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The Magazine of The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

Special Tercentenary Issue!


Message from the president

ON SEPTEMBER 6, 2011, The Lutheran • As an institution located in historic


Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP) Philadelphia, we will raise the profile
will join local, regional, national, and interna- of this significant American historical
tional celebrations of the 300th anniversary of figure who contributed significantly to
the birth of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, the the colonial landscape, and explore the
organizer of Lutheranism in colonial America. ways in which he “fathered” the first
In this issue you will be introduced to his generation of citizens of the United
importance and learn how LTSP will celebrate States of America. His children also have
the anniversary year. There is an impressive stat- made significant, far-reaching contribu-
ue at the entrance of the seminary of tions to American history.
Muhlenberg preaching, but we are not celebrat-
• As a religious institution located on a
ing him because of a magnificent statue or to
campus within a highly diverse religious
observe an anniversary.
and ethnic community, we will create a
We will celebrate who we are as a seminary
dialogue around issues of immigration
of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
and the role of the church in new immi-
due to Muhlenberg’s vision and understanding of the church. Because
grant experiences, explore topics of religious tolerance and pluralism,
of his mission and ministry, we have a constitution for congregations
and support public discussion about the ways in which we are “alike”
and an understanding that the church is larger than the ministry and
and of our shared history as “newcomers” to America.
mission of local congregations and their authority. In many ways, the
Muhlenberg tradition characterizes who we are as a seminary — loyal • We intend to raise sufficient endowed funds ($500,000) to
to the church and its mission to prepare leaders who will proclaim the establish a Muhlenberg scholarship that will provide free tuition
Gospel of our crucified and risen Lord in a diverse and pluralistic for one or more students who will exemplify Muhlenberg’s passion
nation. In addition, we have set the following goals: for mission and ministry in a diverse and pluralistic context.
Now that LTSP has succeeded in renovating its wonderful
• LTSP plans to use this celebratory year as a lens not only to
campus, we are dedicating all our energies to support our
reflect the seminary’s heritage and legacy, but, more importantly,
wonderful student body and the faculty by raising funds for
as a vehicle to engage our constituency, reaching out to new
financial aid and faculty development.
audiences. We have made a commitment to view ourselves —
our collections, our educational offerings, our campus — as a We have a wonderful legacy and treasure to sustain in the
public asset and, as it relates to Muhlenberg specifically, to Muhlenberg tradition, and we welcome and encourage you to join
share his heritage that was integral as well to the formation of us as LTSP continues to carry out that tradition.
the nation. A commemorative project of this type serves the
obvious goals of raising up and exploring a significant historical Christ is risen, Alleluia.
figure and examining his relevance to today’s world, and will
have long lasting ramifications for our institution beyond the
anniversary year.
Philip D. Krey
• As a school of the ELCA, we will help to educate the 5.2 million
Lutherans in the United States as to the legacy of Muhlenberg,
to an understanding of the church’s patriarch that contributes
to an understanding of who Lutherans are, and to paint a picture
of the real man — his strengths and his weaknesses.
• As the largest repository of Muhlenberg’s papers and artifacts
in the United States, we will make available to scholars and the
public, at no charge, our extensive collection for research.
EDITOR/DESIGNER
Merri L. Brown

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
John Kahler

WRITERS
John Kahler
Mark A. Staples

PHOTOGRAPHY
John Kahler
Maria Fumai Dietrich

EDITORIAL BOARD
Merri L. Brown
Lois La Croix
FEATURES ✛ SPRING 2011
David D. Grafton
Louise Johnson
Sharing the Public and Private Witness of ..........................................6
John Kahler Henry Melchior Muhlenberg
Philip D. Krey
John V. Puotinen
Muhlenberg Congregations in North America Map ..............................14
J. Paul Rajashekar The Henry Melchior Muhlenberg House Dig ..................................................17
CORRESPONDENCE Images from a Newly Planted Church ......................................................................18
PS,
The Lutheran Theological Seminary Resettling Immigrants ..............................................................................................................19
at Philadelphia,
7301 Germantown Avenue, YOU are the LIVING LEGACY ..................................................Inside back cover
Philadelphia, PA 19119 of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg
Telephone: 215.248.6311 or
1.800.286.4616
Email: communications@Ltsp.edu
Visit us online: www.Ltsp.edu
DEPARTMENTS
PS is a publication of The Lutheran
Message from the President ............................................................Inside front cover
Theological Seminary at Philadelphia, and
is distributed without charge to alumni/ae,
Offerings ..................................................................................................................................................2
faculty, staff, and friends of the seminary.
Alumni News ..................................................................................................................................20
© Copyright 2011 News and Notes ........................................................................................................................22
The Lutheran Theological Seminary
at Philadelphia Faculty/Staff Activities ........................................................................................................22
Volume 93 Number 2 Passages........................................................................................................................................25
In Memoriam ....................................................................................................................25
Centered in the Gospel of Jesus
Christ, The Lutheran Theological Around Admissions ................................................................................................27
Seminary at Philadelphia seeks to
educate and form public leaders who From the Foundation ......................................................................................28
are committed to developing and
nurturing individual believers and
communities of faith for engage-
ment in the world.

WEB EXTRA!
W
HEINRICH MELCHIOR
M U H L E N B E R G (1711 - 1787)
P ATRIARCH OF THE N ORTH A MERICAN L UTHERAN C HURCH
T R AV E L I N G E X H I B I T I O N O F THE F R A N C K E F O U N D AT I O N S D E D I C AT E D T O T H E MUHLENBERG
TERC ENTENARY I N 2011

Look for this icon throughout the


magazine for extra Web content!
D I M A N S K I

FRANCKESCHE
STIFTUNGEN
ZU HALLE With thanks for their support to our partners in the USA, especially the Lutheran Theological Seminary in Philadelphia,
and to the Lotto Sachsen-Anhalt, the Federal Foreign Office of Germany, the Evangelical Church in Central Germany
OFFERINGS✛
HOW THE MUHLENBERG STATUE CAME TO BE MUHLENBERG 300 CELEBRATION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 6, 2011!
(Written by the late Dr. John Kaufmann in September 1992 for the 75th anniversary of the Muhlenberg Statue on the LTSP Campus) September 6, 2011, marks the 300th birthday anniversary of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, known as
the Father of American Lutheranism, and is also the opening day of the 148th Academic Year at The
Seventy-five years ago, on October 27, 1917, a significant event in occurred in this city.” Over thirty-five thousand people took part in Monument, with the provision
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP), often noted as the culmination of Muhlenberg’s
the life of the seminary occurred. As the Seminary Bulletin reported the parade preceding the acceptance by the city of the statue. that such congregations as have
dream of a seminary in the great colonial city.
at the time, “The grounds ... were filled to overflowing ... and all na- Despite the reputation of the sculptor, many of whose works already made contributions to
To celebrate the day and kick off the Muhlenberg 300 year, LTSP is hosting a day of special events:
ture smiled in the beauty of a glorious Indian Summer day, when stood on public ground (e.g., in Gettysburg and Valley Forge parks), the fund (totaling $6,151.58)
• A Festival Worship will start the day’s events, with Bishop Claire Burkat presiding, and
hundreds of delegates and visitors in attendance upon the General the city’s response to the Ministerium’s offer was cool. The Art Jury shall receive credit on account
Bishop Roy Riley preaching.
Council and the Women’s Missionary Convention, together with of the city was petitioned for a suitable location but rejected several of the said apportionment.” The
• Dr. Martin Marty, Fairfax M. Cone Distinguished Service Professor
other friends of the Seminary, came by train and trolley to Mount suggested sites. The only solution appeared to be the incorporation motion was approved.
Emeritus at the University of Chicago, will keynote the Opening
Airy …” The event? The unveiling of the monument in memory of of the monument into the facade of a Lutheran building. The site of Subsequently, the Seminary
Convocation, speaking on “Henry Melchior Muhlenberg and the
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg. the future Lutheran publication building, ultimately erected at 13th Bulletin reported that most of
Current American Church Scape.”
It had not been the original intention to erect this monument on and Spruce streets, was considered but abandoned because of uncer- the funding was met by offer-
• Afternoon workshops led by LTSP faculty will address various aspects
the campus. Initially conceived as part of the celebration by the tainty as to when it might be constructed and whether the monu- ings “chiefly from the Sunday
of Muhlenberg’s career and today’s church.
Lutheran Church of the quadricentennial of the Reformation, spe- ment as proposed could be coordinated with it. Schools of the Ministerium.”
• The Muhlenberg Exhibition will make its debut, featuring artifacts
cific planning had fallen to the Muhlenberg Monument Committee In a letter to Dr. Theodore E. Schmauk, President of the semi- In its final report, the Monu-
from the seminary and The Lutheran Archives Center at Philadelphia
of the Evangelical Lutheran Ministerium of Pennsylvania and the nary’s Board of Directors, written January 23, 1917, The Rev. F.O. ment Committee expressed its
and “Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, Patriarch of American Lutheranism”
adjacent States. At its 1916 convention, the Ministerium had voted Evers, Chairperson of the Monument Committee, lamented that “deep appreciation of the work
display created by the Francke Foundations of Halle, Germany.
that, as part of the celebration, it would erect a monument “to cost there was “so much opposition on the part of the city Art Jury that of the artist, for the psychologi-
A festival banquet, with Bishop Samuel Zeiser offering the invocation
not over ten thousand dollars, to be placed in a conspicuous place in the whole project is seriously endangered.” He therefore inquired cal insight, technical skill and
and benediction, featuring an appearance by Henry himself, and serving as
Philadelphia …” Funding was to come from contributions solicited whether the seminary board would provide a location on its campus. historical fidelity which the
the kickoff for the Muhlenberg Heritage Campaign, will close the initial day
from congregations and their organizations. In this way, he pointed out, “we shall be free from any outside influences …” monument so strikingly reveals.
of celebration.
A proposal presented by J. Otto Schweizer, a Swiss-born sculptor The correspondence does not reveal the reasons for the city’s cool We feel that the ... monument …
Additional events at LTSP marking the Muhlenberg 300 Celebration
working in Philadelphia, was approved and a contract executed. Mr. response. This being 1917, with war raging in Europe, the fact that exhibits a work of art of rare
include Congregation Day on October 15, Fall Forum on November 7,
Schweizer had done numerous projects involving historical person- the monument was to commemorate a German, a member of the merit, and of which the Lutheran
Advent Vespers on December 4, Women’s Day on March 17, 2012, and
ages and had a very fine reputation. After training in Zurich, Dres- clergy, who had played a leading role in the establishment of the Church may justly feel proud.”
Spring Convocation, May 1-2, 2012.
den, and Florence, he had come to America in 1894, ultimately Lutheran denomination in America certainly must have been in-
settling in Philadelphia. He was employed for eleven years by the volved. In any event, the seminary responded affirmatively and a de- Visit Ltsp.edu/Muhlenberg300 for more information, and sign up for the
Ketterlinus Lithographic Company. Following a strike cision was made to locate the monument at the entrance to the campus. Muhlenberg 300 eNewsletter at Ltsp.edu/Muhlenberg300Signup.
which seriously affected the company, he launched As the saying goes, the rest is history — except for two complica-
out on his own, executing projects for both pri- tions. Unfortunately, the granite base and central figure of the patri-
vate and public patrons, such as the German arch were complete by dedication day but the bronze reliefs on each
Society of Pennsylvania, and a body side of it were not ready. As reported to the Ministerium in 1918 by MUHLENBERG 300 SPEAKERS BUREAU
known as the United States Battlefield the Monument Committee, this was caused by “precarious labor
The Muhlenberg 300 celebration is many things beyond events at LTSP. The Muhlenberg 300 website (muhlenberg300.org) offers oppor-
Parks of Pennsylvania. conditions and difficulties in transportation.” The work, however,
tunities and resources for individuals, congregations and interested groups to share the Muhlenberg story and learn more about Henry Mel-
In 1911, his statue of Major Gen- was soon finished and the committee was able to announce that it
chior Muhlenberg and his contributions to the Lutheran Church and life in Colonial America. Explore the website and see what can be
eral Peter Muhlenberg, commis- had inspected the completed composition and that it had “unani-
useful, or where you can contribute.
sioned by the German society, was mously approved” it.
One of the growing resources is the Muhlenberg 300 Speakers Bureau. LTSP faculty and other Muhlenberg experts are available to speak
unveiled at the southeast corner of The other problem? What else but money. The Auditing Com-
to your congregation or group about Muhlenberg topics. Want to learn more about the Muhlenberg family and its influence in the
City Hall before what the mittee of the Ministerium, in its 1918 convention report, an-
colonies? We have a speaker for that. What influence did Lutheran women have in Muhlenberg’s time — and how does their legacy carry
Philadelphia Public nounced that $8,415 had been borrowed “in order to meet
through to today? Yes, there’s a speaker for that. Interested in the artifacts from the archeological dig at Muhlenberg’s home in Trappe, PA
Ledger called “prob- payments on the Muhlenberg Monument contract.” The Executive
(article, p. 17)? Dig leader Louis Farrell is available to show and tell about the finds. Learn about Muhlenberg’s colonial letters from LTSP
ably the greatest Committee, therefore, proposed a process and the Committee of
Professor Timothy Wengert, or Muhlenberg’s work as a Public Theologian and the Importance of Religious Freedom from LTSP Professor
assembly of na- Review of the Report of the Executive Committee recommended:
Jon Pahl.
tionalities “That the Ministerium direct its Apportionment Committee to
Learn more about the speakers bureau and the speakers and talks available at Ltsp.edu/muhlenberg300-speakersbureau. Interested in
that has apportion the sum of $15,000 for the purpose of meeting the obli-
sharing your Muhlenberg knowledge or stories with others? We invite you to add your name and topics to the speakers bureau. Sign up
ever gations incurred by the erection of the Muhlenberg Memorial
online at Ltsp.edu/muhlenberg-speakers-register.

PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu 3


OFFERINGS✛
HOW THE MUHLENBERG STATUE CAME TO BE MUHLENBERG 300 CELEBRATION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 6, 2011!
(Written by the late Dr. John Kaufmann in September 1992 for the 75th anniversary of the Muhlenberg Statue on the LTSP Campus) September 6, 2011, marks the 300th birthday anniversary of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, known as
the Father of American Lutheranism, and is also the opening day of the 148th Academic Year at The
Seventy-five years ago, on October 27, 1917, a significant event in occurred in this city.” Over thirty-five thousand people took part in Monument, with the provision
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP), often noted as the culmination of Muhlenberg’s
the life of the seminary occurred. As the Seminary Bulletin reported the parade preceding the acceptance by the city of the statue. that such congregations as have
dream of a seminary in the great colonial city.
at the time, “The grounds ... were filled to overflowing ... and all na- Despite the reputation of the sculptor, many of whose works already made contributions to
To celebrate the day and kick off the Muhlenberg 300 year, LTSP is hosting a day of special events:
ture smiled in the beauty of a glorious Indian Summer day, when stood on public ground (e.g., in Gettysburg and Valley Forge parks), the fund (totaling $6,151.58)
• A Festival Worship will start the day’s events, with Bishop Claire Burkat presiding, and
hundreds of delegates and visitors in attendance upon the General the city’s response to the Ministerium’s offer was cool. The Art Jury shall receive credit on account
Bishop Roy Riley preaching.
Council and the Women’s Missionary Convention, together with of the city was petitioned for a suitable location but rejected several of the said apportionment.” The
• Dr. Martin Marty, Fairfax M. Cone Distinguished Service Professor
other friends of the Seminary, came by train and trolley to Mount suggested sites. The only solution appeared to be the incorporation motion was approved.
Emeritus at the University of Chicago, will keynote the Opening
Airy …” The event? The unveiling of the monument in memory of of the monument into the facade of a Lutheran building. The site of Subsequently, the Seminary
Convocation, speaking on “Henry Melchior Muhlenberg and the
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg. the future Lutheran publication building, ultimately erected at 13th Bulletin reported that most of
Current American Church Scape.”
It had not been the original intention to erect this monument on and Spruce streets, was considered but abandoned because of uncer- the funding was met by offer-
• Afternoon workshops led by LTSP faculty will address various aspects
the campus. Initially conceived as part of the celebration by the tainty as to when it might be constructed and whether the monu- ings “chiefly from the Sunday
of Muhlenberg’s career and today’s church.
Lutheran Church of the quadricentennial of the Reformation, spe- ment as proposed could be coordinated with it. Schools of the Ministerium.”
• The Muhlenberg Exhibition will make its debut, featuring artifacts
cific planning had fallen to the Muhlenberg Monument Committee In a letter to Dr. Theodore E. Schmauk, President of the semi- In its final report, the Monu-
from the seminary and The Lutheran Archives Center at Philadelphia
of the Evangelical Lutheran Ministerium of Pennsylvania and the nary’s Board of Directors, written January 23, 1917, The Rev. F.O. ment Committee expressed its
and “Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, Patriarch of American Lutheranism”
adjacent States. At its 1916 convention, the Ministerium had voted Evers, Chairperson of the Monument Committee, lamented that “deep appreciation of the work
display created by the Francke Foundations of Halle, Germany.
that, as part of the celebration, it would erect a monument “to cost there was “so much opposition on the part of the city Art Jury that of the artist, for the psychologi-
A festival banquet, with Bishop Samuel Zeiser offering the invocation
not over ten thousand dollars, to be placed in a conspicuous place in the whole project is seriously endangered.” He therefore inquired cal insight, technical skill and
and benediction, featuring an appearance by Henry himself, and serving as
Philadelphia …” Funding was to come from contributions solicited whether the seminary board would provide a location on its campus. historical fidelity which the
the kickoff for the Muhlenberg Heritage Campaign, will close the initial day
from congregations and their organizations. In this way, he pointed out, “we shall be free from any outside influences …” monument so strikingly reveals.
of celebration.
A proposal presented by J. Otto Schweizer, a Swiss-born sculptor The correspondence does not reveal the reasons for the city’s cool We feel that the ... monument …
Additional events at LTSP marking the Muhlenberg 300 Celebration
working in Philadelphia, was approved and a contract executed. Mr. response. This being 1917, with war raging in Europe, the fact that exhibits a work of art of rare
include Congregation Day on October 15, Fall Forum on November 7,
Schweizer had done numerous projects involving historical person- the monument was to commemorate a German, a member of the merit, and of which the Lutheran
Advent Vespers on December 4, Women’s Day on March 17, 2012, and
ages and had a very fine reputation. After training in Zurich, Dres- clergy, who had played a leading role in the establishment of the Church may justly feel proud.”
Spring Convocation, May 1-2, 2012.
den, and Florence, he had come to America in 1894, ultimately Lutheran denomination in America certainly must have been in-
settling in Philadelphia. He was employed for eleven years by the volved. In any event, the seminary responded affirmatively and a de- Visit Ltsp.edu/Muhlenberg300 for more information, and sign up for the
Ketterlinus Lithographic Company. Following a strike cision was made to locate the monument at the entrance to the campus. Muhlenberg 300 eNewsletter at Ltsp.edu/Muhlenberg300Signup.
which seriously affected the company, he launched As the saying goes, the rest is history — except for two complica-
out on his own, executing projects for both pri- tions. Unfortunately, the granite base and central figure of the patri-
vate and public patrons, such as the German arch were complete by dedication day but the bronze reliefs on each
Society of Pennsylvania, and a body side of it were not ready. As reported to the Ministerium in 1918 by MUHLENBERG 300 SPEAKERS BUREAU
known as the United States Battlefield the Monument Committee, this was caused by “precarious labor
The Muhlenberg 300 celebration is many things beyond events at LTSP. The Muhlenberg 300 website (muhlenberg300.org) offers oppor-
Parks of Pennsylvania. conditions and difficulties in transportation.” The work, however,
tunities and resources for individuals, congregations and interested groups to share the Muhlenberg story and learn more about Henry Mel-
In 1911, his statue of Major Gen- was soon finished and the committee was able to announce that it
chior Muhlenberg and his contributions to the Lutheran Church and life in Colonial America. Explore the website and see what can be
eral Peter Muhlenberg, commis- had inspected the completed composition and that it had “unani-
useful, or where you can contribute.
sioned by the German society, was mously approved” it.
One of the growing resources is the Muhlenberg 300 Speakers Bureau. LTSP faculty and other Muhlenberg experts are available to speak
unveiled at the southeast corner of The other problem? What else but money. The Auditing Com-
to your congregation or group about Muhlenberg topics. Want to learn more about the Muhlenberg family and its influence in the
City Hall before what the mittee of the Ministerium, in its 1918 convention report, an-
colonies? We have a speaker for that. What influence did Lutheran women have in Muhlenberg’s time — and how does their legacy carry
Philadelphia Public nounced that $8,415 had been borrowed “in order to meet
through to today? Yes, there’s a speaker for that. Interested in the artifacts from the archeological dig at Muhlenberg’s home in Trappe, PA
Ledger called “prob- payments on the Muhlenberg Monument contract.” The Executive
(article, p. 17)? Dig leader Louis Farrell is available to show and tell about the finds. Learn about Muhlenberg’s colonial letters from LTSP
ably the greatest Committee, therefore, proposed a process and the Committee of
Professor Timothy Wengert, or Muhlenberg’s work as a Public Theologian and the Importance of Religious Freedom from LTSP Professor
assembly of na- Review of the Report of the Executive Committee recommended:
Jon Pahl.
tionalities “That the Ministerium direct its Apportionment Committee to
Learn more about the speakers bureau and the speakers and talks available at Ltsp.edu/muhlenberg300-speakersbureau. Interested in
that has apportion the sum of $15,000 for the purpose of meeting the obli-
sharing your Muhlenberg knowledge or stories with others? We invite you to add your name and topics to the speakers bureau. Sign up
ever gations incurred by the erection of the Muhlenberg Memorial
online at Ltsp.edu/muhlenberg-speakers-register.

PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu 3


OFFERINGS✛
experience further changes. Much has changed and more changes HAROLD AND MARY ANNE WEISS RECEIVE
are on the way! SOLI DEO GLORIA AWARD
During the academic year, faculty from each curricular area ad- Evan Davis Samantha Drennan Julie Recher The Rev. Dr. Harold S. Weiss ’55 and Mary Anne Weiss were pre-
dressed the issues from their perspective through four area lectures.
sented on December 5, 2010 with the Soli Deo Gloria Award from
Bishop Roy Riley of the New Jersey Synod of the ELCA looked
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP), hon-
from the outside, speaking on “Seminary Education: What the
oring the Allentown, Pennsylvania, couple for their decades of serv-
Church Expects?” Special lectures included “Theological Educa-
ice to the church and seminary. The award is presented annually to
tion in a Globalized World,“ the annual Hein-Fry Lecture, “Hear-
pay tribute to donors and friends of the seminary.
ing the Word: Lutherans Read the Bible with the Ecumenical
Dr. Weiss served for 13 years as Bishop of the Northeastern
World,” that addressed global perspectives, and Lutheran World
Pennsylvania Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Amer-
Relief CEO and President The Rev. Dr. John Nunes was joined by Pamela Peterson Taryn Montgomery Altressa Boatright ica, and for many years as a seminary trustee. Mary Anne Weiss has
LTSP students for the O. Frederick Nolde lecture, which addresses
been involved in decades of volunteer and church service in the
human rights issues. The students had participated during 2010 in
Lehigh Valley and beyond.
the Nolde Seminar, which alternates years with the Lecture.
In expressing thanks for the award at the annual Advent Vespers
Looking toward the future, the Board of Trustees and faculty,
Lutheran World Relief CEO and Pres- Hein-Fry lecturer Dr. Suneel Bhanu,
dinner, Mary Anne Weiss encouraged support for the seminary, not-
staff, and students have reflected on the issues as part of a continuing
ident The Rev. Dr. John Nunes was Moderator/Bishop of the largest ing in her experience “that the congregations that do well have the
joined by LTSP students for the O. Lutheran church body in India, The conversation to keep LTSP a seminary that remains at the forefront
Frederick Nolde lecture Andhra Evangelical Lutheran Church best-trained pastors and best-prepared lay leaders.” She urged the
of theological education that will serve the church long into the future.
laity in the audience to “take advantage of the opportunities before
Tiffany Chaney Colleen Hetrick Ben Siebert them to minister.”
ACADEMIC YEAR THEME: A COLLECTION WEB EXTRA!
W Harold Weiss recalled the names of influential mentors, such as
“Theological Education in the Changed Context of the Church STUDENT ACADEMIC AWARDS Professors Martin Heinecken and Ted Doberstein. He also acknowl-
Recordings of these programs can be viewed online at
and Society” was the theme for a series of convocations featuring LTSP is proud of the academic achievements of its outstanding edged the late Wilson Touhsaent, who preceded him as synodical
Ltsp.edu/ChangedContext.
LTSP faculty and guest presenters, all exploring curricular implica- students, who are fine examples of the seminary’s mission of prepar- bishop, and others. “Thanks for this honor,” Weiss said. “It is mean-
tions of the changes underway in theological education. Change is ing ordained and lay ministers of the Word as leaders for the mission ingful to us beyond words. As the name of the award says, the glory
more perceptible with regard to the gender, age, and racial/ethnic of the church in the world. LTSP awards a number of scholarships for an award like this is really God’s alone. While the spotlight
composition of faculty, staff and students. Patterns of seminary at- DISTANCE LEARNING OFFERINGS shines on us tonight, I hope you will see this as an occasion where
for academic achievement presented at selected fall and spring con-
tendance, academic schedule and the structure of the curricula are LTSP is working with Lancaster Theological Seminary to vocations each academic year. The Rev. Dr. J. Paul Rajashekar, semi- the floodlight shines on all around us who minister well and sup-
undergoing change. With the advent of computers, Internet and develop a distance learning program that will offer courses for nary dean, presented awards to the following students, listed with port the seminary and the church.”
modern technology, new and creative modes of delivery of educa- students who are interested in a seminary education but not the award they received: Learn more about Harold and Mary Anne Weiss and their exemplary
tion have been developed. Students have exhibited diverse motiva- able to move to campus full time or commute to campus for
Evan Davis — Paul J. Hoh/Elizabeth Reed Award leadership and service to the church and the seminary online at
tions and vocational aspirations. Degrees have multiplied, classes. These courses will also offer an opportunity for those Ltsp.edu/SoliDeoGloria2010.
theological disciplines have become specialized and sources of fi- who are drawn to theological learning, looking to “test the Samantha Drennan — Traci L. Maul Award
nancial support have shifted. The cost of theological education, waters” but not sure if a full masters program is right for them. Julie Recher — Karl Elser Wurster Memorial Award
dwindling support from denominations, debt load of students, The schools are designing a full first year of courses leading to Pamela Peterson — The Dr. LeRoy Aden Scholarship
pressure to reduce duration requirements, have all raised serious the Master of Divinity with courses offered by both Philadel- in Pastoral Care
questions about the quality and sustainability of seminary educa- phia and Lancaster that will meet degree requirements and
tion over the long haul. Taryn Montgomery — The Atonement Lutheran Church
with credits that will be accepted for either school’s degree
These changes to some extent reflect societal changes that have of Asbury Park, New Jersey, Preaching Award
program.
impacted the church. The social location of the church and the LTSP will continue to offer selected distance learning and Altressa Boatright and Tiffany Chaney — The Rev. Dr. Joseph
long-stand privileges the culture had extended to Christian intensive courses on both the first professional (Master of Di- Q. Jackson Endowed Scholarship Award for UTI students
churches have now diminished. The religious landscape of our soci- vinity and Master of Arts in Religion) that have been success- Colleen Hetrick — The Dr. and Mrs. William Reifsnyder
ety has undergone change. The face of Christianity too has fully presented for a number of years, with the new course Leadership for Mission Award
changed due to immigration and migration of people. Mainline de- program taking advantage of the latest pedagogical advances in Ben Siebert — The Roy L. Winters and Sarah Stober
nominations have experienced significant decline in membership. teaching and learning is a distance learning environment. Winters Scholarship
Denominations and denominational identity have weakened. In
short the ecology of theological education has changed and will More information, including fees and admission resources, can
More details and photos of the awardees can be found online at
be found online at Ltsp.edu/DistanceLearning.
Ltsp.edu/scholarship-awardees.

4 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu 5


OFFERINGS✛
experience further changes. Much has changed and more changes HAROLD AND MARY ANNE WEISS RECEIVE
are on the way! SOLI DEO GLORIA AWARD
During the academic year, faculty from each curricular area ad- Evan Davis Samantha Drennan Julie Recher The Rev. Dr. Harold S. Weiss ’55 and Mary Anne Weiss were pre-
dressed the issues from their perspective through four area lectures.
sented on December 5, 2010 with the Soli Deo Gloria Award from
Bishop Roy Riley of the New Jersey Synod of the ELCA looked
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP), hon-
from the outside, speaking on “Seminary Education: What the
oring the Allentown, Pennsylvania, couple for their decades of serv-
Church Expects?” Special lectures included “Theological Educa-
ice to the church and seminary. The award is presented annually to
tion in a Globalized World,“ the annual Hein-Fry Lecture, “Hear-
pay tribute to donors and friends of the seminary.
ing the Word: Lutherans Read the Bible with the Ecumenical
Dr. Weiss served for 13 years as Bishop of the Northeastern
World,” that addressed global perspectives, and Lutheran World
Pennsylvania Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Amer-
Relief CEO and President The Rev. Dr. John Nunes was joined by Pamela Peterson Taryn Montgomery Altressa Boatright ica, and for many years as a seminary trustee. Mary Anne Weiss has
LTSP students for the O. Frederick Nolde lecture, which addresses
been involved in decades of volunteer and church service in the
human rights issues. The students had participated during 2010 in
Lehigh Valley and beyond.
the Nolde Seminar, which alternates years with the Lecture.
In expressing thanks for the award at the annual Advent Vespers
Looking toward the future, the Board of Trustees and faculty,
Lutheran World Relief CEO and Pres- Hein-Fry lecturer Dr. Suneel Bhanu,
dinner, Mary Anne Weiss encouraged support for the seminary, not-
staff, and students have reflected on the issues as part of a continuing
ident The Rev. Dr. John Nunes was Moderator/Bishop of the largest ing in her experience “that the congregations that do well have the
joined by LTSP students for the O. Lutheran church body in India, The conversation to keep LTSP a seminary that remains at the forefront
Frederick Nolde lecture Andhra Evangelical Lutheran Church best-trained pastors and best-prepared lay leaders.” She urged the
of theological education that will serve the church long into the future.
laity in the audience to “take advantage of the opportunities before
Tiffany Chaney Colleen Hetrick Ben Siebert them to minister.”
ACADEMIC YEAR THEME: A COLLECTION WEB EXTRA!
W Harold Weiss recalled the names of influential mentors, such as
“Theological Education in the Changed Context of the Church STUDENT ACADEMIC AWARDS Professors Martin Heinecken and Ted Doberstein. He also acknowl-
Recordings of these programs can be viewed online at
and Society” was the theme for a series of convocations featuring LTSP is proud of the academic achievements of its outstanding edged the late Wilson Touhsaent, who preceded him as synodical
Ltsp.edu/ChangedContext.
LTSP faculty and guest presenters, all exploring curricular implica- students, who are fine examples of the seminary’s mission of prepar- bishop, and others. “Thanks for this honor,” Weiss said. “It is mean-
tions of the changes underway in theological education. Change is ing ordained and lay ministers of the Word as leaders for the mission ingful to us beyond words. As the name of the award says, the glory
more perceptible with regard to the gender, age, and racial/ethnic of the church in the world. LTSP awards a number of scholarships for an award like this is really God’s alone. While the spotlight
composition of faculty, staff and students. Patterns of seminary at- DISTANCE LEARNING OFFERINGS shines on us tonight, I hope you will see this as an occasion where
for academic achievement presented at selected fall and spring con-
tendance, academic schedule and the structure of the curricula are LTSP is working with Lancaster Theological Seminary to vocations each academic year. The Rev. Dr. J. Paul Rajashekar, semi- the floodlight shines on all around us who minister well and sup-
undergoing change. With the advent of computers, Internet and develop a distance learning program that will offer courses for nary dean, presented awards to the following students, listed with port the seminary and the church.”
modern technology, new and creative modes of delivery of educa- students who are interested in a seminary education but not the award they received: Learn more about Harold and Mary Anne Weiss and their exemplary
tion have been developed. Students have exhibited diverse motiva- able to move to campus full time or commute to campus for
Evan Davis — Paul J. Hoh/Elizabeth Reed Award leadership and service to the church and the seminary online at
tions and vocational aspirations. Degrees have multiplied, classes. These courses will also offer an opportunity for those Ltsp.edu/SoliDeoGloria2010.
theological disciplines have become specialized and sources of fi- who are drawn to theological learning, looking to “test the Samantha Drennan — Traci L. Maul Award
nancial support have shifted. The cost of theological education, waters” but not sure if a full masters program is right for them. Julie Recher — Karl Elser Wurster Memorial Award
dwindling support from denominations, debt load of students, The schools are designing a full first year of courses leading to Pamela Peterson — The Dr. LeRoy Aden Scholarship
pressure to reduce duration requirements, have all raised serious the Master of Divinity with courses offered by both Philadel- in Pastoral Care
questions about the quality and sustainability of seminary educa- phia and Lancaster that will meet degree requirements and
tion over the long haul. Taryn Montgomery — The Atonement Lutheran Church
with credits that will be accepted for either school’s degree
These changes to some extent reflect societal changes that have of Asbury Park, New Jersey, Preaching Award
program.
impacted the church. The social location of the church and the LTSP will continue to offer selected distance learning and Altressa Boatright and Tiffany Chaney — The Rev. Dr. Joseph
long-stand privileges the culture had extended to Christian intensive courses on both the first professional (Master of Di- Q. Jackson Endowed Scholarship Award for UTI students
churches have now diminished. The religious landscape of our soci- vinity and Master of Arts in Religion) that have been success- Colleen Hetrick — The Dr. and Mrs. William Reifsnyder
ety has undergone change. The face of Christianity too has fully presented for a number of years, with the new course Leadership for Mission Award
changed due to immigration and migration of people. Mainline de- program taking advantage of the latest pedagogical advances in Ben Siebert — The Roy L. Winters and Sarah Stober
nominations have experienced significant decline in membership. teaching and learning is a distance learning environment. Winters Scholarship
Denominations and denominational identity have weakened. In
short the ecology of theological education has changed and will More information, including fees and admission resources, can
More details and photos of the awardees can be found online at
be found online at Ltsp.edu/DistanceLearning.
Ltsp.edu/scholarship-awardees.

4 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu 5


Sharing the Public and
Private Witness
of
Henry Melchior

Muhlenberg
HENRY MELCHIOR MUHLENBERG WAS AN IMMIGRANT who set foot in Philadelphia on November
Thanks to the dedication of Drs. Kurt Wengert let us hear the heartbeat of this almanac for the German colonists living
25, 1742. He had his clothes, some books, and a letter that spelled out a three year term-call to three small Lutheran Aland and Hermann Wellenreuther, who immigrant pastor who worked at securing along the eastern seaboard. All this Muh-
congregations located in Philadelphia, New Hanover, and Trappe. The term-call expired in 1745, but he remained in worked while Germany was being lead to the American Lutheran church on solid lenberg did not for his glorification but, as
reunification, the 1,043 letters that sur- legal, financial, and doctrinal foundations. he stated in a letter dated December 20,
Pennsylvania. He married and built a home for his family and established a church that welcomed thousands of German immigrants
vived were released in five massive volumes Thanks to their diligence, we experience 1764, “for the glory of God [and] for the
who left their families and the familiar to begin a new life in British North America. between 1986 and 2002. the tensions Muhlenberg faced as he strug- good of our Evangelical [Lutheran]
The task of translating the Correspon- gled to bridge the growing gap between Church in this western wilderness.”
Planting the church in this new environ- about by the French and Indian War (1756- The Journals and Correspondence dence into English began in the late 1980s identities that were becoming conflicted: As we, the spiritual descendants of
ment, however, was no easy task. Although 63) and the American Revolution (1775-83). of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg with Drs. John Kleiner in Canada and Hel- German missionary and American cleric, Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, prepare to
Muhlenberg arrived with a wealth of Old The external scaffolding emerged after Muhlenberg documented his forty-five mut Lehmann at LTSP working on the let- British subject and Pennsylvania citizen, celebrate the 300th Anniversary of his
World pastoral experience, he was not pre- years of ministry to a population that was years of public ministry in his Journals and ters exchanged during the first decade of provider for his family and pastor to thou- birth on September 6, 2011, we are fortu-
pared for Pennsylvania’s religious pluralism very mobile, when immigration was ongo- Correspondence that he sent to advisors in Muhlenberg’s public ministry (1740- sands scattered across several colonies. nate to have the Journals and now an im-
or its religious freedom in which the gov- ing, and the church’s mission and authority Europe and left with his family in Pennsyl- 1752). By 1997, Picton Press had pub- While it’s tempting to venerate Muhlen- portant portion of the Correspondence in
ernment had no role in the administration had to be redefined for the American con- vania. After the original handwritten vol- lished 127 letters in two volumes along berg as a “Christian superhero,” it is in the English. These essential resources let us
of the church, and congregational issues text. With no blueprint or instruction umes of the Journals that had survived were with the footnotes of its editors who iden- letters written during the French and In- journey with this immigrant cleric who
were decided by the majority vote of its manual to guide him, Muhlenberg moved assembled at LTSP, Drs. John W. Dober- tified the individuals, issues, and places for dian War that we see him dealing with a planted a church in the American colonial
members. slowly and shared his thoughts and con- stein and Theodore G. Tappert translated the English reading public. mid-life crisis, the shortcomings of his pas- context, transforming its mission and au-
Yet he survived, and at the time of his cerns by corresponding with colleagues them into English. The Muhlenberg Press But this was only the beginning. The ef- toral colleagues, and the emotional drain thority to meet the needs of a mobile pop-
death (1787) had established a network of here and in Europe. In the reflections that released their edition of three volumes be- forts of Drs. Wolfgang Splitter in Halle, caused by an ongoing conflict in the Ger- ulation while embracing ongoing
Lutheran congregations along the eastern follow, faculty and friends of The Lutheran tween 1942 and 1958, and an abridged Germany, and Timothy Wengert at LTSP mantown congregation. immigration. Since we face similar issues
seaboard that were linked by the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia edition in 1959. Fortress Press reprinted have given us Volumes 3 and 4, an English We feel him mourning the loss of family today, Muhlenberg and his missionary
Confessions, a liturgy, a hymnal, as well as (LTSP) who have read Muhlenberg’s Cor- the abridged edition in 1998. Yet without translation of the 121 letters written by or and friends in Germany and the brutal ministry remain relevant and have something
a congregational and synodical constitu- respondence will share their insights on how Muhlenberg’s Correspondence, the picture sent to Muhlenberg during the second massacre of German settlers on the Penn- to say to us in the twenty-first century.✛
tion. This “external scaffolding,” as he they see him engaging people and the issues of this colonial cleric remained incomplete. decade of his pastorate (1753-1762), the sylvania frontier. When he is able to re-
called it, enabled the Lutheran Church to of the day. Working with the Correspondence was On the following pages, LTSP faculty and
years of the French and Indian War. Care- gain some perspective, he plans for the
move with the expanding frontier, interact complicated since the letters were distrib- an alumnus reflect on the Muhlenberg
fully navigating the complexities of future and thinks about establishing a
with the English-speaking host society, and uted in the United States, England, and letters, demonstrating their relevance to
baroque German sentences that can easily school, an orphanage, and a publishing
weather the seismic political shifts brought post-World War II divided Germany. today’s society.
stretch over twenty lines, Drs. Splitter and house that will print a newspaper and

