24 hour constant monitoring equipment at the site and
allowed Town access to the data in real time.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: Experience - 15 years of civic involvement, Proven ability to work through complex
issues, I won’t expose our citizens to costly litigation expenses and attorney fees unless
absolutely necessary. I would rather use tax dollars to provide services our citizens want
or reduce their tax burden.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: Recognizing that Flower Mound ordinances are among the strongest in the state and
that issues relating to developing the Barnett Shale resources are regional in nature, I
would propose a Regional Legislative Council to identify best practices, industry trends,
and to fight Austin and Washington based initiatives that minimize local control. We need
state and federal regulators to work with us, not handcuff us. Flower Mound can have the
strongest ordinances in the United States, but if our upstream and upwind neighboring
communities do not, our citizens can still be at risk.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Development is an opportunity in Flower Mound. For years we built a reputation as
being ‘difficult to do business with.’ Over the past 6 years, we have made progress to
change this perception. As our economy strengthens, we must take the initiative and be
prepared to act when opportunity presents itself. We need to aggressively seek out the
kinds of development that will benefit the town today and in the future.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Our population, like that of the nation is growing older. Flower Mound is a very Family
Friendly place to live. Great Parks, Great Schools, Convenient Shopping. Everything a
family could want or need, except a variety of housing choices for our older citizens. To be
truly family friendly, we need a place the entire family can call home. That can include
single family, townhomes and apartment residences designed for the specific needs of
seniors. We don’t want our empty nesters to leave our nest. We want our seniors to
remain an important, involved, and integral part of our community. To prove that point,
we need to secure funding for a Senior Activity Center.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Unlike some of our surrounding communities, Flower Mound does not have an illegal
immigration problem.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Today we have DART, which Flower Mound voted not to become a part of. In 2003 the
citizens of Flower Mound voted not to support the Denton County Transportation Authority.
We fund a limited service alternative instead, SPAN. I support the decision our citizens
made at the polls in 2003. Because of where the town is located and where the mass
transit corridors were planned, our decision made since. If sometime in the future,
commuter rail linking Denton to DFW is planned, Flower Mound must become a part of the
process. At that point our voters will deserve the opportunity to once again express their
opinion on an important transportation issue.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: First would be my proposal to coordinate efforts around gas development in the Barnett
Shale. Second is to recognize that Flower Mound’s closest partner is the Lewisville
Independent School District. We must work closer with the district to minimize the friction
experienced over the past year. Likewise, we have strong relationships with other
neighboring municipalities. We need to leverage their economic successes to drive greater
economic growth, both for Flower Mound and the communities around us.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: We need to renegotiate our trash collection contract. Recycling must be made the

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primary function of our efforts, not secondary. We must replace current recycling buckets
with wheeled Polly Carts. We need a centrally located facility where citizens can bring yard
and storm debris for mulching and composting.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Flower Mound has weathered the current economic slow down better than some of our
neighbors. This is due in part to the conservative financial controls we work within. We
need to continue this conservative approach to budgeting and spending, and not waste tax
dollars on needless litigation. We also must prepare to take advantage of opportunities
that will come our way. Given our location, consumer base, and highly skilled and
educated work force, Flower Mound will be high on the list of companies seeking to grow
and expand. On April 30th, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital of Flower Mound will open.
This will be an economic development engine for the Health Care industry in Flower
Mound. With the hospital will come professional offices and hundreds of highly skilled, well
paid employees. No longer will our citizens have to travel to neighboring communities to
receive quality health care. I will work together with our Mayor and council members to
expand upon our health care successes to build a diversified commercial tax base. Just like
our 401k plans, the town needs a diversified portfolio of commercial development that
includes Retail, Health Care, Corporate, and Hospitality.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Our Town is deeply divided by the Gas issue. From the extremes of “No Fracking Way”
to “Drill Baby Drill”. We must set aside the heated rhetoric & sound bites. We have to work
together, find common ground and address both the health and safety concerns of all of
our citizens and the rights of the mineral owners. I have spoken with and exchanged
emails with folks on both sides of the issue. I believe we can find common ground, because
we all truly want the same thing, to have Flower Mound remain the best place to Live,
Raise our Families, Work, and Play.

Frisco City Council, Place 2


Description: Note: All Frisco residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Jeff Cheney

Biographical Info:
Name: Jeff Cheney
Street Address: 11377 Deep Canyon Tr
City/Town: Frisco
State: Tx
Date of Birth: 1/22/75
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-550-8200
Home Phone Number: 972-712-7366
Mobile Phone Number: 214-707-7320
Fax Number: 214-550-8201
E-mail Address: jeff@jeffcheney.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.ChooseCheney.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: University of Texas at Austin: Graduated with High Honors with a Bachelor in Business
Administration and a Master in Professional Accounting
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: Since December 2003
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: n/a

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Q: Occupation/main source of income:


A: Realtor, Keller Williams Realty Owner, Northstar Property Management Owner, Frisco-
Online.com
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: * Endorsed by Police Officers Association * Endorsed by Frisco Fire Fighters Association
* Endorsed by the Collin County Association of Realtors * Endorsed by WeAreFrisco.org *
Mayor Pro Tem (May 2009 to current) * Collin County Business Press 21 Leaders for the
21st Century * Frisco Education Foundation Board Member 2005 to Present * Frisco
Chamber of Commerce Member 2004 to Present * Mayor’s Youth Council – Council Liaison
* City Council Budget and Audit Committee * City Council Technology Committee * Frisco
Square Municipal District Board * Certified Public Accountant * Registered Investment
Adviser
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: * Keller Williams Agent Leadership Council * CCAR Certificate of Appreciation for
outstanding contributions to the promotion and preservation of the real estate profession *
Co-founder of Get Fit Frisco! Fitness campaign promoting health and physical activity to
Frisco families * Co-founder of Annual Frisco Child Safety Day * Frisco Relay for Life Top
Fundraising Team for several years * Sponsor and volunteer for many community activities
and local charities
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: I was elected to Frisco City Council in 2007. I was unanimously selected by the Council
to serve as Mayor Pro Tem in 2009.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $2,405 as of April 8, 2010
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Collin County Association of Realtors ($1,000), David Siciliano ($500), Robert
Medigovich ($400)
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: My three years of experience on Council have allowed me to develop many
relationships with our residents, throughout the business community, and with our
surrounding cities and regional partners. With the high amount of turnover we have had
over the last three years, electing experience is more critical than ever. I view this
position, as well as the position of Mayor Pro Tem, as a privilege and I take these
responsibilities very seriously. I attended the University of Texas at Austin and graduated
with High Honors with a Bachelor in Business Administration and a Masters in Professional
Accounting. My professional experience includes working as a Senior Associate for
PricewaterhouseCoopers and a Director of Portfolio Management for Highland Capital
Management. I am currently a Realtor with Keller Williams Realty and a small business
owner of Northstar Property Management and Frisco-Online.com. I am a Certified Public
Accountant, a Registered Investment Adviser, and a Chartered Financial Analyst Level 2
Candidate. My professional background and experience as a business owner has trained
me for the broad skill set required to serve on City Council. Through my career I have
learned many important skills relevant to this position including the importance of proper
operational checks and balances, financial analysis, budgeting, forecasting, negotiation,
and management. My entire career has been in professional services acting as a role as a
fiduciary for my clients, meaning I must always place the interests of my clients above my
own. As a fiduciary for Frisco, I will continue to represent the city in a professional manner,
maintain a high level of integrity and ethics, and I will continue to be dedicated in serving
the needs of our community. Since I work in Frisco, I am easily accessible for our citizens.
Through my business networking and profession, I constantly hear the concerns and
opinions of our local business owners and our residents. My accessibility and day to day
interaction with the citizens of Frisco helps me keep my finger on the pulse of the City. I
am passionate about the direction of Frisco as I want the city to continue to grow into a
wonderful place for my wife and I to raise our 3 young children. I also hope that my
children will see Frisco as a place they would like to live and raise their families. My wife
and I feel blessed that we have been given the opportunity to work within the community
in which we live. We feel it is an honor to serve the community that has been so good to
our family. I am excited about Frisco’s future of being a highly livable community and
maintaining our reputation of being a great place to live, work, play, and grow. Finally, I
believe my proven record of leadership, dedication, community involvement, and open

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communication make me the best candidate for this position.


Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1) Fiscal Conservatism: I believe Frisco should focus on core priorities first (Police, Fire,
and infrastructure). In addition, I believe in a diversified tax base through retail, business
and commercial growth. These types of strategic investments through our Economic
Development Corporation as well as other public/private and FISD partnerships is what
has led to being able to deliver such quality city services at one of the lowest tax rates in
the region. Each year, we have delivered budgets well below the rates advertised during
our bond election. In the last three years, we have reduced the debt service portion of our
tax rate from 50% to 43%. In order to reduce our debt burden further, we need to
continue to be conservative with our bond sales until economic conditions improve. 2)
Economic Development: The Frisco EDC is getting more inquiries than ever as many
businesses are seeing Frisco as a great place to do business and executives see the
community as a great place to relocate their employees. A primary goal we have is to
attract a Fortune 500 company as well as continued growth in the technology sector.
Providing opportunities for our citizens to work in the community they live in, is a core
advantage we have by funding our EDC. Stonebriar mall, IKEA, and the surrounding area
was a very big win for Frisco many years ago. Today we are already starting plans for the
next frontier along 380. Frisco needs to be aggressive in developing infrastructure and
being prepared to win the next mall destined to be built along 380. In addition, much work
has been done to deliver needed services along 423 and Custer road where tax dollars
were leaving to go to neighboring cities rather than staying in Frisco. The Wal-Mart on
423/Eldorado and the Super Kroger on Eldorado/Custer are great examples of keeping tax
dollars in Frisco. We need to continue to look for opportunities along our borders to provide
additional services where residents are currently visiting other cities to get what they
need. Frisco lowers the tax burden on our residents by generating tax revenue from
visitors from outside of the community. One of our main goals is for Frisco to be a
destination city to attract tourism dollars. We have many great venues, great shopping,
and many activities to bring people from all over the metroplex and outside of the region.
We would also like to recruit a destination style hotel and other destination opportunities to
continue on this success. 3) Quality Growth: With Frisco not even 50% developed yet,
many of our decisions center around development. My experience in real estate provides a
unique perspective to these discussions. Frisco needs to continue to focus on high quality
sustainable residential and commercial development by maintaining our high building
standards. We will continue to seek partnerships to attract businesses and projects that
lead to economic growth. I feel it is crucial for Frisco to have a strong central core. Pizza
Hut Park and Frisco Square are a great start. The development of Grand Park, the Frisco
Junction, the Train Museum, and ultimately tying it into old downtown, will give us the very
strong central core that we need. This area will eventually be the signature location in
Frisco that continue to make Frisco a destination city.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: Electing experience is crucial at this time in Frisco’s development. Frisco has become
one of the most sought after locations in North Texas for families and businesses. This
could not have happened without strong leadership and citizen initiative. Frisco has
undergone tremendous turnover over the last three years. I have served with nine Council
Members and two Mayors. In addition, there has been turnover in many of our regional
representatives. Developing relationships with our business partners, regional leaders, and
other stakeholders takes time. Managing the budget over the coming years will require
experience and expert knowledge to position Frisco where we need to be. My experience
on Council and the numerous committees, along with my professional and other civic
involvement, make me the most qualified candidate. When a few people are making the
decisions for the city as a whole, it is crucial that all citizens can have their opinions and
concerns heard. By constantly having my finger on the pulse of Frisco, I am able to bring a
wide range of perspective to the City Council for consideration in our decision making. I
serve on many organization and boards outside of Frisco City Council and I am dedicated
to being available to listen to our citizens. I have found the best way to hear from the
people is to go directly to them. You will continue to see me at nearly every public event in
Frisco to be available to answer any concerns the citizens have. Through my work on the
technology committee, I advocated further transparency through the introduction of live
streaming of council meetings as well as new communication methods such as social
networking. In addition, I am constantly networking within the business community as well
as many other organizations throughout the city. Also, I have consistently met with many
neighborhood groups or any citizen who wants to learn more or express a concern. My city

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phone line connects directly to my cell phone so any resident can reach me instantly. I will
continue these efforts to bringing city government closer to the people.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Continuing to provide excellent service to citizens at a reasonable tax rate can be
accomplished by maintaining the balance of the residential, commercial, and retail tax
base. Focusing on economic development, business recruitment, and high quality
sustainable commercial construction are all important factors in maintaining this balance
and one of my highest priorities. Frisco has done an excellent job in attracting such
development. Prior examples include Stonebriar Mall Complex, Pizza Hut Park, the Frisco
Convention Center, the Dr Pepper Star Center and Ballpark, and Hall Office Park. Our
future top priorities include developing a central core and making long term plans for a
future mall along 380. The growth of more mixed-use developments, such as Frisco
Square, is a high priority. In addition, we intend to attract a Fortune 500 Company to
Frisco as well as attracting more businesses in the technology sector. Our Economic
Development Corporation is the busiest they have ever been with proposal requests from
businesses looking to relocate. We are excited about the opportunities we have to continue
generating economic development, creating quality jobs for our residents.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: One of our fastest growing demographics is the Senior population. Many in this
demographic rely on fixed incomes so we understand the importance of offering discounted
services. We increased our senior tax exemption to $50,000, which is the highest in the
area. We have made significant investments in our Senior Center and still have an
outstanding bond for further expansion. This is a free service including transportation to
and from the facility and services from Meals on Wheels. We offer discounted rates for the
Frisco Athletic Center, health exams on a monthly basis through the Wellness Clinic of
Collin County, and Centennial Hospital provides quarterly exams at no cost. Frisco is
viewed as a quality destination for the senior community with major developer
investments such as Frisco Lakes, a Del Webb Community.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: We should continue to work with federal agencies to vigorously enforce the laws
regarding illegal immigration without placing undue burden on our law enforcement,
business owners, and tax payers. Although reform is needed on much of the nation's
immigration law, Frisco needs to prioritize its resources and tax dollars on the issues
pressing our city which includes the transportation system, public health and safety, and
managing our growth.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Long range mobility plans have always been a priority with the current Council. If
gridlock is going to be minimized in the City, all modes of transportation need to be
considered including mixed use development types, pedestrian oriented communities, and
interconnected hike and bike trails throughout the City. As we build our infrastructure, any
short-term solutions to relieve the stress on our transportation system should be explored
including maximizing light signal efficiency, completing “bottleneck” roads when possible,
and working with contractors and developers to facilitate project completion. With the
current projected congestion levels estimated to remain severe even after our roads are
completed, we must be proactive in prioritizing regional mobility options for Frisco. Frisco
does have an opportunity for a commuter rail line along our existing train tracks. In
addition, we have identified future rail stops where we could have transit-oriented
developments. Currently, we use 1% of our sales tax to fund our EDC and CDC, rather
than public transportation. As our sales tax continue to grow, we may no longer need as
much investment in the EDC and CDC, and can start a managed process of diverting a
portion of those funds to public transportation. We are currently exploring ways to test the
demand for rail in Frisco by having temporary runs for large events in Pizza Hut Park. In
addition, we are looking for ways to phase in the investment in commuter rail rather than
making the substantial investment at once.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: As previously mentioned, North Texas could benefit from stronger regional cooperation
regarding mobility issues. This includes working as a region on a seamless transit system,

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cooperating with our neighboring cities in the completion of bordering roads, and
presenting a unified front when discussing our regional concerns at the state level. I was
supportive of the County bond packages which offered fund matching as incentives for
cities to collaborate on thoroughfares that extend through multiple cities. By forming
regional partnerships, we have opportunities to leverage our resources to create unique
shared projects for a region. A fine example is the Arts of Collin County which is a
collaboration of Frisco, Plano, and Allen. We will be working with these partners over the
coming months to develop an investment plan that makes sense for all involved. Over the
last few years, we have offered Fire services to portions of McKinney until they are able to
build their fire station. While this was serving residents of McKinney, our fire station was
closer to these residents than McKinney’s. Collaborations between cities such as these
benefit the region as a whole. As both cities continue to develop, McKinney may be able to
offer a similar level of assistance to Frisco in the future. We have worked very hard in
developing relationships with our neighboring cities, our county commissioners, and our
state and federal representatives.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Frisco has done an exceptional job in delivering high quality services at a cost-effective
rate to taxpayers. Frisco has one of the lowest tax rates in the region and yet provides
excellent police and fire protection, maintaining a low crime rate and an ISO #1 rating for
the fire department. As Frisco grows, it will be my objective to balance the residential and
commercial tax base while continuing to provide this high level of exceptional service at a
reasonable cost to tax payers. Frisco has been able to offer a high level of amenities by
leveraging our partnerships. We worked with FISD to develop SAFER, a cutting edge
system used by our Police and Fire Departments to respond to situations in our schools.
We look to expand this program to commercial buildings in the future. We used
public/private partnerships to build the Dr Pepper Star Center, the Dr Pepper Ballpark, and
Pizza Hut Park. In addition, we were able to build the Fieldhouse Complex by leveraging
our credit rating and signing a partner to cover all debt service on the facility. These
strategies have allowed us to provide these amenities without the tax burden had we built
them ourselves. City staff performed an audit of utility costs this year. Under average
usage, a Frisco resident pays $87 for water and sewage service. For the same usage
amounts, a resident would pay $93 in Plano and $105 in McKinney.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Through my experience as a Certified Public Accountant, financial auditor, and a
financial analyst, analyzing budgets is one of my strengths and enables me to bring fiscally
conservative and responsible principles to the Council. In my first Council work session, I
expressed my concerns of Frisco’s over reliance on building permit revenues to sustain the
budget. At that time the debt service portion of our tax rate had ballooned to nearly 50%
of the rate. This is alarmingly high, even for a high growth city such as Frisco. By being
fiscally conservative, we have managed that figure down to 43%. My goal is for Frisco to
get under 40%. Reducing our debt load creates a much more stable financial situation.
During my three years on Council as well as serving on the Budget and Audit Committee,
we have accomplished much to keep our taxes the lowest in the region, while also
delivering the highest level of services. Some of this work includes installing internal
control audits, 5 year budget projections, sensitivity analyses, delaying of bond sales,
pricing the FAC to be self sustaining, and balancing all of our utility accounts. In the last
three years, building permit revenues have declined from $11 million to $3 million,
coupled with flattening sales tax, growth, and property values. Despite these challenges,
our efforts toward fiscal responsibility have allowed us to deliver budgets well below bond
projected rates each year. As the economy improves, we can use the growth and new
revenue sources to start capital projects as well as funding our long term capital
reserves. Also, we will continue to look at reducing the tax burden on our residents by
building our retail and commercial tax base, leveraging resources through private/public
partnerships, reducing sales tax leakage along our borders, and generating tax from
outside our borders through tourism and travel. As a result of these policies, Frisco is
positioned to come out of the recession in a much better position than most cities and that
will allow us the flexibility to act on opportunities before us. Conservative fiscal policy is a
key ingredient to maintaining financial health in good times and bad.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Frisco has a high level of debt, even for a high growth city. Three years ago, nearly
50% of our tax rate was going to pay the debt service on our bonds. Although we have
been able to reduce this to 43%, I feel we need to be able to reduce it to 40% or under. In

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addition, Frisco needs to start building a long term capital reserve fund. One downside to
the rapid growth over the last 10 years is that these facilities and infrastructure will start
aging at the same time. We need to start funding a long term capital reserve fund so that
10-15 years from now we have the ability to make these required improvements without
issuing further debt.

Matthew Herrera

Biographical Info:
Name: Matthew James Herrera
Street Address: 10213 Max Ln. Frisco TX 75035
City/Town: Frisco
State: TX
Date of Birth: 09/04/1986
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-741-4770
Home Phone Number: 972-741-4770
E-mail Address: votematthew@live.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.votemherrera.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Graduate of Frisco High School-2005 Graduate of Dallas Baptist University 2009 with a
BBA In process of getting MBA at Dallas Baptist University
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 14 years and 9 months
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 14 years and 9 months
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: National Account Manager for Careington in Frisco, TX
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Chamber Member, Work for Careington in Frisco, Christian leader, Mentor for the youth
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Curtsinger,Smith,6th grade center, Staley, Clark, FHS Graduate, Coach, Relay for Life,
Internship for Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison, Public Speaker, Mission Arlington
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: N/A
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: N/A
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: N/A
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: NO
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I have seen Frisco grow from a small Main Street centered community to one of the
most exciting cities in the USA. I believe for the city to continue to grow and meet the
needs of a changing community, we will need a council that is made up of varied
backgrounds and age groups to represent all of our citizenship. I think my background and
age will complement the council makeup and represent the visions of many of our citizens.
Frisco has established a reputation of being one of the most sought after cities for its
quality of life and atmosphere for raising children. I want to make sure we continue to
provide the leadership needed to maintain these qualities. One of the greatest experiences
of my life was when I was selected to be an intern for Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison.
Working in her Dallas office inspired me to learn the political system and give back to the
community. My father was a City Councilman for the city of San Antonio and encouraged
me to take an active role in helping shape our community’s future. As a college student

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while going to Dallas Baptist University I learned about service to others and the
importance of giving. I have lived and grown up in the city of Frisco and have developed
many friendships with the people here. These friendships have included people from all
cultural and economic backgrounds. They have given me insight into the varying views
held by different groups. I have always been one to set goals and establish priorities.
Starting a business at the age of twenty three has helped me realize anything is possible
as long as you put your mind to it and work hard to make it happen. I have always had the
mindset that a life lived for others, is the only way to live. I have the leadership and
communication skills necessary to be an effective councilman.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: I feel one of the most important actions is motivation and inspiration throughout the
community. After campaigning for several weeks I have been torn with issues from
"Denton County residents and Collin County residents." We need to come together and
agree on issues as a city, not a county split. With unity comes effectiveness with other
obstacles and I believe I can and will encourage the divide. I will also focus on developing
a plan to cut costs in areas that could be reduced and still be effective. My third action will
be to call a meeting with neighboring cities involved in the ACC and re-establish the vision
we once had. I strongly believe we can put our heads together and devise a plan to raise
more money and motivate residents of all the cities to understand the value the ACC will
bring North Texas. There are more than just three actions, the residents of Frisco need to
stand up for what they believe in and get involved. In order for the City to be motivated,
we need a council that is willing to motivate and lead the residents.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: Conservative Voting Motivational skills Public Speaking Leadership qualities for all ages
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Frisco has established a reputation of being one of the most sought after cities for its
quality of life and atmosphere for raising children. With these qualities brings attraction for
residential and commercial development. With Frisco only 49 percent complete, this brings
a journey that we must establish together. This is one of my main priorities. In the last 10
years, our population has tripled but our employment has only doubled. Continuing the
quality level of life in Frisco with arts programs, school development, maintenance of
roads, etc would make getting corporations with employees more viable.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: It's not news to anyone around that growth has stalled, but it is possibly the most
important change in Frisco's demographics. We're not seeing as many new businesses and
developments, but we are seeing transplanted families, growing households and the
existing families of Frisco being pushed to the breaking point. The slowing population has
allowed Frisco to take some time to adjust to the growth that it has seen in the last
decade. Whether it be city departments or the council now is the time for Frisco to adjust,
refocus some priorities and ensure that we're ready when the populations boom again and
our economy shows growth.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Illegal immigration is a concern to all Americans throughout the Country not just on the
city level. I believe the Frisco police department should screen everyone who is arresdted.
If there is no identification, we should get ICE involved and let them do their job. ICE will
determine the outcome. Growing up in Frisco, I have seen our police department do a
great job with this matter.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: With the attractions Frisco currently has and will have in the future, I think a regional
transit system would benefit Frisco. People from surrounding cities will have access to
events in Frisco from concerts, games, and other family attractions without having to
drive. This will also benefit the residents of Frisco who work in other cities and deal with
traffic on a daily basis.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: Our regional relationship is very good. The North Texas regional planning is and will

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always be a priority. We have great relationships and I look forward to doing everything I
can to build on those relationships if elected to office.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Many of the good economic decisions that the city has benefited from came from staff
and the city manager's office. The council made costly decisions, in respect to
communications, over the last few years that have really provided for more transparency
and availability. Each city department has been charged with spending less while still
providing a timely, quality product. Many of Frisco's features are envied so I think it's easy
to say that we've handled our prosperity well.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Make maintenance a priority. Look into a few more tax helps to benefit new
developments. Use the influx of new sales tax revenue wisely (because the Target and
Stonebriar tax benefits have times out). Stabilize sales tax income. Continue to court new
event-driven ideas - like the football championship. Can't just focus on revenue, we have
to cut some costs. We've seen a lot of retail development in the last few years. This
provided permits, fees and tax revenue. In a slow down or in the growth that we soon
expect, we have to focus on maintenance. I'm sure there are some city plans and
properties that have had to be put on hold. Positions have been frozen and cuts have been
made. We must continue this fiscal responsibility throughout the first part of any new
growth seen. We can't ramp up our plans and programs just because the gray skies have a
silver lining. We must look at what is necessary for maintenance and what is needed for
sustenance before we provide for ideas that have yet to be budgeted, funded, planned or
made. City staff have prepared for "no economic growth" in 2010. We are also looking at
numbers from the appraisal offices that would project even more of a tax loss this year,
affecting the budgets we have yet to see. If a city can operate on less, why wasn't it? What
needs to be provided for even in a downturn? What doesn't ever need to be brought back?
Our reputation as a city is at stack in some circumstances; we have to allow for that as
well. Projects that we've started and promised support for cannot be handled the same as
projects that have yet to be begun. It takes vision and passion to balance these difficult
decisions. Council also needs continued support from citizens and groups to know how to
act in some of these areas. Like any good household, the city must prioritize and maybe
sacrifice if we desire to see many of our possibilities and opportunities continue and
flourish.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: With Frisco being 60 percent between the ages of 1 and 18, I strongly feel that our main
uncomfortable truth is the youth. The world we live in has come with more temptation and
areas to fail. We need to organize better programs to enhance our youth's growth. I
believe my age will complement the council and help establish a foundation for the youth’s
future. It should be our duty to focus on the problems in Frisco and create a road to
success for the youth. We need to build more family involved entertainment. We need to
build this process together so our children’s dreams can come true.

Tony Walsh

Biographical Info:
Name: Tony Walsh
Street Address: 12403 Concho Dr
City/Town: Frisco
State: Texas
Date of Birth: July 1,1971
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-395-7519
Mobile Phone Number: 2143957519
Fax Number: 214-483-9226
E-mail Address: frisco4walsh@yahoo.com

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Campaign Web Site Address: www.frisco4walsh.com

Questions:
Q: Education
A: Matriculated for Bachelor of Science in Business Management in Cape Cod,
Massachusetts.
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: I have lived in Frisco for the last 5 1/2 yrs.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: I have lived in the Dallas area for over 16 yrs.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Business Development and Loan Officer in the Mortgage and Home Equity sector,
specializing in facilitating both FHA and conventional loans.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Develop youth skills and citizenship as a basketball coach for the YMCA of Frisco.Frisco
As a coach for the Frisco Baseball and Softball Association, I work with school age children
and parents to improve the self-esteem and athletic prowess of Frisco's youth. I am
intimately involved with the YMCA Princess Guides program, which seeks to prepare young
women for roles as future leaders. Supporter and volunteer for the Tackle Cancer
Foundation.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Frisco Football League-Frisco Texas: Coached young men to playoff positions and
steeled them for the challenges of later athletic and academic challenges. Life Scout
member of the Boy Scouts of America in Rockland, Massachusetts, and Assistant
Scoutmaster, improving the situations and opportunities of young men in this community.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: This is my first attempt to serve the people of Frisco.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: Campaign funds, like city budgets, must be judiciously assigned to the areas that most
benefit the people of Frisco. As such, I refused any donations prior to April 1st, so as to
avoid elongating the campaign. And more important, I have chosen to accept only
donations of less than $500 from private individuals. I will not accept corporate funding of
any sort.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: All three are family members who have contributed less than $500.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: 1994, arrested in Massachusetts for a misdemeanor that resulted in a $100 fine.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: Frisco faces challenges arising from its growth. The citizens deserve a representative in
City Council Seat 2, who mirrors their values, concerns and life goals. As a financial
professional, I know the importance of education, a sense of community, and the security
of highly trained emergency response personnel, that Frisco represents. I will use my
professional background to ensure that the Council acts with these principles in mind.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: Frisco's residents expect that the city will provide every family, regardless of social or
economic status, reasonable and affordable housing. This expectation should not extend to
those who would burden the services of other communities. I underwrite the actions
required to fulfill the needs of Frisco's families, but I reject any plans from outside interests
who would benefit from saddling Frisco with unnecessary infrastructure commitments, or
increased taxes. I would stand against incumbents who have demonstrated their
willingness to acquiesce on these values. Frisco needs more recreational facilities to build
the minds and bodies of its citizens. A healthy community, in all aspects of the word,
begins with this. Frisco has designated funds for parks from developers and its citizen's tax
base. These funds must support projects with all due diligence and speed. Put the Arts of
Collin County project specifics back in front of Frisco voters. They deserve an opportunity
to decide whether the revised benefits outweigh the proposed expense. The cost for
deciding this bond issue is limited to the expenses of the public debate and education in
Council, and the inclusion of the question on a future ballot in a reasonable period of time.
But everyone needs to become educated on this project no matter what side you fall on
this issue.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the

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best choice?
A: My incumbent opponent is a professional politician who is tied to the whims and past
failures of his state party. I am a political outsider, who, when elected, will answer to no
one but the citizens of Frisco, regardless of political persuasion or bent, and my own
conscience. My commonsense and conservative approaches to local leadership preclude
me from blindly following the directives of a faceless political machine. My personal
businesses will not benefit in the forms of increased sales, commissions, or advertising as a
result of my public profile. I am motivated purely by my wish to serve the people of Frisco.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Frisco, like other cities, has experienced a decline in its economic fortunes. The good
news is that sales tax revenues rose in February, after thirteen straight months of decline.
This is a step in the correct direction and I applaud the men and women who run the
backbone small businesses of our community who made it possible. Obviously,
development equates to growth, and it is among the highest of my priorities. It's
commonsense. It's strong conservative use of the region's economic development funds.
It's right for Frisco.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: The 2010 U.S. Census will give the leadership of Frisco the information it needs to
construct a viable and sustainable infrastructure and lifestyle for all of its residents,
regardless of migrating demography. In terms of ethnicity, it is important for the City
Council to recognize and respect the issues of minorities, the disadvantaged, and the
disenfranchised. I would call on the Council to use its long arm to reach out to those who
need the support and assistance of the city, while engendering charitable support from
private organizations and individuals. This is the single most important sociological
undertaking of any governmental body, providing it is done responsibly.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Illegal immigration is a federal issue. While Frisco's emergency response personnel are
among the most highly respected and best trained in the nation, we must...and will...look
to our federal representatives to consider and act upon any threat raised by illegal entry or
settlement to and within the region. The vast burden placed on our economic, health,
education and social services has been devastating, and the Council must insist on federal
attention to the matter.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Regional transit systems are expensive, disruptive while being constructed, and often
are associated with increased crime in and around the areas they serve. However,
ecological sustainability indicates that we must arrive at a cost-efficient and low impact
solution for commuters who will use the system as it is intended. At this time of economic
uncertainty, the negatives seem to outweigh the positives, and I would support tabling any
such proposal until the economic, social, security, and environmental impacts on Frisco are
independently assessed.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: Again, the Arts of Collin County Project remains a potentially beneficial undertaking for
several area communities. As I outlined previously, I would put the question before our
citizens. If they support further cooperation, the Council should appoint a representative
who "owns" the project information and acts as the liaison to the Council on all associated
matters. Additionally, the region should work cooperatively through established and new
bodies to attract new business and development.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: This question requires intimate knowledge of the city budget, and deserves more than
the subjective analysis and proposed action plans offered by career politicians. On the
surface, Frisco's city services are well managed by the city's employees and vendors.
There is always room for improvement, though, and I would work through Council to
create review committees that are both independent and well informed, to make
recommendations to our body.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present

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need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?


A: Frisco's budget for Fiscal Year 2010 is on track to be balanced. This is a positive
attribute of our city's ability to weather the economic downturn and keep its collective
financial head in terms of expenditures. Our city infrastructure department heads are to be
commended.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Frisco is not in a financial or sociological position to accept criminals, burdens on
entitlement programs, or new and unnecessary pressures on its infrastructure, as a result
of accepting new residents from other cities' low-income housing and work release
programs. It's unfortunate, but it's factual; Frisco, like other growing cities, must first take
compassionate care of its own, before addressing those of other cities.

Frisco City Council, Place 4


Description: Note: All Frisco residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Jim Joyner

Biographical Info:
Name: Dr. Jim Joyner
Street Address: 9950 Little Horn Circle
City/Town: Frisco
State: Texas
Date of Birth: April 18, 1955
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-770-8529
Home Phone Number: 972-529-2082
Mobile Phone Number: 214-770-8529
E-mail Address: jjoynerdvm@sbcglobal.net
Campaign Web Site Address: joyner4frisco.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Graduated from Plano High with Honors in 1973. Attended Texas A&M seeking a dual
degree in Marine Biology/Zoology. Applied to Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine in
1975, accepted the same year. Bachelor of Science in Veterinary Medicine in 1978 (Magna
Cum Laude). Graduated from Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine with a D.V.M.
(Cum Laude)1979. Member of Phi Kappa Phi honor society, and Phi Zeta honor society.
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: My wife and I moved from Carrollton to Frisco in 1992, and have lived here
continuously since then.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: I have lived in the North Dallas Region (Plano, Carrollton, Frisco) since 1969.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, and founder and former owner of Carrollton West Pet
Hospital. Currently I am semi-retired, working as a Relief (fill in) Veterinarian in Frisco.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Currently I am a member of the Heritage Association of Frisco, Frisco Citizens on Patrol,
Board member of the Frisco Library Foundation, and member of the Board of Trustees of
The Museum Of American Railroads. I also serve on the Arts of Collin County Advisory
committee.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Please see my full list of civic activities on my Website at joyner4frisco.com. Summary:
COMMITTEES: Hike & Bike masterplan, Parks and Rec. Masterplan, Library Facilities Master
Plan, Frisco Economic Committee, Frisco Youth Net ( one of the founders), CLUBS:Frisco
Rotary Club, Frisco Republicans Mens Club, and Denton County Frisco Republican Mens
Club before it was combined. CLASSES: Frisco Citizens Police Academy Class 13;
Leadership Frisco 2002-2003. PRIVATE BOARDS: Frisco Community Theater Vice President.
CITY BOARDS: Appointed by the Frisco City Council to the Frisco Community Development
Corporation Board (CDC) in 2000, elected Vice Chairman on the CDC in 2000, elected as
Chairman of the CDC in 2001 and again in 2002. BOND COMMITTEE: Appointed to the 2002
Frisco Bond Committee by City Council. Elected as Chairman of the Bond Committee by
my Peers. Helped start, and was elected as the Chairman of the "For Frisco Bonds 02" PAC.
All bonds passed with high percentages.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:

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A: Elected to Frisco City Council Place 5 in 2003. Re-elected to Frisco City Council Place 5
in 2005. Frisco Mayor Pro Tem 2007-2008.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: I pretty much self funded my past elections, but that is not an option this time around
due to the costs and complexities of elections in Frisco Today. I started with $4444.31 from
by own bank account, and have to date raised $1000.00 dollars.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Dr. Jim Joyner Sam Roach
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: Experience! As you can see my involvement in Frisco has been long term and varied. I
am ready to hit the ground running in these trying times. With the dirth of experience with
many of the current Council, not just on the job, but also with the history of Frisco and her
citizens, I felt it was time to get re-engaged. I feel there is a serious lack of vision
currently with some Council members. I was on Council during the years of our rapid
growth, and in those good times we stressed fiscal conservatism, giving our citizens one of
the lowest tax rates in the North Texas region. This experience, and understanding, of
spending taxpayers money in ways to gain meaningful returns for our citizens will serve
our citizens well in this trying economy. Many would like to make this election just about
the Arts of Collin County, but I feel that the ACC issue is just a symptom of the current lack
of vision by some on this Council.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: First, we need to continue to put pressure on TxDOT to complete our vital state
controlled roads within our city. We have waited entirely too long to see Main to Custer,
Preston from Main to the north Frisco boundry, and 423, completed. These roads are not
just important to Frisco, but also the surrounding cities and region. For a state that has "
billions in surplus" at election time, why is there no money for vital regional roads?
Secondly, I would like to see the issue of when to proceed with the Arts of Collin County
discussed and resolved. The 23% savings that would be realized in the current building
economy needs to be weighed against the situation of our cities financial health, and our
citizens desires, and the timetables of our partner cities. The bonds that were approved in
2002 would need to be sold, but the additional M&O would not come into play for almost
three years during construction. Third, I would stress the need to be proactive in seeking
corporate development in Frisco. We need to support our EDC and NTEC in their endevors
to attract and grow strong corporate businesses so we may continue our low tax rates for
our citizens. We must also continue to attract sustainable small businesses and home
builders, so that our momentum does not wither and die, leaving Frisco in the back water
when our local economy reenergizes. In other words, I feel we need to get the vision back!
The funding for the EDC is from sales tax of course, but NTEC is a budgetary issue that we
need to explore.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: For the most part, experience and vision. At this critical time in this country we need
the most experienced people in Government that we can find. We need vision on the
Council to continue the remarkable growth and development that has been a hallmark of
Frisco for the last decade.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: While on the Council previously, we worked hard to attract quality sustainable
developments, and a strong corporate tax base. We must continue to attract quality
corporations and businesses that add to our tax base, which in turn keeps our tax rate one
of the lowest in the North Texas Region. This must continue to be one of our top priorities
as it has been in our past.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Frisco is becoming a much more diverse community then it has been in the past. We
need to continue the support for our growing senior population. We have built a new senior
center with one expansion already, and another planned in the near future. We now have

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growing populations of many diverse cultures, and the city must recognize the needs of our
changing demographics. We have discussed a multicultural committee in the past, and now
we need to see that through to inception.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: The Frisco Police Department has attempted to be diligent in this matter, but without
much luck. Claims of profiling and illegal searches hamper gaining information on illegal
aliens in Frisco. Those that have been caught were more time then not, refused by I.C.E.
and reccommended for release unless a major criminal. We, as city leadership, need to get
involved in working with I.C.E. to get more cooperation for our P.D. Catching those who
break our laws, only to be told to let them go seems like a terrific waste of our officers
time. The state and federal agencies need to do their jobs after our police officers do
theirs!
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: With regional mobility being one of the metroplex's most pressing problems, a regional
transit system may be the only answer to our traffic woes. We have been investigating
commuter rail from Frisco to join in with Dart's light rail, but the cost of 30-50 million
dollars per mile is staggering. We must work together as a region to solve our traffic
problems. Toll roads everywhere we turn is not the answer for our over taxed citizens.
While on Council, we joined and helped fund a multi-city study into the feasibility of using
the BNSF right of ways for commuter rail. We must continue looking into this system so as
to be ready to take advantage of the improvement in our economy.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: Traffic studies, road construction priority discussions, regional rail and airport issues,
water sources and usage, and many other issues are currently discussed by the NTCOG,
Dallas Regional Mobility Coalition, and the North Texas Municipal Water District. Frisco
needs to continue active participation in all of these, and other organizations. We must
remember that this is not just about Frisco, but the entire North Texas Region. The
development and success of the region greatly impacts the success of Frisco.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: For the most part, yes. There is always room for improvement, which we continue to
pursue. For example, we have lowered our garbage rates by using competitive bidding on
residential, commercial, and construction waste separately to allow one company to come
in low on one, and another to deliver the lowest bid on another aspect of refuse collection.
We found that lumping the three types together was getting us higher bids. Also, the
development of single stream recycling has lowered our land fill costs by over $500,000.
Developing our own vehicle service center has saved us time and money when servicing
the large number of city vehicles and equipment. I think that the current take or pay
system used by NTMWD needs to be looked at and revamped, thus allowing cities to pay
for what they use and not guess how much they will need at the beginning of the contract
year.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Our City Manager and his staff have always been strong fiscal conservatives, and very
conservative in their revenue and budget projections. This has served us well in the past,
but never more so than in the last 2 years. A strong general fund reserve, and prudent
spending have helped Frisco to have one of the lowest tax rates and strongest economies
during these tough times. With hiring freezes, mandatory department budget cuts, and
streamlined management our management team was able to offer a flat tax, balanced
budget. The City Council, however, did vote in a 1.5 cent tax increase for the next tax
year. I attended the budget meetings where this was discussed, and their reasoning was
that there could be too much differed maintenance and program interruptions possible
without a slight increase.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Frisco is changing, and it is getting harder and harder to maintain that small town feel
that we have grown used to over the years. Frisco, like most other cities in the country,
must tighten its belt and monitor spending closely until our economy rebounds. The good
news is that Frisco was not hit nearly as hard as most of the metroplex and country, and
we are already seeing some signs of recovery. Our sales tax receipts are up for the last 2
months, there are several commercial developments recently underway, and housing

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starts are starting to come back locally. Almost 70 out of every 100 new jobs are in Texas,
and that bodes well for our state and city. But we are not out of the woods yet, and thus
charges for so services might have to go up, and some services cut back for a short period.

John Keating

Biographical Info:
Name: JOHN KEATING
Street Address: 4932 Shoreline Drive
City/Town: Frisco
State: TX
Date of Birth: 09/24/1963
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-587-0827
Home Phone Number: 214-587-0827
Mobile Phone Number: 214-587-0827
Fax Number: 214-872-3621
E-mail Address: John@Keating4Frisco.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.Keating4Frisco.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Bachelor of Science, Mass Communication, Towson University, Maryland Associate in
Applied Science, Criminal Justice, Central Texas College, Texas Graduate of US Army
Advanced Foreign Counterintelligence Training Course
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 11 years, since May 1999
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: I am a real estate investor and financial services consultant, providing private asset
management for my existing clients. I developed group benefit packages and executive
planning strategies for tech start-ups. I was very fortunate to enjoy a good deal of
business success a few years back and that has freed me up to dedicate more time to my
family and community. If elected, I would be able to focus full-time for the citizens of
Frisco!
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: As the father of two boys (ages 9 & 12) and as a small business owner I share the same
values as a majority of people who live in Frisco. My two sons participate in Frisco sports,
attend Frisco schools and rely on fellow citizens and city officials to keep them safe. I have
a record of serving the community in such roles as President of the Starwood Home
Owners Association, Silent Auction Chair and VP of Fundraising for the Spears PTA, and as
a member of Leadership Frisco Class 13. Through my military, business and community
experience, I've learned that taking decisive action and getting things done within a
framework built upon integrity, honesty and transparency is essential.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: I am a decorated 13-year US Army combat veteran. While having the priviledge to
wear our nation's uniform, I received the best leadership training in the world. I served as
a counterintelligence agent and was active in Operations Desert Shield/Desert Storm. I
also led deployments of counterintelligence personnel throughout three continents to
evaluate special operations forces training. I know what it takes to lead a team, motivate
individuals, make a decision and take responsibility.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: I am not accepting any monies form PAC's or special interests. There's already too
many issues with our elected officials in DC and Austin, catering to the loudest voive and
the thickest wallet. Enough! Can we at least count on our local officials to set a better
example?

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Q: Who are your top three contributors?


A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: As an active member of the community, I have seen and heard first-hand the issues
concerning the average Frisco homeowner and believe I share the same values as the
families who live here. I see issues presented to the council that affect the families of our
community and the dissension that has risen among members of the council. I believe city
leaders should be working together for the benefit of everyone who lives in Frisco, not
simply those with special interests. I am a self-made man, living the American Dream and
leading a purpose-driven life. I bring a balance of experience as a soldier, a businessman,
a husband and father, and as a community leader.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: What brings people to Frisco? Residents move here for the business opportunities, great
schools and low taxes. Why are we raising taxes in a recession? From 2003 to 2008, the
city tax rate went up 35%. Last year, by a 4-3 vote, the city council raised our tax rate. So
in good times they raise our taxes, and in bad times they raise our taxes! When are they
not going to raise our taxes? In the very near future, the federal government will be
raising taxes again. We’re being nickel and dimed to the point where we soon won’t have
any nickels or dimes. I’m campaigning on fiscal responsibility and priorities. To me, public
safety is the number one priority for this council; two, our roads and infrastructure; and
three, genuine public-private partnerships. Everything else follows these priorities.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: One of my fellow candidates is pushing the idea of selling a $16.4 million bond, right
now, or in the very near future, for the Arts of Collin County (ACC) project. It is simply not
prudent for the City of Frisco to take on the burden of additional debt at this time. As
lovers of the arts, my family has donated our own money to the project. That was a
personal decision, but I am not prepared to commit millions of tax-payer dollars to the
project without solid proof of significant economic returns to the three-city region. As a
council member, I am not going to make it compulsory for the good citizens of Frisco to
surrender their hard-earned money right now, during a recession, for a single project that
will cost Frisco an estimated additional $10 million plus over the next 20 years. Do I want
to see it happen eventually, some day? Quite candidly, yes, I do, but in a recession we
must focus on “necessities” not “niceties”!
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: I would like to see more public-private partnerships like Field House USA. City leaders
did an excellent job acting as a bank, offering the developer a $12.5 million dollar loan and
a 20-year lease, without impacting our tax base. The developer pockets the profits from
Field House USA, but pays all the maintenance and operating costs, AND makes principal
and interest payments to the city. At the end of the lease, the city owns the building and
the dirt underneath! We can help Frisco prosper over the long-term by keeping taxes low
and allowing people to keep more of their own money, to spend on and invest in local
businesses.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Frisco is one of the fastest growing cities in the country. From 1990 to 2000, Frisco’s
population grew by 500%! It tripled from 2000 to 2010, and is expected to triple again
over the next 15 years. One of my concerns is clustered Section 8 Housing in Frisco. Even
if only 20% of a clustered development is Section 8, who would want to live in the other
80%? Then, who’s going to want to live in the neighborhood next to the Section 8 Housing,
and then who’s going to want to live in that part of the city? We’ve seen it happen in too
many other urban and suburban areas. A hand up has become a hand out! We need to
stem the tide now!
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: This is a federal issue and the federal government has failed. What's in doubt is whether

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the current administration has the will to properly address and fix the issue. Without
borders, we have no country, language, identity, or culture. I am against any policy to
convert Frisco into a "sanctuary city."
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Not at this time. Economically, we can't afford another tax rate increase. Plano spent
about $600-$700 million on DART and 99% of Plano doesn't use it! Recent estimates (and
they vary...) indicate it will cost $230 million for Frisco to be part of any regional rail
system. Where in the world is a city with a $76 million M&O budget going to come up with
$230 million ever over the next ten to twenty years?
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: The city keeps .02 cents from the 8.25% sales tax. .01 cent goes into the General Fund
and a half cent goes to the CDC and the other half cent goes to the EDC. The EDC
(Economic Development Corporation) is charged with bringing in new business to the
community. We need to continue to fund and encourage our EDC to attract more Fortune
500 companies to Frisco, and seek out international companies ready to expand their
borders and client base in the US. Frisco also has a core of small-business enterprises
supporting the both sides of Frisco's economic bell curve, with both entry-level and
executive-level opportunities. What brings people to Frisco? Business opportunities, great
schools and low taxes.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: 45% of our budget is for public safety. 141 Frisco police officers, Frisco's finest, serve
and protect 109,000 Frisco citizens! We have one of the best police forces in the country!
The Frisco fire department, Frisco's bravest, protects property and saves lives and is rated
as one of the 45 best fire departments in the country! This means lower homeowner's
insurance costs for all of us. Are our police and fire departments up to the task? Absolutely!
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: The good thing the current leadership has done is not issue any bonds last year. .21
cents of our .465 cent per $100 of assessed value goes to debt service. More debt means a
higher tax rate. The bad thing they've done is raise the tax rate by almost 2% by a vote of
4-3. In good times they raised the taxes 35% and in bad times, during a recession, they
raised taxes again!
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Frisco will be built-out in 15 to 20 years. We won’t have the revenue streams we have
now. The 2002 and 2006 bond packages created a lot of debt. We don't have the explosive
growth today we had in the past. We have about $100 million in voter-approved bonds. We
must be proactive, not reactive. We need to prioritize our spending or face another tax
rate hike of 35% or more over the next several years! It's more dangerous to say "yes" to
everything than to say "no." If elected, I am saying no to new debt and no to new taxes
for at least the first 12 months I am on city council.

Garland City Council, Place 5


Description: Note: Only Garland residents living in Place 5 may vote in this race. Click
here to find your district.

Candidates (choose 1):

David McNeely

Biographical Info:
Name: David Allen McNeely
Street Address: 1214 Mayfield Ave.

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City/Town: Garland
State: Texas
Date of Birth: 5/18/1975
Mobile Phone Number: 469-422-4284
E-mail Address: Davidamcneely@yahoo.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: I graduated from South Garland High School in 1995, and then graduated from The
University of Texas at Dallas with my B.A. in Political Science in 2009.
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: Aside from my time in the United States Navy, I have lived in Garland my entire life
with a total of 10yrs in my district.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: I have lived in my district for 10 years.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: My wife and I both work full time. She is employed by Baylor Medical Center of Garland
and I am employed by Dallas County.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: I volunteer at my children’s schools and at our church. I have applied to serve on city
boards but have, to date, not been selected for anything.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: I have volunteered my time working as a case worker at my church providing
assistance to families in need. I have also volunteered at Southgate Elementary school
tutoring children in grades 3-5 in the areas of Reading, Math, Science, and Social Studies.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: I have raised approximately five-thousand to date for my campaign.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Garland Firefighters Association The Garland Automotive Business Association The Lake
Cities Association of Realtors
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: Other than a misdemeanor incident 12 years ago that was dismissed, I have never
been involved in any other criminal proceedings or civil suits.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am running for city council because I am a concerned resident of South Garland and I
don’t think that we are being adequately represented at this time. We are not being
heard. I don’t see many positive changes coming from the existing city council and the
current first-term city councilmember from District 5 is not a vocal proponent for South
Garland. As the city councilmember from District 5, I will focus on substantial and
sustainable economic development in South Garland, working to ensure that public safety
remains a top priority in our city and neighborhoods, working for open and transparent
government, and improving basic city services and amenities for our citizens. South
Garland used to be a great place to live and it is filled with wonderful people, both
established citizens who have lived here for years and younger families trying to carve out
a nice safe place to raise their children; but South Garland needs new life breathed back
into it, and that can only be accomplished with the city taking an active and prolonged lead
in the revitalization process. What is good for South Garland is good for Garland as a
whole.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: Substantial and sustainable economic development followed by greater government
transparency to increase interaction between the citizen and businesses with the city
council, and lastly, provide a proactive stance regarding public safety and city services are
my top priorities. The city needs to work with the Chamber of Commerce to do whatever it
takes to incentivize businesses to open up in South Garland. With quality stores and shops
come jobs, increased quality of life, and pride in community. I want to see a greater
presence of law enforcement in South Garland, I want to increase programs aimed at
allowing citizens to interact with our police officers and fire department personnel and I
want citizens, my neighbors, to know that the city is listening to them when it comes to
cleaning up the areas around their neighborhoods.

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Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I would be much more proactive working with the citizens of District 5 than the
first-term incumbent who does not appear to be a very vocal leader on the City Council or
a very vocal proponent for South Garland.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Commercial development ranks very high on my list. Public safety is number one. In
order to increase economic development and neighborhood prosperity in South Garland we
need to actively pursue business that the community will invest their time and money in. I
think our city as a whole needs to be more involved in hearing from the community about
what types of businesses to aggressively pursue.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: I think that Garland is experiencing the same type of demographic changes that our
neighboring cities are experiencing, a boom in diversity. With that in mind, I feel that it is
incumbent upon the city to recognize this and be proactive by embracing the diversity of
the city when it comes to responding to the established members of our community as well
as welcoming new residents to the city.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: We need to enforce immigration laws and provide our police department with the
personnel needed to do their job in this area while also recognizing that police officers are
not immigration agents.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I am in favor of it, I use it every day to travel from Garland to Downtown Dallas. We
need to work interactively with neighboring cities to produce a universal vision or
expectation of a transit system that would be financially beneficial and cost effective, while
providing a valuable service to the people.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: We could all benefit from greater cooperation, be it neighboring cities or counties. As for
me, I would do everything I could to foster such cooperation and consensus-building while
also respecting the right of individual cities and their leaders to do what they feel is best
for their communities.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: There is always room for improvement however, I am currently reviewing the cost and
accountability of service each department provides. When elected I will work to determine
if the Citizens of Garland are receiving these services in the most cost-effective manner.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: I think they have done a modestly descent job of weathering the economic downturn,
but have made some very poor decisions along the way; like my opponent and other city
council members voting to giving over $100,000 of incentive bonuses to top city officials
and department heads while cutting pay for rank and file city employees, including police
and fire pay as well as forcing furlough days. This is not consistent with my idea of fiscal
responsibility. In our current economic downturn where people are struggling to keep their
jobs and their homes, we should be more prudent in our application of financial resources.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: The City of Garland has built a Day Labor facility funded by the tax payers that I feel
needs additional oversight. I would like to see that every laborer has a current and valid
state or government identification card. I support our documented workers. Immigration
is a very salient topic that we have to address. Illegal immigration presents several issues
that must be addressed such as contributing to a higher crime rate as well as national
security concerns.

John D. Willis

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Biographical Info:
Name: John D. Willis
Street Address: 2116 Patricia Lane
City/Town: Garland
State: Texas
Date of Birth: June 8, 1965
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-278-7722
Home Phone Number: 972-278-7711
Mobile Phone Number: 972-965-9707
Fax Number: 972-278-7722
E-mail Address: john@electjohnwillis.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.electjohnwillis.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: I received my BA in Economics from the University of Texas at Austin in 1988.
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: I was born and raised in Garland. It’s always been my home.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: My home has always been in District 5, except for the eight years I lived just north of
Miller Road, in District 8.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: I own and manage a small family residential rental property business.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: I currently serve on the Garland City Council, District 5.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: I served on the Garland Board of Adjustment from 2006 through 2008, when I resigned
to run for City Council. In 2006 I volunteered countless hours with Let Us Vote, which
fought to hold elections that were illegally canceled. Before I came to council, I worked
with realtors, tenants, landlords, and city staff to reform the single-family rental
ordinance. This ordinance has since been used by other cities across the state.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: I ran for and won the District 5 seat on the Garland City Council in 2008.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $1,894.00
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: The majority of my contributions are under $50.00. My campaign finance reports can be
found on my web site at www.electjohnwillis.com.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: I have never been involved in any criminal proceedings. The only civil action I have
been involved in was when it was the only remaining option to recover medical damages
from a driver who hit my wife’s car.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: Elected officials should be accessible and responsive to the people who elected them. I
have been that type of council member for two years. Being involved in home renovations
for over 20 years, it seems I’ve always been working on neighborhood vitality in Garland.
Combining this with my economics degree, Board of Adjustment service, and current
service as a council member, gives me a unique perspective on important issues affecting
people, neighborhoods, and all of Garland. I've helped existing companies stay and expand
in Garland, and also helped bring in new companies, resulting in new jobs for Garland
residents. I've helped neighborhoods by improving access to grants which fund needed
neighborhood projects. I've attended neighborhood and crime watch meetings across the
district, bringing neighborhood concerns forward. Revitalizing Garland’s gateway corridors
is also important. These corridors are next to neighborhoods, impact the quality of life for
residents, and create the first impression for new visitors to Garland. I’ve asked city staff
to work with commercial property and business owners to clean up important gateways

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into Garland, like South Garland Avenue. This new, comprehensive, pro-active approach
has never before been used in Garland since commercial property maintenance was not a
priority in the past. Since I was elected in 2008 there has been a marked improvement in
the appearance of these areas in District 5, resulting in fewer complaints from residents
and a better appearance for the city.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: If re-elected, I will continue to bring businesses and restaurants to District 5 by being
proactive in working with the Garland Economic Development Partnership, helping to
market the great assets of District 5, and all of Garland. Bringing new businesses and
restaurants to Garland helps lessen the pressure on property taxes by increasing sales tax
revenues. I promise to continue to maintain, as well as strengthen Garland’s Strategy for
Vital Neighborhoods, which is to improve neighborhoods in District 5 and across Garland.
Garland was the first city in the region to move to comprehensive Code Compliance
inspections of all single and multi-family residences. As I stated in a previous question, I’ve
encouraged the city to use the same methods for all commercial properties as well.
Maintaining all of Garland’s properties, residential and commercial, is very important since
there is very little space left for new development. Good property maintenance helps
preserve property values and tax revenues. I will continue to demand increased efficiency
in city operations. Each of these actions will grow the tax base and tax revenues of the
city, which can be used to pay for the initiatives and maintain city services.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My focus is on the citizens and businesses of District 5. I will continue to concentrate on
meeting the needs of District 5. Although I think what goes on in the rest of Garland is
important, I believe my first responsibility is to make sure that District 5 receives its fair
share of capital projects, including streets and sidewalk repairs. I will continue to bring
quality businesses to District 5. I am working with new and existing businesses to ensure
that they are not bogged down in city red tape. I attend District 5 activities, block
parties, and neighborhood association meetings. I like coming early and staying late – this
allows as much time as possible to listen to citizens. I hold community meetings about
important issues, so District 5 citizens and businesses will have direct access to their
elected representative. I recognized the need to provide Garland citizens with the
educational opportunities that are now available through the Garland campus of Richland
College. This satellite campus has brought national recognition to the city and strengthens
businesses by making sure employees are highly trained. I am proud to have supported
this opportunity from the beginning and continue to look for ways to make it even better. I
have worked to improve the quality of life in District 5. I look at all city ordinances and
policies as they relate to the best interests of the entire city. I do not believe in political
patronage. Every citizen and business must be treated with respect and given fair and
equal access to city departments and elected representatives. I have worked to keep
utility rates stable by insisting that funds that are dedicated to utility projects only be used
for those purposes. This means more utility expenses can be paid for without the need to
issue debt. More debt would only mean higher utility or tax rates.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: My focus has been and will be on redevelopment and revitalization of District 5
neighborhoods and shopping centers. I am currently working together with city staff,
property owners, and developers on important projects in key gateway areas like South
Garland Avenue and Centerville Marketplace. New restaurants are opening in District 5,
and the first of two new Aldi grocery stores in Garland is now open in the district.
Commercial development is a challenge in the current economic climate. I will continue to
work closely with small and large developers, property owners, city staff, the Chamber of
Commerce, and the Garland Economic Development Partnership so that Garland will
continue to grow with the economy. District 5 has a great potential for the next successful
concentration of shopping in Garland.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Although Garland is a culturally diverse city, it has a very rich heritage of citizens
working together for our common good. This attitude is the core of our strength as we
move forward into a bright future for Garland.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?