6 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu 7
Sharing the Public and
Private Witness
of
Henry Melchior

Muhlenberg
HENRY MELCHIOR MUHLENBERG WAS AN IMMIGRANT who set foot in Philadelphia on November Thanks to the dedication of Drs. Kurt immigrant pastor who worked at securing lenberg did not for his glorification but, as
Aland and Hermann Wellenreuther, who the American Lutheran church on solid he stated in a letter dated December 20,
25, 1742. He had his clothes, some books, and a letter that spelled out a three year term-call to three small Lutheran worked while Germany was being lead to legal, financial, and doctrinal foundations. 1764, “for the glory of God [and] for the
congregations located in Philadelphia, New Hanover, and Trappe. The term-call expired in 1745, but he remained in reunification, the 1,043 letters that sur- Thanks to their diligence, we experience good of our Evangelical [Lutheran]
Pennsylvania. He married and built a home for his family and established a church that welcomed thousands of German immigrants vived were released in five massive volumes the tensions Muhlenberg faced as he strug- Church in this western wilderness.”
between 1986 and 2002. gled to bridge the growing gap between As we, the spiritual descendants of
who left their families and the familiar to begin a new life in British North America. The task of translating the Correspon- identities that were becoming conflicted: Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, prepare to
dence into English began in the late 1980s German missionary and American cleric, celebrate the 300th Anniversary of his
Planting the church in this new environ- about by the French and Indian War (1756- The Journals and Correspondence with Drs. John Kleiner in Canada and Hel- British subject and Pennsylvania citizen, birth on September 6, 2011, we are fortu-
ment, however, was no easy task. Although 63) and the American Revolution (1775-83). of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg
mut Lehmann at LTSP working on the let- provider for his family and pastor to thou- nate to have the Journals and now an im-
Muhlenberg arrived with a wealth of Old The external scaffolding emerged after Muhlenberg documented his forty-five ters exchanged during the first decade of sands scattered across several colonies. portant portion of the Correspondence in
World pastoral experience, he was not pre- years of ministry to a population that was years of public ministry in his Journals and Muhlenberg’s public ministry (1740- While it’s tempting to venerate Muhlen- English. These essential resources let us
pared for Pennsylvania’s religious pluralism very mobile, when immigration was ongo- Correspondence that he sent to advisors in 1752). By 1997, Picton Press had pub- berg as a “Christian superhero,” it is in the journey with this immigrant cleric who
or its religious freedom in which the gov- ing, and the church’s mission and authority Europe and left with his family in Pennsyl- lished 127 letters in two volumes along letters written during the French and In- planted a church in the American colonial
ernment had no role in the administration had to be redefined for the American con- vania. After the original handwritten vol- with the footnotes of its editors who iden- dian War that we see him dealing with a context, transforming its mission and au-
of the church, and congregational issues text. With no blueprint or instruction umes of the Journals that had survived were tified the individuals, issues, and places for mid-life crisis, the shortcomings of his pas- thority to meet the needs of a mobile pop-
were decided by the majority vote of its manual to guide him, Muhlenberg moved assembled at LTSP, Drs. John W. Dober- the English reading public. toral colleagues, and the emotional drain ulation while embracing ongoing
members. slowly and shared his thoughts and con- stein and Theodore G. Tappert translated But this was only the beginning. The ef- caused by an ongoing conflict in the Ger- immigration. Since we face similar issues
Yet he survived, and at the time of his cerns by corresponding with colleagues them into English. The Muhlenberg Press forts of Drs. Wolfgang Splitter in Halle, mantown congregation. today, Muhlenberg and his missionary
death (1787) had established a network of here and in Europe. In the reflections that released their edition of three volumes be- Germany, and Timothy Wengert at LTSP We feel him mourning the loss of family ministry remain relevant and have something
Lutheran congregations along the eastern follow, faculty and friends of The Lutheran tween 1942 and 1958, and an abridged have given us Volumes 3 and 4, an English and friends in Germany and the brutal to say to us in the twenty-first century.✛
seaboard that were linked by the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia edition in 1959. Fortress Press reprinted translation of the 121 letters written by or massacre of German settlers on the Penn-
Confessions, a liturgy, a hymnal, as well as (LTSP) who have read Muhlenberg’s Cor- — The Rev. Dr. Karl Krueger is Director of
the abridged edition in 1998. Yet without sent to Muhlenberg during the second sylvania frontier. When he is able to re-
a congregational and synodical constitu- respondence will share their insights on how the Krauth Memorial Library and Associate
Muhlenberg’s Correspondence, the picture decade of his pastorate (1753-1762), the gain some perspective, he plans for the
tion. This “external scaffolding,” as he they see him engaging people and the issues Professor of the History of Christianity.
of this colonial cleric remained incomplete. years of the French and Indian War. Care- future and thinks about establishing a
called it, enabled the Lutheran Church to of the day. Working with the Correspondence was fully navigating the complexities of school, an orphanage, and a publishing On the following pages, LTSP faculty and
move with the expanding frontier, interact complicated since the letters were distrib- baroque German sentences that can easily house that will print a newspaper and an alumnus reflect on the Muhlenberg
with the English-speaking host society, and uted in the United States, England, and stretch over twenty lines, Drs. Splitter and almanac for the German colonists living letters, demonstrating their relevance to
weather the seismic political shifts brought post-World War II divided Germany. Wengert let us hear the heartbeat of this along the eastern seaboard. All this Muh- today’s society.

6 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu 7
Queen Anne of England

1711
Sept. 6 Henry

1719
Melchior Muhlenberg died. Succeeded in
1707

1722
Handel appointed the The Moravian
England, Scotland, and (HMM) born in August by George, the

1713
Queen Anne’s War director of Royal settlement Herrnhut
Wales are combined into Einbeck, Germany. Elector of Hanover.
Academy of Music,

1716
ends with the Treaty founded in Saxony by

1726
1720
the United Kingdom of Crowned King George I, Peter the Great, Czar of Peter I proclaimed

1718
of Utrecht William Penn dies. London. Count Zinzendorf.
Great Britain by the Act Last execution for King of Great Britain, Russia, visits Europe for Wallpaper becomes Emperor of All the G.F. Handel becomes
of Union. witchcraft in England. Ireland, and the Colonies. the second time. fashionable in England. Russias. a British subject.
1707 1726

1712

1714
1710
The British Parliament Carolina colony is Karl Philipp Emanuel England declares Daniel Defoe published First serialization of J.S. Bach composes The J.S. Bach appointed
passes the Post Office officially divided into Bach, J.S. Bach’s second war on Spain. Robinson Crusoe. novels in newspapers. Brandenburg Concertos. cantor of St. Thomas
Act that creates a postal North Carolina and son is born. George I, King of after Georg Philipp

1723
1715
system in the American South Carolina. England and Elector New Orleans Telemann refuses
colonies. Is controlled by of Hanover, opens founded by the the post.

1721
the postmaster general Future Frederick the Parliament. French.
of London and his deputy Great of Prussia born.
in New York City.

For Amanda Bernecker, Muhlenberg


heritage is “a personal thing, part of
who I am”
Five generations of Amanda Joy Bernecker’s German-heritage
Lutheran family are still alive as of this writing, so it is no wonder that
Bernecker feels a kinship with North American Lutheran Patriarch
COMMUNITY
For the last six years, my research has taken me up and
down Germantown Avenue in Philadelphia countless times on
share urban space. Pastor Muhlenberg was himself amazed with the
religious diversity. In a letter to Johann Georg Bruchholtz Provi-
prise. Those of European descent no longer predominate — today
much of Germantown Avenue runs through neighborhoods that
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg. dence, (12 Sept 1753) he wrote: are solidly African American. With each census, there has been an
foot, by bus, or by car. As I have gotten to know the many congre-
“The Muhlenberg name was one
gations along the 8.5 miles once known as The Great Road — from “The privilege of freedom of conscience is the reason for all the increasing numbers of the poor as well. Although the Great Road
that I heard since childhood,” Ber-
grand historic churches to small storefront congregations — I have different kinds of religions being practiced here. The free inhabi- goes through the most affluent neighborhoods of Philadelphia, it
necker said. The 23-year-old is a first-
year seminarian at The Lutheran wondered how an earlier traveler along this same route would expe- tants and indentured servants consist of English, Irish, Scots, also goes through the poorest. The legacy of slavery and discrimina-
Theological Seminary at Philadelphia. rience it now. Swedes, French, Dutch, Germans, the local yellow Indians and tion is reflected in the ongoing economic struggle of so many
“Henry Muhlenberg had a huge influ- Henry Melchior Muhlenberg knew Germantown Avenue all too black Africans. They are so-called Quakers, Anglicans, Presbyteri- African Americans in Philadelphia. Muhlenberg occasionally re-
ence on us as modern-day Lutherans,” well. In serving the newly-planted congregations in Philadelphia, ans, Mennonites, Saturday and Sunday Anabaptists, Separatists, ported on the presence of slavery without flinching, such as when
Bernecker added. “Without his ministry Germantown, Providence, and New Hanover, he made the arduous Schwenckfelders, Zinzendorfers, Roman Catholics, Reformed, pastors would be provided with parsonage and slaves. There cer-
to German immigrants in colonial East- Lutherans.” tainly was theological discussion about the sinfulness of slavery he
34 mile trek countless times. Constant travel on the muddy and
ern Pennsylvania, we wouldn’t be here Without editorial comment, he goes on to note that the “so- would have no doubt heard about. In 1688 the first faith-based
rutted road wearied him: “riding all the time ... saps my physical
today as the kind of community of faith
and spiritual energies” (#184 2/27/59). We still complain about called” Quakers had both male and female preachers. statement against slavery was developed and signed on German-
we are.”
the potholes on the Avenue, which would not come as a surprise to Of course, the religious pluralism along Germantown Avenue town Avenue by some of his Mennonite and Quaker neighbors.
Bernecker grew up in Good Shep-
herd Lutheran Church in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Because of her Muhlenberg. Earlier in my career students revolted when I decided and throughout the city has continued. Anabaptists are no longer Despite this blind spot, Pastor Muhlenberg had a heart for the
German heritage, she said simply that “the Muhlenberg legacy is not to teach a required course at St. Michael’s Lutheran Church; they divided along Saturday/Sunday groups but now there are all man- poor. In the same letter to Johann Bruchholtz in 1753 he wrote:
only a Lutheran legacy, but it is a personal legacy for me. It’s part of feared the three quarter-mile trip along Germantown Avenue ner of Baptists along the Avenue, accounting for about half of the “We wish to set up schools and institutions for the poor, for we
who I am.” It didn’t hurt that Bernecker got an expanded view of the would ruin the chassis of their cars. Despite its perennial ruts and congregations. There are ten more Mainline Protestant churches have learned from experience that building the kingdom of God
legacy by attending Muhlenberg College. She graduated in 2010, hav- potholes, however, people have been drawn to worship God along now as Methodists, Episcopalians, and Congregationalists joined must begin vigorously with the poor, abandoned and numerous
ing majored in psychology with a minor in women’s studies. the Lutherans and Presbyterians on Germantown Avenue. New im- youth ... There are an immense number of poor widows and or-
the Avenue for over 350 years.
Bernecker’s decision to attend seminary is a testimony to the differ- migrants have continued to plant congregations; although their ac- phans and other children of many nations in Philadelphia and
As often as I travel along the Belgian blocks and trolley tracks of
ence a congregation can make in a young person’s faith formation.
the Avenue, I marvel how it is constantly changing. Each trip brings cents are Spanish, rather than German, they have the same Germantown.”
Both of her parents taught Sunday School at Good Shepherd and
a new discovery — a new church opens, a business is closing, a lot is challenges of adjusting to a new context and the same congrega- Some days as I walk along Germantown Avenue, taking in the
served as youth advisors. Amanda sang in the children’s and adult
choirs. She has served on the Christian Education Committee, and being developed, another language is being spoken by pedestrians. tional tensions around language that Muhlenberg encountered. But changes and the challenges, I wonder what Henry Melchior Muh-
after she was confirmed was appointed to congregation council. Would decades of change make the Avenue unrecognizable to the current religious pluralism along the route he knew so well lenberg would make of all this. He might be surprised by the prolif-
“The church feels like family to me,” she said. “I’ve always felt en- Henry? would amaze him. Pentecostal, Black Hebrew, Hurleyite, and eration of religious groups and grieved by the spread of poverty.
couraged by members of the congregation.” Pastors Peter Kuritz and Certainly, many of the ecclesial neighbors to St. Michael’s which Apostolic congregations would have been beyond his imagining, But perhaps he would be heartened that the Lutherans at St.
Janell Wigen have been mentors to Bernecker. “I’ve had conversations he constantly passed are still standing and have congregations not to mention the two Muslim masjids. The Roman Catholic Michael’s are not embroiled in a boisterous church fight but are
with Pastor Wigen about discernment because we have worked church on Germantown and Hunting Park was razed in recent feeding the poor, that those at Trinity and Christ Ascension
which have continued since Muhlenberg’s day, including Mennon-
closely together in the areas of education and youth ministry,” Ber- years by a mega church, whose yellow brick modern structure re- Lutheran churches have particular ministries with children, and we
ite (founded in 1683), Quaker (1690), and Brethren (1723) meet-
necker said. Pastor Wigen’s ministry helped to confirm Bernecker’s
ing houses, and the old Reformed church on Market Square (1733) placed the grey Gothic structure. This is one of three megachurches here at LTSP, under the very shadow of his statue, are forming lead-
confidence in serving as a female pastor.
where both Muhlenberg and George Whitfield preached. German- on Germantown Avenue, different in theology and liturgy than ers who understand that “building up the kingdom of God must
At Muhlenberg, Bernecker was profoundly influenced by volunteer-
ing at the college’s Institute for Jewish-Christian Understanding. The town Avenue was becoming an ecumenical corridor in William what Muhlenberg was used to, but growing out of the same soil of begin vigorously with the poor …”
program focuses on encouraging interfaith dialogue. Penn’s Holy Experiment of religious pluralism. Those who had religious tolerance and the need for city folk to find meaning in in- The Rev. Dr. Katie Day is The Charles A. Scheiren Professor, Church
She explained churches in a global context cannot afford to be iso- come from mono-religious territories in Europe, or even areas in creasingly complex urban life. and Society and Director, Metropolitan/Urban Concentration.
lated within their communities. “They need to dialogue and work for which Anabaptists, Reformed, and Lutheran communities were Muhlenberg’s correspondence reflects his awareness of Negroes,
understanding with people of other faiths in their communities. hostile, if not outright persecuting each other, were now learning to but the demographic shifts since would probably catch him by sur-
Churches that remain isolated will fail.”

8 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu 9
Queen Anne of England

1711
Sept. 6 Henry

1719
Melchior Muhlenberg died. Succeeded in
1707

1722
Handel appointed the The Moravian
England, Scotland, and (HMM) born in August by George, the

1713
Queen Anne’s War director of Royal settlement Herrnhut
Wales are combined into Einbeck, Germany. Elector of Hanover.
Academy of Music,

1716
ends with the Treaty founded in Saxony by

1726
1720
the United Kingdom of Crowned King George I, Peter the Great, Czar of Peter I proclaimed

1718
of Utrecht William Penn dies. London. Count Zinzendorf.
Great Britain by the Act Last execution for King of Great Britain, Russia, visits Europe for Wallpaper becomes Emperor of All the G.F. Handel becomes
of Union. witchcraft in England. Ireland, and the Colonies. the second time. fashionable in England. Russias. a British subject.
1707 1726

1712

1714
1710
The British Parliament Carolina colony is Karl Philipp Emanuel England declares Daniel Defoe published First serialization of J.S. Bach composes The J.S. Bach appointed
passes the Post Office officially divided into Bach, J.S. Bach’s second war on Spain. Robinson Crusoe. novels in newspapers. Brandenburg Concertos. cantor of St. Thomas
Act that creates a postal North Carolina and son is born. George I, King of after Georg Philipp

1723
1715
system in the American South Carolina. England and Elector New Orleans Telemann refuses
colonies. Is controlled by of Hanover, opens founded by the the post.

1721
the postmaster general Future Frederick the Parliament. French.
of London and his deputy Great of Prussia born.
in New York City.