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A: I favor consistently enforcing existing laws and ordinances already on the books, and
continuing Garland’s participation in the Criminal Alien Program. I am open to considering
other laws, so long as those actions will not bring expensive lawsuits that the taxpayers
must pay to fight.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I am a strong supporter of regional mobility and transportation; in fact I voted for DART
when it was originally proposed. DART’s light rail is important to regional transportation
solutions. The current 635 Service Road Project will create a continuous service road from
Centerville to Shiloh Road. This will create new opportunity for businesses and along with
the completion of the SH 190 Toll Road to I-30, will also relieve traffic congestion on LBJ
freeway.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: Garland is an important part of the Metroplex. It is the second largest city in Dallas
County, and tenth largest in the state. It is important to create regional partnerships that
make sense and help the regional economy, and I visit with other local and county officials
about important issues that are regional in scope. Without regional cooperation, much
needed road projects wouldn't get done, air quality wouldn't improve, and the quality of
life for everyone in the region would suffer. The Super Bowl coming to North Texas is only
one example of how regional cooperation benefits everyone.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: The City of Garland effectively delivers high quality service to its citizens and
businesses. The recent record-breaking snowfall, that resulted in extended power outages
elsewhere, caused few problems for Garland Power and Light. I believe it is important to
maintain our electric infrastructure so customers are not left in the dark. Other cities in
the region are still struggling to clean up all the broken trees left by the snow. All that
debris in Garland was cleaned up in a matter of days, not weeks or months.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: The Garland City Council, and senior city staff, recognized early that we had to cut back
in order to survive the current economy. Taking steps early meant that during the last
budget, no city employees lost their jobs and essential city services were maintained. It
is essential that basic infrastructure be maintained, but expensive new projects can be
delayed until the economy improves. It is equally essential that new development and
redevelopment opportunities be created so we can keep our local economy strong, and
growing.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: There are no uncomfortable truths in Garland. We are an open, forward-looking, and
proud community, whose citizens enjoy a safe, secure lifestyle in well-established
neighborhoods. I am proud to live in Garland. I am proud to be a graduate of Garland
High School, and proud to live in the neighborhood where I grew up. I decided to live here
after graduating college because there is no better place to live, work, and raise our
family.

Grand Prairie City Council, Place 4


Description: Note: Only Grand Prairie residents living in Place 4 may vote in this race.
Click here to find your district.

Candidates (choose 1):

Richard Fregoe

Biographical Info:
Name: Richard Fregoe

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Street Address: 2709 Spartacus Dr.


City/Town: Grand Prairie
State: Texas
Date of Birth: 20 January 1936
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972.641.2981
Home Phone Number: 972.641.2981
Mobile Phone Number: None
Fax Number: 972.641.2069
E-mail Address: rfregoe@gptx.org
Campaign Web Site Address: None
Questions:
Q: Education
A: B.S. Degree, Florida State University Executive Development Programs *Penn State
University *Notre Dame University
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 20 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 20 years
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Retired Senior Executive, Army & Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES)
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: BOD, Grand Prairie Wellness Center – Co-Founder BOD, Grand Prairie Sister Cities –
Founder BOD, Grand Prairie United Charities BOD, Grand Prairie Unity Coalition - Founder
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Chairman, BOD Dallas/Ft. Worth Medical Center Grand Prairie Zoning Board of Appeals
Grand Prairie ISD After School Program – Co-Founder
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Elected to Grand Prairie City Council, District 4, 1994 – Present
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: Fund raising just underway
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Fund raising just underway
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: It is an honor and a privilege to represent the citizens of Grand Prairie on the City
Council. I wish to continue to be a part of the leadership that has excelled in positioning
Grand Prairie where it is today, on the verge of greatness. My vast experience in
government and business, proven leadership and a results orientation along with long and
deep community involvement make me the best choice.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: I would continue to work to achieve a balanced city budget without city tax rate
increases or significant layoffs. Austerity and even greater creativity are key factors.
Commuter rail service for Grand Prairie citizens is of great importance. Change in state
law allowing a 1% local option sales tax increase is the best revenue source. Expanded
health care continues to grow and is already funded or supported by fundraising activities.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My proven commitment, vast experience, outstanding results and extensive community
involvement make me the right choice.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: This is an ongoing process and to the extent allowed by state law. The city has been and
continues to be proactive in implementing ordinances and is seeking changes to state law
that would give the city greater control.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Grand Prairie continues to attract residential and commercial development while

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ensuring supporting infrastructure is keeping pace. I consider this planned growth critical
to the city’s future. I would evaluate the city as doing a very good job.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Growth is evident throughout the city with the heaviest in the southern sector. The
entertainment district (around Lone Star Park) continues to grow and downtown is being
re-vitalized. I like what’s happening.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Enforce the laws that are on the books.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I favor a regional system, but the city cannot be the lone funding source. Federal and
state funding is required. Local option adoption of a 1% sales tax could be the city
contribution (change to state law needed).
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: Better controls over gas drilling. Highway construction (planning and funding).
Communication interoperability. I would work to support these efforts.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Improvement must always be the goal. We are constantly seeking better ways to do
business and clearly that is the current effort.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Present leadership is doing a good job as evidenced by current balanced budget with no
city tax rate increase or big layoffs. Attracting more businesses and residents must be a
key part of our planning as well as continued frugal management.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Balancing the city budget, a challenge every resident and business owner also faces,
continues to be a very real challenge. Cut backs on service levels and some services could
be necessary. We need to work at creating more jobs.

Jeffrey Sodoma

Biographical Info:
Name: Jeffrey B. Sodoma
Street Address: 2631 Blackstone Drive
City/Town: Grand Prairie
State: Texas
Date of Birth: December 4, 1975
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 817 917 2210
Home Phone Number: 972 606 1956
Mobile Phone Number: 817 917 2210
E-mail Address: voteforjeffrey@yahoo.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.myspace.com/jsodoma
Questions:
Q: Education
A: University of North Texas, School of Community Service, Denton, TX May 2005: Master
of Public Administration (MPA) Northeastern University, College of Business
Administration, Boston, MA May 1998: Bachelor of Science in Business Admin. (BSBA) with
majors in Internationa. Business and Transportation & Logistics University of Wisconsin
—Madison Nov 2009: Certificate—Light Rail/Rapid Transit/Commuter Rail: Engineering
Fundamentals of Modern Mass Transportation Systems (2.6 CEU/26 PDH)
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: I have been blessed to have lived in Grand Prairie for 2 years and 7 months.

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Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:


A: Same.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: I am an Operations Planner with AECOM, a global architectural, engineering, and
consulting company. We are working with Dallas Area Rapid Transit to expand public
transportation in the 13 Member Cities that DART serves.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Currently, I am the President of the Berkshire Park Association of Homeowners, and
have been elected President three times in a row. I have shepherded the HOA through a
difficult transition from builder-based to homeowner-based control system. I have worked
with the City of Grand Prairie in many areas, including code compliance, urban forestry,
construction project coordination, and planning and development, as they impact our
community. Working with various stakeholders and homeowners has illuminated many
facets of the complicated interplay between residents and the City of Grand Prairie.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: 1) Member of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP). 2)
Member of the Urban Management Assistants of North Texas (UMANT). 3) Member of the
River of Trade Corridor Coalition (ROTCC). 4) Member of the National Model Railroad
Association (NMRA). 5) Certified Toastmaster by Toastmasters International. 6) Participant
in community-level transportation efforts—including numerous Local, State, and
Federal-level meetings and informational exchanges related to transportation issues in
Texas, including NCTCOG-sponsored meetings on Tower 55, the Southwest Parkway,
Future Rail Alternatives for North Texas, SH 161, and others. 7) Independently authored a
grant funding request for a non-profit agency in north Fort Worth which would have
allowed for the addition of multiple personnel in order to increase the depth of service to
the local community. 8) Authored the earliest extant system plan (80 page thesis paper)
for a light rail startup for the city of Charlotte, NC for service between Charlotte and
Mooresville, NC.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: In early 2001, I ran for City Council in Fort Worth, to serve the residents of District 4 in
that City. While I did not win that contest, my quest to represent my constituents helped
me to learn many things about the community, the city, the administration of the city, the
public sector--and public office in general.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: Fund raising has begun and will continue for the duration of the campaign. Fund raising
information is public record with the City of Grand Prairie.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Fund raising has begun and will continue for the duration of the campaign. Fund raising
information is public record with the City of Grand Prairie.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I feel that everything I have done in my life to this point has uniquely qualified me to be
the City Councilman from Grand Prairie for District Four. I am, to borrow the phrase, the
right person at the right place to serve at the right time. I will do my best to use my
extensive educational, vocational, and social training to serve my constituents--it's as
simple as that!
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1) Fight complacency at all levels--amongst citizens, elected officials, and city
administrators, so that people will stand up and take action on any issue that interests
them, rather than waiting for "someone else" to take the first step. In other words, help
people "plug in" to the immense number of resources that are available within the city to
help them achieve their goals. If everyone is more involved, the City of Grand Prairie will
be the best city in the Metroplex. I seek inclusion of all into the social and economic
structure of the City, and will do my best to utilize underused public and private resources
toward this end. 2) Increase code compliance activities in the city. This could be paid for
by making code compliance inspections more efficient (increasing technology levels so that
Code Compliance Officers were not using paper ticket pads, for instance). This would allow
Code Inspectors to actually conduct code inspections and resolve code complaints, rather
than spend time filling out paperwork. Code compliance is the first step towards
maintaining the quality of life in our fine city. 3) Push for a more robust public

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transportation network in the city. While I realize funding options are limited for our city,
and the region as a whole, and the majority of citizens may not wish to raise their own
taxes to pay for public transportation, the reality is that Grand Prairie can no longer ignore
public transportation. The two economic engines of the Metroplex are Dallas (served by
DART) and Fort Worth, (served by The T). So far, Grand Prairie has not seen the wisdom of
having public transport, and neither have Arlington or many of the faster-growing
communities to the north of Dallas and Fort Worth. While those other cities will experience
tremendous transportation problems over the next few years (Arlington due to Cowboys
Stadium, the northern suburbs due to increasing congestion and unprecedented
construction coming in the next 1-7 years), we are in an enviable position to capture
economic development right here in Grand Prairie. We need to continue this push! The first
step is to remove the anti-public transportation clause in the City Charter that prevents the
City from spending money on public transportation. After that, paying for a system is up to
the citizens of the City.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My opponent has served District 4 well as a multi-term incumbent and has done many
good and honorable things for the city of Grand Prairie. It is good to fondly view the
accomplishments of the past and celebrate the accomplishments of the present. However,
there must always be a view towards the future. Citizens of District 4 should vote for me
because I am the person that is looking toward the future. It is a future full of promise and
hope, and my qualifications speak clearly to the fact that I am uniquely qualified to serve
in this capacity at this time.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: Before committing to an answer for this excellent question, I would have to do more
research to determine the extend of city laws dealing with natural gas drilling, extraction,
and processing. I would also need a fuller understanding of State and Federal regulations
governing this area of economic activity. Natural gas extraction presents a fantastic
opportunity for the city, its residents, and businesses operating in the city. Conversely, we
must also understand the social, economic, and all other costs that natural gas extraction
imparts on our city. Is the City doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests
of its citizens? More than likely, no, but they are likely doing the best they can do with the
resources at their disposal. If they are not, and if I am elected, I will ensure that the city
DOES do the best job they can--period.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Attracting quality development that benefits our citizens, and my constituents in the
coming years, is a worthy priority for myself, and I suspect will be for the rest of the City
Council as well. It is my opinion that the city has done a tremendous job of attracting
residential and commercial development to the city. However, we must now focus on
integrating the city and renewing our commitment to having a Grand Prairie that serves all
citizens as best it can. We must strive to erase the perception amongst some that there
are three "separate" areas of Grand Prairie and that we are all one city, moving forward
into the 21st century.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: No comment.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: We must remember that there are laws already in place that govern this issue. Illegal
immigrants are breaking a Federal law, having crossed a national border for purposes that,
while they may be honorable to some, are, by definition, illegal. The primary responsibility
for enforcement of these laws should fall to the Federal Government. The City should not
encourage, nor should they facilitate, the breaking of these laws, by assisting those who
violate the laws. To the extent that, in the course of their normal duties, local police forces
can interdict illegal immigrants and facilitate their prosecution by the Federal Government,
they should do so. It is my opinion that the City should not conduct "sweeps" for illegals or
conduct vehicular checkpoints--again, these types of activities are not in their purview.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Absolutely I favor a seamless regional transit system. First, I will seek the input of my

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constituents to determine their transit needs. Second, I will work with numerous other
citizens of the city, through proper means, to overturn the provision in our City Charter
that prohibits the City from spending money on public transit. Third, if it suits my
constituents and the other citizens of the city, I would convene a series of meetings to
determine what direction the City should take in facilitation of a seamless regional transit
system. It is my opinion at this time that the City could benefit from "joining forces" with
one of the other three public transit agencies in the Metroplex, but if the opportunity arose
to have a locally-based transit system, and that is what the voters want, then let's try it!
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: 1) Economic development--It is my belief that the Metroplex should look past
extremely locally-focused economic development strategies. Single-city metropolitan
areas of a similar size to the Metroplex often have singular goals and singular strategies in
attracting economic development. In DFW, every city and local government has its own
strategy, which must be confusing to companies relocating to the area, and I expect this
wide variety of strategies may be detrimental to the area as a whole. Why should Grand
Prairie and City X get in a fight to see which city can give away the most economic
incentives to attract business? The business will come to the Metroplex anyway, and both
cities are worse for the deal. 2) Transportation issues, as detailed in the previous question.
3) Educational issues (school district boundaries vs. city boundaries, number of districts,
quality of education in two school districts being drastically different but the districts are
geographically contiguous, etc.).
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: It would be unwise to automatically assume that any unit of government is delivering
services in the most cost-effective manner. The longer the administration of that
governmental unit serves, and the more isolated the administration becomes from
advances in governmental service delivery, the worse any problems will become. If
delivery of city services remains mired in "the ways of the past" and the attitude of city
administration is not focused on cost-effective, constant, continuous improvement, then
changes must be made. It would be extremely shortsighted for me to advise on changes
having not been elected yet. However, one example of concrete improvement in city
service provision that I have helped create is in the distribution of recycling bins in our
neighborhood. Over 80 homes can now recycle because I thought to question "why" the
city required individual homeowners to go pick up bins at the Animal Shelter, one by
one--and asked the recycling people to bring three truckloads of bins to our neighborhood.
This saved the city time and money, and helped our residents, too.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: The leadership of the City has done fairly well in leading the city through the economic
storm. We don't see massive cutbacks and city service levels or large tax increases
year-after-year in Grand Prairie, and that is a good thing. However, I have seen no
evidence that the City is controlling costs or cutting back on spending levels, but instead is
approving the expenditure of tremendous amounts of capital on numerous items across
the entire City. We'll have a new Police Department and a new senior citizen's center soon.
We have numerous streets being worked on every day. And the expenditures have not
slowed in any appreciable way. We are spending our tax dollars and getting some very
nice items in return--however, the questions must be asked: is it in the budget, can the
city really afford it, and can the city afford to operate it in the years to come? I also find it
very strange that a simple road construction project near our neighborhood took months
longer than originally expected and saw over ten rather major change orders applied to
the contract, resulting in higher costs to the City. What other areas of the administration of
the City are in need of changes to streamline, operate more efficiently, and effectively? Is
technology being implemented in a integrated manner that will facilitate higher levels of
inter-departmental coordination and effectiveness? If elected, I will, on behalf of my
constituents, work with the City administration to determine the optimum level of services
that the City should provide. And I will then seek to balance that against what the City can
pay for. The difference between the two necessitates discussion and decision-making with
our constituents as far as what level of services they want, and are willing to pay for. Its as
simple as that.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Honestly, we all (voters and non-voters) must realize that our City will only be a great
place to live if they step up to the plate and participate in the life of the City. I fear voter
apathy and wonder why, in 2007, the total number of voters in the District 4 election was

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under 1000 people. I fear citizen apathy more than anything else. That feeling is not
assuaged by some of the actions that I see people performing in our city each and every
day. I wonder why people litter. I wonder why people vandalize public spaces. I wonder
why people don't mow their own lawns, or leash their dogs. There are any number of
items that could be solved in our City if only people would stand up, walk out of their
houses, and do something. So many people in Grand Prairie do volunteer and do good
things, but wouldn't it be great if people kept their lawns mowed, picked up litter, leashed
their dogs, disciplined their children, and generally took responsibility for their
surroundings, life, and city? We must confront this basic fact: the level of government that
impacts our lives the most is our local government. We are that government, and we need
to stop always asking what the government can do for us. Let's confront apathy in our
community, and get out there and do something to make Grand Prairie a better place for
ourselves and our kids.

Highland Park Town Council


Description: Note: All Highland Park residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Andrew Barr

Biographical Info:

Questions:
Q: Education
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: - no response -
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: - no response -
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: - no response -
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: - no response -
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?

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A: - no response -
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: - no response -
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: - no response -
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: - no response -
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: - no response -

Will C. Beecherl
Biographical Info:

Questions:
Q: Education
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: - no response -
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: - no response -
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: - no response -
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: - no response -
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what

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steps would you take to make it happen?


A: - no response -
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: - no response -
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: - no response -
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: - no response -

Gail Madden
Biographical Info:

Questions:
Q: Education
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: - no response -
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: - no response -
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: - no response -
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: - no response -
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: - no response -

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Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: - no response -
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: - no response -
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: - no response -

Larry Nixon
Biographical Info:

Questions:
Q: Education
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: - no response -
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: - no response -
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: - no response -
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: - no response -
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: - no response -
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such

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issues?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: - no response -
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: - no response -
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: - no response -

Stephen Rogers
Biographical Info:

Questions:
Q: Education
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: - no response -
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: - no response -
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: - no response -
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: - no response -
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: - no response -
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: - no response -

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Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: - no response -
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: - no response -
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: - no response -

Sam C. Tamborello

Biographical Info:
Name: Sam C. Tamborello
Street Address: 4637 Southern Avenue
City/Town: Highland Park
State: Texas
Date of Birth: February 18, 1967
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (214) 727-8805
Home Phone Number: (214) 357-9618
Mobile Phone Number: (214) 727-8805
Fax Number: n-a
E-mail Address: sam@tamborello.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.Tamborello.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: St. Thomas High School 1985 - Houston, Texas University of Houston, Economics 1990
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 8 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: n-a
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Private businessman-investing
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: 1. Active grass roots door to door election campaign. The purpose is to talk with the
town's community and to listen to ideas and issues; 2. Active with the town regarding
various initiatives that range from public safety, finance, and open records.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: 1. Citizen Commendation Award from the Town of Highland Park. The award was for
assisting town police in the capture of a serial felon who was robbing homes in the town; 2.
Initiated, advocated, and implemented a pedestrian crosswalk at a major town
intersection; 3. Advocated the prohibition of hand held cell phone use in school zones; 4.
Advocated the mandating of criminal background checks on current administrative
employees; 5. Advocated the transparency of HP government records; 6. Advocated an
ehtics policy for our town council; 7. Identified a serial permit violator, along with several
other permit violators that were working in violation of town law; 8. Advocated a smoking
ordinance that reduced second hand smoke in HP restaurants.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: n-a
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: I am self funded. I do not accept campaign contributions because I want to be
independent of any conflicts of interest.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: n-a
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: I have never been arrested and/or involved in criminal proceedings.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you

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to serve in this office?


A: I believe that I will be a fresh face to town council, a candidate who advocates a town
council free of conflicts and independent thought, a candidate who advocates the
transparency of our town government, and a candidate who is passionate about listening
to the town residents about their ideas and input for the community. And, I enjoy talking
to the town residents on a one on one basis to hear their voice. I believe voters should
consider me a most qualified candidate because I am passionate about Highland Park in
many diverse ways. I have been actively involved with the town and the town council
ranging from public safety, finance, and governmental functions. I have done what no
other current candidate has ever done before, and that is, assist our town's police in the
capture of a serial felon robbing homes in Highland Park. Professionally, I have a degree
in economics and have a very good understanding of fiscal responsibility. I understand the
function of government, finance, and micro and macro economic challenges that may be
present now and/or in the future. I have actively participated in the town's governement,
and most, important, I love to be among the residents to hear their voices and ideas. I
believe my personality, social skills, and approachability gives me a significant advantage
in this campaign.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1. I would mandate a second to none 911 system in our town. I find it surpriaing that
our officers at dispatch have to manually look up some numbers, and, that our 911 system
is outdated. This would be paid for from monies already set aside; 2. I would mandate
immediate criminal background checks on approximately 50 adminstrative employees who
have never been criminally checked by the town since employed. I believe a policy to
check "new hires" only is a failed policy and bad town management. This would be paid for
from reserves already set aside. 3. I would mandate the immediate identifying of
businesses working in our town in violation of town ordinances.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I believe I represent a fresh new face to town council, a candidate that will be
independent of the "good old boy" network at town hall, a candidate that enjoys to be
among the residents, a candidate that thinks outside of the box, and a candidate that
desires to technologically advance our town second to none in Texas.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Though residential and commercial development is important, the Town of Highland
Park is relatively a small town. Development in Highland Park is mainly comprised of
residential development, since space is very limited for commercial areas. Though I
understand that some older homes are not economically feasible to redevelop, I do
support groups such as the Park Cities Preservation Society. Our challenge as a city is to
make sure that historic homes are preserved for future generations to enjoy and not
demolished.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: I believe one area demographically that is changing is the baby boomer generation
taking care of their parents as they age themselves. As a council memeber, I would make
sure that the city is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to ensure the
safety of our aging population who are physically impaired.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: If our city or police are confronted with an issue of illegal immigration, I believe they
have to enforce U.S. law. I think that enforcement should be done with the upmost
integrity and respect to those that are here illegally.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: The Town of Highland Park is relatively small. Any transit system that I would favor
would need serious thought due to the impact on the town and it's environment. I would
favor considerable planning, ideas, and input from residents if this issue was favored, and
allow the town's residents to vote on any transit system.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: I believe that some issues that the city could benefit from are learning technology

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innovations that are used by other cities to make their towns more efficient, possibly learn
from those ideas, and study the impact these technolgies would have on our own town.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: In order to determine if our city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers, I would as council member analyze the cost structures of city services to
determine the answer to this question. I think any and all city delivered services need
real-time cost evalaution due to the rapid changes in our world. Some ideas I would
consider are: evaluate clean energy for the city's personnel, emergency, and police
vehicles and to utilize technology in various areas to lower costs that the town might incur
on a daily basis.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: I believe the current leadership needs work with fiscal responsibility. I would as a
council member implement greater oversight of adminstrative expenses so that taxpayers
are not incurring large increases unnecessarily. I beleive this should be evaluated first
before passing costs onto taxpayers.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Voters must recognize that our town adminstration and current coucil have failed on
essential basics of running our town. A few examples: 1). our town has a dated 911 system
that should have been replaced years ago. There are some telephone numbers that police
have to mannually look up; 2). the town administrator and the current council have failed
to conduct criminal background checks on approximately 50 administrative employees.
These are basic and essential items for any town. It would put doubt into a voter's mind as
to the effectiveness of our current town administration and current town council.

Irving City Council, Place 1


Description: Note: Only Irving residents living in Place 1 may vote in this race. Click here
to find your district.

Candidates (choose 1):

Mike Gallaway

Biographical Info:
Name: Michael Gallaway
Street Address: 700 Ricker Court
City/Town: Irving
State: Texas
Date of Birth: March 1st
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (972)251-7030
Home Phone Number: (972) 251-7030
Mobile Phone Number: (817) 723 3367
Fax Number: None
E-mail Address: gallawayfordistrict1@gmail.com
Campaign Web Site Address: Facebook:Gallaway For-Irving
Questions:
Q: Education
A: B.S. Business Logistics-Penn State University,Dec. 1987 State College, PA; APICS-CIRM
Certification, 2005
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 1 Year 3 Months
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 1 Year 3 Months
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Supply Chain Professional & Small Business Owner

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Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:


A: 1.) District Improvement Committee thru Irving ISD 2.) Transportation & Infrastructure
Committee thru Irving Chamber of Commerce
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: 1.) Summer 2009: Volunteered 3 weeks to tutor 3rd & 4th Graders in Math & Reading
2.) Spring 2009: Coordinatd a food drive that raised a total of 300 to 400 pounds of food
for 2 Irving Food Banks
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None, first time running for public office
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: Funding has been adequate to run a competitive campaign.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: At this time contributions continue to come in and a full reporting of this information will
be made in accordance with state and local regulations
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No, I have not been involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am running for Office for the following reasons: 1.) I have a desire to serve the
citizens of Irving and give back to the community in which I live 2.) I want to be part of
the solution that continues to move Irving forward. I respectfully ask for the citizens of
Irving to vote for me based on the following qualifications: 1.) I am a man of integrity and
concern for the community 2.) My concern for the community is demonstrated thru my
community service on the District Improvement Committee, Transportation &
Infrastructure Committee, Food drive coordinator, and summer math & reading tutor. 3.)I
have been blessed to work in my degreed field for 22 years, 2.5 of which have been as a
manager of others. The leadership, team building, communication and analytical skills that
I have developed during my career will allow me to be an effective advocate for the
citizens of Irving. 4.) I have a vested interest in Irving because I am a residential property
owner, business owner in the Irving Heritage District, member of the Irving Heritage
Society and I worship God at Hope Fellowship Church in Irving
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: The three actions that I would take are as follows: 1.) I would do my best to bring
reconciliation to the city. During my campaign I have noticed that the city of Irving has
been divided over a number of heated issues in the last few years. I have started this
process during my campaign by bringing people of different beliefs, political parties, and
races together at campaign events. My purpose in doing this is so that we begin to rally
around the one thing that we all have in common. That one thing is that we care about
Irving and want to see it move forward. I would seek out and take advantage of similar
opportunities as a council member. 2.) Economic Development: I would begin to support
the Chamber of Commerce in attracting and retaining business in Irving. The final result of
redevelopmet efforts along 183 & in the Heritage District will have a major impact on the
busness community in Irving. I want to make sure that Irving does not become a city that
drives away business. I want businesses (small & large) to continue to grow in Irving
because sales tax revenue from business is one of the key elements to keeping taxes low
for all residential property owners. 3.) I would look at all of the current redevlopment
projects to understand how citizen input has been incorporated into the redevelopment
efforts. One of things that I have heard during the campaign is that some citizens feel they
don't have a voice with the city when it comes to redevelopment efforts.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: 1.) The first key difference is my education & Professional experience. 22 years of
working in my degreed field has allowed me to develop leadership, team building,
communication, and analytical skills that will make me an effective servant and advocate
for the citizens of Irving. One other quality that I have developed is the ability to
understand issues quickly. This is one trait that once again will allow me to be an effective
servant for the citizens of Irving. 2.)The second key difference is my community
involvement. I would ask voters to focus on what I have been involved in during the short
time I have been in Irving as compared to my opponent's lack of community service
during the 39 years he has lived in Irving. 3.) The third key difference is that I have a
vested interest in Irving because I am a residential property owner and small business
owner in the city.

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Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Residential and commercial development rank very high on my list of priorities. These
types of activities are important to any city for a number of reasons (job creation, tax
revenue, etc) and ones that should be encouraged. I believe that Irving thru the Chamber
of Commerce has been doing a good job in attracting development to the city but we must
remain diligent in attracting residential & commerical development.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: There are two major issues that the rest of the DFW region should be aware of. The first
is the expected increase in population and the need to be able to move efficiently thru the
metroplex. The second is that of affordable housing. When you look at the Irving ISD you
see that there are more single parent families who have a need for affordable housing. I
believe Irving is making adequate progess in both of these areas to ensure that it set's the
pace for the metroplex.
Q: Should the city have single-member district representation? What kind of system, and
what boundaries, do you think would give citizens the best representation?
A: Single member district representation can be an effective strategy as cities grow to
ensure that citizens still feel connected to local governments. I have seen single member
districts work well and I have also seen them not work so well. The key is whether those
who are elected work together for the good of the entire city.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Work within existing state and federal regulations to address this issue.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: I do have some concerns about the current Irving ordinance that addresses natural gas
drilling. Specifically: a.) Noise Levels: Is 90 decibels an appropriate limit or not? b.)
Neighborhood Notice: It appears the ordinance calls for 20 day notice but I would suggest
that it should be 30 or 45 days. c.) Traffic Congestion: I have a major concern about
whether the drilling will negatively impact the traffic pattern in the drilling area. The
ordinance does call for a traffic plan to be presented to the Council but I believe it should
be scrutinized very closely to minimize the impact.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Yes I do favor a seamless regional transit system for two main reasons. The first reason
is that the population of the DFW area is expected to double within the next 10 to 12
years. With that in mind we must develop ways to effectively move throughout the DFW
area. The second reason is that this is one thing that is considered by businesses when
they look at areas to place facilities in. Being part of such a system will only increase
Irving's ability to attract more business. In terms of making this happen I currently serve
on the Transportation & Infrastructure Committee thru the Irving Chamber and this is one
of major issues this committee plans on addressing in conjunction with the North Texas
Council of Governments.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: The other issue that comes to mind is one of air quality. Irving should continue to work
with the North Texas Council of Governments to find solutions for this issue.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: At this point I believe the city is doing their best to operate in a cost effective manner.
One evidence of this is the AAA Bond Rating that Irving has. This is not something that
happens if you don't operate in a cost effective manner.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: As a residential property owner I believe the city of Irving has done a good job in
weathering the economic storm. Keeping a balanced budget is about making sure that you
choose the right priorities and utilize your resources effectively. I would make sure that the
council has as much citizen input as possible to ensure we are choosing the right priorities.
I would also make sure all city departments are utilizing new techniques such as lean & six
sigma to ensure effective resource utilization.

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Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: I addressed it in an earlier question and that is one of reconciliation. During my
campaign I have noticed that the city of Irving has been divided over a number of heated
issues in the last few years. We are not always going to agree on every issue but we need
to focus on what we have in common to move Irving forward.

Trini Gonzalez
Biographical Info:
Name: Trini Gonzalez
Street Address: 1316 Balleywood Rd
City/Town: Irving
State: Texas
Date of Birth: Feb 15,1946
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-707-6380
Mobile Phone Number: 214-707-6380
Fax Number: 469-442-3914
E-mail Address: glassbricksbytc@yahoo.com
Campaign Web Site Address: go daddy www trini gonzalez.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: 12 years
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 40 years.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 6 years
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Self employed
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: A 22 year member of Clavary Church, J. Don George is my Pastor The community
asked me to serve and I am answering the call in this election Member of Irving Hispanic
Chamber of Commerce
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: I served my country and represented my community when I served in the Air Force
from 1964 to 1968 Active member of Calvary Church which does many community
outreach projects benefitng Irving residents I love to volunteeer to help my chucrh help
the community
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: 3,000
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Domingo Garcia Luis Spinola Victor Arias
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am running because after having been asked by people in District One , I decided to
serve. I have been knocking on doors since this campaign started and I see a great need
for many voiceless citizens in Irving Disrtict One to have a voice on the Council. I want the
citizerns of District One and all Irving residents to be my eyes and ears on the ground and
I will be their voice if I am elected to serve on the Council.I have lived a life of service to
our country and our community. I want to continue this passion to serve others on the City
Council.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: !. Continue the strong economic development plans the City already has in store and to
bring more such projects that are going to enhance the quality of life for all Irving
residents 2.I want to see our whole city infrastucture , meaning all city-owned buildings
and parks to be Wi- Fi 3. I want our City to focus more emphasis and resources to better
address the growing homelessness problem in Irving, with a keen eye to helping homeless
school children I will push for them through town hall meetings , getting community
buy-in and I will work to see our City be creative as possble to look for new funding means

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to pay for these proposals


Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: The key difference is in my experience living in the heart of South Irving since 1970. My
opponent has only been here just a little over a year. In walking door to door in District
One, I have personally seen the need for a Council person in this Place One District to be
bi-lingual. To my knowledge my opponent is not bi-lingual.I am the sole caretaker of a 87
year old mother and a 87 year old father that have lived the majority of their lives right
here in Irving. I want to make them proud to know their son is serving the community and
their longtime neighbors on the Irving City Council.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: As I have stated previously, this is all a part of a good and well thought out, economic
development plan for any City. Irving must do everything we can to protect our Triple A
Bond Rating. To date , our City has done an outstanding job in protecting this rating that
puts Irving in very elite company compared to other cities Nationwide.I am very proud of
irving for this , and if elected will work with my colleges on the Council to keep Irving so
ionacilly strong.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: The 2010 Census will tell Irving and all of North Texas that the Latino Comunnity is
growing by leaps and bounds. If elected I want to build respect bridges amongst all citizens
of Irving. Irving has had a motto " Be Kind" for years.I believe our City must do more
outreach to all segments of our diverse community and encourage them to serve on
boards and commission and to volunteer where needed within the City to make Irving
better.
Q: Should the city have single-member district representation? What kind of system, and
what boundaries, do you think would give citizens the best representation?
A: This is an issue that has already been decided by the courts. I believe we should abide
by the ruling. Of course , I realize that this is a historic election here in Irving because I
am running in a single member District, Place one .
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: I believe this is a Federal issue and the Federal government ought to give all of America
some solutions to this situation.On the local level I believe our Police should follow , City,
State and Federal laws that exist today.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: I believe as many Town hall meetings as needed should be held all across Irving to
better educate us all about this natuarl gas drilling. I just believe there are so many
unknowns that alot more educated information has to be deciminate all across Iring before
we go full steam one way or the other.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I favor a transit system that will have safety as its highest goal. whatever transit
system we have it has got to transport our love ones and citizens safely.Again, i firmly
believe that the community has to be intimately involved all the way for the concept stage
to the final construction stage of any transit system.Collaboration between all parties
involved is the key.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: This whole issue of Health-care is still going to be big going forward for all cities and
communities. I believe in Public-Private Partnerships. Moving forward Irving as a City
should strive to make all Irving residents less dependent on the government and more self
sufficient.This is going to again take a collaborative approach involving all segments of
Irving.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: More centralization of services is already being discusses within the City staff and by
many of the social service providers all across the City. I would like to see some common
place found and nurtured that would more centralize many city services.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do

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you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: I gotta give the current city administration passing marks in this area, economically we
are in pretty good shape right now but I believe our city is going to have to generate some
new income streams possibly through more grants and green technology grants just to
mention two ways to add to our total economic pie.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: There is still racial and economic division in Irving. We should want all citizens in Irving
to live in safe , clean and affordable neighborhoods and be good neighbors to each other.If
elected I will be a voice for all citizens of Irving treating each one with respect.

Irving City Council, Place 2


Description: Note: All Irving residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Roy Santoscoy

Biographical Info:
Name: Roy Santoscoy
Street Address: 7729 Pine Street
City/Town: Irving
State: TX
Date of Birth: 2/17/1966
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-929-6700
Home Phone Number: 972-556-1994
Mobile Phone Number: 214-929-6700
Fax Number: 972-579-8038
E-mail Address: roysantoscoy66@hotmail.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.roysantoscoy.com
Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/v/l9MEqxjgEjM&hl=en
Questions:
Q: Education
A: I am a product of Irving's public schools and a graduate of Irving High School (1984). I
subsequently completed management business courses at North Lake College in Irving.
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: I have been a resident of Irving all 44 years of my life.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: Not applicable
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: For two decades, I have been the owner of a small business in South Irving on Irving
Boulevard. My business, Roy's Pawn Shop, Inc., is my primary source of income.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: I currently serve as a trustee for Baylor Medical Center at Irving, where I am a
member of the finance committee. I am a member of the Irving Downtown Association,
the Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce, and the Irving Hispanic Chamber of
Commerce. At Irving Bible Church, I am a youth leader. I also participate in prison
ministry outreach with Bill Glass's Champions for Life.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: My previous involvements include the Irving Convention and Visitors' Bureau vice chair;
Tax Increment Finance Board; Irving Planning and Zoning Commission chair; Urban Center
Task Force; and numerous other governmental and community task forces and
committees.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: This is the first time I have sought public office.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?

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A: To date, supporters have contributed approximately $33,000 directly to my campaign.


Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Louis Santoscoy Vincent Santoscoy Robert Power
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I've long wanted to serve Irving on the City Council but needed to wait until my children
were a bit older and my business was stable enough to allow me to seek election. I grew
up in Irving. I built a business here. My wife and I are raising our family here. I love
Irving. Because of that love, I have contributed more than a decade of volunteer service
on city and community boards, commissions and tasks forces. Because of the challenges
facing our city today, Irving needs an elected official in the at-large Place 2 position who is
committed to serving the public good and who can be a consensus builder for our city. I am
the most qualified candidate based on my level of involvement with and commitment to
Irving.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: First, I will ask the Irving City Council and all schools serving families in our city to form
a task force for the purpose of addressing dropout rates, campus violence and homeless
students. Second, I will call for a review of the ordinances that affect small businesses;
that review would include direct communication with owners to better understand the
impact these ordinances have had on Irving's businesses. Third, I will ask for a complete
review of the McDougal project, the downtown redevelopment proposal; this review will
include the history, the various project plans, and the financing. Any financial agreements
will be transparent. In all three actions, there is no new cost. It simply requires the time
and commitment to make them happen.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I will do the necessary work up front work to build consensus on issues. This is
something that my opponent has been unable accomplish. I will listen respectfully to the
public and my colleagues and seek solutions, not just vote against issues without offering
alternatives. It's not enough to just show up and cast an opposition vote.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: My service on the Planning and Zoning Commission has shown me the value of smart
residential and commercial development. My service on the Irving Convention and Visitors'
Bureau has taught me the importance of strategic promotion and relationship-building
within our corporate community. Development is high on my list of priorities. Irving has
done a good job and I believe we need to maximize every opportunity to add quality
residential housing stock and to continue building corporate community.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: The demographic changes happening in Irving are the same as those in cities across our
region. We are very diverse. The overall population is increasing and aging, which creates
unique challenges. The school-age population also is increasing. With growth has come
urban congestion. Irving is aggressively pursuing the redevelopment of its roadways and
an expansion of the DART transportation system. I support these actions. In addition, I
would strengthen the relationship between our city and its schools in order to meet the
needs of our families and their children. Also, I will focus on issues that ensure that senior
adults have a high quality of life in Irving.
Q: Should the city have single-member district representation? What kind of system, and
what boundaries, do you think would give citizens the best representation?
A: This issue for Irving has been resolved in the federal courts. The time for debate is over
and now we need to work together to make this new system successful.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Irving wisely avoided the legal entanglements and expense that Farmers Branch has
incurred. Irving has a form of the criminal alien program (CAP). This program is under
review by the Department of Homeland Security. We do not yet know the results of that
review. What we do know is that effective policing can be accomplished without racial

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profiling.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: I believe we must review all current natural gas drilling ordinances in order to ensure
the safety of our community. If this review brings to light any concerns, we should adjust
our regulations accordingly.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I favor a seamless regional transit system. Irving has always been a leading participant
in this effort. I will continue to support sound transportation policies.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: Waste management, environmental concerns and the availability and conservation of
water all offer opportunities for regional cooperation. I would ask Irving to take these
three issues as seriously as it has taken regional transportation, which has achieved
national recognition. I believe we can develop similar initiatives to successfully address
these three issues.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: As a councilman, we should always review our service delivery to residents and
businesses. I look forward to reviewing city services and to bringing my business sense to
making them better and more cost effective for the people of Irving.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Irving's tax base is such that the economic downturn has not affected it as detrimentally
as most cities in our region. However, we need to continually monitor our tax revenues
and wisely contain costs whenever possible. Now, more than ever, we need to focus on
areas of highest priority in order provide necessary infrastructure maintenance.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: There are emerging and sometimes divisive issues in Irving that, if not addressed, will
surely handicap our progress. Our diversity and our location are our strengths. I look
forward to serving in Place 2 at large on the City Council in order to represent all parts of
and all people in Irving. We have an amazing community to promote to our Metroplex, our
region, our state, our nation and the world. Irving can be an international city that is
perfect for both business and family life.

Tom Spink

Biographical Info:
Name: Tom Spink
Street Address: Home: 1319 N. Irving Heights Office: 2311 Texas Drive 1 block north of
Hwy 183.
City/Town: Home: Irving Office: Irving
State: Home: Texas 75061 Office: Texas 75062
Date of Birth: June 7, 1938
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-554-1300 (this # is forwarded to Tom's
mobile or home if Tom is not in his office)
Home Phone Number: 972-554-1300 (this # is forwarded to Tom's mobile or home if
Tom is not in his office)
Mobile Phone Number: 972-554-1300 (this # is forwarded to Tom's mobile or home if
he is not in his office)
Fax Number: 972-579-9044
E-mail Address: thinkspink4irving@gmail.com
Campaign Web Site Address: thinkspink4irving.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Tom holds multiple degrees from colleges and universities in Arkansas, Kansas, and
Illinois, earning degrees in engineering, business and law. Tom worked his way through

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school and managed to excel in both business and school during those years. His business
endeavors have led Tom to achieve special licensing in multiple fields in order to own,
manage and succeed in his almost 50 years in the business world. Tom and his wife Linda
are long time Irving residents and make their home in South Irving. Their family is grown
making them proud grandparents, and they have now filled their home with their golden
retrievers. Some of their Golden Retrievers have been trained as “hospital” ambassadors
to various rehab groups.
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: Tom and his wife Linda have lived in south Irving for 21 years. Tom also has his
business offices in south Irving.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: This question is not applicable as Tom is running for an AT LARGE position on the Irving
City Council where anyone living anywhere in the city can run and EVERYONE in the city
can vote for the candidate in this race. Tom has lived in the city for 21 years and thus is
qualified to run in Place 2, AT LARGE. Tom’s previous district, where he had only served
part of one term, was changed because of the Single Member District Lawsuit filed against
the City and settled with the plaintiff by a majority vote of the City Council which left Tom
out of his previous district by about 100 feet.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Tom and his employees specialize in insuring businesses and individuals for a complete
range of coverage. Tom’s belief in diversity is apparent in his staff of multi-ethnic and
multi-generational employees. His reputation in the corporate world is impeccable. He
also serves as a consultant to the boards of several Texas Community Banks.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: In addition to attending City Council meetings and work sessions for the past three
years, Tom attends many of the city boards and commissions meetings when he is not
appointed to them so that he can stay in touch with what is going on in the city and hear
citizens’ concerns. Tom is active in Chamber of Commerce activities such as visiting with
current Irving businesses, making personal calls to attract new businesses to Irving. Tom is
always eager to support various IISD sports events with his time and money. Tom and
Linda have donated some of their beautiful Golden Retrievers to be “Ambassador’s” with
the Animal Volunteer Group at Baylor where Tom, himself, volunteers to visit critically
burned children. His work with Prince, the trained canine Ambassador is a particular civic
highlight tor Tom. Tom has been financially involved in establishing a trust for mentally
challenged children also. Tom also maintains a professional and personal relationship with
many state and local elected officials to enhance his city council work and his work with
citizens to help solve their problems.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: During Tom’s three years on the City council, he has never missed a Council meeting
nor has he missed a Council work session. In addition, Tom has visited personally with
over 1,000 constituents on both personal and business related problems and concerns.
Tom’s efforts have led to solving most of concerns that caused people to call Tom, through
his efforts with City staff and others. Some of the efforts to solve problems for citizens are
ongoing. Tom is a neighborhood volunteer and attends Neighborhood association
meetings all over the city regularly in addition to his home Neighborhood Group. Tom is
also a 32nd degree Mason and volunteers his time with this group. As many who have
called on Tom for his help can attest to, volunteering is one of Tom’s greatest joys in life.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Tom’s only previous held office is that of City Councilman in Irving for the past three
years. Tom ran for Mayor of Irving some years ago and before that ran for U.S. Senator
when Lloyd Bentsen stepped down and left that Senate seat open.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: Tom has raised $10,000.00. Tom's supporters are the resident citizens of Irving, not
Unions or out of town groups, so he has no obligations to anyone except the voters of
Irving.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Carol Wood, Don Rorschach, Mary Owen
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: NO! Tom has not been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings. The only civil
suit in which Tom has been involved is the law suit against the City of Irving when the
Plaintiff was seeking Single Member Districts and the city, as well as all council members,
was named in the suit
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you

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to serve in this office?


A: Tom is running for this office to continue to give the citizens an INDEPENDENT VOICE on
the Irving City Council. Tom has completed almost one term of three years and has
gained knowledge of procedures and needs of the City. Tom’s education combined with his
professional experience provide the expertise needed to understand and deal with all
aspects of being a successful councilman, including understanding and developing
responsible budgets, awarding contracts, developing personnel policies, establishing
appropriate protocol and all other professionally related council responsibilities. In
addition, because Tom’s children are grown and therefore place no demands on his time
and his work schedule allows him the time needed to spend the time to fully serve the
citizens of Irving; Tom is in the perfect position to serve a second term. Tom is a great
listener and works to solve problems, over 1000 calls & requests, since his election. He
regularly visits Neighborhood Association meetings to learn what citizens want and what
support they need from a council person. He averages over 300 personal visits with
citizens per year, a fact that in itself indicates that he is serving the citizens in a way that
someone with young, active children probably could not manage. Tom’s experience on
the council; his relationship with dozens of Neighborhood Groups; his flexible personal and
business schedule; his proven ability to take the time and efforts spent on city council
meetings and other committee meetings; and his attention to citizen and business owner
needs clearly illustrate his devotion to the city and more importantly to those who work
and live in the city.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1. Tom will work with council members and city staff to create a Safer and more secure
city by attaining a Public Protection Code rating for the Irving City fire Department. Tom
feels that progress has been made to arrest and detain criminal illegal aliens, and others
who participate in criminal activities but that much more work must be done to return our
City to a safer place. 2. Tom will work for much more Transparency and Honesty at City
Hall – Tom feels that it is entirely too difficult for citizens to be heard and to get
information necessary to participate in the governing of their city. Tom continues to work
to restore a televised Citizens’ Forum. Tom continues to work to obtain the third supporter
which is required to place this item on the agenda for public discussion. Tom continues to
work towards more advance placement of items to be discussed at council meetings so
that citizens can become aware and participate if they choose. Tom continues to request
that the contract process the city uses be scrutinized more vigilantly and that extension
and expansion of contracts should only be done with the utmost due diligence. Tom
continues to monitor the lack of progress and lack of transparency surrounding the
Heritage District project and the Entertainment Venue as well as the tax dollars being
invested. 3. Balanced Budget - Tom will continue to use his experience, expertise and
INDEPENDENT VOICE to insist upon a balanced budget - - Protecting Citizens and
Businesses, especially during tough economic times is essential.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: The primary differences are education, experience and work flexibility. Tom holds
multiple degrees in engineering, business and law, all applicable to running a city the size
of Irving. Tom has over 40 years of experience in the professional business world, all of
which is also applicable to running a city the size of Irving. Tom has experience in raising
money, budgeting large sums, working with banks, and understands the law. Tom has
managed large staffs of people. In addition to the education and experience, Tom has the
time to devote. It has been said by various council members that being a councilman is
just about a full time job, and Tom because of Tom’s lack of family commitments and his
professional position, has the time and the willingness to devote that time to city business.
In addition Tom has three years of experience in city council work and responsibilities
including budgeting and the myriad of council challenges as well as thousands of hours of
listening to Neighborhood groups, and concerns and problems of individual citizens and
business owners. Tom’s opponent is a young man with young children in the home and he
is active in their sports and other activities, which leaves him without the time for City
Council that is needed. Tom’s opponent also owns a business which probably will present
conflict of interest in two areas: the Irving Boulevard Redevelopment as well as the
Heritage District Redevelopment.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: The city does a good job attracting and developing commercial and residential
development to North Irving, which is a good thing. Unfortunately, South Irving and the

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western side of Irving along Highway 161 are not developing as they must do in order to
provide additional taxes to the Irving Independent School District. More development is
needed south of Royal Lane in order to provide a larger tax base for both the city and the
Irving Independent School District. The city’s efforts and redevelopment of the Heritage
District began with lots of promise; however, the past 18 months have seen very little
progress as promised. The city must observe a more businesslike relationship with the
Heritage District developer and press for real progress that meets the expectations
promised by the developer or serious sanctions or charges for failure to make progress.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: The socio-economic demographic has changed and been reduced considerably for the
southern part of the city where older homes and apartment projects offer less expensive
dwelling units. This is not that different from most of the DFW area. Many areas in South
Irving are genteel havens for senior citizens and provide quality living conditions. The city
deals well with most of these changes. The problem area seems to be an increase in
vandalism and crime which our police department works diligently to stop. Tom wants to
see “storefront” police location in the Valley Ranch area of Irving replaced to assure quick
response to Valley Ranch as well as more police patrols and quicker response in Hackberry
Creek. Tom will strive for quicker response time for police calls throughout the city. Tom
also will work to encourage tougher charges for those criminals who commit crimes in
Irving.
Q: Should the city have single-member district representation? What kind of system, and
what boundaries, do you think would give citizens the best representation?
A: Irving has a single-member district representation at the current time due to the
settlement of a law suit to force that change. Commenting about what Tom would prefer
is a non-starter, since the court has adjudicated, required and approved the mapping for
single-member districts in Irving.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: The police department should continue to enforce the CAP program. Especially
important is getting the violent criminal element of illegal aliens identified and
incarcerated. Too many citizens and others are being robbed, raped and abused by the
violent criminal illegal aliens. The police should increase their efforts to locate, identify and
incarcerate violent criminals.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: Tom proposes a moratorium on additional drilling until further information can be
gathered which will answer whether or not the process is detrimental to the citizens of
Irving. Further, he proposes a bond to be obtained by the city to replace the road and
property damage done by heavy drilling equipment to be sure that damage can be
replaced without the cost consuming the revenue derived from fees, production and taxes
on the successful wells which are anticipated to be funds available for budget needs.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Tom favors seamless regional transit system and volunteers to work with a group of
concerned citizens and elected officials as well as decision makers of all transit systems in
the Metroplex to further the success of a regional transit system.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: Irving could benefit from greater regional cooperation with neighboring cities to insure a
regional seamless transit system. Additionally, some biohazard equipment is so
expensive that it neighboring cities could agree to either share the cost of some of this
equipment or one city could own and other cities could in effect pay a “time share” cost for
the equipment so that it would be available when needed for other regional cities.
Disaster event training and practice should be a Regional partnership. Without cooperation
of all regional cities, a disaster at DFW Airport or any of the regional cities could be a
major trauma for the entire region.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Irving delivers services in a moderately effective manner to taxpayers. Some
departments such as code enforcement and garbage collection could benefit from cost
containment. As an example, garbage collection could be a once a week service to contain
and reduce costs. Code enforcement needs to emphasize officer initiatives to encourage

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code officers to be able to write all visible and known code enforcement infractions
immediately when seen thus making those officers more efficient and increase resident
satisfaction. Code enforcement officers should have immediate method of liaison and
response with police and animal control to obtain enforcement actions on
wrecked/inoperable vehicles and stray animals. An animal control officer should be
available 24 hours per day seven days a week to apprehend dangerous animals and strays
that frighten and/or threaten residents and tear open garbage bags left at curbs for
pick-up. Other initiative in addition to these should be investigated and implemented.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: With sales tax reductions in our city, the city should hold the line on additional
expenditures to prevent having to increase taxes or fees. One way to cut the budget is to
go to a one day a week garbage pick-up. Another is to hold the line on personnel and
increases in pay when many residents in the city are out of work or have taken reduced
pay or hours in order to keep working. Job sharing (Six-Sigma) may be a way to cut costs
by allowing two people to do one job which would allow personnel to reduce child care
costs and thus allow them to work part time and have more quality time with their
children. Out of town garbage hauling vehicles should possibly have to pay a higher fee to
dump in our City’s dump to off-set the costs of repairing roads that heavy loaded trucks
damage. City street beautification projects should be put on hold until the economy
stabilizes. All contracts should be re-bid to obtain lower costs based on the current
economic climate instead of doing contract add-ons. Consulting contracts should be
carefully scrutinized with reduction of costs and consultants being the goal. More work
should be done in-house. A program of contracting retired successful business executives
could be executed at a very low price or for free as community service to substitute for
expensive consultants.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Resident voters must realize that Irving, while more successful than some regional
cities with their budget requirements, does not have an unlimited source of funds for
expenses. Irving must cut all non-essential projects in order to maintain its AAA tax rating
and to keep taxes low. In order to continue to attract new businesses to Irving, we must
provide lower taxes than some of the neighboring cities. The uncomfortable truth is that
Irving is overextended on the Heritage District redevelopment, based on the current
economic climate. Irving’s Council must recognize and adjust to this reality or be forced
to raise taxes and fees to cover the burden of this project, especially if the economic
climate does not improve substantially in the next few months. The longer city taxpayer
money is needed to pay the interest on the $25 million dollar loans, the more expensive
the property gets and the higher the development costs of projects. The city will probably
have to accept less than the effective cost of the property in order to allow a development
to be built that will be economically feasible for the area and this will mean that the
taxpayer winds up subsidizing the developments.

Irving City Council, Place 7


Description: Note: Only Irving residents living in Place 7 may vote in this race. Click here
to find your district.

Candidates (choose 1):

Gerald Farris

Biographical Info:
Name: Gerald Farris
Street Address: 1308 Mosswood Ln.
City/Town: Irving
State: TX
Date of Birth: 07/02/1958

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Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-754-6547


Home Phone Number: 972-554-1810
Mobile Phone Number: 972-754-6547
E-mail Address: 4place7@geraldfarris.net
Campaign Web Site Address: www.geraldfarris.net
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Attended IISD schools: Barton, Crockett, Irving High. Attended both the Tarrant and
Dallas County College systems with an Associates Degree from North Lake in Irving, 1995.
Attended UTA as a part time chemistry major 1995 to 1997.
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: Resided in Irving over 40 years total including the first 20 years of my life and the last
16 years. Have always resided in Dallas or Tarrant Counties.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 16 years (as presently drawn)
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Regulatory Manager for a local paint company.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Elected 3 times as president of the Irving Hospital District Neighborhood Association
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Serving my 5th year as neighborhood association board member.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: I have never sought nor held public office.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: This information will be available on 8th of April.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: This information will be available on 8th of April.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am running for office quite simply to be a representative of the voters of Irving and
Place 7. My relationship to the voters is basic, fundamental and well grounded in
representative government. My experience and heritage with the city is of someone that
grew up here and emphasizes the basics of a community through neighborhoods, church
and school. My experience as neighborhood president always placed families and
community first. Especially emphasizing involvement of children. My work history includes
research and development as well as regulations at the federal and state level. I have to
be very meticulous and precise conveying safety and hazard information to our customers
and with compliance reporting to federal and state agencies. My seven years in research
and development gives me experience as a self-starter and problem solver designing paint
products to meet the specific application needs of the customer. I paid for all of my own
upper level education and completed most of it while working full time. Prior to my R&D
lab experience, much of my work experience was on the factory floor.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: One item is the 60/40 ordinance amendment 2983 approved on 22 October 2009.
Whether I personally believe that this will harm the city or not, many citizens fear that it
could. Therefore, this should be revisited by the council to the reconciliation of our citizens
and our faithful restaurateurs. Budget considerations and city staffing. City management
has done an excellent job maintaining city services on the front lines while in a difficult
economy. However, behind the scenes I have also heard dissatisfaction from current and
former city employees on the need to address fundamental HR concerns. These concerns
could grow more vocal if the city budget has to be tightened. Economic development.
Economic development should be promoted through private investors as much as possible
so as to increase the city tax base and maintain the city’s high bond rating. Our primary
focus in the next few years will be the convention center and adjacent development, state
hwy 183 and the downtown Heritage District.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: The difference I offer is a fresh perspective. Government will benefit with fresh ideas
from new members. City government is no different. It is not a matter of pushing people

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out. But instead, it is a matter letting in a new point of view. I will always put what is good
for the community first. I will always listen to the concerns of constituents.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Commercial development has to rank very high as a priority. As I go out and speak to
voters, this is one of the primary concerns. I am not certain why we cannot attract good
quality retail in the southern part of the city. The northern sectors continue to attract good
corporate and retail growth. I give the city a mixed review on this matter with need for
improvement.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: When growing up in the 60’s and 70’s we were taught equality. Now we are taught
demography and our population is measured by statistical differences. I would deal with
that by accentuating what we have in common and less on what we don’t have in common.
Q: Should the city have single-member district representation? What kind of system, and
what boundaries, do you think would give citizens the best representation?
A: Even though I am running in a single member district, I will work to serve all the
citizens of Irving. However, district 7 will certainly receive due consideration given the
amount of attention North Irving has received in comparison. Whatever preference we
have as individuals, I am opposed to dividing districts down neighborhood streets that
have like problems and concerns.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: The city should continue to address problems from the perspective of a municipality.
Strong police and enforced codes will go a long way in benefitting our community.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: If the citizens or other evidence is presented that causes concern, then these issues
should be reviewed by city staff and the council. I do not know of anyone that would not be
in favor of implementing greater protection for our neighborhoods and environment given
evidence and necessity to do so. Some are satisfied that this evidence has already
revealed itself from other surrounding cities. This evidence can certainly be placed into the
equation and acted upon at any time.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Irving has paid the price in millions of dollars to DART for the mass transit system we
currently have. “Seamless” comes with a price. Cities that have not participated would
certainly have to pay their fair share to make this happen.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: Water and transportation are always areas for needed cooperation. There are many
others such as emergency response, crime prevention, etc.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: That is something I will have greater knowledge of once elected. I will make decisions
and support changes that will positively affect efficiency if reasonable.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: As mentioned earlier, current leadership has done a good job to this point. If faced with
cuts, priorities would include outside services and consultant contracts. Priorities will also
be set with input from constituents.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Irving has always been my home and I enjoy living here. I am running for city council
to further advance Irving as a desirable place for families. I will take an approach that will
promote this goal.