For Amanda Bernecker, Muhlenberg


heritage is “a personal thing, part of
who I am”
Five generations of Amanda Joy Bernecker’s German-heritage
Lutheran family are still alive as of this writing, so it is no wonder that
Bernecker feels a kinship with North American Lutheran Patriarch
COMMUNITY
For the last six years, my research has taken me up and
down Germantown Avenue in Philadelphia countless times on
share urban space. Pastor Muhlenberg was himself amazed with the
religious diversity. In a letter to Johann Georg Bruchholtz Provi-
prise. Those of European descent no longer predominate — today
much of Germantown Avenue runs through neighborhoods that
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg. dence, (12 Sept 1753) he wrote: are solidly African American. With each census, there has been an
foot, by bus, or by car. As I have gotten to know the many congre-
“The Muhlenberg name was one
gations along the 8.5 miles once known as The Great Road — from “The privilege of freedom of conscience is the reason for all the increasing numbers of the poor as well. Although the Great Road
that I heard since childhood,” Ber-
grand historic churches to small storefront congregations — I have different kinds of religions being practiced here. The free inhabi- goes through the most affluent neighborhoods of Philadelphia, it
necker said. The 23-year-old is a first-
year seminarian at The Lutheran wondered how an earlier traveler along this same route would expe- tants and indentured servants consist of English, Irish, Scots, also goes through the poorest. The legacy of slavery and discrimina-
Theological Seminary at Philadelphia. rience it now. Swedes, French, Dutch, Germans, the local yellow Indians and tion is reflected in the ongoing economic struggle of so many
“Henry Muhlenberg had a huge influ- Henry Melchior Muhlenberg knew Germantown Avenue all too black Africans. They are so-called Quakers, Anglicans, Presbyteri- African Americans in Philadelphia. Muhlenberg occasionally re-
ence on us as modern-day Lutherans,” well. In serving the newly-planted congregations in Philadelphia, ans, Mennonites, Saturday and Sunday Anabaptists, Separatists, ported on the presence of slavery without flinching, such as when
Bernecker added. “Without his ministry Germantown, Providence, and New Hanover, he made the arduous Schwenckfelders, Zinzendorfers, Roman Catholics, Reformed, pastors would be provided with parsonage and slaves. There cer-
to German immigrants in colonial East- Lutherans.” tainly was theological discussion about the sinfulness of slavery he
34 mile trek countless times. Constant travel on the muddy and
ern Pennsylvania, we wouldn’t be here Without editorial comment, he goes on to note that the “so- would have no doubt heard about. In 1688 the first faith-based
rutted road wearied him: “riding all the time ... saps my physical
today as the kind of community of faith
and spiritual energies” (#184 2/27/59). We still complain about called” Quakers had both male and female preachers. statement against slavery was developed and signed on German-
we are.”
the potholes on the Avenue, which would not come as a surprise to Of course, the religious pluralism along Germantown Avenue town Avenue by some of his Mennonite and Quaker neighbors.
Bernecker grew up in Good Shep-
herd Lutheran Church in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Because of her Muhlenberg. Earlier in my career students revolted when I decided and throughout the city has continued. Anabaptists are no longer Despite this blind spot, Pastor Muhlenberg had a heart for the
German heritage, she said simply that “the Muhlenberg legacy is not to teach a required course at St. Michael’s Lutheran Church; they divided along Saturday/Sunday groups but now there are all man- poor. In the same letter to Johann Bruchholtz in 1753 he wrote:
only a Lutheran legacy, but it is a personal legacy for me. It’s part of feared the three quarter-mile trip along Germantown Avenue ner of Baptists along the Avenue, accounting for about half of the “We wish to set up schools and institutions for the poor, for we
who I am.” It didn’t hurt that Bernecker got an expanded view of the would ruin the chassis of their cars. Despite its perennial ruts and congregations. There are ten more Mainline Protestant churches have learned from experience that building the kingdom of God
legacy by attending Muhlenberg College. She graduated in 2010, hav- potholes, however, people have been drawn to worship God along now as Methodists, Episcopalians, and Congregationalists joined must begin vigorously with the poor, abandoned and numerous
ing majored in psychology with a minor in women’s studies. the Lutherans and Presbyterians on Germantown Avenue. New im- youth ... There are an immense number of poor widows and or-
the Avenue for over 350 years.
Bernecker’s decision to attend seminary is a testimony to the differ- migrants have continued to plant congregations; although their ac- phans and other children of many nations in Philadelphia and
As often as I travel along the Belgian blocks and trolley tracks of
ence a congregation can make in a young person’s faith formation.
the Avenue, I marvel how it is constantly changing. Each trip brings cents are Spanish, rather than German, they have the same Germantown.”
Both of her parents taught Sunday School at Good Shepherd and
a new discovery — a new church opens, a business is closing, a lot is challenges of adjusting to a new context and the same congrega- Some days as I walk along Germantown Avenue, taking in the
served as youth advisors. Amanda sang in the children’s and adult
choirs. She has served on the Christian Education Committee, and being developed, another language is being spoken by pedestrians. tional tensions around language that Muhlenberg encountered. But changes and the challenges, I wonder what Henry Melchior Muh-
after she was confirmed was appointed to congregation council. Would decades of change make the Avenue unrecognizable to the current religious pluralism along the route he knew so well lenberg would make of all this. He might be surprised by the prolif-
“The church feels like family to me,” she said. “I’ve always felt en- Henry? would amaze him. Pentecostal, Black Hebrew, Hurleyite, and eration of religious groups and grieved by the spread of poverty.
couraged by members of the congregation.” Pastors Peter Kuritz and Certainly, many of the ecclesial neighbors to St. Michael’s which Apostolic congregations would have been beyond his imagining, But perhaps he would be heartened that the Lutherans at St.
Janell Wigen have been mentors to Bernecker. “I’ve had conversations he constantly passed are still standing and have congregations not to mention the two Muslim masjids. The Roman Catholic Michael’s are not embroiled in a boisterous church fight but are
with Pastor Wigen about discernment because we have worked church on Germantown and Hunting Park was razed in recent feeding the poor, that those at Trinity and Christ Ascension
which have continued since Muhlenberg’s day, including Mennon-
closely together in the areas of education and youth ministry,” Ber- years by a mega church, whose yellow brick modern structure re- Lutheran churches have particular ministries with children, and we
ite (founded in 1683), Quaker (1690), and Brethren (1723) meet-
necker said. Pastor Wigen’s ministry helped to confirm Bernecker’s
ing houses, and the old Reformed church on Market Square (1733) placed the grey Gothic structure. This is one of three megachurches here at LTSP, under the very shadow of his statue, are forming lead-
confidence in serving as a female pastor.
where both Muhlenberg and George Whitfield preached. German- on Germantown Avenue, different in theology and liturgy than ers who understand that “building up the kingdom of God must
At Muhlenberg, Bernecker was profoundly influenced by volunteer-
ing at the college’s Institute for Jewish-Christian Understanding. The town Avenue was becoming an ecumenical corridor in William what Muhlenberg was used to, but growing out of the same soil of begin vigorously with the poor …”
program focuses on encouraging interfaith dialogue. Penn’s Holy Experiment of religious pluralism. Those who had religious tolerance and the need for city folk to find meaning in in- The Rev. Dr. Katie Day is The Charles A. Scheiren Professor, Church
She explained churches in a global context cannot afford to be iso- come from mono-religious territories in Europe, or even areas in creasingly complex urban life. and Society and Director, Metropolitan/Urban Concentration.
lated within their communities. “They need to dialogue and work for which Anabaptists, Reformed, and Lutheran communities were Muhlenberg’s correspondence reflects his awareness of Negroes,
understanding with people of other faiths in their communities. hostile, if not outright persecuting each other, were now learning to but the demographic shifts since would probably catch him by sur-
Churches that remain isolated will fail.”

8 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu 9
Spain seizes Gibraltar, April 5 HMM

1741

1743
Frederick captures April 15 Cornerstone
1727
England and Spain at war. King Frederick William I May HMM relocates leaves Hannover.
Jan. 26 Pr. Brunnholtz laid for St. Michael’s in

1736
of Prussia settles 12,000 to Halle, Germany. July HMM called Silesia from Maria April 16 HMM

17299
King George I of England Salzburg Lutherans in as pastor in Theresa. arrives in England. and seminarians Kurtz Germantown.

1740
Grosshennersdorf. Thomas Jefferson born.

1738
dies and is succeeded by Ducal Prussia. Future King George III, University of Sept. 23 HMM arrives and Schaum arrive in
his son, George II. March 19 HMM grandson of George II, Pennsylvania founded. Sept. 6 HMM in Charleston, SC. Philadelphia from Halle.

1731

1733
Ben Franklin publishes The First public library Ephrata Cloister James Oglethorpe 8,000 Salzburg becomes student at the is born. First of the Aug. 12 HMM accepted call to the Oct. 2 HMM arrives in April 5 HMM lays the
Quakers demand the Pennsylvania Gazette which becomes founded by Ben Franklin established in founds Savannah, Lutherans settle in newly established HMM starts teaching Hannoverian kings to examined by Leipzig Frederick the Great United Congregations Savannah, GA. cornerstone for St. April 30 HMM marries
abolition of slavery. the most popular colonial newspaper. in Philadelphia. Lancaster, PA. Georgia. Georgia. Göttingen University. school. be born in Britain. Consistory. becomes King of Prussia. in Pennsylvania. Nov. 26 HMM leaves Michael’s in Phila. Anna Maria Weiser.
1727 1746
First American Great Awakening Aug. 24 HMM ordained War of Austrian Dec. 9 HMM preaches Phila. for New Hanover. May 2 HMM lays the Oct. 6 HMM dedicates

1732
J.S. Bach composes the

1734
June 24 Anna Maria George Washington Patrick Henry is born.

1746
synagogue constructed St. Matthew Passion.

1742
Weiser, future wife born. begins in to Ministry of Word Succession begins. farewell sermon in crossing Perkiomen and cornerstone for Augustus Augustus Church in
1728
in New York City. Massachusetts. Paul Revere is born. and Sacrament in St. France and Spain allied Grosshennersdorf. Skippack creeks. Almost Lutheran in Trappe, PA. Trappe. Oct. 1 John Peter

1737

1739
of HMM, is born.

1730
Queen Caroline, wife of Nicholas Church, Leipzig. against Great Britain. drowns. Muhlenberg is born.

1745
American George II of England and Frederick the Great of Jonathan Edwards Nov. 28 HMM preaches HMM Baptizes three
The future General von

1735
Philosophical Society Hanover, dies. Aug. 1739-Dec. 1741 Prussia goes to war preaches “Sinners in the first sermon in America. African Americans in
Steuben is born. Dec. 25 Elders/deacons
founded in HMM Assistant Pastor against Austria. Hands of an Angry God.” Trappe.
Philadelphia. in Gross Hennersdorf. in Trappe and New
Hanover sign HMM’s call.
Dec. 27 Elders/deacons
in Phila. sign call.
IMMIGRATION

Henry Melchior Muhlenberg came to North In 1840, he was commissioned as the first missionary of the Min- Most of the women mentioned in Muhlenberg’s Journals are Pastor Carl Adams: A “three-generation”
America as a missionary to German immigrant communities isterium of Pennsylvania to go to Andrah Pradesh state in India. never named. One of them was, apparently, a fine theologian in
Heyer served in India from 1841-1845, and again from 1847- her own right. According to Muhlenberg, one Sunday he was
seminarian who appreciates Henry
after his theological education and training at the University of
Halle, in what is now Germany. Halle was the most important 1871. When he retired from missionary service, Father Heyer teaching a confirmation class with youth, and the question came Melchior Muhlenberg’s legacy
Pietist mission center of Europe in the eighteenth- and early returned to Philadelphia, where he was the “House Father” for up: will Jews and heathen be damned? The youth answered “yes,” Pastor Carl R. Adams of Wernersville,
nineteenth-centuries. Following the teachings of A.H. Francke, the students at LTSP until his death. and Muhlenberg not surprisingly concurred. The woman, who Pennsylvania, is a three-generation semi-
the school sent missionaries throughout the world. And it is that A portrait of Father Heyer hangs in the Exhibition Hall of overheard this teaching session, questioned her pastor about this narian. A 1958 graduate of Muhlenberg
center of theological education that ties together many commu- The Brossman Center. matter. After reporting on a long exchange between them, Muh- College, he earned his BD from LTSP in
nities throughout the world today. Both Ziegenbalg and Heyer are commemorated together in lenberg reports that the woman concluded: “The Lord will do all 1961, becoming a parish pastor in
the Lutheran Calendar on November 7. things well.” Far from taking offense at this questioning, Muhlen- Moorestown, Pennsylvania. In the 1970s
In 1706, Bartholomäus Ziegenbalg, the first Lutheran Mis-
In 1992 and in 2007, two professors, graduates of the United berg recalled that: “I often use her as a bellwether in the congrega- he earned his Master of Sacred Theology
sionary from Halle, went out to Tranquebar, India. He initiated
from the seminary. Now he’s close to
a long history of successful Lutheran mission work that has re- Theological College in Banglore, in Andhra Pradesh, were called tion. On Sundays when we go over the sermon in questions and
completing his DMin. (He also holds a
sulted in the creation of numerous self-governing, self-support- to serve at LTSP; J. Paul Rajashekar, the Luther D. Reed Profes- answers, she always gives beautiful, intelligent answers, and this sets
Master’s degree in Pastoral Counseling
ing, self-propagating churches and institutions. But more sor of Systematic Theology, and J. Jayakiran Sebastian, the H. a good example for the others.” Here, Muhlenberg’s generosity is from Moravian Seminary.)
importantly, he created a network of associations that have criss- George Anderson Professor of Mission and Cultures. Their ap- clear, as is the presence of a fine female theologian in his congregation. Adams said he felt certain he would
crossed the oceans and the vicissitudes of time by joining Indian pointment to the faculty of LTSP continues the legacy of this Not all of the female congregants at Trappe were so noble, of become a pastor even in his early years.
Christians and American Lutherans in a variety of ways. inter-connected mission history and present reality of a true course. One of them, identified only as “a deacon’s wife,” had par- “I felt my life was really laid out for me. I
A stamp of the Indian government commemorating the three World Christianity of intertwined relationships. From India to ticipated in military actions in Germany (Austrian Empress Maria never really had any doubt about what I would do,” he said. He grew up
the United States, the University of Halle trained pastors and lay Theresa was a famous eighteenth-century woman warrior). Ac- in Moselem Springs in Berks County, just outside of Kutztown. He was
hundredth anniversary of the arrival of Ziegenbalg in India
leaders for service in the church throughout the world. The cording to her pastor, the deacon’s wife “had a martial spirit, lived active at Zion Lutheran Church, Moselem Springs, and in the youth pro-
hangs in the hallway of The Brossman Center at LTSP, as a re-
gram at St. Paul Lutheran Church in nearby Fleetwood.
minder of this important link. legacy of Ziegenbalg and Muhlenberg, who began very successful in a coarse manner, and engaged in all kinds of uncouth, sinful
Adams has spent some time reflecting on the 300th anniversary
The link between India and Pennsylvania goes deeper than missions in very different parts of the world, has now come full circle. practices.” She “always wanted to talk at great length about her war
of the North America ministry of Lutheran Patriarch Henry Melchior
Ziegenbalg and Muhlenberg’s training in Halle, however. Years The Rev. Dr. David D. Grafton is Associate Professor, Islamic experiences,” Muhlenberg reported, “but she was not so fluent Muhlenberg. “What strikes me about Muhlenberg’s ministry is that he
after Henry Melchior Muhlenberg had established the German Studies and Christian-Muslim Relations and Director of when it came to the order of salvation.” Indeed, according to her was charged with planting the church in a new land. And those were the
Lutheran presence in the Mid-Atlantic States, the first mission- Graduate Studies. The Rev. Dr. J. Jayakiran Sebastian, is pastor, some in early Pennsylvania thought the woman, who was same instructions I received when I was first ordained — plant and grow
ary of the Ministerium of Pennsylvania was John Christian Fred- H. George Anderson Professor of Mission and Cultures and physically imposing, was “a witch.” In fact, she became a faithful the church where you serve. That is what I always tried to do.” “Muhlen-
erick Heyer. Heyer studied theology in Philadelphia and served Director of the Multicultural Mission Resource Center. Lutheran. “Toward the end,” Muhlenberg recalled, “she became berg served the young church during times of great turmoil, and that
many years as a missionary on the frontiers of the new Republic.

with quieter and wanted to hear nothing but the great love of Jesus ... was the case for me too as the nation was dealing with the challenges of
Vietnam, racial turmoil, and great change in the 1960s,” he recalled.
“When I was first a student I learned from faculty members consid-

In the eighteenth-century, as now, women consti-


tuted a majority of church-goers. Understandably then, Henry
MINISTRY when he married Anna Maria Weiser, the daughter of a prominent
German citizen of Pennsylvania, Conrad Weiser, in 1745. Oddly,
WOMENShe died, I trust, under His cross ... clothed, out of pure grace in
faith, with the garments of salvation and the cloak of righteousness.”
ered to be giants — Ted Tappert, Martin Heinecken, John Reumann,
William Lazareth, Robert Bornemann. It was a great time for me to learn
and grow. And I’m still blessed to be learning today from fine faculty
members at this school — Timothy Wengert, Wil Gafney, Erik Heen, and
David Grafton.” He credits the newer faculty for helping him with per-
spective about the challenges impacting the modern church, thus en-
abling him to fine-tune his approach to preaching.
Muhlenberg reports in his Journals two different dates for the mar- Dozens of such illuminating interactions dot Muhlenberg’s Through all the changes he has known as a pastor he finds it is
Melchior Muhlenberg’s Journals are replete with accounts of his in-
riage — April 23 and April 30 — thus demonstrating that even a Journals as they marked his life and ministry. Women, then as still critical in this day to be “faithful to our Lutheran identity, defending,
teractions with women — most of which have never been studied
protecting, and proclaiming the Gospel and our Confessions.” He said
by scholars. When Muhlenberg arrived in America in 1742, he was Lutheran patriarch might forget his anniversary. The marriage now, were crucial to every Christian community, and vital to
he is encouraged by emerging church leaders he has met at LTSP during
single. In the early years of his vocation, he wrote, he was “often endured, and Anna Maria gave birth to 11 children, seven of whom successful public leadership.
his most recent study tour, and adds that he thinks what the seminary is
vexed at the great number of people who were concerned about lived to adulthood. Anna’s own gifts for ministry were, Dr. Jon Pahl, is Professor, History of Christianity in North America doing to develop strong leaders is a hopeful sign for the church’s future.
securing my welfare through marriage.” This vexation was solved no doubt, crucial to Henry’s success. and Director of MA Programs.

10 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu 11
Spain seizes Gibraltar, April 5 HMM

1741

1743
Frederick captures April 15 Cornerstone
1727
England and Spain at war. King Frederick William I May HMM relocates leaves Hannover.
Jan. 26 Pr. Brunnholtz laid for St. Michael’s in

1736
of Prussia settles 12,000 to Halle, Germany. July HMM called Silesia from Maria April 16 HMM

17299
King George I of England Salzburg Lutherans in as pastor in Theresa. arrives in England. and seminarians Kurtz Germantown.

1740
Grosshennersdorf. Thomas Jefferson born.

1738
dies and is succeeded by Ducal Prussia. Future King George III, University of Sept. 23 HMM arrives and Schaum arrive in
his son, George II. March 19 HMM grandson of George II, Pennsylvania founded. Sept. 6 HMM in Charleston, SC. Philadelphia from Halle.

1731

1733
Ben Franklin publishes The First public library Ephrata Cloister James Oglethorpe 8,000 Salzburg becomes student at the is born. First of the Aug. 12 HMM accepted call to the Oct. 2 HMM arrives in April 5 HMM lays the
Quakers demand the Pennsylvania Gazette which becomes founded by Ben Franklin established in founds Savannah, Lutherans settle in newly established HMM starts teaching Hannoverian kings to examined by Leipzig Frederick the Great United Congregations Savannah, GA. cornerstone for St. April 30 HMM marries
abolition of slavery. the most popular colonial newspaper. in Philadelphia. Lancaster, PA. Georgia. Georgia. Göttingen University. school. be born in Britain. Consistory. becomes King of Prussia. in Pennsylvania. Nov. 26 HMM leaves Michael’s in Phila. Anna Maria Weiser.
1727 1746
First American Great Awakening Aug. 24 HMM ordained War of Austrian Dec. 9 HMM preaches Phila. for New Hanover. May 2 HMM lays the Oct. 6 HMM dedicates

1732
J.S. Bach composes the

1734
June 24 Anna Maria George Washington Patrick Henry is born.

1746
synagogue constructed St. Matthew Passion.