Sam C. Smith

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Biographical Info:
Name: Sam Smith
Street Address: 1601 Oak Meadows Dr
City/Town: Irving
State: Texas
Date of Birth: August 12, 1937
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-876-6835
Home Phone Number: 972-253-8202
Mobile Phone Number: 214-876-6835
E-mail Address: samsmithplace7@gmail.com
Campaign Web Site Address: samsmithplace7.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Attended SMU
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 45 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 45 years
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Retired\Investments
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Irving City Council\ 3 terms\ currently Mayor Pro-Tem City Council Liason to the Irving
Convention and Visitors Bureau & Irving Arts Board Chairman of the City Council's
Legislative Committee and Community Services Committee Member\ City Council Planning
and Development Committee Member\Irving Rotary Club (16 yrs); served as Scholarship
Chairman for 2 years Member\ Chamber of Commerce Member\ Irving Heritage Society
Lifetime member\ Friends of the Library
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Served 6 years| Irving Convention and Visitors Bureau Board of Directors\ Chairman of
the Board on two different occasions. 2 years on the Irving Schools Foundation Board of
Directors\ President of the Board First Chairman of the Board of the Irving Independent
School District's "Excellence Now" Committee. 4 years on the Greater Irving\Las Colinas
Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors\ Served as Group Vice Chairman of Marketing.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Served on Irving City Council from 2002-present.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $1,250 plus $1,800.00 personal loan to my campaign.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Carla Smith $1,800.00 K.W. Corry $250.00
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am running because I want to continue to serve my city and it's citizens. I am the
most qualified candidate becuse of the combination of my business\professional
background, my long record of public service in Irving, and the 3 terms I have already
served on the City Council. My business background includes 30 years in the Advertising
Agency Industry. I served as a Senior Executive with one of the top 25 largest ad agencies
in the U.S. From the ad agency business, I transitioned into the Executive Search business
where I owned and operated my own Executive Search firm for 15 years. My client base
was national and my specialty was marketing and advertising searches for major talent.
After retirement, I decided to run for our City Council and was electd in 2002. Since then, I
have run twice more and was re-elected both times. I currently serve as Mayor Pro-Tem.
This unique combination of leadershp experience in my professional\business background

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and while on the City Council qualifies me to continue to serve our citizens.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: The three most important actions I will take when elected are as follows: 1. HOLD THE
LINE ON TAXES! We are approaching a difficult budget process for the upcoming fiscal
year. Revenues are down while basic City needs are on-going. I will work to find solutions
to a balanced budget that does NOT include any tax increase. As I mentioned earlier, the
City Council instructed staff to find ways to reduce the size and cost of government several
years ago. This process is ongoing. We have reduced payroll while increasing the quality of
basic city services at the same time. We have consolidated resources and combined inter-
departmental responsibilities. At the same time we are opening a new library, a new
aquatic center, and a new convention center this year. And, this is being done WITHOUT a
tax increase! Irving enjoys the lowest property tax rates and the lowest water rates in the
Metroplex. When I am re-elected, I will work to see that it stays that way. 2. CONTINUE
TO STRENGTHEN IRVING'S NEIGHBORHOODS! Since I have been on the City Council, I
have been a champion of strong neighborhoods and the establishment\support of strong
neighborhood associations. I attended Neighborhood Roundtable meetings early in the
process where we had trouble filling the seats. Now, we are running out of space. I fought
to establish neighborhood grants so that neighborhood associations would have dollars to
reinvest into their neighborhoods. Today, I am fighting to get these grant dollars increased.
I have been a major voice on the city council to dramatically increase code enforcement
efforts because this represents a major tool with which to fight crime. Today, code
enforcement and our Fire\Police Departments work hand-in-hand to clean up our city and
reduce crime. As a result today, Irving enjoys the lowest crime rate in our city's history.
We still have lots of work to do but we have come a very long way. During the upcoming
budget planning process, I will continue to fight for funding to build stronger
neighborhoods, fight crime, and continue to clean up our city. Additionally, I will advocate
for allocation of sufficient financial resources to accelerate the demolition of sub-standard
"slum" apartments and work to secure authorization for bond monies to fund the effort. 3.
SUPPORT PARKS AND GREEN SPACES! I was very instrumental in pushing through to
completion the planning and development of so called "pocket" or "neighborhood" parks in
Irving, whether it be the "park" at MacArthur and Grauwyler, the "park" at Shady Grove
and MacArthur or other pocket parks and alcoves throughout our City. It's good for our
citizens, it's good for our city's image; and it helps to strengthen neighborhoods, improve
lifestyles and fight crime. Just as I have in the past,I will continue to support the growth in
this movement during the budget development process.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: The combination of my successful business background, my long record of public service
in Irving, and my three terms on the City Council uniquely qualify me to be re-elected.
Long before I decided to run for the important job of City Councilman, I had spent years
learning about the needs and wants of our City it's problems and opportunities, and the
need and wants of it's citizens. I was fully prepared to step into a City Council seat, without
missing a step. I had paid my dues and was ready to go to work!
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: A. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ranked as the highest resident priority in the 2009 Irving
Residential Survey and is one of eight key focus areas in the City's Strategic Plan. While
Irving is known natinally for its Las Colinas Urban Center, the city has other areas with
significant economic development potential, including an expanding office\warehouse
district in its southwest quadrant. Maximizing regional transportation systems, including 5
major freeways, the Trinity Railway Express commuter rail line and the under-construction
DART Light Rail Orange Line that will serve as a direct link to DFW International Airport,
Love Field and downtown Dallas, is of the utmost priority to Irving. COMMERCIAL:
Through it's partnership with the Greater Irving \Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce, the
City maximizes resources to achieve impressive results in recruiting and retaining
commercial development and corporate citizens. According to one of the DFW areas
largest commercial real estate brokerage firms, Irving-Las Colinas is rated as one of the
top office market performers during 2009 in the entire Metroplex. Today, nine commercial
projects have been completed and twenty eight others are under construction, including a
convention center, industrial\flex, civic-use, and others. Thirty others are planned for
future development. New companies having recently selected Irving \Las Colinas include
GKN Aeorspace, PrimeSource Building Products, Universal Technical Institute, Mojave
Foods, and AHC Inc. Companies already here which are expanding through increased lease

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space or construction of new facilites include Nokia Siemens Networks, Shermco


Industries, Dallas Cowboys Merchandising and HMS. RESIDENTIAL: Through our focused
commitment to improving community standards, corridor enhancements, park, recreation
and library amenities and redeveloment initiatives, Irving is cultivating it's reputation as
an ideal city for vital, vibrant neighborhoods. In the previous twelve months, Irving
issued building permits for 429 homes, ranging in price from $400,000.00 to
$1,400,000.00. These residential developments will enhance the already diverse housing
stock in our city.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Irving is a culturally diverse community. The 2000 Census reported Irving's Hispanic
population to be at 31%. The 2010 Census is expected to show a significant increase during
the last ten years. The City is looking forward to receiving new updated information so we
can continue to adapt to it's changing demographics. Irving has implemented multiple
initiatives to foster and embrace a multicultural community and this committment is
reflected in our City's Strategic Plan under Goal #5: Promote and Support Diversity in the
Community. Somoe of these initiatives include: *Cinco de Mayo Multicultural Festival
*Dragon Boat Race *Juneteenth Celebration *Martin Luther King event *Islamic Center
Open House *Irving Fire Department Multicultural outreach coalition. *CommunityFest
*Blue Christmas *Irving Hispanic Chamber of Commerce *Minority and Women Owned
Business participation. One demographic that goes relatively unnoticed is the growth in
Irving's aging population. We must continue to support our senior citizens. When I am
re-elected, I will push to contruct an additional Senior Citizens Center in a location still to
be determined. This can be funded through the activation of bonds already approved by
the Citizens.
Q: Should the city have single-member district representation? What kind of system, and
what boundaries, do you think would give citizens the best representation?
A: We already have single-member district representation, I.e. 6 single-member district
seats and 3 at-large seats. The Municipal election of May 8,2010 will be the first election of
this type ever held in our City. We await the arrival of 2010 Census information which will
tell us what revisions should be made to respond to most recent data.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: When it came to illegal immigration solutions at the local level, Irving proved that the
best solutions rarely come from the same old tired models. Instead, we did something
different and what we did is working. In this case, many wanted us to follow a federal
initiative known s 287(g). This was created by Congress and it authorizes local police to act
as federal immigration officers after they have been trained by Federal Immigration and
Customs Enforcement agents. But, strings were attached which included local communities
continuing to pay the salaries of the police officers even though they would have been
supervised and controlled by Federal Agents. It also came with many pitfalls, not the least
of which was the caft that police officers acting as immigration officers would cause
significant tensions between our police and a large part of our community. But even worse,
this solution was clearly just trying to do more of what was already not working and
getting local communites to pay for it. Irving instead created what we call the 24\7
Criminal Alien Program which includes an informative sharing link with ICE that allows
them to screen prisoners into the Irving jail who cannot be easily identified by either
fingerprints or a Texas Drivers License. With this program in place, if an illegal immigrant
is arrested for violation and discovered they are held accountable. Since it's
implementation, more than 5,000 illegal aliens have been identified and deported. This
success by our Police Department is unprecedented. No other municipality in the United
States can match it. So, Irving found a way to make the federal government more efficient
and it didn't cost anything! The Irving 24\7 CAP has been widely copied by other law
enforcement agencies in Texas and has even been formally recognized by U.S.
Congressman Pete Sessions. And, Irving was invited to speak at the U.S.\Mexico
Congressional Border Issues Conference in Washingto D.C. and our Police Chief has
testified about the program before an Austin Legislative Sub-Committee.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: There are many challenges facing Irving relative to natural gas drilling. These include
how to protect our landowner's rights, clear water and air, and public health. Fully
understanding these ever changing issues obligates us to constantly review the
effectiveness of laws that govern the extracting of natural gas. * efforts must be made to

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minimize quality of life impacts on surrounding land uses. * the location of drilling and
production should be as far away as feasible from residents, hospitals, nursing homes, and
schools to help minimize adjacent impacts. * utilities should be buried to encourage wildlife
use of those lands. In Irving, it is the City Council's responsibility to do everything in its
power to protect our citizens and our environment from environmental problems and we
should consider any necessary oversight provisions and more frequent inspections to
ensure citizen safety.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: The DFW Metroplex and all of North Texas are dependent upon an effective
transportation system. As rapid growth continues, our transportation system's limitations
become even more acute and they negatively affect the regional mobility of people and
goods, air quality and resident quality of life while threatening our continued economic
prosperity. The answer is to create a seamless transit system consisting of multiple
modes of transportation that provides interconnectivity to the entire region. This means
that local cities, transportation agencies, MPO's and the Congressional legislative
delegation for the entire region work together with a common understanding of priorities,
finance methods and projective selection methods. The North Texas region has a number
of entities focused on transportation issues such as Vision North Texas, North Central Texas
Council of Governments, Regional Transportation Council, Dallas Regional Mobility
Coalition, Tarrant Regional Transportation Coalition and Partners in Mobility, just to name a
few. In order to create a seamless transportation network, it is critical that this
fragmentation of transportation entities be eliminated and a concensus on priorities be
reached. We must speak with one voice while also exploring multiple methods of
financing transportation projects. There needs to be more education directed at the public
sector and North Texas residents as well as the region's congressional and legislative
delegations and transit agencies. We should consider public meetings, training workshops,
and collateral materials.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: Another issue of potential great benefits to the region is the BNSF Commuter Rail
project. One major proglem facing local municipalities is how to pay for aging
infrastructure to meet the needs of a growing population base. North Texans, like other
U.S. areas, have transportation needs that far outreach the capital investment they can
absorb. Although population continues to increase, there is little likelihood of a gas tax
increase and the national transportation bill has not been reauthorized to provide funding.
A joint solution is needed requiring collaboration. The Burlington Northern-Santa Fe line
project represents almost 30 miles of freight rail that cities along the line have been
working together to include in the commuter rail network. These cities include Irving,
Carrollton, Farmers Branch, Hebron, The Colony and Frisco. It is clear that this regional
unity resulted in a push forward to the project. And, although funding sources have yet to
be identified, the concept of innovative financing methods including public\private
partnerships are being investigated. The benefits of the BNSF project are great, not only to
the cities along the line, but also to the entire region. This would reduce traffic congestion,
provide better interconnectivity, reduce gas consumption and allow municipalities to
benefit from commercial development(TOD's)around the stations.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: The City of Irving Water Utilities Department was recently recognized as the best
municipal utility in Texas by the Texas Municipal Utility Association for it's leadership,
innovation in problem solving, efficiency, and improvement in customer service.
Additionally, Irving was also noted as having the lowest rates in North Texas. So, I believe
our citizens are receiving a high value at a low cost.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Four years ago, we instructed staff to look at ways to reduce the size of government in
order to become as efficient as possible while remaining effective. And, we have
succeeded. We consolidated responsibilities like combining Code Inspections with the Police
Department yielding the lowest crime rates in Irving's history for the last three years in a
row. As we became leaner and more efficient, we were able to continue library hours at
normal hours. We recently signed a contract for electricity that saved the city over
$3,500,000.00 a year for the next several years. This innovative cost-cutting mind-set has
saved dollars on fixed costs without impacting the delivery of basic services to our
residents.

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Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: CHANGE: Irving is at a critical point in it's life cycle. We can accept what we are
currently and be content with the status quo.... or we can dream of what we can become.
Growth, in any form requires change. As Will Rogers once put it... "Even if you're on the
right track, if you just stand there, you'll get run over." Through big dreams, Irving has
enjoyed abundant success... but with success comes struggle. This is the time for citizens
to continue to work so we can discover and accept those things that will take this
community to the next level and continue to improve the overall quality of life as it
impacts residents, businesses, and our position within the region.

Lewisville City Council, Place 4


Description: Note: All Lewisville residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Thomas (TJ) Gilmore

Biographical Info:
Name: Thomas “TJ” Gilmore
Street Address: 724 Juniper Lane
City/Town: Lewisville
State: Texas
Date of Birth: 12/11/1972
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 469-322-9432
Mobile Phone Number: 214-649-6076
E-mail Address: tjgilmore@gmail.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.tjgilmore.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: BA Social and Behavioral Science, University of Arizona 1996 Minor in Business
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: March of 2001. 9 Years.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: March of 2001. 9 Years.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Telecommunications Systems Sales- Regional Territory Manager
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: 2005-Present Lewisville Community Development Block Grant Committee (Vice Chair
08-09, Chair 09-10) Graduate 2009 Lewisville Citizen’s Police Academy 2010 – Cubmaster
Pack 233 Lewisville Texas 2010 Relay for Life Advocacy Chair
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: 2003-2004 Irving Texas Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors Involved in
community discussions and feedback regarding Oil and Gas development
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: No Previous offices held. Ran for Lewisville City Council Place 4 in 2009.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: In these difficult times fund raising has been limited and can be found on my campaign
filings which are available through the City of Lewisville’s City Secretary’s office.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: My top contributors are individual citizens who believe in fiscally conservative ways of
addressing Lewisville’s issues without entering into contracts with other government
entities which increase our liability and tax burden.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most

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qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I’m running because I believe I offer a positive and exciting vision of what Lewisville
can be. I’ve put in the time to understand how the city and region operate, I’ve learned
about my neighbors and citizens, and I’ve done the research on what it will take to grow
Lewisville for my children. My over 5 years of working with approximately $600,000 per
year in city revenues through the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
committee have helped me to understand the nuances of our budget. Having to spend
several weeks per year evaluating and recommending the various civic programs as well
as redevelopment initiatives so those ideas can be presented to the City Council reinforced
my understanding of how to solve budget challenges on a shoestring. During my term the
council has always approved recommendations from the CDBG committee. My
involvement with chambers of commerce, local businesses, social service agencies, my
church, as well as neighborhood initiatives such as oil and gas have given me not just a
‘city hall’ point of view but have allowed me to have a broad view of the tapestry that
makes up our community. As a council member I would be the most open to new ideas
that would be best for Lewisville because of this broad involvement.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: First, would be to have Lewisville be one of the first cities in the state to enact a PACE
program (Property Assessed Clean Energy) which was approved by the State Legislature
last year. This State program for municipalities creates self funding incentives for property
owners to reinvest in their home, raising the property values of Lewisville. It also reduces
energy costs, helping our seniors and fixed income homeowners to reduce their monthly
expenses. This is at no additional cost to the city. Second, I would review our apartment,
condominium, single family, multi family and trailer home zoning, much like the city
recently did with our Hotel/Motel zoning. I would work with other council members,
business owners, developers, and citizens to improve the quality of the developments we
have as well as to set the standards for new developments. This could be coupled with
incentives for sustainable building practices which help keep construction dollars local.
Third I would look to enact contracting rules that would encourage legal documented
employment practices with companies that contract with the city. These rules would look to
reward companies who voluntarily complied or went ‘above and beyond’ to verify
employment practices, as well as ensure they haven’t been in violation of labor laws for a
period of time. This would ensure the city spends its money wisely without the potential of
lawsuits and big government contracts. E-Verify, should it become easier for cities to enact
is a possibility, however, many State Representatives (including Burt Solomons) will be
looking to enact E-Verify state wide, which would keep an even playing field for Lewisville
and our tax dollars. I believe this issue is best handled through creative local rules, as
opposed to going down well trodden paths that have done nothing but cost our neighboring
cities millions in legal fees.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: Two of my top thee initiatives focus on property value. My competitor has no actionable
plans for improving property values per his website. Dish and Flower Mound Texas are
both facing difficult challenges with oil and gas development. I have given personal
feedback and even had a limited amount of my ideas added to our oil and gas ordinance. I
have rounded up neighbors to place them in a better position to negotiate leases, and I
continue to give input on oil and gas development so that our citizens can receive benefits
from their mineral leases and that we are treated fairly. We need to ‘Trust and Verify’ that
the drilling companies will be good corporate stewards of our resources and property
values. My competitor has given virtually no feedback and stated in a council meeting that
when he worked for an oil company 29 years ago things were safe enough. This is a
potentially divisive issue that needs to have strong council stewardship. Regarding my
opponent, I am not a fan of ‘gotcha politics’. Making a mistake or two is only human. When
someone continues to perform mistake, after mistake, after mistake, one has to wonder if
the next mistake won’t cost the city and its citizens their tax dollars. In the grand scheme,
not understanding how open meetings work, asking for votes during city business, and
failing to understand tax rules might be small pieces, they add up to a pattern unbecoming
of a public office holder and can impact our relations with developers, other cities, and
even our citizens. All of the above actions of my opponent are well documented and the
only response has been to misstate his liability on his web site, and claim he was joking
about government transparency. My opponent and I are no different in our belief in the
end game of illegal immigration: we both want a safe and prosperous Lewisville for
Citizens. The difference is how we get there. My opponent’s only documented actionable

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items are E-Verify, which will be done at a state level, and the 287(g) program which our
police and even local immigration officials have said are not as effective for Lewisville as
our CAP and Ice ACCESS programs. He claims that we should have one immigration
trained office like we have one Drug Enforcement Agency officer. A simple conversation
with officers in the city has pointed out that since all arrests are run through an
immigration check at the jail, it would only increase response times and put more work on
our police officers to run those checks from their cars.
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: Lewisville is only beginning to have drilling, we have one well which is not producing as
expected and we have two pending drill sites. Our existing ordinance could be
strengthened in two ways; the first would be to require emission free drilling as is done in
Colorado. This could be counterbalanced with a reduction or a payback of business
personal property taxation so as to not be onerous. We make gasoline stations abide by a
zero emissions policy, it only makes sense for a drill site. We could also explore escrowing
frac fluid during the process. This would keep a record should any of Lewisville’s water
supplies be tainted, but could only be analyzed if there is a court finding that there is water
pollution. This would protect the intellectual property of the drilling companies because the
samples would remain sealed and would be returned after a period of time, say 10 years.
We also need to determine if we should allow centralized fluid storage facilities like the one
being proposed for Flower Mound.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Property development and redevelopment are central to my beliefs in a prosperous
Lewisville. Unfortunately I-35 redevelopment is hindering our major business corridor. I
plan to continue to give input at public forums and would be working with city staff and
business owners to help those impacted by the development. Lewisville’s Economic
Development Department has done an excellent job developing plans for Old Town, the
new Light Rail Stations, Mill Avenue, the Arts District and even a proposed Lewisville Lake
development. These are great ideas but the city needs developers to make it happen. I
believe we’ve laid the foundation but it is now up to our city leaders to lead the charge and
attract developers with updated ordinances that encourage sustainable building methods.
We need to change our energy ordinances to encourage wind and solar usage. As a
councilman my career as a sales professional makes me uniquely qualified to build these
working relationships.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: There are 3 demographic changes that will significantly impact Lewisville: 1- The
continued influx of citizens of various ethnicities. Lewisville has a rich and diverse history;
we need to ensure that we work with this community. I’d like to see more cultural events
celebrating Lewisville’s African American, Latino and Asian communities. I believe this can
be accomplished with our new arts district. 2- The population of residents over the age of
65 is expected to double over the next 15 years. This will put a particular burden on our
emergency responders as well as our social service agencies. Lewisville continues to fund
organizations like Meals on Wheels and Day Stay for Adults, as well as provide
programming at our senior center. We will have to ensure funding continues for these
agencies so our seniors will continue to be a vital and engaged part of the populace. 3-
Influx of Burmese or ‘Chin’ religious refugees. Lewisville has approximately 600 of these
refugees who have been given asylum by the US government. Since these refugees tend
to settle where others of their extended family, displaced church, or regional affiliations
have settled, we can expect many more of these oppressed people to make their homes in
Lewisville. As residents and citizens they will bring a unique perspective, and unique needs
that we as a city are only now beginning to understand. The city needs to create an
outreach program to work with Chin families and help them acclimate to their new home.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: My opponent will discuss 287(g) which is being dismantled by the federal government as
well as E-verify which is being pursued by the state. Both are legislative dead ends at the
local level. Lewisville police do an excellent job and process all arrests through the
Criminal Alien Program, having removed nearly 1,000 criminal aliens from Lewisville at
last count. Why sign contracts that make our police work for the federal government when
we have an outstanding program that makes the feds work for us? Our police have done

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an excellent job with managing our enforcement resources and have even received
feedback from local immigration officials stating that Lewisville is a model for using CAP
and ICE Access programs. We should continue to explore programs that allow us to
leverage federal resources without expending our limited enforcement budgets and
manpower. Operation Community Shield was one of these. Councilman Watts has put forth
a concept for punishing companies who violate labor law while rewarding those who go
above and beyond which I am fully behind. These types of local initiatives avoid legal
entanglements while still reducing the harmful impacts of illegal immigration.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Lewisville has spoken and we are large investors in DCTA and the light rail program.
Having lived in cities with world class public transit; Tucson Arizona’s bus system and
Boston Massachusetts’ commuter rail, I’m excited by the opportunities the rail will give to
our citizens and am in favor of making the system as seamless as possible. I currently
attend transit public forums and have given regular citizen input. As a council member I
would push to create mixed use developments that are commuter friendly. I believe this
will be one of the biggest economic boosts for our region over the next 20 years as energy
prices continue to climb.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: Lewisville already participates in regional water and transportation associations. I would
continue to keep Lewisville involved. We could also look to create and strengthen regional
councils on aging to ensure our seniors continue to be an active and involved part of our
communities. We can also look to develop regional plans for sustainable development to
keep the North Texas region leading in programs that encourage low energy consumption
and local jobs. I have, as a citizen, given input on these types of programs and would
continue to build those relationships as an elected representative.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Lewisville does a solid job of providing good services at a low cost. I would like to see
the city peruse voluntary electricity aggregation for citizens, review our waste collection
and recycling programs to perhaps lower costs and increase recycling so we can stretch out
the usefulness of our landfill as a revenue source. I would also be interested in creating a
‘municipal mulch’ program much like Plano and Arlington have for things like mulch,
decomposed granite, and crushed cement fill for projects. These could create revenues and
would also provide additional services to residents.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Lewisville has maintained one of the lowest property and sales tax rates in the
metroplex. Our fiscal conservativism has allowed us to bring outstanding developments
like the new arts center, the light rail, and Railroad Park online. As a city we raised fees
last year and are still experiencing at least a 1.5 million dollar shortfall for the upcoming
fiscal year. The city has halted a bond request for this year and has consolidated several
bonds to take advantage of lower interest rates to keep from raising taxes. There will be a
slow down in capital expenses (infrastructure projects) but the city still has a ¼ cent sales
tax option that every city surrounding us has taken advantage of. This of course would be
up to the citizens to enact and not council. I believe my property reinvestment agenda will
help raise property values and in turn bring more revenue to the city without having to
raise taxes.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Lewisville is a mature city with little in the way of empty developable space. Because of
our lack of “master planning” that other, younger communities enjoy, there can be a sense
that the grass is greener in another community. Without large Home Owners Associations,
we have to work harder to engage with our neighborhoods, and we don’t have the newest
and swankiest retail and restaurant options. With that being said, we do have history,
stability, and more of an independent streak. That authenticity is a competitive advantage,
as is our geographic location and the Lake. We will have to work hard over the next couple
of years to ensure that the I-35 development, Old Town redevelopment, and the light rail
are encouraged to flourish. This can only happen with more citizen involvement and more
voter involvement. This race will be decided by a handful of our over 100,000 residents.
That’s a shame.

John Gorena

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Biographical Info:
Name: John Gorena
Street Address: 417 Creekwood Ln
City/Town: Lewisville
State: TX
Date of Birth: March 2, 1962
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-315-0496
Home Phone Number: 972-315-0496
E-mail Address: John.Gorena@Gorena.org
Campaign Web Site Address: http://www.Gorena.org
Questions:
Q: Education
A: I am a graduate of the University of North Texas with a degree in Emergency
Administration and Planning (and 15 hours of graduate level classes for public
administration).
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: Since 1987 – 23 years.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: Since 1987 – 23 years , Lewisville City Council members are elected at large (City
wide). There are no districts.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: CURRENT EMPLOYMENT: My occupation is as an IT Consultant, Owner of JMG
Enterprises: Server & PC Networking, Domain Hosting Services, Web Design Services. I fix
Computers, maintain server based networks for companies and residences. I had started a
part-time computer repair business in 1982 while working for Texas Instruments and
named it JMG Enterprises. As it grew, it began to demand more of my time, so in 2000 it
developed into a full-time business. It has been a very successful business. PREVIOUS
EMPLOYMENT: I was employed with Texas Instruments (1982 to 1993). After volunteering
as a firefighter (1987 to 1993), I was led to follow my ambition of becoming a Professional
Firefighter Paramedic for the City of Coppell (1993 to 2000). I also worked part-time in
Carrollton on the Fire Chief’s staff in Emergency Management (1996 to 1999) which started
as an intern position and later became a part-time employee for another 2 more years.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Lewisville Citizens Police Academy Alumni Association, various volunteer work in the
Community. I also created and maintain the Sounds Of Lewisville website to list free
events in the area for residents, Board member for Citizens for Immigration reform.
Member of The Lewisville Area Chamber of Commerce since 2000. Though the City Council
is not a partisan position I am an active member of the following in Lewisville: Pachyderm
Club, Denton County Republican Club, Lewisville Area Republican Club, the Denton County
Republican Assembly, and Precinct Chair #318. I was elected to the Lewisville City Council
in June 2009 and my first meeting as a councilman was in July 2009. At the time of this
writing, I have been on the Lewisville City Council for nine months and I am running for a
full term this May.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: I have had the honor of helping my community in several ways including: church
activities, volunteering for the Lewisville Volunteer Fire Department (1987 to 1993), the
Boy Scouts, along with my son, John, from (1989 to 2006), as well as, lending a hand with
many of the City’s events such as the Christmas Stroll, Summer Blast, Western Days, on
the City's Transportation Board (2007 to 2008), Working at the voting locations and
Election judge in the last few elections, a sponsor of The Sounds of Lewisville, member of
Old Town Business Association. I regularly attended the City Council Meetings and
workshop sessions (since April 2007) before I was elected in June 2009.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: In the 2009 City Special Election for an unexpired term in which I received 44% of the
votes, and was in the runoff. The Runoff led to my election. This year I am running for the
full three year term.

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Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?


A: At the time of this writing, $1550. See http://www.Gorena.org for donation information
and to donate online.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Citizens of Lewisville: Bob & Doris Hale, Daniel & Melanie Tsakonas. A Citizen from
Allen: Marvin Brooke. Though these are the top three financial contributors, I would also
like to thank many other people who have given to this campaign with their money, time,
and energy.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: The citizens of Lewisville elected me in 2009. At the time of this writing, I have been
serving for nine months. I regularly attended City Council meetings and open workshop
meetings since April 2007 before I was elected in 2009. I also served on the City’s
Transportation Board prior to my election. As a citizen of Lewisville, I care very much for
this city as all the candidates do. I am running for office because I think the City needs to
make decisions differently than they have in the past. I would like to continue making the
right changes for Lewisville in the positive way for its future, and in order to fulfill this, I
need to be elected again in order to continue doing what is right for Lewisville’s residents.
If I thought all was fine the way things are then I would not have run for office. I became
active with the issues of the city in 2007 when the city council voted to build a day laborer
site (which has been stopped). I think that decision was the wrong route to take.
Sometimes enough is enough. As a council member, I never would have made that
decision for many reasons. I would rather have pushed for enforcement. As a Christian, a
patriotic American citizen, a person of Hispanic heritage, I am affected like other
Americans about the issues caused by illegal immigration. As a business owner, I follow the
rules and run my business as a law abiding citizen. It is unfair for any business (or
individuals) to hire illegal aliens to cheat the system by not paying the employee taxes, a
fair wage, FICA, etc... I have a degree in Emergency Administration and Planning and
have 15 Hours of Public Administration classes at the graduate level. I understand how a
City works from the inside. For many years, I have been involved with Lewisville and other
cities in the area.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: Since I was elected to finish a partial term, I knew that I would be in office for about 10
months. I took action quickly and tried to get things done before my partial term would
end. Some of these items are still in process. I will continue to push for these top issues.
Readers can get more detail about the actions that I took from my website at
http://www.Gorena.org and click on Status Report. I think the cost will be minimal and
have a great positive impact on our city. The Actions I took included the initiation and
voting on: taping council workshops (transparency of government), Term Limits for council
members, adding E-verify as a requirement for contractors, Immigration enforcement
training (287g) for an officer or two so that they can participate in a regional Immigration
task force with ICE. A crosswalk for a senior living community (still in progress), continue
the Liberty Freeway Concept (a proclamation already passed by Farmer’s Branch and
Carrollton), and more.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My opponent is the same person from last year. I could not really discern what his
issues were. Readers will have to compare the answers from him and draw their own
conclusions. However, I know the discussion of illegal immigration is a big topic here in
Lewisville and he has made his position clear that he does not agree with me. I think that
we should participate in enforcement and do all that we can to help ICE. Though I believe
we should avoid lawsuits where possible, we should not cower in fear of one either. We
have to take a stand. The opposition (racial organizations) will most likely file frivolous
lawsuits knowing that many will cower in fear. There are many things we can do legally
and avoid litigation. We can vote people on the Council that are willing to actually do
something by following the Rule-of-Law where we can. This is not narrow mindedness as I
have been accused of being. It is courage to do what is right in the face of adversity. The
other choice is to let it continue until we cannot do anything about it. It is already costing
us too much. It is not just the federal government’s job – it’s everyone’s job. That is why
the federal government has programs like 287g, secure communities, IMAGE (E-verify),

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the Criminal Alien Program (CAP), and there are many more. I am not saying that
SOMEONE needs to do something. I am saying that WE need to do something and we need
to do all that we can. I would like to point out that I had pushed for participation in the
287g program and add E-verify as a requirement for our contractors. See the Status
Report on my website at http://www.Gorena.org for details. All the issues are important
and there are many issues that I stand for, here are a few (more in depth answers can be
found on my website at http://www.gorena.org: *** Providing for the Best Police and Fire
Protection *** Neighborhood and Retail revitalization *** More effective transparency of
government *** Economic Stability and Growth *** Maintain or reducing our property
taxes
Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas
drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its
citizens?
A: I understand the concerns from both sides of this issue. Our City Staff and City Council
are very concerned about the drilling. I believe that our Country needs to strive to be
independent of other countries and be self sufficient. However, if these drilling companies
cannot do it safely, then we should not allow them to drill. Safety is a high priority. I am
for monitoring the drilling sites and our ordinances are continually being reviewed and
modified to assure the safety for our citizens. On 02-15-2010, we voted to hire a
consultant to help with the inspections of these sites in Lewisville. The costs are billed to
the Drill Site.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: This is a very high priority. The City has done well in attracting development. Lewisville
is getting closer to a point where most of the city is built up. While we still do have some
room to build up new areas, we should start focusing on redeveloping older areas. Historic
Downtown area was a good start for revitalization and that process will continue for a few
more years before we see the effects. Lewisville has a great location in the Metroplex and
is a great place to invest. Those investing in new building construction usually do not like to
build in an area with older deteriorating areas. Redevelopment of older areas is very
important to attract new development. What is needed is the right type of development.
Some have been content in getting any type of business – a position that I do not agree.
The type of business that attracts illegal aliens or promotes non-desirable affects on the
community is something we need to discourage. This is one complaint that I hear about
the most.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Several issues are affecting our city. In recent years, the State of Oklahoma and
Arizona passed laws to address illegal immigration. Illegal Aliens are leaving those states
and coming to Texas. We see this clearly in Lewisville too. I perceive Lewisville to be like
Farmers Branch and Irving was about 8 years ago. We know from recent events what
issues they are facing with illegal aliens in their communities and the positive changes that
they are seeing because of their efforts. I want to make it clear that Illegal Alien is NOT a
race. The economic impact of Illegal aliens in our community is felt at all levels: City,
County, and School District. The 2009 Housing Estimates figures from the North Texas
Council of Governments estimates that there are more multi-family (apartments/condos)
housing units than single family housing units in Lewisville. Another study suggests that
about 35% of single family dwellings in Lewisville are rental properties. Combine all the
apartment complexes and those houses that are rental properties and that is more than
65% rented dwellings in Lewisville. This is 25 to 30 times the amount of rental properties
as compared to neighboring cities. Also, our mean rent is $775 which is about half of the
cities mentioned. If a certain population is going to fit as many people as they can in a
single dwelling, they usually do not go for the higher rental areas. We must find ways to
control the number of people living in a single family dwelling or apartments. I think our
schools are feeling most of the problem at this time. If we enforce ordinances and laws,
this should help.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Our police department is filled with very dedicated officers. As stated in a previous
question, I am not saying that SOMEBODY needs to do something... I am saying that WE
need to do something. Law enforcement is mainly at the local level. We do not have a
federal police force roaming our streets so who else is supposed to uphold the Rule of Law?
We need to take care of our piece of America called Lewisville. Police and elected officials

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use the same basic Oath Of Office which contains, "… and will to the best of my ability
preserve, protect and defend the Constitution and Laws of the United States and of this
State and the Charter and Ordinances of this city." Why would anyone want us to not
preserve nor defend? Though I believe we should avoid lawsuits where possible, we
should not cower in fear of one either. The opposition (racial organizations) will most likely
file frivolous lawsuits knowing that many will cower in fear. There are many things we can
do legally and avoid litigation. We can also vote people on the Council that are willing to
actually do something by following the rules. This is not narrow mindedness as I have been
accused of being. It is courage to do what is right in the face of adversity. The other choice
is to let it continue until we cannot do anything about it. It is already costing us too much.
I think that we should participate in enforcement and do all that we can to help ICE. It is
not just the federal government’s job – it’s everyone’s job. That is why the federal
government has programs like 287g, Secure Communities, IMAGE (E-verify), the Criminal
Alien Program (CAP), and there are many more. Our police department is currently
participating in the Secure Communities and CAP programs. I would like to point out that
I had pushed for participation in the 287g program and add E-verify as a requirement for
our contractors. See the Status Report on my website at http://www.Gorena.org for
details. I think having one or more officers trained in the 287g program and becoming
involved with the ICE regional task force will have a positive impact. The 287g program of
the recent past has changed to become part of about 15 different programs. We should do
all these different parts that we can do.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: In Denton County, Denton County Transportation Authority (DCTA) has been working for
about seven years to complete the A-train from Carrollton to Denton which should be in
operation by the end of 2010 or early 2011. We will have three stations in Lewisville:
Hebron Pkwy near the Mall, Old Town Lewisville which is being revitalized, and the
Highland Village/Lewisville Lake station.
Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater
regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?
A: For the most part, I think the regional relationship is very good. Our Police and Fire
departments have mutual aid agreements to assist when needed. Though it would be nice
for every department to have every specialty mastered, most departments have taken the
responsibility to specialize in a few areas so that they can assist when needed. Some of
these specialties are dive teams, trench rescue, etc… Our police department also has a
Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) trained officer that works with the regional DEA office. I
also think cities should be involved with immigration law enforcement and get officers
trained in 287g and participate in a regional ICE task force. We are lucky to have The
University of North Texas in our County with one of the best Emergency Administration
departments in the Country. They have recently completed an Emergency Operations
Center to help with Regional Exercises and plans. Regional cooperation is already a priority
in this region.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: I do think our City delivers services to taxpayers in the most cost-effective manner.
Departments in our City are already running with a minimum level of personnel and are
providing the needed services. With the current and projected growth of Lewisville, we will
have to increase personnel levels in Police, Fire, Streets, and Parks departments. This will
be part of our Budget retreat in August.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Lewisville has also been affected by declining revenues but because of prior planning
from our City Staff we should be able to pull through with some effort. Recent efforts
include refinancing debt, postponing projects, and not hiring for non-critical positions. We
will be discussing other possible solutions at the next budget retreat.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: There are several things that citizens of Lewisville need to keep in mind and be
prepared. Lewisville is about to have a large amount of disruption along the I35 corridor
with the expansion. This will take years to complete. It is unavoidable and we must stay
focused on the finished project. Lewisville is getting older and certain areas of our city will
need to be redeveloped to maintain a good local economy. Lewisville will have to address
the problems caused by illegal immigration. With lower rental rates and a larger amount of
rental properties when compared to our neighboring cities, Lewisville’s problem will get
worse if do not concentrate on revitalizing parts of our City.

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Mesquite City Council, Place 5


Description: Note: All Mesquite residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Brian Hutcheson

Biographical Info:
Name: Brian Hutcheson
Street Address: 2606 Hollow Bend
City/Town: Mesquite
State: Texas
Date of Birth: November 29, 1977
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-683-4032
Mobile Phone Number: 214-683-4032
E-mail Address: brian@brianhutcheson.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.brianhutcheson.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: I graduated from Ralph H. Poteet High School in Mesquite, TX in 1995 and proceeded to
receive a Bachelor in Science from Texas A&M University in 2002.
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: With the exception of a small stint in College Station, TX to receive my degree, I have
resided in Mesquite my entire life. Currently my wife and I are raising our four daughters
in the city that we both spent our childhood.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: I have always been a resident of Mesquite, TX excluding my college years.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: In 2002 I became the third generation to manage our family business, Mesquite Ace
Hardware. My grandparents opened this establishment in 1954 and I am honored to
continue the small business tradition that my family began so many years ago. In 2005 my
wife, Ashley, and I embarked on a new endeavor by starting a business in Mesquite, Go
Figure Fitness for Women. Through long hours, determination and hard work these
businesses continue to prosper.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Currently I stay involved with our community civically through promoting the Mesquite
Parks and Recreation. My children participate in city sports as well as I donate time and
money toward functions and events sponsored by our Parks and Recreation Department.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: In 2008 I was awarded the Mesquite Parks and Recreation Ca-Hoots award for assisting
in programs the department held for citizens. The small business my wife and I own, Go
Figure Fitness for Women, was also honored for supporting youth activities through the
City of Mesquite.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Member of The City of Mesquite Board of Adjustments
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: Less than $1500.00
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Brian and Ashley Hutcheson Ace Hardware Friends and Family
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: Mesquite is a wonderful city with tremendous potential to become even greater. As a

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citizen I have vast interest in the future of our city. Ashley and I have centered our lives in
Mesquite: we are raising our four daughters here, attend La Prada Drive Church of Christ
in Mesquite and have businesses locally. The direction our city leadership takes us will
affect all areas of our lives, particularly the future of our children and their generation. I
want to take an active role in ensuring Mesquite is on the path for success. As one of three
candidates my qualifications are unique. Mesquite is made of families and businesses; I am
the only candidate that represents both. I am eager and tenacious willing to evoke new
ideas and a fresh look to city politics. Working with the public daily, I have a direct
understanding of the needs and desires of fellow residents. I am not a politician by nature,
but actively seek to make a difference in our community.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: Revitalization is of prime importance to the direction of Mesquite. To improve our image
we must expand these parameters to encompass more of the city. Our current council has
taken the first step of a long journey that will take many years to complete. I will place
great effort toward rezoning areas of our city necessary for renewal. Attracting and
retaining professional families, specifically young professionals, is essential in our forward
progression. Mesquite offers a central geographic location with easy access to major
highways and to downtown Dallas. There is no reason Mesquite should not be the most
desirable suburb in the North Texas area. We lack some of the amenities necessary to
appeal to professinals. We need to revisit the city budget appropriating more monies
toward these needs. Mesquite has many resources to attract industry, yet we have not
aggressively sought such. A larger tax base and new employment opportunities
accompany the expansion of industry which Mesquite could greatly benefit from. Currently
we, the citizens, are the backbone of taxes collected. The addition of industry can help shift
some of our tax burden to industry allowing a reduction in residential taxes.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I am a man of integrity and live by my word. My Christian values are evident in my
personal and professional life. I have proven to be a successful businessman and will
provide the City Council knowledge of business and management while balancing them
with the needs of individual residents. Through speaking with citizens each day, I am more
aware of their trials, concerns and requests. No other contender in this race has a young
family he is raising; therefore, cannot relate to them as I can. I will promote family values
and am not afraid to make sure individuals are heard.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Attracting residential development is pertinent to achieving goals I have for our city; we
need to introduce executive style housing that our city currently does not offer. Due to
economic times, many commercial developments are vacant. A greater emphasis should
be placed on recruiting businesses and industry to Mesquite.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Mesquite is a diverse blended city; we need to continue to encourage diversity and
cultural blending. A more proactive approach in bringing young professionals here to live
and shop is vital.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: In response to illegal immigration, we need to continue course in combating this
problem.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I favor a regional transit system and believe we should develop a Mesquite Transit
Authority.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: Our airport should be a regional hub for transit and freight. Hi-Tech, industrial,
commercial and retail development require Mesquite to boost it's profile in this arena.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Mesquite can be more efficient, more productive and more accountable to it's citizens.
The city needs to balance long term planning and common sense for the tax payers to

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receive maximum benefits.


Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Our current leadership has been able to sustain taxes during our economic downturn.
We need to make sure priorities are set to encompass our needs, efficiency should be
continually evaluated in productivity and we must be persistent to never raise taxes during
this recession.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: The allocation of resources needs to reflect the priorities of the city such as
revitalization and amenities offered to citizens.

Gary Ward

Biographical Info:
Name: Gary Ward
Street Address: 709 Parkhaven Drive
City/Town: Mesquite
State: Texas
Date of Birth: July 30, 1949
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214.284.9615
Home Phone Number: 972.329.0406
Mobile Phone Number: Same as campaign phone number
Fax Number: N/A
E-mail Address: garyward3@sbcglobal.net
Campaign Web Site Address: N/A
Questions:
Q: Education
A: W.W. Samuell High School, U.S. Army (Light Weapons Infantry School,
Non-Commissioned Officer School),EMT/Paramedic School, Eastfield College - Associates
Degree, Master Fire Fighter.
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 38 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 38 years in at-large district
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Retired
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: March of Dimes Fill the Boot Santa Toy Drive Easter Bunny Baskets to Children’s
Hospital Mesquite Firefighters Scholarship Fund Addressing Mesquite Smoke detector
installation program for elderly and disabled Public Safety Education at various Mesquite
Schools MISD Fire Safety Poster Contest Assistance to Mesquite Social Services Worked to
Reinstate Fire Safety Education
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Vietnam Service Medal with 3 Bronze Service Stars Good Conduct Medal Bronze Star
Medal Army Commendation Medal Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm Unit
Citation Badge Worked to implement paramedic service for City of Mesquite (graduate of
first Paramedic class, U.T. Southwestern) Graduate of first Leadership Mesquite class with
Mesquite Chamber of Commerce Former Member of Chamber of Commerce Board of
Directors First Chairman, Leadership Mesquite Committee Board of Trustees Member,
Mesquite Independent School District, 1993-1996 Former Committee Member, Gross Road
Baptist Meritorious Conduct Award March of Dimes Fill the Boot Santa Toy Drive Easter
Bunny Baskets to Children’s Hospital Mesquite Firefighters Scholarship Fund Addressing
Mesquite Fire Education through Firehouse Safety with Mesquite Service League Public
Safety Education at various Mesquite Schools Public Education of CPR through Mesquite
High Schools
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Board of Trustees Member, Mesquite Independent School District

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Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?


A: $9,725.00
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Mesquite Fire Fighters Association Ted B. Lyon Lee and Merry Johnsey
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No, with the exception of an incident 15 years ago for which I was cleared of any
wrongdoing and a Judge ordered the matter expunged from my record; I have never been
involved in any criminal or civil matter before or since.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: Having just retired after 36+ years with the Mesquite Fire Department, the last ten as a
Station Captain, I believe I know the citizens of Mesquite. I have been in every
neighborhood in Mesquite and have seen our citizens at their best and their worst. I am a
38 year resident of Mesquite and I am confident that I understand the issues facing our city
and its citizens. I previously served on the Mesquite ISD Board of Trustees and am
committed to promoting economic growth in our city, ensuring that Mesquite maintains a
first-rate police and fire department, continues to improve code enforcement, while
providing quality city services and amenities to the citizens.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: Seek to convene a select committee representative of the Community to create
proposals aimed at accelerating the Mesquite revitalization program, work to bring quality
economic development to Mesquite, protect our neighborhoods with aggressive public
safety initiatives within the parameters of the city’s overall budget objectives.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I have 30+ years of experience and civic involvement. I have worked for the citizens as
a member of the MISD Board of Trustees, also with business leaders as a member of the
Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors. I have attended numerous City Council budget
workshops over the past 20+ years. I also worked with a citizens committee to upgrade
the Fire Dept./EMS system to a full paramedic, MICU service. My opponents have little to
no such record of involvement on behalf of Mesquite citizens.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: In order to keep tax rates low, it is necessary for the City to broaden and diversify the
tax base. That requires bringing in new business, which also creates jobs, which also
increases demand for quality housing. I believe the City has done an admirable job in
attracting new development. However, we desperately need to upgrade our housing stock,
but we have limited open land with which to do so. Therefore, we are left with the
dilemma of how to replace some of the deteriorating housing units in some of our older
neighborhoods. With input from all potentially affected parties, including homeowners, we
should be able to amicably solve this problem.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Like all other inner-ring Dallas area cities, Mesquite is growing increasingly diversified
and the city needs to continue to communicate the new standards and expectations to all
of our citizens. I will spend time visiting with neighborhood associations and residents to
get a perspective of what the needs are and then work with them to accomplish shared
goals.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Enforce the laws that are currently in place.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I support a regional transport system whose focus is light rail.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: I would support city, North Texas, and statewide efforts to create a modern light rail
transit system across our region and state. Also, regional cooperation concerning water
and public safety should also result in more efficiency and lower costs for all our citizens.

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Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Given that the average cell phone plan costs a little less than the City tax bill on the
average home, and for that citizens receive #1 rated fire/ems services, police services
which provide Mesquite one of the lowest crime rates in the Metroplex, clean water and
sanitation pickup 3-times a week, recyclable collection, quality parks and recreation
centers, and a soon-to-be premiere hike/bike trail system, etc, I believe the City services
are very cost-effective. With that said, I would like to see our recycling program expanded
and continued improvement to the City’s code enforcement division.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: The current leadership has done a commendable job in conserving funds while
maintaining quality services and not imposing new taxes.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: The unfair, false perception that Mesquite does not measure up to other area cities.
Mesquite is an excellent place to live and work. Our city is well positioned geographically
with easy access to four major highways and a short commute to Dallas. But we can and
will continue to move our city toward the first tier ranking it deserves. Mesquite is at a
crossroads and now is the time where experienced leadership is absolutely necessary. This
is not the time for on-the-job training.

Rockwall City Council, Place 2


Description: Note: All Rockwall residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Bill Bricker

Biographical Info:

Questions:
Q: Education
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: - no response -
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: - no response -
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: - no response -
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: - no response -
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: - no response -
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: - no response -
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: - no response -
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: - no response -
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you

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evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: - no response -
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: - no response -
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: - no response -
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: - no response -
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: - no response -
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: - no response -
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: - no response -

Mark Russo

Biographical Info:
Name: Mark Russo
Street Address: 402B S. Fannin Street
City/Town: Rockwall
State: TX
Date of Birth: 06/15/1976
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-793-2923
Home Phone Number: 214-793-2923
E-mail Address: mark.russo@sbcglobal.net
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Pennsylvania Culinary- Associates Degree Ohio Center for Broadcasting St.Thomas
Aquinas High school -Louisville Ohio R.G Drage Vocational-Restaurant Management
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 6 Years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 6 years
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Media Consulting
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: MusicFest, Alliance for Arts, Rockwall County Coffee Conservatives, Various political
organizations
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Former Rockwall Breakfast Rotary Old Town Rockwall Neighborhood Association- Board
member Former Rockwall Boys and Girls Club- Board member
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Rockwall City Council Place 2
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $1000 at present

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Q: Who are your top three contributors?


A: Robert Dillender, Gary Freedman,KL Mckinney
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: Yes Traffic Speeding Violations while 18.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am running for this office for a second term. My dedication to the community and
ability to listen are some of my strengths. I have taken the time to research the issues and
I do look for cost effective solutions. During this time, Downtown has seen positive
growth.We have pushed forward on building and improving roads. I believe in being an
action-oriented councilman. The citizens have elected to me serve two years and looking
to continue what I have started.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1. Keep the tax-rate where it is today by looking for alternative funding. 2. Continue
with the Downtown Plan. There are grants that are available to off set costs. 3. Look for
Alternative-Funding and Resources. I believe the creation a new community-based
committee would provide assistance.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My philosphy is serving the citizens with high quality customer-service. Keeping the
tax-rate low. I also take time to research the issues on foot and with information.
Community input is important and I have been involved within the community.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: We have focused on specific areas like downtown. I do believe we can do more to bring
in new and bigger businesses to Rockwall. I do belelieve the city has been aggressive in
economic development. We do have the quality people to help achieve this goal. This is an
area we can always improve on.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: The city is growing and developing at a rapid pace. We have focused on future
development planning. We must focus also on aging neighborhoods and infrastructure. I
encourage using a City-wide Preservation plan to assist in grants and indicate future areas
that may need assistance. It is easy to get excited about new projects but, we must also
share the energy towards existing areas.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: We must uphold and enforce the current laws.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Currently, I feel we must still focus on our local roads and other local transportation
options first.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: Economic development and water issues. I believe it comes down to good
communication and information with other groups rather than consensus. Our water
demand will be a ftuture problem and we must stay ahead of it as our population
grows.Our water planning is crucual..
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Technology has helped reduce some costs. It is my belief we can always do something
to better improve services in a cost-effective manner .New volunteer programs may help
offset some costs. Another idea would be the creation of a Grant and Resource Committee
that would assist in finding new resources.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Currently, we have had many different issues arise in this economy. We must find
alternative resources and utilize technology. The truth is we must prioritize our absolute

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needs first.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Foreclosures are having a significant impact. This is a time where we must be honest
about our wants versus needs. We must be very mindful of the current economy and
cognizant of the needs of citizensb first. We must also focus on future water needs.

Rockwall City Council, Place 6


Description: Note: All Rockwall residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Margo Nielsen

Biographical Info:
Name: Margo Nielsen
Street Address: 1655 Shores Blvd
City/Town: Rockwall
State: TX
Date of Birth: February 21, 1945
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972.754.7729
Home Phone Number: 972.771.9356
Mobile Phone Number: 972.754.7729
Fax Number: 972.771.7782
E-mail Address: manielsen@sbcglobal.net
Campaign Web Site Address: margonielsen.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: B.A, Dunbarton College of Holy Cross, Washington, D.C., 1967
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 25 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: n/a
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: I am the executive director of a non-profit agency in Rockwall that provides financial aid
and healthcare to Rockwall residents facing a crisis.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: In addition to serving on the Rockwall City Council and several Council sub-committees,
I am on the Board of Directors of Rockwall PAWS, an Advisory Board member of Rockwall
MusicFest and the Rockwall County Agricultural Extension Service and I'm an active
honorary member of the Rockwall Rotary Club.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: I served as a Rockwall Child Protective Services Board member for six years,
Commissoner on the Housing Authority of the City of Rockwall for nine years, President of
the Rockwall Housing Development Corportion for eight years, and I was a charter
member of Lone Star Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) and Rockwall Area
Habitat for Humanity. I am a past president of the Lone Star chapter of National Charity
League, past president of the Shores Ladies Golf Association, recipient of the Soroptimist
Woman of Dististintion award, and was the Rockwall County representative to the North
Central Texas Workforce Development Board and the Health Services Planing Council for
the Dallas EMA. I'm a lifelong Episcopalian.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: I have served on the the Rockwall City Council since my appointment to fill an
unexpired term in 2005. Before being appointed to Council, I served as a member of the
Building and Standards Commission.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: I have raised $3,240 as of April 2, 2010.

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Q: Who are your top three contributors?


A: John and Gayle Albritton Dr. Bruce Paton Dan Bobst
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I've been active in the community for almost 25 years and have a broad base of
experience and knowledge of the issues in Rockwall. I have learned that decisions are
far-reaching with both expected outcomes and, in some cases, unintended consequences.
The reponsibility of casting a vote that will affect the community for 20 years or more is
one that I take seriously. I believe that I approach the work of Council with common sense
and balance. Everyday, I see the needs of our residents as well as the the generosity of
the people living here. In the non-profit world we never have enough money to solve all
the problems; we have to live within a budget. Being fiscally responsible and a good
steward of others' money and trust is a skill that I bring to the Council from my
professional life.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: A recent citizens survey indicated that citizens want additional street improvements,
more neigborhood parks and recreation facilities and we also need a new police station.
Since we don't anticipate any additional revenues from property or sales tax, all new
projects will have to be financed through voter approved bond issues. Without voter
approval, these projects will not be initiated. I support putting these issues to the voters
for approval.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I believe in the process of good government; in zoning laws so that neighborhoods in
Rockwall have protection against unregulated development, in quality of life improvements
that make our community one of the most desireable places to live in the nation, in
throughly discussing the issues - whether it be about trees or tax rates - so that good
decisions can be made because they will affect the city for years to come. I take the role of
council member seriously and work hard to serve and represent the voters.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Rockwall has attracted a lot of devlopment in the past five years. The City Council is
engaged with the projects and progress of the Rockwall Economic Development
Corporation as well as City planners. In the past five years tens of millions of dollars in
business improvements have developed because of the newly built Presbyterian Hospital in
Rockwall and The Harbor. Two major retail centers, The Crossing and The Plaza on
Interstate 30 and CostCo have been established. While home builders have not been as
active in the last two years there is still some growth in that area. The new Stone Creek
development north of downtown is bringing in a grocery store and other retail outlets.
Meanwhile, Downtown is thriving with four new eateries and several new shops on the
Square. Our goal is to have a shared tax burden between business and homeowners of
50% each.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Rockwall has experienced dramatic growth in the last decade. Between 2006 and 2008
the population grew by 85%. Rockwall was in gridlock five years ago and I'm proud that
I've been part of the Council that has taken steps to alleviate the congestion. John King
Blvd, the 205 bypass, was finished in four years; more than a dozen city street
improvement projects were completed as was the State 205 improvement through the
center of town. The Council has been proactive in regulating development by establishing
overlay districts, by working with planning staff and a citizens committee to develop a
master land use plan, by working with developers to institute building standards and
through code enforcement. I am willing to continue to work hard to uphold development
standards that result in a quality of life that makes Rockwall such a great place to work
and live.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Law enforcement officials should enforce existing laws. I hope that our federal officials

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address this issue quickly.


Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I favor putting the issue of participating in a regional transportaion system to the voters
in Rockwall.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: Transportation and economic development are two top priorities for North Texas.
Rockwall needs adequate and fair representation on regional committees and commissions
so that the needs of our community are met with available state and federal resources.
Expansion of roads and road improvements have been a priority in Rockwall for a long
time and will continue to be a pressing issue in the future. The creation of jobs and a
labor force that has the skills to meet today's labor market are also concerns that need
regional planning and cooperation. The North Central Texas Workforce Board represents
many counties in the North Texas area and is the position to be the leader in planning and
building consensus. Rockwall County is represented on the Workforce Development Board
and is an active partner in economic development.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: There are always ways to be more efficient and cost-effective in a large organization.
The City of Rockwall initiated Customer Centered Government training three years ago.
Teams, made up of a cross section of staff members, have been working on several
processes that will lead to greater efficiency and effectiveness. New teams are formed
each year to examine current processes and recommend improvements.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: The City has been affected, like many other municipalities, with flat property values and
small sale tax increases. Because debt service on voter approved projects and necessary
capital costs must be paid, the Council and staff have worked diligently to reduce expenses
on the maintenance and operations side of the budget. Deep cuts have been made in the
budget for items including demolition of dangerous structures, planning and consulting
fees, purchase of supplies, mowing, the Youth Advisory Council participation, police
overtime, etc. There was no tax increase in the 2009 -2010 budget. However, maintenance
and operations cannot continue to absorb the cost of covering new debt service items and
the Council may have to consider tax increases.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Fire protection, police protection, code enforcement, animal control, water and sewer
operations, parks and recreation, street improvement and maintenance, drainage
improvements and a host of other city services take money. A well-run and efficient city
workforce has to have adequate resources to do the job. City facilities need to operate cost
effectively and be in good repair. The Council works hard to balance the needs against
wants so that the budget is the leanest we can achieve. When voters approve projects like
parks, fire stations, an animal adoption center, or an adult recreation center, the Council's
role is to fulfill the mandate. Paying for voter approved projects comes on the debt side of
the budget - not the operations side and I think most voters understand that. Under
normal circumstances that means a tax increase to pay for the debt that is issued.