1742
Weiser, future wife born. begins in to Ministry of Word Succession begins. farewell sermon in crossing Perkiomen and cornerstone for Augustus Augustus Church in
1728
in New York City. Massachusetts. Paul Revere is born. and Sacrament in St. France and Spain allied Grosshennersdorf. Skippack creeks. Almost Lutheran in Trappe, PA. Trappe. Oct. 1 John Peter

1737

1739
of HMM, is born.

1730
Queen Caroline, wife of Nicholas Church, Leipzig. against Great Britain. drowns. Muhlenberg is born.

1745
American George II of England and Frederick the Great of Jonathan Edwards Nov. 28 HMM preaches HMM Baptizes three
The future General von

1735
Philosophical Society Hanover, dies. Aug. 1739-Dec. 1741 Prussia goes to war preaches “Sinners in the first sermon in America. African Americans in
Steuben is born. Dec. 25 Elders/deacons
founded in HMM Assistant Pastor against Austria. Hands of an Angry God.” Trappe.
Philadelphia. in Gross Hennersdorf. in Trappe and New
Hanover sign HMM’s call.
Dec. 27 Elders/deacons
in Phila. sign call.
IMMIGRATION

Henry Melchior Muhlenberg came to North In 1840, he was commissioned as the first missionary of the Min- Most of the women mentioned in Muhlenberg’s Journals are Pastor Carl Adams: A “three-generation”
America as a missionary to German immigrant communities isterium of Pennsylvania to go to Andrah Pradesh state in India. never named. One of them was, apparently, a fine theologian in
Heyer served in India from 1841-1845, and again from 1847- her own right. According to Muhlenberg, one Sunday he was
seminarian who appreciates Henry
after his theological education and training at the University of
Halle, in what is now Germany. Halle was the most important 1871. When he retired from missionary service, Father Heyer teaching a confirmation class with youth, and the question came Melchior Muhlenberg’s legacy
Pietist mission center of Europe in the eighteenth- and early returned to Philadelphia, where he was the “House Father” for up: will Jews and heathen be damned? The youth answered “yes,” Pastor Carl R. Adams of Wernersville,
nineteenth-centuries. Following the teachings of A.H. Francke, the students at LTSP until his death. and Muhlenberg not surprisingly concurred. The woman, who Pennsylvania, is a three-generation semi-
the school sent missionaries throughout the world. And it is that A portrait of Father Heyer hangs in the Exhibition Hall of overheard this teaching session, questioned her pastor about this narian. A 1958 graduate of Muhlenberg
center of theological education that ties together many commu- The Brossman Center. matter. After reporting on a long exchange between them, Muh- College, he earned his BD from LTSP in
nities throughout the world today. Both Ziegenbalg and Heyer are commemorated together in lenberg reports that the woman concluded: “The Lord will do all 1961, becoming a parish pastor in
the Lutheran Calendar on November 7. things well.” Far from taking offense at this questioning, Muhlen- Moorestown, Pennsylvania. In the 1970s
In 1706, Bartholomäus Ziegenbalg, the first Lutheran Mis-
In 1992 and in 2007, two professors, graduates of the United berg recalled that: “I often use her as a bellwether in the congrega- he earned his Master of Sacred Theology
sionary from Halle, went out to Tranquebar, India. He initiated
from the seminary. Now he’s close to
a long history of successful Lutheran mission work that has re- Theological College in Banglore, in Andhra Pradesh, were called tion. On Sundays when we go over the sermon in questions and
completing his DMin. (He also holds a
sulted in the creation of numerous self-governing, self-support- to serve at LTSP; J. Paul Rajashekar, the Luther D. Reed Profes- answers, she always gives beautiful, intelligent answers, and this sets
Master’s degree in Pastoral Counseling
ing, self-propagating churches and institutions. But more sor of Systematic Theology, and J. Jayakiran Sebastian, the H. a good example for the others.” Here, Muhlenberg’s generosity is from Moravian Seminary.)
importantly, he created a network of associations that have criss- George Anderson Professor of Mission and Cultures. Their ap- clear, as is the presence of a fine female theologian in his congregation. Adams said he felt certain he would
crossed the oceans and the vicissitudes of time by joining Indian pointment to the faculty of LTSP continues the legacy of this Not all of the female congregants at Trappe were so noble, of become a pastor even in his early years.
Christians and American Lutherans in a variety of ways. inter-connected mission history and present reality of a true course. One of them, identified only as “a deacon’s wife,” had par- “I felt my life was really laid out for me. I
A stamp of the Indian government commemorating the three World Christianity of intertwined relationships. From India to ticipated in military actions in Germany (Austrian Empress Maria never really had any doubt about what I would do,” he said. He grew up
the United States, the University of Halle trained pastors and lay Theresa was a famous eighteenth-century woman warrior). Ac- in Moselem Springs in Berks County, just outside of Kutztown. He was
hundredth anniversary of the arrival of Ziegenbalg in India
leaders for service in the church throughout the world. The cording to her pastor, the deacon’s wife “had a martial spirit, lived active at Zion Lutheran Church, Moselem Springs, and in the youth pro-
hangs in the hallway of The Brossman Center at LTSP, as a re-
gram at St. Paul Lutheran Church in nearby Fleetwood.
minder of this important link. legacy of Ziegenbalg and Muhlenberg, who began very successful in a coarse manner, and engaged in all kinds of uncouth, sinful
Adams has spent some time reflecting on the 300th anniversary
The link between India and Pennsylvania goes deeper than missions in very different parts of the world, has now come full circle. practices.” She “always wanted to talk at great length about her war
of the North America ministry of Lutheran Patriarch Henry Melchior
Ziegenbalg and Muhlenberg’s training in Halle, however. Years The Rev. Dr. David D. Grafton is Associate Professor, Islamic experiences,” Muhlenberg reported, “but she was not so fluent Muhlenberg. “What strikes me about Muhlenberg’s ministry is that he
after Henry Melchior Muhlenberg had established the German Studies and Christian-Muslim Relations and Director of when it came to the order of salvation.” Indeed, according to her was charged with planting the church in a new land. And those were the
Lutheran presence in the Mid-Atlantic States, the first mission- Graduate Studies. The Rev. Dr. J. Jayakiran Sebastian, is pastor, some in early Pennsylvania thought the woman, who was same instructions I received when I was first ordained — plant and grow
ary of the Ministerium of Pennsylvania was John Christian Fred- H. George Anderson Professor of Mission and Cultures and physically imposing, was “a witch.” In fact, she became a faithful the church where you serve. That is what I always tried to do.” “Muhlen-
erick Heyer. Heyer studied theology in Philadelphia and served Director of the Multicultural Mission Resource Center. Lutheran. “Toward the end,” Muhlenberg recalled, “she became berg served the young church during times of great turmoil, and that
many years as a missionary on the frontiers of the new Republic.

with quieter and wanted to hear nothing but the great love of Jesus ... was the case for me too as the nation was dealing with the challenges of
Vietnam, racial turmoil, and great change in the 1960s,” he recalled.
“When I was first a student I learned from faculty members consid-

In the eighteenth-century, as now, women consti-


tuted a majority of church-goers. Understandably then, Henry
MINISTRY when he married Anna Maria Weiser, the daughter of a prominent
German citizen of Pennsylvania, Conrad Weiser, in 1745. Oddly,
WOMENShe died, I trust, under His cross ... clothed, out of pure grace in
faith, with the garments of salvation and the cloak of righteousness.”
ered to be giants — Ted Tappert, Martin Heinecken, John Reumann,
William Lazareth, Robert Bornemann. It was a great time for me to learn
and grow. And I’m still blessed to be learning today from fine faculty
members at this school — Timothy Wengert, Wil Gafney, Erik Heen, and
David Grafton.” He credits the newer faculty for helping him with per-
spective about the challenges impacting the modern church, thus en-
abling him to fine-tune his approach to preaching.
Muhlenberg reports in his Journals two different dates for the mar- Dozens of such illuminating interactions dot Muhlenberg’s Through all the changes he has known as a pastor he finds it is
Melchior Muhlenberg’s Journals are replete with accounts of his in-
riage — April 23 and April 30 — thus demonstrating that even a Journals as they marked his life and ministry. Women, then as still critical in this day to be “faithful to our Lutheran identity, defending,
teractions with women — most of which have never been studied
protecting, and proclaiming the Gospel and our Confessions.” He said
by scholars. When Muhlenberg arrived in America in 1742, he was Lutheran patriarch might forget his anniversary. The marriage now, were crucial to every Christian community, and vital to
he is encouraged by emerging church leaders he has met at LTSP during
single. In the early years of his vocation, he wrote, he was “often endured, and Anna Maria gave birth to 11 children, seven of whom successful public leadership.
his most recent study tour, and adds that he thinks what the seminary is
vexed at the great number of people who were concerned about lived to adulthood. Anna’s own gifts for ministry were, Dr. Jon Pahl, is Professor, History of Christianity in North America doing to develop strong leaders is a hopeful sign for the church’s future.
securing my welfare through marriage.” This vexation was solved no doubt, crucial to Henry’s success. and Director of MA Programs.

10 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu 11
July 13 HMM’s Aug. 19 Catharina June 11 cornerstone
Jan. 29 Eva Elizabeth Dec. 20 HMM April 27 HMM’s
King George II father-in-law, Salome Muhlenberg of Zion Church in

1749
wears glasses to

1752
(Betsy) Muhlenberg decrees that Britain, Conrad Weiser, dies. Oct. 29 Muhlenberg sons, John, Gotthilf, (one year and four Philadelphia laid.

1766
read and write.

1751
May 26 HMM and Friedrich, leave

1758
is born Ireland, and the Aug. 10 Rev. Richard family moves to months) dies.

1756
conducts worship for school in Halle.

1762
colonies will begin Peters, an Anglican Philadelphia. Oct. 18 Constitution Repeal of Stamp Act

1764
in English using the Chief Justice William

1760
Aug. 15 Ministerium of using the new priest and Secretary of Zion Church in Quartering Act by King George III.

1754
1747

Dec. 29 HMM’s Pennsylvania and Jan. 2 Friedrich BOOK OF COMMON (Gregorian) calendar. Nov. 17 Gotthilf March HMM says Nov. 4 Mary (Polly) Aug. 21 Johann of Pennsylvania, Haydn appointed Phila., accepted and Allen is their Mozart (age eight) passed that requires Declaratory Act
mother is buried in adjacent States August Muhlenberg PRAYER in New Sept. 3-13 were Heinrich Muhlenberg that he must wear Catharina Muhlenberg Britain declares war Enoch Muhlenberg preached in Trappe Kapellmeister to signed by the chaperone aboard writes his first colonists to house/ established Britain’s
Germany. established in Phila. is born. York City. omitted. is born. glasses all the time. is born. on France. is born. Church. Prince Esterhazy. membership. the ship to England. symphony. feed British soldiers. right to tax colonies.
1747 1766

1761
1757
1753
Peace of Paris ends Feb. 16 Johann

1763
Aug. 14 HMM dedicates J.S. Bach dies Sept. 17 Margaret Oct. 1 St. Michael’s French troops seize King’s College British army June 5 Pr. Brunnholtz George Washington George III becomes Coronation of British Parliament July 13 Maria

1750
(Peggy) Henrietta dies in Philadelphia. the French and Enoch Muhlenberg
1748
St. Michael’s in Phila. in Germantown the Ohio Valley. (future Columbia defeated at Fort and John Forbes King of England, George III. passes Stamp Act. Salome (Sally)

1765
Seminarian Johann Muhlenberg is born. dedicated. University, New Duquesne take Fort Duquesne Ireland, and colonies. Indian War. dies at the age of 6. For the first time, Muhlenberg is born.

1755
Kurtz ordained. York) founded. (Pittsburgh). from the French. He is Prince Elector Oct. 19 George the British colonists
March 12 Organ of Hannover, but Whitefield, one of April 18 Catharina will pay taxes
in St. Michael’s in never visits Germany. the preachers of the Salome Muhlenberg directly to the
Phila. dedicated. Nov. 18 Johann Carl Great Awakening, is born. English instead of
Muhlenberg is born. preaches at St. local legislatures.
Nov. 24 Johann Carl Michael’s in Phila. Oct. 9 Pr. John
Muhlenberg dies. Handschuh dies at
the age of 51.

Tim Ness: LTSP scholar amazed that


Muhlenberg was willing to be pushed
out of his “comfort zone”
Tim Ness, a second year seminarian at CHURCH
LTSP, said he is highly impressed with
the pioneering work Lutheran Patriarch
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg undertook
in Pennsylvania in the mid-1700s.
“I’ve been taking a seminary course
called ‘Lutherans in North America’ and
Woefully underfunded in comparison to other
Reformed, Presbyterian, and Anglican churches, and with far
poorer congregants than the relatively wealthy Mennonite and
Quaker settlers, who often bought Germans off the boats as inden-
tured servants, Muhlenberg was forever begging for money from
FINANCES money … The German Reformed pastors receive part of their
salaries from Holland … We do not mention this from a lack of
Lutherans do not believe in fate but in God’s good providence.
Where Rauss accused the Ministerium of not paying him, Muhlen-
reading Muhlenberg’s Journals,” Ness,
wealthy supporters in Europe and contrasting them to the “mites” faith, mistrust, and vileness but count it among the hindrances berg responded by making his accounting books public and saying
a native of Torrington, Connecticut,
said. “I’m amazed at how he sailed
his people managed to give. Muhlenberg also realized that there to the free discharge of our office.”1 that Rauss had taken financial advantage of him and local congre-
here from Germany and started over as was a corrupting side to the way in which colonial churches were The more things change, the more they remain the same! And gations over the years. Where Rauss claimed that Muhlenberg and
a pastor, without having a really clear forced to finance their work. An especially poignant letter to just when we thought things were rough today! the other pastors had treated him in an unchristian manner, Muh-
idea at first of what he would be doing. Francke and Ziegenhagen from the Ministerium pastors demon- The Rev. Dr. Timothy Wengert is Ministerium of Pennsylvania lenberg said that he had rescued him from indentured servitude,
It seems to me he was pushed out of his comfort zone. That is also the strates this scandal. Professor, Reformation History. educated him for the ministry, and hosted Rauss’ wedding mostly
case with many pastors today. They end up serving in unfamiliar and “With regard to the external circumstances of our colleagues at his own expense.
1
challenging situations.” Ness has no preconceived idea of where he wants and the united pastors, they are resting on shaky foundations. For Correspondence, 3: 86 Rauss also complained that Muhlenberg had said that the
to serve as a parish pastor. “I am willing to be led,” he said with a smile.
the most part we are poor and must live on parishioners’ voluntary Lutheran faith was in error. Searching his memory to think what
Ness tells of growing up in Torrington as a member of one of the
mites. Our extensive official duties require extensive costs for that accusation could have meant, Muhlenberg recalled a conversa-
New England Synod’s largest congregations, St. Paul Lutheran
Church. The idea of coming to seminary first surfaced in high school.
horses, harnesses, and clothing, and the majority of the parish- Around his fiftieth birthday and after nearly 20 tion in which he quoted some of Luther’s colorful words about sin
ioners are poor and want more from us than they are able to give years as a missionary in Pennsylvania, Henry Melchior Muhlenberg in the church (LW 24:205-208). Rauss had missed the point en-
“I was really involved in the church, reading lessons and serving as a
youth leader,” he recalled. “Others around me began to tell me that I back. Many give as much as they can afford, others grow tired of was charged with heresy by a younger colleague, Lukas Rauss. Then tirely. By refuting this charge, Muhlenberg turned the tables and
had gifts to serve as a pastor, and I was resistant.” giving, and if one accepts the well-known proverb, truth gives birth pastor of the Lutheran congregation in York, Rauss accused Muh- showed Rauss as the one with a poor grasp of the Lutheran tradi-
By word of mouth he heard of Muhlenberg College. He visited the to hatred [veritas odium parit], as an empirical truth, it is easy to lenberg and other leaders of unorthodox doctrine and unchristian tion and life in the church militant.
school and liked it. During his college years a variety of experiences imagine that little can be obtained where the truth is not at home. conduct. Although Rauss’ letter of accusation is no longer extant, Muhlenberg’s response shows a willingness to endure hardship
further led him toward the idea of parish ministry. “Pastor Mike Mil- In our opinion, it is a hindrance to the joyful and free discharge of Muhlenberg’s response to the charges has recently been translated for the sake of the church. At the same time, he knew that he had
lum of St. Paul was a true mentor. Muhlenberg’s chaplain, Peter Bred- in the new fourth volume of his correspondence as Letter 216.
our office when pastors have to live completely on the voluntary to defend his name, his colleagues, and his church from defamation
lau, MDiv ’96, spoke with me as well.” Another turning point was his At this point in his life, Muhlenberg had already endured serious
mites of the listeners, not to mention that it causes problems in the and harmful attacks. To do this, he called upon “reason and revela-
immersion experience during college through Project Connect. Project
congregations themselves while giving rise to charges from other quarrels among churches in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New tion,” so that sound logic, public accountability, and good theology
Connect pulls together a variety of young people discerning the possi-
parties. The inexperienced think and say that a pastor is their hired York. From those conflicts he had learned to expect derision and could make his case. In the end, the arbitrators judged in his favor
bility of a call to serve God as a professional church leader.
Ness said he really enjoys being part of the seminary community. servant and needs to hold office like a job for the sake of daily slander simply for having been involved. But he had also learned and asked that Rauss apologize, which he did not do. Letters like
“The faculty really help you engage church doctrine, the creeds, theol- bread and according to their rules. Others think their money or that sometimes “lies, libels, and hypocrisy” need to be confronted these show Muhlenberg’s skill as a theologian and his inspiring
ogy, and the Bible.” Favorite classes so far have included Lutheran gift secures them the privilege of remaining in sin and attending directly. On October 17, 1761, he wrote a long reply to his Swedish endurance as a church leader.
Confessions, Pastoral Theology, and Liturgy. Holy Communion undisturbed; yea, they think they are free to Lutheran colleagues who were to decide the case. He wrote that at
The Rev. Dr. Martin Lohrmann, PhD ’10, translator and
Another highlight of seminary was the first-year experience of visit- hire a new preacher for their money every year and cast out the old such times one needed to heed the advice of Solomon: “Answer
ing congregations on unfamiliar turf. “I recall visiting an African Amer- editorial assistant of The Correspondence of Heinrich Melchior
ones, etc. etc. Moreover, every year fortune-seekers arrive of their fools according to their folly, or they will be wise in their own eyes”
ican congregation in North Philadelphia. I was being pushed out of my Mühlenberg Volumes 3 and 4.
own accord, who join the disgruntled haters of the truth and who (Prov. 26:5). Worried about further damage to himself and the
comfort zone. But what I found was a church filled with people of God
make it as easy for them as they can … The pastors sent from Swe- Ministerium, Muhlenberg called upon his deep knowledge of the

HERESY
welcoming me with open arms.”
den are supported by their fatherland; the English ministers have Bible, the Lutheran Confessions, and congregational life to try to
Once he graduates and receives a parish call, Ness hopes to con-
tinue his education on a steady basis. “I think a pastor has to continue subsidies from the society. The [Moravians] know how to win over get Rauss to stop hurting the church.
with education in today’s culture. That’s so important.” wealthy people, sometimes along with all their worldly goods and Where Rauss had invoked “some unfavorable fate” as the force
behind his sad circumstances, Muhlenberg pointed out that

12 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu 13
July 13 HMM’s Aug. 19 Catharina June 11 cornerstone
Jan. 29 Eva Elizabeth Dec. 20 HMM April 27 HMM’s
King George II father-in-law, Salome Muhlenberg of Zion Church in

1749
wears glasses to

1752
(Betsy) Muhlenberg decrees that Britain, Conrad Weiser, dies. Oct. 29 Muhlenberg sons, John, Gotthilf, (one year and four Philadelphia laid.

1766
read and write.

1751
May 26 HMM and Friedrich, leave

1758
is born Ireland, and the Aug. 10 Rev. Richard family moves to months) dies.

1756
conducts worship for school in Halle.

1762
colonies will begin Peters, an Anglican Philadelphia. Oct. 18 Constitution Repeal of Stamp Act

1764
in English using the Chief Justice William

1760
Aug. 15 Ministerium of using the new priest and Secretary of Zion Church in Quartering Act by King George III.

1754
1747

Dec. 29 HMM’s Pennsylvania and Jan. 2 Friedrich BOOK OF COMMON (Gregorian) calendar. Nov. 17 Gotthilf March HMM says Nov. 4 Mary (Polly) Aug. 21 Johann of Pennsylvania, Haydn appointed Phila., accepted and Allen is their Mozart (age eight) passed that requires Declaratory Act
mother is buried in adjacent States August Muhlenberg PRAYER in New Sept. 3-13 were Heinrich Muhlenberg that he must wear Catharina Muhlenberg Britain declares war Enoch Muhlenberg preached in Trappe Kapellmeister to signed by the chaperone aboard writes his first colonists to house/ established Britain’s
Germany. established in Phila. is born. York City. omitted. is born. glasses all the time. is born. on France. is born. Church. Prince Esterhazy. membership. the ship to England. symphony. feed British soldiers. right to tax colonies.
1747 1766

1761
1757
1753
Peace of Paris ends Feb. 16 Johann

1763
Aug. 14 HMM dedicates J.S. Bach dies Sept. 17 Margaret Oct. 1 St. Michael’s French troops seize King’s College British army June 5 Pr. Brunnholtz George Washington George III becomes Coronation of British Parliament July 13 Maria

1750
(Peggy) Henrietta dies in Philadelphia. the French and Enoch Muhlenberg
1748
St. Michael’s in Phila. in Germantown the Ohio Valley. (future Columbia defeated at Fort and John Forbes King of England, George III. passes Stamp Act. Salome (Sally)

1765
Seminarian Johann Muhlenberg is born. dedicated. University, New Duquesne take Fort Duquesne Ireland, and colonies. Indian War. dies at the age of 6. For the first time, Muhlenberg is born.

1755
Kurtz ordained. York) founded. (Pittsburgh). from the French. He is Prince Elector Oct. 19 George the British colonists
March 12 Organ of Hannover, but Whitefield, one of April 18 Catharina will pay taxes
in St. Michael’s in never visits Germany. the preachers of the Salome Muhlenberg directly to the
Phila. dedicated. Nov. 18 Johann Carl Great Awakening, is born. English instead of
Muhlenberg is born. preaches at St. local legislatures.
Nov. 24 Johann Carl Michael’s in Phila. Oct. 9 Pr. John
Muhlenberg dies. Handschuh dies at
the age of 51.

Tim Ness: LTSP scholar amazed that


Muhlenberg was willing to be pushed
out of his “comfort zone”
Tim Ness, a second year seminarian at CHURCH
LTSP, said he is highly impressed with
the pioneering work Lutheran Patriarch
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg undertook
in Pennsylvania in the mid-1700s.
“I’ve been taking a seminary course
called ‘Lutherans in North America’ and
Woefully underfunded in comparison to other
Reformed, Presbyterian, and Anglican churches, and with far
poorer congregants than the relatively wealthy Mennonite and
Quaker settlers, who often bought Germans off the boats as inden-
tured servants, Muhlenberg was forever begging for money from
FINANCES money … The German Reformed pastors receive part of their
salaries from Holland … We do not mention this from a lack of
Lutherans do not believe in fate but in God’s good providence.
Where Rauss accused the Ministerium of not paying him, Muhlen-
reading Muhlenberg’s Journals,” Ness,
wealthy supporters in Europe and contrasting them to the “mites” faith, mistrust, and vileness but count it among the hindrances berg responded by making his accounting books public and saying
a native of Torrington, Connecticut,
said. “I’m amazed at how he sailed
his people managed to give. Muhlenberg also realized that there to the free discharge of our office.”1 that Rauss had taken financial advantage of him and local congre-
here from Germany and started over as was a corrupting side to the way in which colonial churches were The more things change, the more they remain the same! And gations over the years. Where Rauss claimed that Muhlenberg and
a pastor, without having a really clear forced to finance their work. An especially poignant letter to just when we thought things were rough today! the other pastors had treated him in an unchristian manner, Muh-
idea at first of what he would be doing. Francke and Ziegenhagen from the Ministerium pastors demon- The Rev. Dr. Timothy Wengert is Ministerium of Pennsylvania lenberg said that he had rescued him from indentured servitude,
It seems to me he was pushed out of his comfort zone. That is also the strates this scandal. Professor, Reformation History. educated him for the ministry, and hosted Rauss’ wedding mostly
case with many pastors today. They end up serving in unfamiliar and “With regard to the external circumstances of our colleagues at his own expense.
1
challenging situations.” Ness has no preconceived idea of where he wants and the united pastors, they are resting on shaky foundations. For Correspondence, 3: 86 Rauss also complained that Muhlenberg had said that the
to serve as a parish pastor. “I am willing to be led,” he said with a smile.
the most part we are poor and must live on parishioners’ voluntary Lutheran faith was in error. Searching his memory to think what
Ness tells of growing up in Torrington as a member of one of the
mites. Our extensive official duties require extensive costs for that accusation could have meant, Muhlenberg recalled a conversa-
New England Synod’s largest congregations, St. Paul Lutheran
Church. The idea of coming to seminary first surfaced in high school.
horses, harnesses, and clothing, and the majority of the parish- Around his fiftieth birthday and after nearly 20 tion in which he quoted some of Luther’s colorful words about sin
ioners are poor and want more from us than they are able to give years as a missionary in Pennsylvania, Henry Melchior Muhlenberg in the church (LW 24:205-208). Rauss had missed the point en-
“I was really involved in the church, reading lessons and serving as a
youth leader,” he recalled. “Others around me began to tell me that I back. Many give as much as they can afford, others grow tired of was charged with heresy by a younger colleague, Lukas Rauss. Then tirely. By refuting this charge, Muhlenberg turned the tables and
had gifts to serve as a pastor, and I was resistant.” giving, and if one accepts the well-known proverb, truth gives birth pastor of the Lutheran congregation in York, Rauss accused Muh- showed Rauss as the one with a poor grasp of the Lutheran tradi-
By word of mouth he heard of Muhlenberg College. He visited the to hatred [veritas odium parit], as an empirical truth, it is easy to lenberg and other leaders of unorthodox doctrine and unchristian tion and life in the church militant.
school and liked it. During his college years a variety of experiences imagine that little can be obtained where the truth is not at home. conduct. Although Rauss’ letter of accusation is no longer extant, Muhlenberg’s response shows a willingness to endure hardship
further led him toward the idea of parish ministry. “Pastor Mike Mil- In our opinion, it is a hindrance to the joyful and free discharge of Muhlenberg’s response to the charges has recently been translated for the sake of the church. At the same time, he knew that he had
lum of St. Paul was a true mentor. Muhlenberg’s chaplain, Peter Bred- in the new fourth volume of his correspondence as Letter 216.
our office when pastors have to live completely on the voluntary to defend his name, his colleagues, and his church from defamation
lau, MDiv ’96, spoke with me as well.” Another turning point was his At this point in his life, Muhlenberg had already endured serious
mites of the listeners, not to mention that it causes problems in the and harmful attacks. To do this, he called upon “reason and revela-
immersion experience during college through Project Connect. Project
congregations themselves while giving rise to charges from other quarrels among churches in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New tion,” so that sound logic, public accountability, and good theology
Connect pulls together a variety of young people discerning the possi-
parties. The inexperienced think and say that a pastor is their hired York. From those conflicts he had learned to expect derision and could make his case. In the end, the arbitrators judged in his favor
bility of a call to serve God as a professional church leader.
Ness said he really enjoys being part of the seminary community. servant and needs to hold office like a job for the sake of daily slander simply for having been involved. But he had also learned and asked that Rauss apologize, which he did not do. Letters like
“The faculty really help you engage church doctrine, the creeds, theol- bread and according to their rules. Others think their money or that sometimes “lies, libels, and hypocrisy” need to be confronted these show Muhlenberg’s skill as a theologian and his inspiring
ogy, and the Bible.” Favorite classes so far have included Lutheran gift secures them the privilege of remaining in sin and attending directly. On October 17, 1761, he wrote a long reply to his Swedish endurance as a church leader.
Confessions, Pastoral Theology, and Liturgy. Holy Communion undisturbed; yea, they think they are free to Lutheran colleagues who were to decide the case. He wrote that at
The Rev. Dr. Martin Lohrmann, PhD ’10, translator and
Another highlight of seminary was the first-year experience of visit- hire a new preacher for their money every year and cast out the old such times one needed to heed the advice of Solomon: “Answer
ing congregations on unfamiliar turf. “I recall visiting an African Amer- editorial assistant of The Correspondence of Heinrich Melchior
ones, etc. etc. Moreover, every year fortune-seekers arrive of their fools according to their folly, or they will be wise in their own eyes”
ican congregation in North Philadelphia. I was being pushed out of my Mühlenberg Volumes 3 and 4.
own accord, who join the disgruntled haters of the truth and who (Prov. 26:5). Worried about further damage to himself and the
comfort zone. But what I found was a church filled with people of God
make it as easy for them as they can … The pastors sent from Swe- Ministerium, Muhlenberg called upon his deep knowledge of the

HERESY
welcoming me with open arms.”
den are supported by their fatherland; the English ministers have Bible, the Lutheran Confessions, and congregational life to try to
Once he graduates and receives a parish call, Ness hopes to con-
tinue his education on a steady basis. “I think a pastor has to continue subsidies from the society. The [Moravians] know how to win over get Rauss to stop hurting the church.
with education in today’s culture. That’s so important.” wealthy people, sometimes along with all their worldly goods and Where Rauss had invoked “some unfavorable fate” as the force
behind his sad circumstances, Muhlenberg pointed out that

12 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu 13
Christ Lutheran Church Johnstown PA Allegheny
Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church Lunenburg NS Canada
Zion Lutheran Church Baltimore MD Delaware/Maryland
St. John’s Lutheran Church Hagerstown MD Delaware/Maryland
St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church Thurmont MD Delaware/Maryland
Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Church Wilmington DE Delaware/Maryland
St. Paul’s Lutheran Church of Wurtemburg Rhinebeck NY ELCM
St. James Episcopal Church Collegeville PA Episcopal St. Joseph (Hill) Lutheran Church Boyertown PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Gabriel’s Episcopal Church Douglassville PA Episcopal Ziegels Lutheran Church Breinigsville PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. James Church of Kingsessing Philadelphia PA Episcopal St. Paul Lutheran Church Coopersburg PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Emmanuel Episcopal Church Woodstock VA Episcopal Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church Coopersburg PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Peter Evangelical Church Freeburg PA Independent St. Paul Lutheran Church Douglassville PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
First Lutheran Church Chambersburg PA Lower Susquehanna St. John Lutheran Church Easton PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church Elizabethtown PA Lower Susquehanna Christ Lutheran Church Fleetwood PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Jacob Lutheran Church Glenville PA Lower Susquehanna New Hanover Evangelical Lutheran Church Gilbertsville PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
OR St. Jacob’s (Stone) United Church of Christ St. Luke’s Evangelical Lutheran Church Hellertown PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. David Lutheran Church Hanover PA Lower Susquehanna Friedens Lutheran Church Kempton PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Matthew Lutheran Church Hanover PA Lower Susquehanna Jerusalem (Red) Lutheran Church Kempton PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Zion Lutheran Church Harrisburg PA Lower Susquehanna St. John Lutheran Church Kutztown PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Zion Lutheran Church Hummelstown PA Lower Susquehanna Zion Moselem Lutheran Church Kutztown PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Zion Lutheran Church Jonestown PA Lower Susquehanna St. Peter’s Union Church Macungie PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Holy Trinity Lutheran Church Lancaster PA Lower Susquehanna Robeson Lutheran Church Mohnton PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church Lebanon PA Lower Susquehanna Weisenberg Lutheran Church New Tripoli PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Zoar Lutheran Church Lebanon PA Lower Susquehanna Zion Lutheran Church Old Zionsville PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Brickerville United Lutheran Church Lititz PA Lower Susquehanna Jordan Lutheran Church Orefield PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Zion Lutheran Church Manheim PA Lower Susquehanna Christ Lutheran Church Reading PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Trinity Lutheran Church of Colebrook Manheim PA Lower Susquehanna Trinity Lutheran Church Reading PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Trindle Spring Lutheran Church Mechanicsburg PA Lower Susquehanna Zion Spies Evangelical Lutheran Church Reading PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Peter’s Lutheran Church Middletown PA Lower Susquehanna Altalaha Lutheran Church Rehrersburg PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Luke Evangelical Lutheran Church Schaefferstown PA Lower Susquehanna St. Daniel Lutheran Church Robesonia PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Luke Evangelical Lutheran Church Schaefferstown PA Lower Susquehanna Zion’s Evangelical Lutheran Church of Perry Township Shoemakersville PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. John Lutheran Church Shiremanstown PA Lower Susquehanna Heidelberg Lutheran Church Slatington PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Christ Lutheran Church York PA Lower Susquehanna Zion and St. John’s (Reeds) Lutheran Church Stouchsburg PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Holy Trinity Lutheran Church New York NY Metropolitan New York Christ Hamilton United Lutheran Church Stroudsburg PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Paul Lutheran Church West Camp NY Metropolitan New York Christ Lutheran Church Womelsdorf PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Evangelical Lutheran Church of St.Matthew New York NY Missouri Synod Emanuel Lutheran Church Elmer NJ New Jersey
Huffs Lutheran Church Alburtis PA Northeastern Pennsylvania Spruce Run Evangelical Lutheran Zion Church Glen Gardner NJ New Jersey
St. Paul Lutheran Church Allentown PA Northeastern Pennsylvania Zion Lutheran Church Long Valley NJ New Jersey
Evangelical Lutheran Friedens Church Bernville PA Northeastern Pennsylvania Zion Lutheran Church Oldwick NJ New Jersey
Robeson Lutheran Church Birdsboro PA Northeastern Pennsylvania St. James Lutheran Church Phillipsburg NJ New Jersey
Alsace Lutheran Church Reading PA non ELCA
Organ Lutheran Church Salisbury NC North Carolina
Upper Dublin Lutheran Church Ambler PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Paul Lutheran Church Ardmore PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. John Lutheran Church Center Square PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Peter Lutheran Church Chester Springs PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Augustus Lutheran Church Collegeville PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Luke Lutheran Church Ferndale PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Advent Lutheran Church of Goschenhoppen Harleysville PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Peter Lutheran Church Lafayette Hill PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Trinity Lutheran Church New Holland PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Peter Lutheran Church North Wales PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Peace-Tohickon Lutheran Church Perkasie PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Christ Church in Philadelphia Philadelphia PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Gloria Dei Church Philadelphia PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Old Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church Philadelphia PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Michael Lutheran Church Philadelphia PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Paul Lutheran Church Red Hill PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Jerusalem Lutheran Church Sellersville PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. John Lutheran Church Spinnerstown PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Zion Lutheran Church Spring City PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Little Zion Lutheran Church Telford PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Christ Lutheran Church Trumbauersville PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Paul’s Lutheran Church — Red Hill Upper Hanover Twp. PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. John Lutheran Church Charleston SC South Carolina
St. John Lutheran Church Pomaria SC South Carolina
Jerusalem Lutheran Church Rincon GA Southeastern
Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Ascension Savannah GA Southeastern
St. Peter Lutheran Church Freeburg PA Upper Susquehanna
Botschaft Lutheran Church Mount Pleasant Mills PA Upper Susquehanna
St. Peter Lutheran Church Mount Pleasant Mills PA Upper Susquehanna
Himmel Lutheran Church Rebuck PA Upper Susquehanna
Christ Little Tulpehocken Church Bernville PA UCC
Salem United Church of Christ Klingerstown PA UCC
First Lutheran Church Albany NY Upstate New York
Trinity Lutheran Church West Sand Lake NY Upstate New York
Muhlenberg Lutheran Church Harrisonburg VA Virginia
Hebron Lutheran Church Madison VA Virginia
St. Mary Lutheran Church Mount Jackson VA Virginia
St. Paul Lutheran Church Strasburg VA Virginia
Rader Lutheran Church Timberville VA Virginia
Grace Lutheran Church Winchester VA Virginia
Emmanuel Lutheran Church Woodstock VA Virginia
Christ Lutheran Church Johnstown PA Allegheny
Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church Lunenburg NS Canada
Zion Lutheran Church Baltimore MD Delaware/Maryland
St. John’s Lutheran Church Hagerstown MD Delaware/Maryland
St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church Thurmont MD Delaware/Maryland
Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Church Wilmington DE Delaware/Maryland
St. Paul’s Lutheran Church of Wurtemburg Rhinebeck NY ELCM
St. James Episcopal Church Collegeville PA Episcopal St. Joseph (Hill) Lutheran Church Boyertown PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Gabriel’s Episcopal Church Douglassville PA Episcopal Ziegels Lutheran Church Breinigsville PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. James Church of Kingsessing Philadelphia PA Episcopal St. Paul Lutheran Church Coopersburg PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Emmanuel Episcopal Church Woodstock VA Episcopal Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church Coopersburg PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Peter Evangelical Church Freeburg PA Independent St. Paul Lutheran Church Douglassville PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
First Lutheran Church Chambersburg PA Lower Susquehanna St. John Lutheran Church Easton PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church Elizabethtown PA Lower Susquehanna Christ Lutheran Church Fleetwood PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Jacob Lutheran Church Glenville PA Lower Susquehanna New Hanover Evangelical Lutheran Church Gilbertsville PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
OR St. Jacob’s (Stone) United Church of Christ St. Luke’s Evangelical Lutheran Church Hellertown PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. David Lutheran Church Hanover PA Lower Susquehanna Friedens Lutheran Church Kempton PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Matthew Lutheran Church Hanover PA Lower Susquehanna Jerusalem (Red) Lutheran Church Kempton PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Zion Lutheran Church Harrisburg PA Lower Susquehanna St. John Lutheran Church Kutztown PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Zion Lutheran Church Hummelstown PA Lower Susquehanna Zion Moselem Lutheran Church Kutztown PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Zion Lutheran Church Jonestown PA Lower Susquehanna St. Peter’s Union Church Macungie PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Holy Trinity Lutheran Church Lancaster PA Lower Susquehanna Robeson Lutheran Church Mohnton PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church Lebanon PA Lower Susquehanna Weisenberg Lutheran Church New Tripoli PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Zoar Lutheran Church Lebanon PA Lower Susquehanna Zion Lutheran Church Old Zionsville PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Brickerville United Lutheran Church Lititz PA Lower Susquehanna Jordan Lutheran Church Orefield PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Zion Lutheran Church Manheim PA Lower Susquehanna Christ Lutheran Church Reading PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Trinity Lutheran Church of Colebrook Manheim PA Lower Susquehanna Trinity Lutheran Church Reading PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Trindle Spring Lutheran Church Mechanicsburg PA Lower Susquehanna Zion Spies Evangelical Lutheran Church Reading PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Peter’s Lutheran Church Middletown PA Lower Susquehanna Altalaha Lutheran Church Rehrersburg PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Luke Evangelical Lutheran Church Schaefferstown PA Lower Susquehanna St. Daniel Lutheran Church Robesonia PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Luke Evangelical Lutheran Church Schaefferstown PA Lower Susquehanna Zion’s Evangelical Lutheran Church of Perry Township Shoemakersville PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. John Lutheran Church Shiremanstown PA Lower Susquehanna Heidelberg Lutheran Church Slatington PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Christ Lutheran Church York PA Lower Susquehanna Zion and St. John’s (Reeds) Lutheran Church Stouchsburg PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Holy Trinity Lutheran Church New York NY Metropolitan New York Christ Hamilton United Lutheran Church Stroudsburg PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
St. Paul Lutheran Church West Camp NY Metropolitan New York Christ Lutheran Church Womelsdorf PA Northeastern Pennsylvania
Evangelical Lutheran Church of St.Matthew New York NY Missouri Synod Emanuel Lutheran Church Elmer NJ New Jersey
Huffs Lutheran Church Alburtis PA Northeastern Pennsylvania Spruce Run Evangelical Lutheran Zion Church Glen Gardner NJ New Jersey
St. Paul Lutheran Church Allentown PA Northeastern Pennsylvania Zion Lutheran Church Long Valley NJ New Jersey
Evangelical Lutheran Friedens Church Bernville PA Northeastern Pennsylvania Zion Lutheran Church Oldwick NJ New Jersey
Robeson Lutheran Church Birdsboro PA Northeastern Pennsylvania St. James Lutheran Church Phillipsburg NJ New Jersey
Alsace Lutheran Church Reading PA non ELCA
Organ Lutheran Church Salisbury NC North Carolina
Upper Dublin Lutheran Church Ambler PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Paul Lutheran Church Ardmore PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. John Lutheran Church Center Square PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Peter Lutheran Church Chester Springs PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Augustus Lutheran Church Collegeville PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Luke Lutheran Church Ferndale PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Advent Lutheran Church of Goschenhoppen Harleysville PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Peter Lutheran Church Lafayette Hill PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Trinity Lutheran Church New Holland PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Peter Lutheran Church North Wales PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Peace-Tohickon Lutheran Church Perkasie PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Christ Church in Philadelphia Philadelphia PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Gloria Dei Church Philadelphia PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Old Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church Philadelphia PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Michael Lutheran Church Philadelphia PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Paul Lutheran Church Red Hill PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Jerusalem Lutheran Church Sellersville PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. John Lutheran Church Spinnerstown PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Zion Lutheran Church Spring City PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Little Zion Lutheran Church Telford PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
Christ Lutheran Church Trumbauersville PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. Paul’s Lutheran Church — Red Hill Upper Hanover Twp. PA Southeastern Pennsylvania
St. John Lutheran Church Charleston SC South Carolina
St. John Lutheran Church Pomaria SC South Carolina
Jerusalem Lutheran Church Rincon GA Southeastern
Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Ascension Savannah GA Southeastern
St. Peter Lutheran Church Freeburg PA Upper Susquehanna
Botschaft Lutheran Church Mount Pleasant Mills PA Upper Susquehanna
St. Peter Lutheran Church Mount Pleasant Mills PA Upper Susquehanna
Himmel Lutheran Church Rebuck PA Upper Susquehanna
Christ Little Tulpehocken Church Bernville PA UCC
Salem United Church of Christ Klingerstown PA UCC
First Lutheran Church Albany NY Upstate New York
Trinity Lutheran Church West Sand Lake NY Upstate New York
Muhlenberg Lutheran Church Harrisonburg VA Virginia
Hebron Lutheran Church Madison VA Virginia
St. Mary Lutheran Church Mount Jackson VA Virginia
St. Paul Lutheran Church Strasburg VA Virginia
Rader Lutheran Church Timberville VA Virginia
Grace Lutheran Church Winchester VA Virginia
Emmanuel Lutheran Church Woodstock VA Virginia
March 2 Peter Feb. 2 Anna
July 4 HMM notes in US Constitution
Sept. 22 Gotthilf