David White

Biographical Info:
Name: David White
Street Address: 294 Perch
City/Town: Rockwall
State: Texas
Date of Birth: 11/23/74

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Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-771-8665


Home Phone Number: 972-771-8665
Mobile Phone Number: 972-771-8665
E-mail Address: david@electwhite.org
Campaign Web Site Address: ElectWhite.org
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Rockwall High School 1993 El Centro College 1998
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: Moved to Rockwall 1987, brief stint in Dallas 1996-1998 during college to avoid I-30
bridge construction traffic.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Systems Integrator. Sophisticated HVAC and building controls for very large buildings
and complexes. We create systems designed to greatly reduce the energy usage by
buildings.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Rockwall Republican Men's Club Member since 2005, Treasurer 2010 Attended all but
one regular council meeting since Feb 2009, blog about it RockwallZoo.com
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Lake Rockwall Estates Annexation Task Force
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: Rockwall City Council 2009 (Ineligible being too soon after annexation of my
neighborhood)
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $135
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: - no response -
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: Nope
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am running because I love Rockwall and want it to be the shining example of
greatness, not a clone of other suburbs as seems to be the goal now. "Qualified" for office
is a term used to confuse or mislead voters into thinking that one candidate's job
experience or community service automatically makes them a great decision maker.
Everyone who meets the basic "qualifiers" laid out by the city can and should run for
council - basically, not a criminal and lived here long enough. Basic common sense and a
belief that any amount of money is real money and who it really belongs, is all it takes to
be a good councilman. In my personal life, I practice what I believe - frugality. I have zero
debt, except for a very small amount left on my mortgage which will likely be paid off this
year. I was able to do that living within my means, just as I expect my government to do.
I take care of my needs, before I start spending on extras or luxuries. Just as I expect my
city to do - if every road in Rockwall is not 100%, why is there a plan for a 20-30 million
dollar athletic complex and other luxury spending?
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: I am an odd candidate because I have no great project I wish to build so everyone in
town can see how great I am. My three most important things: (1) I would push for is
getting more citizens to attend city council meetings. Many times the only two people left
at the end are the reporter from the Herald-Banner and myself. Social media has been
discussed at length at council to do this, but this free and easy service has not been
utilized. (2) Broadcasting/streaming council meetings. This is already being discussed and
could be done for little cost. Councilman Farris is already pushing for this and I would do
whatever it takes to get it implemented. (3) Without a Taj Majal-style pet project, I am at
a loss for a third.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I think voters are smart enough to read our answers and make that choice on their
own.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or

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commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: People want to move to Rockwall, there has never been negative growth in the city.
People will always want to move to Rockwall so long it always maintains the Rockwall
"feel" - small town, great community. It is more a priority of mine to maintain Rockwall's
greatness, growth will follow. Businesses come to Rockwall because of the growth. I have
seen multiple instances where businesses that wanted to come to Rockwall get push-back
and ultimately did not come to Rockwall. The are even cases where some of the newer
businesses had to jump through hoops just to open. I would almost say the business
development occurred despite they city's actions.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: My neighborhood was annexed which is 80-90% Hispanic. The city has passed or
proposed ordinances targeted at our neighborhood. Rockwall is over 150 years old, and it
is odd that certain things only became an issue for certain staff and council right after
annexation. Our neighborhood has its own code enforcement officer whose job it is to help
"clean up the neighborhood." The constant hammering over the head has subdued a lot for
the last couple of months. What I would do differently is encourage and work with the
neighborhood and get outside people involved who want to affect positive change in the
neighborhood as Lake Pointe Church has done, not try and force change with heavy
handed tactics.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: Immigration is a responsibility of the Federal government. The city should only be
involved when hiring employees, and the police should only be involved in hiring
employees or following guidelines for turning an illegal alien over to the federal
authorities. The city has enough on it's plate without expending money and resources to do
the job of the Federal government.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I oppose only for Rockwall. If other cities want it, they can have it and they can waste
their dollars on it. It would be nothing more than a heavily subsidized operation and it
would be a grave mistake to engage in it. DART takes in a fraction of what it costs to
operate, the rest is subsidized from taxes. A regional transit system would be an even
bigger money pit.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: If there were interest and desire by citizens regarding further expansion of Collin
County College into the community, I would support.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: It appears that trash collection, park maintenance, police and fire protection, and roads
are done well. A result of good people employed by the city and not necessarily a direct
action of council.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: There are over $65,000,000 dollars in projects being considered by council. "Projected
money is down, let's spend some more" is the attitude of some council members. It is
unacceptable to let any road, sewer, or other basic infrastructure go into a state of
disrepair. The city would have to cutback on some of the less-vital programs like Concerts
by the Lake if the alternative means potholes and sewer problems.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Some council behavior during session is downright shameful. Mocking or berating other
members during a meeting is an embarrassment to the city.

Rowlett Mayor
Description: Note: All Rowlett residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

John E. Harper

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Biographical Info:
Name: John E. Harper
Street Address: 8622 Southbay Circle
City/Town: Rowlett
State: Texas
Date of Birth: February 6, 1943 (same day as President Reagan)
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (214) 284-6972
Home Phone Number: (972) 463-4926
Mobile Phone Number: (972) 989-3146
Fax Number: (972 463-4926
E-mail Address: JHarper@JohnHarper-Rowlett.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.JohnHarper-Rowlett.com
Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/v/tnzwgy26nA0&hl=en
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Bachelor of Science (BS) cum laude in Accounting - Syracuse University - 1968 Master
of Arts (MA) in Finance - University of Alabama - 1971 Institute for Education Management
- Harvard University - 1986 Doctor of Education (EdD) in Higher Education Administration
and Supervision - University of Houston - 1996 Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Certified
Management Accountant (CMA)
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: My wife, Debra, and I moved to Rowlett in August 1999, almost 11 years ago. I also
lived in Fort Worth 1983-1986 and in Houston 1993-1994.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: Not applicable..I have lived in Rowlett for almost 11 years at my current address.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: I am semi-retired but do serve as the Consulting Chief Financial Officer (CFO) for The
Cooper Institute, a Dallas-based international medical research and education group. The
Institute is associated with the Cooper Clinic, Cooper Spa, Cooper Fitness Center, and
Cooper Lodge as well as the Cooper Center at Craig Ranch. Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper,
founder of Aerobics, is the Chairman of the Board of The Cooper Institute. My CFO duties,
which are focused on the Board of Directors, typically require about 20 hours of my time
weekly. I retired from the United States Air Force in 1980 where I served 8 years as an
enlisted man and Russian linguist flying on reconnaissance aircraft surveying the Soviet
Union and then 12 years as an officer in charge of financial management of worldwide
intelligence units. I retired from the Texas A&M University System in 2006 after 26 years
of service. I was a senior ranking executive and Vice President for Business Affairs at
colleges and universities in Texas, North Carolina, and Ohio. I am compensated for being
the Mayor of Rowlett ($150 monthly). I typically spend 30-35 hours a week on mayoral
duties.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: I was elected Mayor of Rowlett in May 2007. I was elected GOP Precinct Chair in
Rockwall County in 2008. I was elected a Primary Delegate to the Texas GOP State
Convention in 2008 and again in 2010. I share the membership of the Regional
Transportation Council (RTC) with Garland Mayor Ronald Jones. I am one of the 7-member
Governance Committee of the Dallas Regional Mobility Coalition (DRMC) and also Chair
the DRMC Finance Committee. I co-chair the States and Federal Issues Committee of the
TEX-21, Transportation Excellence in the 21st Century. I am a member of the Rockwall
County Planning Consortium. I am an invited member of the North Texas Crime
Commission Legislative Committee. I am appointed to the Dallas County Criminal Justice
Advisory Board. I have written newspaper articles, delivered speeches, and made
presentations throughout the Metroplex and surrounding area on the two major issues of
mass transit and criminal justice. I am a member of the select Inaugural Leadership North
Texas program presented by the North Texas Commission. Leadership North Texas is a
graduate level leadership program aimed at recruiting, developing, and supporting leaders
who have a commitment to civic engagement, to learning, to collaboration, and to the
North Texas region.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:

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A: Member and officer of home owners associations. Member of Advisory Board of private
club. Member of Vestry of my church. Acolyte Master of my church. Member and officer of
civic clubs and non-profit organizations. My accomplishments were to provide my high
level of energy and knowledge of finance to guide each of those activities to excellence.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None. While serving in the Air Force and again later while serving in public higher
education, holding a public office was either prohibited or strongly discouraged.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: I have used my personal funds for my campaign along with a modest amount of
donations received from other Rowlett citizens.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: 1. MetroTex Association of Realtors 2. Jeff Johnson 3. Gary Smith
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: I have not been sued or arrested ever. I was an Alternate Member of the IRS Taxpayer
Advocacy Panel. I was also a Neutral for the American Arbitration Association. Both of
these required a thorough vetting before my appointment. My professional and personal
reputation is important to me. I never forget that I am the “face” of the City. I have never
filed for bankruptcy. I did initiate a lawsuit in the Small Claims Court which was settled out
of court to my favor. I have managed my personal affairs in the same manner as with the
City…prudently!
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am running for a second term as Mayor of Rowlett to keep the momentum and
positive direction going from my first term. Much of my first term was spent on leading the
City of Rowlett to economic stability. Once the financial issues of the past were under
control, my leadership focused on improving communications with Rowlett citizens and
with those external groups who could assist the City with its future economic development.
Significant progress has been made towards restoring civic pride among Rowlett residents,
restoring trust from the citizens, and also with achieving a much improved image among
outside builders and developers. That is the foundation for the genuine economic
development which is sorely needed to continue to control the City of Rowlett property tax
rate as has been done for the last three years. I have personally reached out to regional
leaders and influencers and, when invited, joined with them so I could both promote and
protect the interests of the City of Rowlett. During my second term as Mayor, the results of
those efforts will be more fully realized. I want Rowlett to achieve its highest destiny...the
highest levels of public safety and public health along with a quality of life unique to
Rowlett. I want to lead that effort to make my community an even better place to live,
work, and play. I currently serve as the Chief Financial Officer for The Cooper Institute in
Dallas. For more than two decades I served as a senior executive, a Vice Chancellor, and
as an Executive Vice President of colleges and universities in Texas and elsewhere. In that
role I managed the business affairs of large colleges and universities. Those institutions of
higher education are very much like a small city. While the Mayor and City Council are
supposed to limit their role to policymaking, this past experience is a great advantage to
me as we also fulfill our oversight responsibility to know and understand the opportunities
and the constraints that are being managed by City Staff. I have the highest credentials
and an established professional network and the ability to bring together regional leaders
for collaboration. That is what is needed by the City of Rowlett and its citizens as the City
transforms itself from a semi-rural bedroom community to a regional center for commerce
in the northeast Metroplex.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: The most important action, by far, is simply to keep your promises! I did that during my
first term and I will continue to do that during my second term as Mayor of Rowlett. The
City of Rowlett is very fortunate that its past leaders had the foresight and the tenacity to
bring both the President George Bush Turnpike Eastern Extension and the DART Blue Line
Extension to Rowlett. While both projects are enormous economic engines in their own
right, one of the most important actions the City of Rowlett must take during my second
term is to utilize those engines to the utmost. The City now needs to assure quality
development of the areas that will soon be served by the Turnpike and the DART Rail. That
will require updated comprehensive land planning to align with the current markets and
also comprehensive zoning decisions to support the investors who will bring millions of
their dollars to Rowlett for commercial development. In addition, the City will have to
partner with private developers to provide their projects with access and infrastructure

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such as sufficient water and sewer. The funding for the planning is in hand and was set
aside during my first term as Mayor. The funding for access roads will initially come from
balances on hand and then later, I anticipate, allocated by the Metroplex Regional
Transportation Council where I share a seat with Garland Mayor Ronald Jones. Additional
funding will either come from the Tax Increment District or from a proposed Bond
Referendum, currently being considered for November 2012. Another important action
that I will take in my second term as Mayor is to lead the presentation of a Bond
Referendum to finance the needed continuing investments in Rowlett neighborhood
revitalization, municipal infrastructure, parks and trails, and city facilities. A citizen-led
Bond Committee did yeoman's work in 2008/2009 to present a recommendation the Mayor
and Council for a Bond Referendum, planned then for November 2009. Due to the
downturn and the slow recovery of the economy, that Bond Referendum has been delayed
until November 2011 or November 2012. The work done by the citizen committee will
need to be updated. A citywide program, led by the Mayor, will have to be presented to
fully inform and educate Rowlett citizens and civic groups about the Bond Referendum and
the benefits and costs. This will require leadership skills, organizational skills, and
communication skills to be certain that citizens understand and support the future Bond
Referendum to provide financing for growth needs in Rowlett. This is a major undertaking
that will take months to accomplish. The elements of civic pride and trust in government
must also be constantly affirmed and grown in order to win the vote of the citizens for a
Bond Referendum. It is also very important to continue to reach out the leaders of our
neighboring cities to assure regional collaboration. As Mayor of Rowlett, I already work
very closely with the Mayors and Councils of Garland, Sachse, and Rockwall. I also work
directly with the Mayors of Mesquite, Dallas, and the cities of Rockwall County. While each
City is often competing with one another, each Mayor does recognize that a success for one
city in the region does lift the fortunes of all the cities in that region. That air of
cooperation and collaboration will become even more important in the future as resources
become more difficult to come by. Shared resources by all of us is a possible solution. I do
not list a revamp of the city operating budget as an action that I would take when
re-elected. It has already been done. The Rowlett Mayor and Council did a comprehensive
review almost three years ago which led to difficult, but correct, decisions to reduce
spending and to reorganize for greater efficiency and effectiveness. Each year for the last
three, the Mayor and Council continued the fiscal conservatism in spending. In spite of the
downturn in the economy and lower collections of city property taxes and sales taxes,
Rowlett has built its reserves sufficiently to maintain the levels of core city services until
the economic recovery is completed.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: First and foremost...I kept my promises in my first term as Mayor! I have been very
successful in leading complex organizations at the executive-level for almost 30 years now,
including 3 years as Mayor of Rowlett. I am trained to be a high-level financial manager
and hold advanced finance degrees and the CPA certification. I have developed my
communication skills and my people skills to be very effective at building relationships not
only with other leaders but also with the frontline workers who create the successes. My
transition from "civilian" life to being a Mayor was relatively seamless because I have dealt
with policy matters and oversight issues in the public sector for most of my career. In my
first term as Mayor I have been invited to join the Regional Transportation Council (RTC),
the Dallas Regional Mobility Coalition (DRMC), TEX-21, the Dallas County Criminal Justice
Advisory Board, and the North Texas Crime Commission because they recognized my
leadership skills and my valuable experience and professional network. In addition to my
work in the region, my presence in the City of Rowlett has been recognized and
appreciated. I was awarded the "Hero of the Year" by the Men & Women of Honor...an
organization of young people ages 11-17 who are seeking adult guidance to develop their
values and beliefs. I am invited to the Eagle Scout Courts of Honor and asked to speak
about patriotism and citizenship. I am invited by school teachers to visit their class and
speak to their students. I am regularly invited to business groups and civic groups to
provide an update of the activities and events that will affect Rowlett citizens and
neighbors. More than two years ago I established and now co-host a monthly TV news
show broadcast on demand at the city website and also on the city cable channel. This
show has attracted many viewers who are now better informed and more excited about
their City. I often am stopped on the street and asked a question or given a compliment.
Rowlett residents know their Mayor is engaged and involved. I am the transformational
leader of the City. The City of Rowlett is experiencing a cultural change from a semi-rural
bedroom community to soon becoming a center of commerce for the northeast region of
the Metroplex. I understand that vision...I understand the role of the Mayor to achieve

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that destiny. My opponent does not have advanced training in financial management. My
opponent does not have any experience in leading complex organizations. My opponent
has not attended any of the meetings outside of the City of Rowlett where the Metroplex
leaders discuss and decide the resolution of regional issues and the allocation of regional
funds that directly affect the City of Rowlett. My opponent has not presented any vision for
the future of the City of Rowlett other than to support what I, as Mayor, have articulated
and the City Council supported. My opponent is not a seasoned leader.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Since becoming Mayor of Rowlett, I have asked many of the other Mayors in the
Metroplex for their opinion of the right mix of residential and commercial development in a
City. The consensus is for a proportion of 60% residential and 40% commercial. Such a
property tax base provides resources that can be dedicated to improving the quality of life
in a city. I believe that a city must provide the highest level of public safety, public health,
and the most amenities that can be afforded. I recognized and made it my top priority,
once there was economic stability in Rowlett and greater civic pride and trust in Rowlett, to
bring about quality economic development in Rowlett. The Rowlett City Council has
supported me in all of those endeavors. We have been able to attract new businesses,
including relocations from other nearby cities, during the severe economic downturn of the
last two years. This has resulted in a modest growth in the commercial tax base for
Rowlett. However, this is just the beginning. Completion of the Bush Turnpike Extension
and the DART Rail Extension will stimulate commercial growth exponentially in Rowlett.
The investments made by the North Texas Tollway Authority, the Texas Department of
Transportation (TxDOT), DART, and the RTC as well as those made by Rowlett citizens
through the latest bond referendum are beginning to bring a return on that investment.
In 2008 The City of Rowlett entered into a Letter of Intent with a partnership of developers
for a 100-acre, $500 million mixed-use project on Lake Ray Hubbard. The City Staff along
with the Mayor and Council are in the final stages of analyzing that opportunity and will be
moving forward soon. The planning for development of the Downtown Main Street in
Rowlett in conjunction with the new DART Rail Station is underway and will pick up speed
in the next several months. I work closely with the Rowlett City Manager and the Director
of Economic Development to be a resource to them in whatever capacity I am needed. I
have assisted with organizing and presenting two forums for commercial developers and
brokers that attracted those investors to Rowlett to learn more about the City. I simply
serve as the "ambassador" for the City of Rowlett wherever I go. My knowledge and my
enthusiasm have made a difference. I believe the Mayor, City Council, City Manager, City
Executives, and civic leaders in Rowlett have done a remarkable job to date to attract
development. That is supported by the fact that the commercial tax base has increased,
albeit modestly, over the past three years bringing almost 1,000 new jobs to Rowlett.
Furthermore, the number of very reputable developers and their intense interest in the
City of Rowlett bodes very well for the near future. Those developers have also noted and
complimented the changes made by the City Council and City Staff to become more
"business friendly" in both policy and procedure.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Rowlett is a well-educated citizenry. Rowlett is a youngish community. Rowlett is a fairly
well-off community. The forecast for the future is that Rowlett will maintain those
demographics but become younger still. In addition, the international community in
Rowlett is growing. All of these demographics are also shared by communities surrounding
Rowlett. What is making the City of Rowlett different is the opportunity to create new
developments that take into consideration the changing desires and needs of its citizens.
Downtown Main Street is likely going to be a transit-oriented development with a mixture
of retail establishments, office complexes, and small residential units all tied together by a
pedestrian mall. The two waterfront entertainment districts will reflect the current
markets. The new mass transit systems in Rowlett will attract more of the younger
families. All of these changes will result in Rowlett becoming a destination. Rowlett will be
the center of commerce for the northeast sector of the Metroplex. At the same time as
these exciting opportunities for the youngish community, the City is addressing the needs
of our senior citizens. Our senior citizens (I am one) already enjoy significant property tax
benefits in Rowlett. Senior citizens already enjoy programs for them at the Rowlett
Community Centre. The City has also attracted developers interested in providing
affordable housing for senior citizens. That project is in process now. I would not change
any of what the Mayor, Council, and City Staff are doing to respond to the needs and wants

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of our citizens. Certainly we would all do more if the resources were available or could be
reasonably anticipated. But, Rowlett lives within its means.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: I have always believed that the federal government is responsible for addressing the
issue of illegal immigration. The City and the Police Department will follow all established
statutes and regulations...and do. However, unless asked by the federal government for
assistance, it is up to the federal government to enforce those laws. I personally serve on
the Dallas County Criminal Justice Advisory Board and on the North Texas Crime
Commission. Each of those groups works hard to assure that existing federal laws are
enforced. Those groups lobby our Senators and Congressmen and Congresswomen to
make and enforce proper immigration law.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Yes...I certainly do favor a seamless regional transit system. Being on the Regional
Transportation Council and the Dallas Regional Mobility Coalition has greatly sensitized me
to the need for a seamless regional transit system. The Metroplex is enjoying deserved
recognition for being a wonderful location to live, work, and play. Conservative forecasts
project that our current 6 1/2 million population will grow to 9 million by 2030. Where are
we going to put all those people? More importantly, how are we going to move them
around the Metroplex? The major roadways of the Metroplex are already congested. The
Metroplex already does not meet air quality standards. Additional congestion is only going
to add to the problem of air quality, road safety, and worker productivity. The solution is to
get cars and trucks off the roads. So, how do we get workers who have fled the inner city
to the suburbs and to the semi-rural areas of the Metroplex to their jobs and back each
day? The answer is mass transit. However, the federal highway trust fund is almost out of
money. The Texas Department of Transportation has no funding for new construction. The
Texas State Legislature has stopped the construction of new toll roads via public-private
partnerships. How do we fund the needed mass transit? The Texas State Legislature has
routinely diverted the State gas tax for purposes other than highway construction. The
amount of gas tax paid by Texans to the federal government does not get sent back to
Texas intact...a portion of it is diverted to other states. Recent Legislatures have not
agreed to increase sales taxes to fund mass transit or a local option for a menu of fees and
taxes to fund mass transit. I favor a mandate to stop the diversion of both the federal and
state gas taxes. Furthermore, I favor indexing both taxes to match any increase in
inflation to assure the purchasing power of those existing taxes. I would refine the Texas
user fees to be sure that those who are using the Texas roads are paying for them
proportionately. The last thing I would consider is an increase in the gas tax of a nominal
amount provided the voters statewide support the increase...dedicated to funding mass
transit in Texas. Doing nothing is not a viable option. Having worked with the Tarrant
County and Denton County authorities for the past three years, I appreciate their ability to
work together through the Regional Transportation Council to achieve mutual benefit for all
Metroplex residents.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: North Texas is the fastest growing region in the country. Businesses and people are
moving here because of our good weather, our central location, and our friendly business
climate as well as the lack of an income tax. Our inland ports are becoming busier than
ever as Asian nations, African nations, and South American nations are sending their goods
through Texas more than ever before. We have excellent transportation systems in place
now...DFW International airport, freight lines, interstate highways...but those systems are
close to capacity and aging. Corporate relocations and expansions are dependent on
keeping North Texas transportation systems the best. Corporate relocations are also
dependent on having an educated workforce. That requires the Community College
districts in the Metroplex to work together to provide trained workers without duplicating
efforts. This requires the Metroplex universities to attain Tier I status and bring the most
sophisticated researchers...and inventors...here. And, these workers expect quality
education for their children. Public education and higher education must collaborate and
cooperate to attain and retain the best educational environment possible. The consensus
building will require diverse groups with diverse agendas to come together to achieve the
basic common good...quality jobs and more jobs in North Texas through corporate
relocations and expansions. This will require an acceptance of the vision and the goals and
objectives necessary to achieve that vision. Only when all the parties can see the mutual
benefit will true collaboration take place. My approach to consensus-building is to first

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identify the potential rewards of working together and then an intense information
program so that all participants can understand their part of the solution. Then the
relationships that have been built become even more important as the leader seeks
voluntary acceptance of the roles and scope of each group participant as all work towards
achieving the vision. I have observed Dallas Mayor Tom Leppert using these techniques
and skills as he promotes the Trinity project. Success for the leader requires not only
extraordinary management and leadership skills but also communication and people
skills.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: The Rowlett Mayor and City Council hired a new City Manager about 15 months ago.
One of the priority tasks given to the City Manager was to review all operating
departments to identify inefficiencies, waste, or cronyism. A system of performance
indicators to include benchmarks to measure progress towards the goal is being
established for each operating department. The goal is to assure that the Rowlett taxpayer
receives the maximum value from their tax dollar. That value will be measured in the
quality and amount of city services provided to taxpayers. At this point, the City Manager
is about 60% done with the operating reviews. Because the City Manager and the City
Executives have adopted "citizen-centered" decisionmaking and also have made a
commitment to the highest level of customer service, the city property tax rate, which has
not been increased during my first term as Mayor, is likely not going to increase next fiscal
year either. I recommended and endorse these internal reviews. While I do not think that
the City of Rowlett has achieved the highest level yet, I am confident that the City
Manager and her team are on track to do that. The remaining operating department
reviews must be completed and reacted to as soon as possible and those changes
institutionalized. Then, there must be vigilance on the part of the managers as well as by
the Mayor and City Council. That can only be accomplished if there is genuine transparency
and accountability by the City. The City of Rowlett is going to be recognized by the Texas
State Comptroller for its recent accomplishments to achieve such transparency and
accountability!
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: I believe the current leadership has done reasonably well in weathering the economic
storm. Decisions made almost three years ago to reduce spending then were difficult to
make and implement. Discipline to continue to set aside tax dollars to build reserves and
also to reallocate dollars for investment in the Rowlett neighborhoods was sometimes
waxing and waning. More than once I had to remind City Council and City Staff that such
discipline was essential. Regardless, today the City of Rowlett is prepared for a recovery
that will take 18-24 months to return to where we were revenue-wise. However, should
the recovery take longer than that, the new leadership will have to dig even deeper to find
resources to maintain core public services without a tax increase. The City uses economic
models to decide where to invest its maintenance dollars on roads and sidewalks as well as
in its facilities and fleet. I do not advocate abandoning those models unless there is a crisis
situation. Balancing the budget sounds simple...stay within your means. What that really
means is to be sure that the City is collecting all revenues due to it without adding new
discretionary fees or taxes. It also means that every expenditure is scrutinized and the
question "Is this the highest and best use of our limited resources?" answered in the
affirmative before proceeding. Furthermore, it requires full, open, and honest disclosure to
our citizens and the opportunity for them to make their choices know to the leaders.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: The most uncomfortable truth about the City of Rowlett that voters must confront is
how little control we have over so many of our utility costs and costs of other services. The
City of Rowlett purchases its potable water from the North Texas Municipal Water District
(NTMWD). The City does not have a seat on the Board because we do not also purchase
sewer services from the NTMWD. The policy of the NTMWD is that cities must purchase and
pay whatever was the historical peak of consumption in the past at a minimum each year.
To the City of Rowlett, that means the City purchases millions of gallons of water and pays
tax dollars for water that is never consumed. The City has no voice to change that policy.
The City of Rowlett purchases sewer services from the City of Garland. Each year the
Garland City Council sets the rates and even adjusts the rates without consultation. Those
rate increases are contractual and must be paid. There is no other provider to turn to
without a major investment in infrastructure. The City of Rowlett contracts with IESI for
waste services. That multi-year contract contains automatic fee increases when certain
conditions are met. The City has no choice but to pay the agreed upon contractual rates.

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The effect of this is that the City of Rowlett has one of the highest utility fees in North
Texas. Given its circumstances, it will be very difficult to ever move far away from that
status since spending decisions are made by others and the City must simply fund those
decisions. The City of Rowlett does have control over discretionary fee increases.

Cindy Rushing

Biographical Info:
Name: Cindy Rushing
Street Address: 6305 Joel Court
City/Town: Rowlett
State: Texas
Date of Birth: 11/01/1952
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-475-0914
Home Phone Number: 972-475-0914
Mobile Phone Number: Not available
Fax Number: 972-475-0914
E-mail Address: crushing@rowlett.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.CindyRushing.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Education: Graduated from Lake Highlands High School Dallas, Texas 1993 to 2001; 102
hours in computer sciences, business, accounting, photography and related studies from
Richland and Collin County Community Colleges with a 3.75 GPA. Several training
seminars related to elected officials through Texas Municipal League and National League
of Cities. Homeland Security Mayoral Institute Seminar for All Hazards Preparedness
Crisis Prevention Intervention training completed 8 hours 2-18-09 (GISD Training Team)
Leadership Rowlett Graduate of Class XVIII July 2009 Experience:Management, Sales,
Clerical, Working with special needs and preschool children, Photography, and Public
Speaking Strengths: Excellent communication and organizational skills, self starter,
Involved in community activities.
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: I have lived in Rowlett for 29 years.
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: I have lived in the Dallas area for 46 years.
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: I am semi-retired and currently work for the Garland Independent School District,
driving a school bus for special needs children in The Garland and Rowlett area.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: I believe in giving back to my community and volunteering as often as time permits.
For the last 6 years I have served my community as the place 2 council member on the
Rowlett City Council, serving as Mayor Pro Tem in 2007. I am a current member and
charter member of the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT). I am an active
member of Rowlett Fire Corp team 2. I have served as the chair of the Rowlett Womens
Club scholarship committee 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010 and the treasurer of the Rowlett
Womens Club 2009-2010. I served last year as the Chair of the Rowlett Womens Club
Christmas Home Tour and will do that again in this year.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Rowlett is a great place to live and I have met so many wonderful friends and neighbors
through all the difference organization I have worked with over the years. Listed below are
many of the volunteer positions I have served in during that time and recognitions I have
received: Rowlett Elementary School assisting teachers in the classroom when my
children attended there 1981 to 1985. Wesleyan Christian academy working as a
volunteer, in my grand children's preschool classes, 2001 to 2008 Charter member of the
Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Received the Distinguished Service Award
in May 2008 Past Treasure of the Artist Round Texas Club (ART) Member of the All
America City team representing Rowlett in the 2009 competition Graduate of Rowlett
Citizen Fire Academy Class 2 in 2003 Graduate of the Rowlett Community Emergency
Response Team Training 2003 Graduate of the Rowlett Citizens Police Academy 2007

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Chair of the Severe Weather Awareness Poster Contest 2007 and 2008 Graduate of
Leadership Rowlett Class XVIII 2009 Chair of the Rowlett Womens Club scholarship
committee 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010 Chair of the Rowlett Womens Club Audit
committee 2008 and 2009 Treasurer of the Rowlett Womens Club 2009-2010 Chair of the
Rowlett Womens Club Christmas Home Tour 2009 and 2010 President George W. Bush
Bronze Volunteer Service Award 2006
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: I have served on the Rowlett City Council in place 2 for the past six years.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: I have raised about $900.00 for my campaign.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Most of the funds raised have come from neighborhood contributions.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No, I have never been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am running for Mayor of Rowlett because I believe the citizens want a Mayor that is
responsive to them. My years of service and volunteer involvement has given me an
understanding of how the city works, including our opportunities and greatest challenges. I
see a bright future for our city and I am willing to work to make it happen. Rowlett is
truly at a crossroads. It is time to make critical decisions that will shape our future.
Reducing the tax burden is a hot topic, but at the same time we have to focus on
continuing to update and maintain our aging infrastructure. Balancing these issues will
require a financially responsible leader to use our limited resources responsibly. My time
on council has given me the experience to work through the budget process and find ways
to make our tax dollars stretch further. Rowlett needs a Mayor with authentic leadership
skills. One who builds teamwork and leads by example. I have many years of experience
in bringing people together to accomplish group goals. I believe I am the person that can
accomplish the task before us as a growing city. My goal is to work with the six other
council members who all bring different life experiences to the table to publicly discuss and
debate issues that face us as a growing city. I believe together we can arrive at decisions
that will move Rowlett forward in a positive manner.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1.I would continue the Cash Capital Improvement Spending program the city started
three years ago to improve street and alleys with out creating long term debt. 2. I would
continue to look at private public partnerships to make our tax payers dollars stretch
further. 3.I will continue to encourage neighborhoods to consider Public Improvement
Districts to move their project to the top of the list of needed work to be done in the city.
Funds for this type of projects could be available by using monies saved as we start to
lower our debt payments by paying down older bonds.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I believe the voters of Rowlett want a Mayor that is truly one of them. Someone that is
active in Rowlett. I feel interacting with our citizens at an HOA meeting or community
events is important. I will keep the decision making process public. The voters want to
know that the decision are reach after public discussion and debate in a public setting. Not
among a few in private meetings. That things as routine as appointing board and
commission member will not be done behind close doors as has been done in the past. And
that their Mayor truly wants to serve the community not build a resume for future political
ambitions. As always I welcome your comments and suggestions! Please email me at
crushing@rowlett.com, join my blog, or just call me at 972-475-0914. Thank you again for
your support over the last 6 years! Now I need your support to take the good ol’ boy
system out of Rowlett politics! Elect an authentic leader for Rowlett VOTE on May 8th
CINDY RUSHING FOR MAYOR
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Attracting commercial development is at the top of the list in Rowlett. We have been
very active in the last few year in holding events geared toward the development
community in the Metro Plex area. Showing off what Rowlett has to offer is a key factor is
attracting new business to our area.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should

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know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Rowlett for years has had a large number of young professional families. Keeping our
average age in the early 30's. That is slowly changing as we attract more seniors, but our
average age is still below 40 years old. As a city we need to find ways to have playgrounds
and soccer fields for the young people and still provide activities that interest those of us
that are not quite so active anymore.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: I believe if anything at all is done on the issue of illegal immigration it would have to be
on a national level not local government.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Rowlett has been a long time member of the DART transit system. It would be nice to
think someday we could ride a train anywhere. We as citizens need to learn to use mass
transit. But with that said it will be hard for most of us to give up the luxury of driving our
own cars everywhere we go.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: Transportation is is definitely at the top of the list for regional cooperation but water
conservation and clean water issues are a close second. But with that said there can
always be cost saving when cities jointly share in communication facilities, training
facilities, or lake and stream clean up projects.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Rowlett has been reducing the cost of delivering services to our residents for the last
several years. We are always looking for ways to work smarter and more efficiently.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: The balancing act of providing services to our residents as cost continually rise and not
raising taxes is a problem local government has always had to deal with. As the recent
economic down turn has lowered property values thus lower city revenues, that job has
become harder. Rowlett now uses more technology to help keep our employee cost lower.
The city now also out sources more operations to reduce cost. The city is also evaluating
the size and function of our fleet so that it can be operated in the most economical way
possible.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: We still have millions of dollars of work to be done to improve our aging infrastructure
and at some point we will have to incur more debt to take care of this problem.