1774
sails to London to Muhlenberg
April 2 Pr. Henry July 26 Gotthilf his Journal that signed in Phila.
and Friedrich return be ordained in the March 3 John severely burned
Helmuth arrived in marries Mary Hall. Continental Congress

1770
to Phila. from Halle.

1778
Anglican Church. Jan. 16 HMM made brigadier when she falls into

1772
Phila. from Halle. June 13 Pr. Kunze declares independence Sept. Friedrich

1776
Aug. 27 HMM, meets with leaders general by act of Nov. 3 Friedrich pot of boiling beets.
writes the from Britain. May 27 HMM takes elected president of
Oct. 25 Gotthilf and elected speaker of Peace at Versailles

1780
Anna, and daughter of Ebenezer Church June 12 HMM

1784
April 21 John Congress.

1782
June 25 Zion Friedrich ordained ordained an constitution for a Mary sail from in Georgia and Washington defeats the Oath of the Pennsylvania Sept. 6 HMM June 12 HMM ends the war marries an African the Penn. Convention
Lutheran Church, by the Ministerium Anglican deacon in German school in Philadelphia to helps them write a Hessian troops at British defeated at Allegiance to the House of celebrates his 70th writes his last will between Britain American couple in that ratified the
Phila., dedicated. in Reading, PA. London, England. Philadelphia. Charleston, SC. constitution. Trenton, NJ. Princeton, NJ. United States. Representatives. birthday. and testament. and America. Downingtown. Constitution.
1767 1787

1775
July 11 Emanuel Boston Tea Party Sept. 29 HMM

1773
Nov. 6 Peter Oct. 15 Friedrich Sept. 25 HMM Paul Revere rides July Muhlenberg Sept. 27 Trappe March 2 Friedrich British capitulate at Dec. 6 HMM April 16 HMM HMM receives an

1781
April 23 John
Samuel Muhlenberg notes the baptizes Anna Frey.

1783
marries Anna marries Catharine ordained an preaches in English from Charleston to family moves to Trappe. Church occupied by elected to the Yorktown. celebrates the 40th honorary doctorate
He notes it in his

1771
is born. Meyer. Schaefer. Anglican priest in in the Presbyterian Lexington. Penn. militia. Continental anniversary of his proclamation of from University of

1777
Aug. 22 HMM peace and the end Journal. It’s the last
Congress. arrival in Phila. (In Pennsylvania.
1769

London, England. Church in Charleston. Oct. 24 Members of


preaches in English

1787
Dec. 24 Emanuel Boston Massacre Second Continental American forces Congress, the Assembly, the old calendar of the War of entry.

1779
Samuel Muhlenberg Oct. 27 Muhlenberg and German to Independence in
First Partition of Congress meets at defeated at Dec. 27 HMM Council assemble in the date was Nov.
dies. family arrives in soldiers in Trappe. his Journal. Oct. 7 HMM dies at
Poland. Philadelphia. Germantown and writes a letter to Zion Lutheran for 25, 1742.)
Savannah. home in Trappe.
Dec. 28 HMM learns Brandywine, PA. Benjamin Franklin. service of thanks for
Continental Congress of Washington the surrender of
convenes in Phila. crossing Delaware Cornwallis. Oct. 10 HMM buried

SLAVERY
Seminary alumna Skyle Rea sees from Friedrich. in Trappe Cemetery.

today’s church as connecting people It is quite possible that Henry Melchior Muhlenberg The Henry Melchior Muhlenberg House Dig:
the way Muhlenberg did had a foretaste of the “American Dilemma” while still in university
in Halle.
Stacey-Kyle “Skyle” Rea, a 2010 LTSP Anton Wilhelm Amo is reputed to be the first African philosopher Findings Suggest a Lifestyle Different
graduate now on internship in
to receive a doctoral degree in Germany. Amo, a Ghanaian, was
Moorestown, New Jersey, is a Muhlen-
berg College graduate (2001) who ad-
sold into slavery in 1707 at age four, transported to the Dutch from What You Might Imagine
mires how hard Lutheran Patriarch
West Indies, and given to Duke Anton Ulrich von Braunschweig-
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg must have Wofenbuttel. Christened in 1708 and baptized in 1721, his bene- ARCHEOLOGICAL DIGS can help to give be typical of a kitchen site. Pressed glass
worked to hold Lutheran congregations factors assured his education, including a law degree from Halle a picture of the daily lives of people in the beads, buttons from women’s clothing, sil-
together in Eastern Pennsylvania. University (1729), and a Master (1730) and a Doctor of Philoso- ver, glass, and pieces of necklaces were also
past, and the dig begun at the Henry Mel-
“I’ve lived in Gilbertsville, Boyer- phy (1734) from Wittenberg. He was then Professor at Halle found, an indication that women would
town, Jeffersonville, and now in Center chior Muhlenberg House in Trappe, Penn-
(1735-39) and the University of Jena (1740-46). have lived and worked in the space.
City Philadelphia,” Rea explained. “My Henry Melchior Muhlenberg completed his studies at Halle in sylvania in the summer of 2010 found
home congregation in Gilbertsville was indications of a lifestyle of a reasonably “This is an example of public archeol-
1738, and might very well have crossed paths with the professor ogy,” said Farrell. Volunteers receive basic
a daughter congregation of a Muhlen- well-off family in the American colonies in
from the West Indies. Muhlenberg remained in Halle for a time, training in working at a site before they
berg church — New Hanover in
teaching at an orphanage, before being called to Grosshennerdorf the mid-1700s. Louis Farrell, a member of
Gilbertsville. Over the years I’ve personally driven over roads, proba- participate in the dig. While participants
bly many of the same roads, that Muhlenberg must have known in his orphanage as an assistant minister and director for the next two St. John’s Lutheran Church, Ambler, Penn- may lack extensive academic training, they
colonial travels. He worked so hard traveling back and forth to places years. He then accepted the call to North America. sylvania, who is a social studies teacher at come with a sense of discovery and excite-
like Trappe, where he lived, Boyertown, and Philadelphia, where he Muhlenberg arrived in Charleston, and in his journals he was Upper Perkiomen High School, Penns- ment, especially students. Farrell believes
struggled as a pastor to connect German immigrants of his day. As I conscious that there were social rules and American laws regarding burg, Pennsylvania, and a PhD student in that public archeology is important. “It at-
drive I think about our church’s deep-rooted history of connecting peo- heathen slaves. He critiques the visual life of Charleston, noting the Archeology program at Temple Uni- tracts people with ties to the area and the
ple. And that is what pastors try to do today — connect people and “one also finds here many slaves who are only half black, the off-
churches to each other so that they can serve others.” versity, is leading the multi-year dig. LTSP area’s past. The landscape may have
spring of those white Sodomites who commit fornication with changed over the years, but remnants of the
Rea said her call to become a pastor has been the result of a gradual Associate Professor of New Testament and
their black slave women.” On September 24, 1742, leaving past are still there waiting to be discovered,
journey that began at Muhlenberg College. “Muhlenberg College, Greek Robin Mattison joined over 30 vol-
through its community service outreach and teaching does a great job
Charleston to visit the Salzburg colony, he wrote, “A black heathen and academics cannot do it alone.”✛
unteer high school students from five high
of bringing people together as Henry Muhlenberg did,” she said. girl, twelve years old, had secretly slipped into our boat and seated
herself between the Salzburg children. She belonged to the colonel schools belonging to the Upper Perkiomen
As someone drawn to the life challenges she has seen in urban
Philadelphia, Rea easily became attracted to the urban/metropolitan in the city of Charleston and intended to escape from her master. Archeology Club, members of the Trappe WEB EXTRA!
W

concentration offered at LTSP and said the focus helped her take a The skipper of our boat thought she belonged to Salzburgers, since Historical Society, which owns the house,
closer look at urban challenges and what the church might do to help. and the community who worked on the Information and videos from the dig can be
the Salzburg children were burned almost as black by the sun. The
Rea believes the church serves as “Jesus in the world today. I think site from June 23 through July 18. Some found at www.thedigis.org under Muhlen-
Salzburgers ... thought she belonged to the skipper ...The skipper
most people want to help the hungry. Hunger is a problem in so many berg House Field School. Volunteers are
of the boat dragged her out and gave her a sound thrashing to make participants were drawn to the work by a
places, from cities to small towns. Food pantries do not have enough invited to join the 2011 dig, scheduled for
her admit the escape and returned her to her master. All of us on sign on the street outside the house that in-
food to meet the need in today’s struggling economy.” this July. Contact Louis Farrell at
“I’m really optimistic about today’s church and its future,” Rea con-
the boat might have been subject to arrest if we had inadvertently vited volunteers. thedigis@gmail.com with the subject line
tinued. “The church connects so many people to real need. It may not taken her along.” Farrell notes that the dig spent its first “Free Labor.” A training seminar will be
go on the way it always has, but it will continue to exist despite tough In many ways, the German immigrants Muhlenberg found in year excavating the summer kitchen site at provided.
times, and make a difference.” America were as economically suppressed as the African slaves, in- the house. A summer kitchen would have
She credits the seminary with strong teaching during her studies. dentured servants and indigenous peoples. Yet, the care of the soul been typical of German homes of the era.
“I had extraordinary friendships here, an amazing diversity of students led Muhlenberg and those he mentored. At the October 1, 1752, The dig found evidence of a family of
and perspectives on faith. The faculty and staff were so caring and consecration of a new sanctuary for St. Michael’s Lutheran Church means, with artifacts including hand
helped me to discern my future a great deal.”
in Germantown, Muhlenberg preached, and a Black male, Chris- painted Creamware, named for the cream
After concluding her current internship, she hopes to be approved
tian Gotthilff, was baptized. The growth of God’s realm, always the color of the earthenware, along with
for a call process by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Synod, entering
service as a parish pastor in the Philadelphia area.
focus of the man sent from Halle. butchered bones and charcoal that would
The Rev. Dr. Richard N. Stewart is Associate Professor,
Communications, Parish Administration.

16 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu 17
March 2 Peter Feb. 2 Anna
July 4 HMM notes in US Constitution
Sept. 22 Gotthilf

1774
sails to London to Muhlenberg
April 2 Pr. Henry July 26 Gotthilf his Journal that signed in Phila.
and Friedrich return be ordained in the March 3 John severely burned
Helmuth arrived in marries Mary Hall. Continental Congress

1770
to Phila. from Halle.

1778
Anglican Church. Jan. 16 HMM made brigadier when she falls into

1772
Phila. from Halle. June 13 Pr. Kunze declares independence Sept. Friedrich

1776
Aug. 27 HMM, meets with leaders general by act of Nov. 3 Friedrich pot of boiling beets.
writes the from Britain. May 27 HMM takes elected president of
Oct. 25 Gotthilf and elected speaker of Peace at Versailles

1780
Anna, and daughter of Ebenezer Church June 12 HMM

1784
April 21 John Congress.

1782
June 25 Zion Friedrich ordained ordained an constitution for a Mary sail from in Georgia and Washington defeats the Oath of the Pennsylvania Sept. 6 HMM June 12 HMM ends the war marries an African the Penn. Convention
Lutheran Church, by the Ministerium Anglican deacon in German school in Philadelphia to helps them write a Hessian troops at British defeated at Allegiance to the House of celebrates his 70th writes his last will between Britain American couple in that ratified the
Phila., dedicated. in Reading, PA. London, England. Philadelphia. Charleston, SC. constitution. Trenton, NJ. Princeton, NJ. United States. Representatives. birthday. and testament. and America. Downingtown. Constitution.
1767 1787

1775
July 11 Emanuel Boston Tea Party Sept. 29 HMM

1773
Nov. 6 Peter Oct. 15 Friedrich Sept. 25 HMM Paul Revere rides July Muhlenberg Sept. 27 Trappe March 2 Friedrich British capitulate at Dec. 6 HMM April 16 HMM HMM receives an

1781
April 23 John
Samuel Muhlenberg notes the baptizes Anna Frey.

1783
marries Anna marries Catharine ordained an preaches in English from Charleston to family moves to Trappe. Church occupied by elected to the Yorktown. celebrates the 40th honorary doctorate
He notes it in his

1771
is born. Meyer. Schaefer. Anglican priest in in the Presbyterian Lexington. Penn. militia. Continental anniversary of his proclamation of from University of

1777
Aug. 22 HMM peace and the end Journal. It’s the last
Congress. arrival in Phila. (In Pennsylvania.
1769

London, England. Church in Charleston. Oct. 24 Members of


preaches in English

1787
Dec. 24 Emanuel Boston Massacre Second Continental American forces Congress, the Assembly, the old calendar of the War of entry.