Rowlett City Council, Place 2


Description: Note: All Rowlett residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Jerry Berggren

Biographical Info:
Name: Jerry Berggren
Street Address: 1417 Sherwood Dr
City/Town: Rowlett
State: TX
Date of Birth: 1968
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-345-1378
Mobile Phone Number: 972-345-1378

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E-mail Address: jerry@jerryberggren.com


Campaign Web Site Address: JerryBerggren.com

Questions:
Q: Education
A: B.A. - Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA M.B.A. - Tulane University, New
Orleans, LA
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: Nearly 13 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Director of Research & Information, National Association of Dental Plans
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Member of Rowlett's Tax Increment Financing District Board
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Vice-Chair of the Parks & Recreation Subcommittee, Rowlett Bond Commission
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None.
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: To date, my campaign is self-funded.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: N/A
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: 1. Sustainable Growth. A City Council that is patient and thoughtful in its attempts to
attract commercial enterprises will do more for the future health of the city than the desire
to trade our tax base for the promise of faster commercial development. We have the
opportunity of encouraging the creativity and diversity of commercial enterprise that want
to establish a presence in Rowlett or we can crush that creativity with onerous
requirements that encourage uniformity and end up looking and feeling like any other
suburb across America. 2. No Increase in Tax and Utility Rates. The City of Rowlett has
the second highest property tax rate and the second highest utility rates in North Texas. As
our city grows, the pressures to raise taxes and utility rates will be great as the city grows
to support new development. As Rowlett residents, we already pay enough taxes and
enough for our water and sewer services. I am running to find ways to not just keep taxes
and rates flat, but to reduce our property tax and utility rates. 3. Partnerships for
Development. The City of Rowlett has failed to develop many of its open spaces. We are
fortunate to have so many natural resources available to us for recreation, yet most of
those resources remain undeveloped. With 30 miles of unusable or inaccessible shoreline
along Lake Ray Hubbard, dozens of empty lots with faded and crumbling signs indicating a
park is coming soon, and major roads with no sidewalks for our children to walk safely
from one neighborhood to the next, the time has come for Rowlett to work with private
businesses and civic associations to find creative solutions to these problems.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1. Reduce the City's exposure to those services that can be managed by private
enterprises, and eliminate those services and programs that directly compete with services
and programs offered by private businesses and civic or religious organizations. 2.
Increase the cash funding for road and utility maintenance, so that the taxpayers are not
asked to borrow more money through general obligation bonds to accomplish those basic
services that the city should have completed from funds available in the general budget.
3. The City of Rowlett has begun a program that encourages residents to anonymously
report their neighbor for code violations. While the program accomplishes the goal of
encouraging property owners to maintain their property according to code, it also creates
an environment that discourages community. I would like to find a way to encourage
neighbors to act like neighbors rather than encourage Rowlett citizens to act like code
enforcement officers. Working with homeowners associations, religious groups and civic
associations to identify those in our community who are chronically unable to maintain
their property AND to help those individuals with the repairs they need will do far more to
develop a sense of community than a city-run Easter Egg hunt.

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Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My wife and I face the same struggles many families in Rowlett face; raising a family,
paying a mortgage, and planning for our future. I am keenly aware of the challenges that
many families in Rowlett face, so developing opportunities for families to live, play and
work in our city is my primary goal.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Attracting commercial development is THE priority for the City of Rowlett. The Eastern
extension of the President George Bush Turnpike and the extension of DART's Blue Line
into Rowlett open up miles of undeveloped lakefront to commercial and recreational
development that will transform Rowlett from a bedroom community to a regional
destination. The next five to ten years will determine what Rowlett looks like for
generations to come.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: Rowlett is landlocked and has very little land available for residential development. As a
result, our city's demographic profile will not likely change much over the next ten years.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: When illegal immigrants are arrested for crimes or stopped for traffic violations, our city
should follow the existing federal and state laws that require law enforcement to report
those individuals to the appropriate state and federal authorities.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: Rowlett will see the completion of the DART rail Blue line in 2012. So to benefit the
residents and businesses in Rowlett, it is in our interest to encourage a seamless regional
transit system into other parts of North Texas.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: The single biggest issue that will involve regional cooperation is related to lakefront
development and specifically, Robertson Park. Lake Ray Hubbard and Robertson Park are
currently owned by the City of Dallas, yet development on the lakefront and around
Robertson Park will be critical to Rowlett's future. The Council and the Mayor will have to
work with the City of Dallas on issues related to the lake and finding common ground on
lakefront development will be very important to Rowlett's future.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: Rowlett has been run, for at least the past three years, in a fiscally conservative
manner. Our high tax and utility rates are a result of an undisciplined approach to the city's
budget prior to the current leadership. With a slow economy and an increased tax burden
at the federal level, the Mayor and City Council must do more to reduce the burden on
taxpayers in the years to come.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: The next City Council must have the courage and foresight to identify those programs
and operations that can be managed more efficiently by private enterprise, and not place a
burden on the city's finances. Two great examples of this are the annual Festival of
Freedom and the Wetzone Waterpark. 1. This year, the Festival of Freedom is being
organized and managed by the Rowlett Exchange Club with private funds. In the past, the
City has performed these functions with taxpayer funds. Moving the operation of the
Festival of Freedom to the private sector removes the financial risk to taxpayers and
places that risk where it rightly belongs in the private market. 2. With the exception of its
first year of operation, the Wetzone Waterpark has lost at least $100,000 per year, with
some years experiencing deficits of more than $500,000. I believe the city needs to get
out of the business of running a water park. Rowlett needs to find a private sector partner
to operate the Wetzone. We already have precedent with the city's Waterview golf course,
which is operated by American Golf. It is time we find a partner to operate the Wetzone
under a similar agreement.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Coming increase in utility rates. Rowlett buys its water from the North Texas Municipal

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Water District. NTMWD have already informed Rowlett of fee increases of 10% for the next
two years. With one of the highest water utility rates in the region, the next City Council
will have to deal with long term solutions to our ever increasing water rates.

Donna Davis

Biographical Info:
Name: Donna Davis
Street Address: 6905 Westover Drive
City/Town: Rowlett
State: Texas
Date of Birth: 08/23/1950
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-412-4030
Home Phone Number: 972-412-4030
Mobile Phone Number: 469-834-8610
E-mail Address: donnadavis999@msn.com
Campaign Web Site Address: www.votedonnadavis.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Wayland Baptist University - Bachelors Degree - Business
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 6.5 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: 6.5 years
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Retired after 34 years with Texas Instruments Incorporated. Main source of income is
retirement funds.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Library Board Vice-Chairman, GED Tutor, volunteer instructor of Computer Classes for
Senior Citizens, DART Arts and Design Committee, City of Rowlett Performance Evaluation
redesign, 2010 Rowlett Citizens Police Academy, Rowlett Women’s Club and volunteer for
Main Street events
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: 2008 Charter Review Commission, 2008-2009 Mayor’s ad hoc Bond Committee, 2009
Rowlett Women’s Club Christmas Tour of Homes, Library Board, GED Tutor, volunteer
instructor of Computer Classes for Senior Citizens, and Rowlett Public Library craft
programs
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: I have a pledge from the MetroTex Association of Realtors as the candidate they have
endorsed for Place 2 in the amount of $500. The remainder of my campaign has been
personally financed.
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: I have a pledge from the MetroTex Association of Realtors as the candidate they have
endorsed for Place 2 in the amount of $500. The remainder of my campaign has been
personally financed.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: No.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: As we see the completion of the President George Bush Turnpike and the DART light Rail
line, Rowlett has wonderful opportunities for growth. We also have many challenges ahead
of us. We must continue to keep Rowlett a safe place to live and work. The maintenance
and repair of infrastructure and the need for improved parks, trails, senior and youth
programs and other services are constant challenges. In running, I want to ensure that the
Council keeps the citizen’s vision for our city at the forefront. I bring a common sense,

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balanced approach to decision making. I have thirty-four years supervisory and Human
Resources work experience with Texas Instruments. Since my retirement 2.5 years ago, I
have volunteered in many capacities in the City of Rowlett. My work as a member of the
2008 Charter Review Commission, the 2009 ad hoc Bond Committee and regular
attendance at Council Meetings and work sessions have given me an understanding of how
the City operates and issues we face. My work with the library, Rowlett’s senior citizens
and the project to revise the City’s performance evaluation system have allowed me to
work alongside many of our citizens and City employees. I believe government has an
obligation to citizens to operate in an efficient, effective way that places as little tax and
bureaucratic burden on citizens as possible. I fully support the right of citizens to have a
voice in their governance and a vote on the issuance of any new debt. I strongly support
individual property rights and sustainable economic development.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1. Economic Development I view economic development in two parts. First, the City
and Council must work closely with our Chamber of Commerce to promote the local
businesses already established in Rowlett. Keeping them strong only adds to our appeal as
a community when other businesses are considering Rowlett as a location. Second, the
completion of the President George Bush Turnpike and DART light rail will give us
significant opportunities for development of the North Shore Commercial District,
Downtown Transit Oriented Development, Waterfront District and the possible acquisition
and development of Roberson Park from the City of Dallas. It is critically important that we
are patient and attract quality, sustainable businesses that complement each other and
existing businesses. We must do this right the first time. At the same time, we must
preserve the safe community feel that excites so many of our citizens about living in
Rowlett. The right kinds of commercial development help transfer part of the tax burden
off the homeowner and increase sales tax to fund the operation of the city. 2. Regional
issues of transportation, water, electricity and clean air without crippling tax hikes The
North Central Texas Council of Governments forecasts area population to grow to
approximately 9 million by 2030. Growth of this magnitude will require regional solutions
to the issues of transportation, water, electricity and clean air. It is important that Rowlett
be involved with regional initiatives and decisions on these topics. We have seen what it
means to be a customer of a local regional water district, rather than a member city … we
have no vote on the board and little recourse. The decisions made today will impact the
citizens of Rowlett for many years to come. 3. Balance of Infrastructure repair and
amenities that make Rowlett a great place to live Rowlett, like many other cities, has
more needs than it has money to fund those needs. We must provide a balanced approach
between repair of our aging infrastructure and the amenities that so many citizens enjoy.
I believe that the current practice of using a pavement assessment program (index) serves
us well. Rowlett can then repair pavement before a much more expensive reconstruction is
needed. We are still paying for neglect in the past by having to reconstruct a number of
streets and alleys. We also face repair and replacement on infrastructure that is not so
visible. We have significant water pressure issues in some areas of our city. Over 50% of
our water lines and waste water lines are more than twenty years old. Several
neighborhoods need work. Spending for infrastructure must be balanced with amenities
that make this a great community. Improvement in our parks, trails, senior and youth
programs, our library and community center all impact citizens. Our amenities also impact
our economic development efforts. Paying for everything that Rowlett needs will always
be a challenge. Our property tax rate is already one of the highest in the region and should
not be raised. Smart economic development will help fund some of Rowlett’s needs in the
future. However, we may not see the financial benefits for a number of years. I am a fiscal
conservative who believes that the Council and City staff must make tough decisions about
what services we offer and how we deliver them to citizens. We must be efficient and
effective and ensure that citizens are receiving value for their money. We must use the
issuance of debt wisely and always with the voter approval. Ultimately, it is the voter who
determines what they are willing to pay for.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I believe that all of the candidates for Place 2 want to see Rowlett realize its potential
as a great place to live, do business, work and play. We each have differences in the life
experiences and points of view that we offer. I bring a skill set to the Council that enables
me to listen to different points of view and formulate successful solutions, to understand
the importance of vision, to lead teams and be an effective team member, to research and
analyze complex issues, to make difficult decisions based on facts, to look for effective and
efficient ways of doing things, to consider the impact of decisions on others and the future,

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and to communicate. My extensive work as a volunteer for the City of Rowlett has given
me a deeper knowledge of how the City works and an appreciation for our City employees.
Most of all, I believe I am known for living up to and surpassing my commitments. I offer
a balanced, common sense, fiscally conservative approach.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: I rank smart economic development as one of my three highest priorities. Rowlett is
land locked with Garland and Sachse as neighbors and Lake Ray Hubbard as a border. This
makes it critically important that we develop our assets in a way that benefits the citizens
of Rowlett. We have miles of undeveloped waterfront and approximately 1,000 acres
bisected by the new President George Bush Turnpike. Completion of the DART light rail
gives us opportunity for transit oriented development. We have opportunities for
affordable senior housing development. Smart commercial development helps shift some
of the tax burden from our homeowners. Rowlett is making good progress on marketing
our city to position us for future development. There has been interest from developers. As
the economy improves, we should see more. I believe we are on the right track. Our
challenge will be in being patient enough to encourage smart development. The Council
must seek input from the citizens on their vision for Rowlett’s future. Then the Council
must ensure that our zoning, codes and ordinances are up to date and reflect the citizen’s
vision.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: One recent demographic change I see in Rowlett is the change in income for some
families because of the economy. The economy and loss of jobs has led many families to
seek free or low cost entertainment and services. Library program attendance is up. A
number of families have dropped internet service providers and are now using computers
at the library. Attendance at the Main Street event series remains strong. We should
consider these situations in making decisions to support these community services as a
City. Fortunately, Rowlett has an outstanding volunteer program and local sponsors who
help mitigate cost. Another demographic change is the increasing number of senior
citizens. The investment that Rowlett makes in programs and amenities for senior citizens
needs improvement. Even though cost is always an issue, I believe we can do better as a
community. I would encourage the Council to begin to make small changes in budget now
and plan for a place seniors can call their own when revenues improve. This could begin
with a small center as a part of another city facility. Based on materials presented at the
latest Vision North Texas Regional Summit, it is expected that in the future there will be
more seniors, a smaller percentage of households with children, a larger percentage of
single-person households, and larger percentage of transit households. I don’t expect
Rowlett to be any different than the region. It is important that we keep these changes in
mind in economic development as well as the types of amenities available to citizens. I
believe we should solidify our vision of what citizens want Rowlett to be in the future. With
each decision, the Council should ask if it brings us closer to our citizen’s vision.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: In the normal course of stopping or apprehending an individual, the Rowlett police
should contact the Immigration and Naturalization Services for a decision on how to
proceed on the immigration issue if they find the individual is in the U.S. illegally. I believe
this is the current process. Federal courts have ruled that local ordinances such as a ban on
renting to illegal immigrants are unconstitutional. Recently, U.S. District Judge Jane J.
Boyle of Dallas ruled that these bans were an attempt to enforce U.S. immigration laws,
which only the federal government can do. Until the federal government stands behind our
laws, protects our borders and gives local police stronger authority to act, the handling of
illegal immigration according to our courts remains primarily a federal decision.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I rated regional issues as one of my three most important actions if elected. I believe
that transportation issues have become so complex and expensive that no city can solve
them alone. Rowlett is a member city of DART and will soon see the benefit of that
decision with the completion of the DART light rail. As population continues to grow, we
must address the movement of people and goods as a region. Transportation also has a big
impact on our air quality. I support full participation in efforts to define current and future
needs and develop regional solutions.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional

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planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such


issues?
A: Water, clean air and the volume of electricity required for future use will require
regional planning and solutions. Rowlett should play a part in the discussions and the
solutions. With population growth, demand will only increase. As a region, we must
encourage and explore water conservation, reuse and new sources. Air quality must be a
part of regional transportation solutions. The Council can change codes to allow alternative
sources of energy. Citizens should be kept informed and have a voice in determining future
solutions. I would also encourage cooperation with our neighboring cities as we look to
improve other services. Possible areas to explore would be the building and operation of
facilities such as the animal shelter, a venue for the performing arts, etc. in a partnership
with other cities.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: I am encouraged by the focus the new City Manager, Lynda Humble, has placed on
customer centered service, cost effectiveness and value for taxpayer investment. There
are always improvements to be made. We should continue to seek out ways to do things
differently and in a more cost effective manner. The Council should always be evaluating
services the City offers. A prime example is the Wet Zone. Since 2002, the Wet Zone has
lost between $100,000 and $492,000 annually. With the changes implemented by the new
manager, this year it is forecast to break even. Citizens should have a voice in whether
they want to continue to pay for this amenity. The Council should evaluate whether the
City should continue to operate this types of amenity, lease it out or sell it at the
appropriate time. Another example of cost effectiveness and efficiency is some of the
changes in the Police Department. The recent move of code enforcement and animal
services to the Police Department allows for a more seamless partnership between all
three groups. Clean, safe neighborhoods make Rowlett a good place to live and attract
economic development. The most difficult areas to favorably impact cost are the delivery
of water, sewer and garbage collection. We must vigorously examine our current contracts
and processes and look for ways to keep costs down. This will be extremely difficult in an
environment where increases have already been announced by our suppliers.
Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: Rowlett is in a good financial position and I give full credit to the City Manager, Finance
Department and the current Mayor and Council for their fiscal responsibility. Rowlett has
more than its required reserves in place. It is important that we stay the course. Even
when the economy improves, we must learn from past mistakes of borrowing more than
we need for the short term and raising our taxes to cover the service on the debt. We
must make wise and conservative decisions about growth in city government and spending
taxpayer dollars. It is by making fiscally conservative, wise decisions when the economy is
good that we remain strong when the economy is bad. In the next two years, the Council
will face a decision about calling a bond election to seek voter approval to issue debt to
fund infrastructure repairs and reconstruction. Because bond debt is such a long term
proposal, it is important that we issue bonds only as needed and only with approval of
voters. I favor listing each bond proposal separately on the ballot rather than combining
them into one large bond package. In this way, voters can speak clearly about what they
are willing to pay for. In the meantime we should continue to search for more economical
ways to maintain our infrastructure. An example is the City‘s current approach to the
maintenance of streets and alleys. Using an index, they regularly assess streets and alleys.
The City is focusing on repair before streets fall into a category where they must be
replaced. Repair is much less expensive than reconstruction. At the same time, they are
reconstructing where they index is too low to repair. These reconstructions will take a
period of several years.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: One of the most uncomfortable truths about our city is the high water and sewer rates.
While many other cities are catching up with Rowlett, that doesn’t make the rates more
affordable for our citizens. It is an uncomfortable truth that these rates are likely to keep
increasing in the future. Rates in Texas and the nation are forecast to increase 5% to 7%
every year. There are several reasons why our rates are high. Our suppliers, the North
Texas Municipal Water District and the City of Garland, are both raising rates to cover
rising costs and the costs of aggressive capital improvement plans and quality
improvements. Many cities don’t charge the entire cost of service in the utility rate. In
these cases, the general fund subsidizes a portion of the cost. Rowlett has a policy of
reimbursing the General Fund for water and sewer expenses to cover costs. Subsidizing

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our rates from the General Fund would ultimately result in higher taxes. As costs continue
to rise, assets need replacement and new sources of water are funded, we must seek new
solutions as a region to minimize the financial impact on citizens.

Rowlett City Council, Place 6


Description: Note: All Rowlett residents may vote in this race.

Candidates (choose 1):

Michael Gallops

Biographical Info:
Name: Michael Gallops
Street Address: 5206 St Charles Drive
City/Town: Rowlett
State: TX
Date of Birth: 11/14/1964
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 469-628-7926
Fax Number: 866-537-3510
E-mail Address: michael@michaelgallops.com
Campaign Web Site Address: http://wwww.michaelgallops.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Bachelor of Science, Angelo State University
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 5 years, 8 months
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: - no response -
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Currently unemployed
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Rowlett Fire Corps, Board Member at Freedom Life Church, Leadership Rowlett Class
XIX, Director of Freedom Life Church Job Networking, DART Blueline Art & Design
Committee, Vice Chair of Rowlett Mayors Ad Hoc Bond Committee, Rowlett Community
Emergency Response Team (CERT), Board of Directors - Specialized Alternatives for Family
& Youth (SAFY), Rowlett Citizens Police Academy, Board Member & Secretary, Harborside
Homeowners Asssociation
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: Rowlett Historical Society, Rowlett Arts & Humanities Commission, Veterans Advisory
Board of Verizon, Dallas Youth Resource & Advisory Council (Texas Youth Commission)
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $2500
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Friends, will be disclosed in Ethics Commission reportreport.
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: Only a divorce.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: Our family has lived in Rowlett since the summer of 2004. We moved here from
Mesquite with 6 of our 7 children because we wanted to live in a place that had city
amenities and a small town feeling. Rowlett fit that description perfectly then, and still
does today. Since 2004 I’ve been involved in a variety of organizations in Rowlett and have
come to truly love this city. I’ve seen great things and not so great things happen over the

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past 6 years and that’s what drove me to run for City Council. I believe that I can make a
difference, and that my 5-point Vision truly sets the framework for more great things in
Rowlett. My military leadership and my experience in process improvement and project
management makes me uniquely qualified to serve as a city councilman.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: Strengthen Rowlett’s public safety by making sure the police and fire departments have
the resources, training and support they need to keep our families and neighborhoods safe
and secure, including facilities, equipment and human resources. That means supporting
increases in equipment and personnel to meet the demands of a growing community, such
as the completion of the President George Bush Turnpike Eastern Extension. Immediately
begin to improve communications between the citizens and the City. For instance, working
with the City Manager’s office, I want to ensure that the communication and marketing
plan includes use of today’s technology, such as social networking. This enables us to reach
further, quicker, to a different segment of our community that may not have been
receiving our messaging. Initiatives such as this are low or no cost because they take
advantage of technological systems that are already in place and underutilized. Review
the existing tax and fee structure to determine what may be lowered without impacting
services.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: My experience in reviewing and improving processes is a unique skill set that my
opponents do not have. My opponents also have a more singular focus while my 5-point
vision for Rowlett touches on all areas of the city – not just fiscal and economic
development.
Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or
commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you
evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development?
A: Attracting commercial development is one of my highest priorities. I believe the
direction the city is going is the right one but efforts need to be more focused and
targeted. The economic development plan is nearly 3 years old and should be reviewed
and updated on a more regular basis.
Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should
know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would
you do differently?
A: The biggest change in demographics in Rowlett is growth in young married couples and
families. Rowlett’s efforts to improve the downtown area as well as the addition of the
DART rail and the PBGT Eastern Extension are steps in the right direction. When attracting
new commercial development to Rowlett I’d like to see more focus on family friendly
businesses that complement our demographics. I would also focus on improving the city
and neighborhood park system because our younger families are more environmentally
conscious and want healthier living as part of their lifestyle.
Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal
immigration?
A: While the issue of illegal immigration is primarily a federal one I believe that local law
enforcement should be allowed to question and identify suspected illegal immigrants in the
normal course of their duties. If they do apprehend an illegal immigrant they should be
allowed to detain and report them to the federal authorities.
Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what
steps would you take to make it happen?
A: I favor a regional transit system as long as it is done with citizen input and approval.
Q: On what other issues could North Texas and your city benefit from greater regional
planning and cooperation? What would you do to encourage consensus-building on such
issues?
A: A 2030 Master Transportation Plan is a great example of interagency cooperation.
Ensuring that the roads of today are ready for the traffic of tomorrow. Another issue is
lakeside cleanup. Regional cooperation around the Ray Hubbard Reservoir would result in
a much cleaner and safer recreational area.
Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to
taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend?
A: I believe the city tries to do the best it can considering the economy we’ve had to deal
with the last couple of years. I believe we need to review all of our services and ensure
that we aren’t wasting tax dollars when they should be used for vital services. I also
believe that the city council should focus on setting policy and approving the budget and
allow the City Manager and staff to determine the best manner to carry out services.

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Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do
you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present
need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?
A: It’s critical that we find ways to work with less revenue coming in. That’s to say that we
need to work smarter, not harder to provide essential services through process
improvement and an emphasis on quality. I also believe that a focus on encouraging
volunteerism in the city will allow staff to utilize tax dollars on maintaining and improving
infrastructure. We need to depoliticize the boards and commissions process to encourage
more citizens to volunteer. Using the expertise of citizen volunteers can also save tax
dollars.
Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront?
A: Our water utility rates are the highest around. A big part of that is because we are not a
member city of the water district. We’re told we have no options for reducing water rates
but I think we need to look harder before simply giving in.

Ron Miller

Biographical Info:
Name: Ron Miller
Street Address: 7315 Stonemeadow Circle
City/Town: Rowlett
State: Texas
Date of Birth: August 18, 1938
Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-412-8444
Home Phone Number: 972-475-1149
Mobile Phone Number: 214-616-1767
Fax Number: 972-412-8444
E-mail Address: ron.miller2@verizon.net
Campaign Web Site Address: ronmiller2010.com
Questions:
Q: Education
A: Indiana University, 1958-1962, Business Administration Richland College, Board of
Advisors, Construction and Technology Dept., 1982-1986 Numerous real estate land
development seminars
Q: Length of residency in the city:
A: 35 years
Q: Length of residency in district, if applicable:
A: NA
Q: Occupation/main source of income:
A: Administrative consultant and construction/development inspector to numerous DFW
area banks.
Q: Current civic involvement/highlights:
A: Member, Parks and Recreation Advisory Board, Member Rowlett DART station platform
design, Subcommittee of Rowlett Environmental Learning Center.
Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments:
A: None other than above.
Q: Previous public offices sought/held:
A: None
Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?
A: $175.00
Q: Who are your top three contributors?
A: Bill Birdwell Jason Pehde
Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?
Please explain:
A: Traffic tickets....no felonies.....no civil suits.
Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most
qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you
to serve in this office?
A: I am running for office because I think Rowlett will improve its opportunities to become

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a charming, modest sized city with my input. My unique career in real estate planning,
construction, and land development provides the experience that Rowlett currently needs
to plan it's undeveloped business tax base. I have spent nearly a half century in real estate
appraisal, sales, construction, land development, finance, and loan administration. I have
experience from coast to coast. These are unique qualifications. All are listed in my resume
and posted on my website.
Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you
push for them and pay for them?
A: 1. Seek professional land planning "Think Tank" advice. This is preferred over
developers at this time. I want the benefit of the most current academic input with the
future of Rowlett in mind instead of the future of a developer. Rowlett will have a need for
"Developers for a living" later. 2. Invite companies with plant expansion plans to Rowlett to
discuss Rowlett's industrial park potential. The "high tech" clean industries would be
courted. If some firms are sincere with a Rowlett expansion plan, they will be asked to
participate in the land plan "brain storming," however Rowlett's overall development
designs will remain in place. 3. Start development of a "critical path" plan to commence
the construction of bike and walking trails, waterfront parks, pedestrian sidewalks, and
complete development of existing parks. I would want no less than a 10 year plan to tie all
Rowlett neighborhoods, parks, employment, and shopping into a bicycle, and walking
friendly mid-sized city. Connections to waterfront improvements would be a priority. Water
taxis for popular stops will be considered.
Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the
best choice?
A: I have a very good friend. He is an attorney; a very good attorney. He is smart, funny,
totally enjoyable, and a generally well rounded, very intelligent fellow. But, I wouldn't
want him to take my appendix out. I would rather a surgeon do that. The surgeon would
have the training and experience. Clearly, it is the experience. Rowlett's future rests in
how it plans and develops it's undeveloped land and water assets. These resources will
provide the tax revenue that Rowlett will need to turn itself into a charming little city. The
successful conversion of these undeveloped lands will provide all the funding needed to pay
for the city's new needs. To the best of my knowledge, my experience in these matters far
exceed my competition