1779
Samuel Muhlenberg Oct. 27 Muhlenberg and German to Independence in
First Partition of Congress meets at defeated at Dec. 27 HMM Council assemble in the date was Nov.
dies. family arrives in soldiers in Trappe. his Journal. Oct. 7 HMM dies at
Poland. Philadelphia. Germantown and writes a letter to Zion Lutheran for 25, 1742.)
Savannah. home in Trappe.
Dec. 28 HMM learns Brandywine, PA. Benjamin Franklin. service of thanks for
Continental Congress of Washington the surrender of
convenes in Phila. crossing Delaware Cornwallis. Oct. 10 HMM buried

SLAVERY
Seminary alumna Skyle Rea sees from Friedrich. in Trappe Cemetery.

today’s church as connecting people It is quite possible that Henry Melchior Muhlenberg The Henry Melchior Muhlenberg House Dig:
the way Muhlenberg did had a foretaste of the “American Dilemma” while still in university
in Halle.
Stacey-Kyle “Skyle” Rea, a 2010 LTSP Anton Wilhelm Amo is reputed to be the first African philosopher Findings Suggest a Lifestyle Different
graduate now on internship in
to receive a doctoral degree in Germany. Amo, a Ghanaian, was
Moorestown, New Jersey, is a Muhlen-
berg College graduate (2001) who ad-
sold into slavery in 1707 at age four, transported to the Dutch from What You Might Imagine
mires how hard Lutheran Patriarch
West Indies, and given to Duke Anton Ulrich von Braunschweig-
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg must have Wofenbuttel. Christened in 1708 and baptized in 1721, his bene- ARCHEOLOGICAL DIGS can help to give be typical of a kitchen site. Pressed glass
worked to hold Lutheran congregations factors assured his education, including a law degree from Halle a picture of the daily lives of people in the beads, buttons from women’s clothing, sil-
together in Eastern Pennsylvania. University (1729), and a Master (1730) and a Doctor of Philoso- ver, glass, and pieces of necklaces were also
past, and the dig begun at the Henry Mel-
“I’ve lived in Gilbertsville, Boyer- phy (1734) from Wittenberg. He was then Professor at Halle found, an indication that women would
town, Jeffersonville, and now in Center chior Muhlenberg House in Trappe, Penn-
(1735-39) and the University of Jena (1740-46). have lived and worked in the space.
City Philadelphia,” Rea explained. “My Henry Melchior Muhlenberg completed his studies at Halle in sylvania in the summer of 2010 found
home congregation in Gilbertsville was indications of a lifestyle of a reasonably “This is an example of public archeol-
1738, and might very well have crossed paths with the professor ogy,” said Farrell. Volunteers receive basic
a daughter congregation of a Muhlen- well-off family in the American colonies in
from the West Indies. Muhlenberg remained in Halle for a time, training in working at a site before they
berg church — New Hanover in
teaching at an orphanage, before being called to Grosshennerdorf the mid-1700s. Louis Farrell, a member of
Gilbertsville. Over the years I’ve personally driven over roads, proba- participate in the dig. While participants
bly many of the same roads, that Muhlenberg must have known in his orphanage as an assistant minister and director for the next two St. John’s Lutheran Church, Ambler, Penn- may lack extensive academic training, they
colonial travels. He worked so hard traveling back and forth to places years. He then accepted the call to North America. sylvania, who is a social studies teacher at come with a sense of discovery and excite-
like Trappe, where he lived, Boyertown, and Philadelphia, where he Muhlenberg arrived in Charleston, and in his journals he was Upper Perkiomen High School, Penns- ment, especially students. Farrell believes
struggled as a pastor to connect German immigrants of his day. As I conscious that there were social rules and American laws regarding burg, Pennsylvania, and a PhD student in that public archeology is important. “It at-
drive I think about our church’s deep-rooted history of connecting peo- heathen slaves. He critiques the visual life of Charleston, noting the Archeology program at Temple Uni- tracts people with ties to the area and the
ple. And that is what pastors try to do today — connect people and “one also finds here many slaves who are only half black, the off-
churches to each other so that they can serve others.” versity, is leading the multi-year dig. LTSP area’s past. The landscape may have
spring of those white Sodomites who commit fornication with changed over the years, but remnants of the
Rea said her call to become a pastor has been the result of a gradual Associate Professor of New Testament and
their black slave women.” On September 24, 1742, leaving past are still there waiting to be discovered,
journey that began at Muhlenberg College. “Muhlenberg College, Greek Robin Mattison joined over 30 vol-
through its community service outreach and teaching does a great job
Charleston to visit the Salzburg colony, he wrote, “A black heathen and academics cannot do it alone.”✛
unteer high school students from five high
of bringing people together as Henry Muhlenberg did,” she said. girl, twelve years old, had secretly slipped into our boat and seated
herself between the Salzburg children. She belonged to the colonel schools belonging to the Upper Perkiomen
As someone drawn to the life challenges she has seen in urban
Philadelphia, Rea easily became attracted to the urban/metropolitan in the city of Charleston and intended to escape from her master. Archeology Club, members of the Trappe WEB EXTRA!
W

concentration offered at LTSP and said the focus helped her take a The skipper of our boat thought she belonged to Salzburgers, since Historical Society, which owns the house,
closer look at urban challenges and what the church might do to help. and the community who worked on the Information and videos from the dig can be
the Salzburg children were burned almost as black by the sun. The
Rea believes the church serves as “Jesus in the world today. I think site from June 23 through July 18. Some found at www.thedigis.org under Muhlen-
Salzburgers ... thought she belonged to the skipper ...The skipper
most people want to help the hungry. Hunger is a problem in so many berg House Field School. Volunteers are
of the boat dragged her out and gave her a sound thrashing to make participants were drawn to the work by a
places, from cities to small towns. Food pantries do not have enough invited to join the 2011 dig, scheduled for
her admit the escape and returned her to her master. All of us on sign on the street outside the house that in-
food to meet the need in today’s struggling economy.” this July. Contact Louis Farrell at
“I’m really optimistic about today’s church and its future,” Rea con-
the boat might have been subject to arrest if we had inadvertently vited volunteers. thedigis@gmail.com with the subject line
tinued. “The church connects so many people to real need. It may not taken her along.” Farrell notes that the dig spent its first “Free Labor.” A training seminar will be
go on the way it always has, but it will continue to exist despite tough In many ways, the German immigrants Muhlenberg found in year excavating the summer kitchen site at provided.
times, and make a difference.” America were as economically suppressed as the African slaves, in- the house. A summer kitchen would have
She credits the seminary with strong teaching during her studies. dentured servants and indigenous peoples. Yet, the care of the soul been typical of German homes of the era.
“I had extraordinary friendships here, an amazing diversity of students led Muhlenberg and those he mentored. At the October 1, 1752, The dig found evidence of a family of
and perspectives on faith. The faculty and staff were so caring and consecration of a new sanctuary for St. Michael’s Lutheran Church means, with artifacts including hand
helped me to discern my future a great deal.”
in Germantown, Muhlenberg preached, and a Black male, Chris- painted Creamware, named for the cream
After concluding her current internship, she hopes to be approved
tian Gotthilff, was baptized. The growth of God’s realm, always the color of the earthenware, along with
for a call process by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Synod, entering
service as a parish pastor in the Philadelphia area.
focus of the man sent from Halle. butchered bones and charcoal that would
The Rev. Dr. Richard N. Stewart is Associate Professor,
Communications, Parish Administration.

16 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu 17
This mural is from New Hanover Lutheran Church, served by Muhlenberg. It
depicts the 1768 meeting of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, during which the
congregation’s new church building was dedicated.

Resettling Immigrants: A Muhlenberg


Legacy Passed Down to Modern Day The Rev. John Nunes

in North America
Images from a Newly Planted Church
THE FOLLOWING STRIKING IMAGES connected to the life of Lutheran Patriarch Henry NORTH AMERICAN PATRIARCH Henry legacy among Lutherans in the United
Melchior Muhlenberg appeared originally in a 1996 commemorative booklet celebrating his life Melchior Muhlenberg’s exhaustive efforts States served as a catalyst for Lutherans
and sacrifice expended in “planting the Lutheran Church” in North America. His exhaustive, to plant the Lutheran Church in colonial taking up the cause of relief,” Nunes added.
pioneering efforts paved the way for the founding of The Lutheran Theological Seminary at North America also planted the seeds for a “The relationships that Muhlenberg first
Philadelphia in 1864. lively legacy of serving immigrants today in fostered led to the shipment so many years
The pictures and captions describe the efforts of the pastor from Halle, Germany, to organize America and abroad. later of quilts and clothing to those most in
a church and its immigrant believers in a new land, including the formation of the young The baton has been passed to Lutheran need. And the international worldview of
church’s three original congregations — Augustus Church in Trappe, New Hanover Church in Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS) the Lutheran colonial tradition carries on, The Rev. Dr. David D. Grafton
New Hanover, and Old Zion in Philadelphia, all in Pennsylvania — as well as other colonial and Lutheran World Relief (LWR) and as we reach out to the victims of disasters,
churches in the region. many partner congregations and organiza- poverty, and injustice, and envision a world War, or an Iraqi family finding a new be-
View a copy of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg & the Colonial Lutheran Church including more tions. LWR is lead today by The Rev. John where each person, every community, and ginning in Detroit, we are called as a faith
artifacts and stories: www.Ltsp.edu/colonialchurch. Nunes, who once studied at The Lutheran all generations live in justice, dignity, and peace.” community to journey together with them
Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP). LWR is working around the world to in service and justice.
“I’ve seen first-hand the work of LIRS end poverty, injustice, and human suffer- “As an organization, we are proud to be
and LWR overseas,” explained The Rev. Dr. ing. One major way LWR is carrying out the embodiment of that legacy today,”
David D. Grafton, LTSP’s Associate Pro- that mission is by fighting malaria in Africa Hartke continued. “Every day, I see in our
fessor of Islamic Studies and Christian- through the Lutheran Malaria Initiative dedicated staff and partners the energy,
Muslim Relations and Director of (LMI), a movement to help end malaria perseverance, and self-sacrifice that Muh-
Graduate Studies. His last call was in mis- deaths in Africa by 2015. The agency is re- lenberg was known for.
sionary service in Egypt. In a nutshell, he sponding to the Japan earthquake through “In the same way Muhlenberg eventu-
explained, LWR works to assist refugees in its partners at the Evangelical Lutheran ally organized the congregations he served
a variety of troubled world settings, paving Church in America and the Lutheran into an independent synod, we too strive to
the way for LIRS to enter the scene to Church — Missouri Synod. It continues to enable refugees and immigrants to become
strategize the resettling of refugees in trou- work with partners in Haiti in the after- independent and self-sufficient as quickly
ble as immigrants to other parts of the world. math of 2010’s earthquake, in Colombia as possible,” Hartke noted. “It is a beautiful
Reflecting on Muhlenberg’s inherited following flooding episodes there, as well miracle and a privilege to see them rebuild
(Clockwise from top left): Muhlenberg’s collec-
legacy, LWR President and CEO John as with other emergency/disaster situations in a new country and quickly begin to give
tion of boxed cards for daily Bible reading and Nunes said, “Lutheran World Relief is around the world. back to their communities. This cycle of
meditation, a mainstay of the piety fostered at
Halle, Germany, that flourished in America proud to stand on the tradition that Henry “The spirit of Muhlenberg’s ministry to continued service bears witness to God’s
among the colonial immigrants. Melchior Muhlenberg so greatly influ- immigrants lives on in the Lutheran legacy love and sustains us as we continue to find
Among Henry Melchior Muhlenberg’s many enced. Muhlenberg’s deep connections to of serving the newcomer in this land,” ex- new and better ways to serve the sojourner
personal effects housed at LTSP is this small
wooden chest.
the wider Lutheran community, both in plained Linda Hartke, LIRS President and and the newcomer.”
America and Europe, began a legacy that CEO. The headquarters for both LWR As a professor of Islamic studies with
A 1749 deed, signed by Muhlenberg and his
wife, Anna, for the purchase of land to be used eventually led to the creation of LWR. and LIRS are in Baltimore, Maryland. nine years of experience in the Middle
for the building of a seminary, school, and re- Legend has it that during the Revolutionary
tirement home. This went unrealized until the War, John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg (Henry’s
“After World War II, when Lutherans in “Whether it is a German immigrant con- East, Grafton is proud of the continuing
founding of LTSP in 1864. son), an officer in the colonial militia, entered Germany had been battered, bombed, and gregation in eighteenth-century Pennsylva- Lutheran legacy serving refugees and im-
the pulpit of his congregation in Woodstock,
Muhlenberg’s ordination certificate (1739) was Virginia, wearing this preaching robe. He then displaced from their homes, Muhlenberg’s nia, a German orphan of the Second World migrants worldwide.✛
often utilized to help the patriarch of American said, “There is a time to preach and a time to
Lutheranism establish his position as a recog- fight, and now is the time to fight,” took off
nized Lutheran clergyman in the eyes of both his robe to reveal his military uniform under-
the congregations he was invited to serve and neath, and joined his waiting troops.
of the civil and religious authorities of the day.

18 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu 19
This mural is from New Hanover Lutheran Church, served by Muhlenberg. It
depicts the 1768 meeting of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, during which the
congregation’s new church building was dedicated.

Resettling Immigrants: A Muhlenberg


Legacy Passed Down to Modern Day The Rev. John Nunes

in North America
Images from a Newly Planted Church
THE FOLLOWING STRIKING IMAGES connected to the life of Lutheran Patriarch Henry NORTH AMERICAN PATRIARCH Henry legacy among Lutherans in the United
Melchior Muhlenberg appeared originally in a 1996 commemorative booklet celebrating his life Melchior Muhlenberg’s exhaustive efforts States served as a catalyst for Lutherans
and sacrifice expended in “planting the Lutheran Church” in North America. His exhaustive, to plant the Lutheran Church in colonial taking up the cause of relief,” Nunes added.
pioneering efforts paved the way for the founding of The Lutheran Theological Seminary at North America also planted the seeds for a “The relationships that Muhlenberg first
Philadelphia in 1864. lively legacy of serving immigrants today in fostered led to the shipment so many years
The pictures and captions describe the efforts of the pastor from Halle, Germany, to organize America and abroad. later of quilts and clothing to those most in
a church and its immigrant believers in a new land, including the formation of the young The baton has been passed to Lutheran need. And the international worldview of
church’s three original congregations — Augustus Church in Trappe, New Hanover Church in Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS) the Lutheran colonial tradition carries on, The Rev. Dr. David D. Grafton
New Hanover, and Old Zion in Philadelphia, all in Pennsylvania — as well as other colonial and Lutheran World Relief (LWR) and as we reach out to the victims of disasters,
churches in the region. many partner congregations and organiza- poverty, and injustice, and envision a world War, or an Iraqi family finding a new be-
View a copy of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg & the Colonial Lutheran Church including more tions. LWR is lead today by The Rev. John where each person, every community, and ginning in Detroit, we are called as a faith
artifacts and stories: www.Ltsp.edu/colonialchurch. Nunes, who once studied at The Lutheran all generations live in justice, dignity, and peace.” community to journey together with them
Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP). LWR is working around the world to in service and justice.
“I’ve seen first-hand the work of LIRS end poverty, injustice, and human suffer- “As an organization, we are proud to be
and LWR overseas,” explained The Rev. Dr. ing. One major way LWR is carrying out the embodiment of that legacy today,”
David D. Grafton, LTSP’s Associate Pro- that mission is by fighting malaria in Africa Hartke continued. “Every day, I see in our
fessor of Islamic Studies and Christian- through the Lutheran Malaria Initiative dedicated staff and partners the energy,
Muslim Relations and Director of (LMI), a movement to help end malaria perseverance, and self-sacrifice that Muh-
Graduate Studies. His last call was in mis- deaths in Africa by 2015. The agency is re- lenberg was known for.
sionary service in Egypt. In a nutshell, he sponding to the Japan earthquake through “In the same way Muhlenberg eventu-
explained, LWR works to assist refugees in its partners at the Evangelical Lutheran ally organized the congregations he served
a variety of troubled world settings, paving Church in America and the Lutheran into an independent synod, we too strive to
the way for LIRS to enter the scene to Church — Missouri Synod. It continues to enable refugees and immigrants to become
strategize the resettling of refugees in trou- work with partners in Haiti in the after- independent and self-sufficient as quickly
ble as immigrants to other parts of the world. math of 2010’s earthquake, in Colombia as possible,” Hartke noted. “It is a beautiful
Reflecting on Muhlenberg’s inherited following flooding episodes there, as well miracle and a privilege to see them rebuild
(Clockwise from top left): Muhlenberg’s collec-
legacy, LWR President and CEO John as with other emergency/disaster situations in a new country and quickly begin to give
tion of boxed cards for daily Bible reading and Nunes said, “Lutheran World Relief is around the world. back to their communities. This cycle of
meditation, a mainstay of the piety fostered at
Halle, Germany, that flourished in America proud to stand on the tradition that Henry “The spirit of Muhlenberg’s ministry to continued service bears witness to God’s
among the colonial immigrants. Melchior Muhlenberg so greatly influ- immigrants lives on in the Lutheran legacy love and sustains us as we continue to find
Among Henry Melchior Muhlenberg’s many enced. Muhlenberg’s deep connections to of serving the newcomer in this land,” ex- new and better ways to serve the sojourner
personal effects housed at LTSP is this small
wooden chest.
the wider Lutheran community, both in plained Linda Hartke, LIRS President and and the newcomer.”
America and Europe, began a legacy that CEO. The headquarters for both LWR As a professor of Islamic studies with
A 1749 deed, signed by Muhlenberg and his
wife, Anna, for the purchase of land to be used eventually led to the creation of LWR. and LIRS are in Baltimore, Maryland. nine years of experience in the Middle
for the building of a seminary, school, and re- Legend has it that during the Revolutionary
tirement home. This went unrealized until the War, John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg (Henry’s
“After World War II, when Lutherans in “Whether it is a German immigrant con- East, Grafton is proud of the continuing
founding of LTSP in 1864. son), an officer in the colonial militia, entered Germany had been battered, bombed, and gregation in eighteenth-century Pennsylva- Lutheran legacy serving refugees and im-
the pulpit of his congregation in Woodstock,
Muhlenberg’s ordination certificate (1739) was Virginia, wearing this preaching robe. He then displaced from their homes, Muhlenberg’s nia, a German orphan of the Second World migrants worldwide.✛
often utilized to help the patriarch of American said, “There is a time to preach and a time to
Lutheranism establish his position as a recog- fight, and now is the time to fight,” took off
nized Lutheran clergyman in the eyes of both his robe to reveal his military uniform under-
the congregations he was invited to serve and neath, and joined his waiting troops.
of the civil and religious authorities of the day.

18 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg www.Ltsp.edu 19
ALUMNI NEWS✛
classNOTES
The Rev. Annemarie H. Cook, MDiv, 07, was James Goodyear, MDiv ’10, was ordained on
installed as pastor of Holy Sunday, April 10, 2011 at
Trinity Lutheran Church, Gloria Dei Lutheran Church,
Bruce H. Davidson, class of 1974, Maple Shade, NJ, on May 1,
2011.
Huntingdon Valley, PA. Pas-
tor Goodyear will be serving
at Trinity Lutheran Church,
this year’s Distinguished LTSP Alumnus Fort Washington, PA.

For 10 years he advocated vigorously for New Jersey’s


Jennifer Kingstorf, MDiv ’07, was installed as Dana Heiserer, MDiv ‘10 was ordained on
poor, homeless, and disenfranchised associate pastor at Trinity Lutheran Church, Sunday, April 17, 2011 at St.
Robesonia, PA, on May 22, 2011. Petri-Hope Lutheran Church,
Philadelphia, PA, where she
THE REV. BRUCE H. DAVIDSON, class of an intentional three-year-interim call as “Without question my gifts and inter- Welcome Rowan Michael Wesch, born April is serving.
1974, was this year’s recipient of the Dis- full-time senior pastor and head of staff. ests were best used in these recent years 27, 2011 at 1:14 am, 7 lbs. 11 oz., 20 inches to
tinguished Alumnus/Alumna Award of Davidson credits the clarity of biblical with LOGM/NJ,” he felt. “I got to help The Rev. Dr. Ed Oestreich BD, ’58 has written Erika Wesch, MDiv '08, associate pastor at St.
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at and theological teaching at LTSP in aiding both those in the church and those in and published a book of original poetry enti- Paul’s Lutheran Church, Doylestown, PA, and
him to communicate clearly to others, in- elected office think about the importance tled Far From Home. (Goose River Press, 2010) Guenter M. Wesch.
Philadelphia (LTSP) and was honored at Mark Rigg, MDiv ’10, was ordained and in-
cluding sometimes unchurched politicians, of caring for the overlooked. I think some
the annual convocation banquet Tuesday The Rev. Dr. Robert H. Linders, BD ’67, senior Kathleen A. Afflerbach, MAR ’09, Service of stalled as the new pastor of
the essential importance of justice through in public office, especially those who had pastor of St. Paul’s Lutheran Commissioning as an Asso- Advent Lutheran Church,
May 3, at LTSP. ciate in Ministry in the ELCA
serving others. “I learned in the process of fallen away from the church, were really Church in Doylestown for West Lawn, PA, on January
Davidson, a resident of Stockton, New at St. John’s Evangelical
responding to my call to serve as a pastor surprised that a church body would devote the past 33 years, was in- 15, 2011.
Jersey, was recognized for his commitment ducted into his high school’s
Lutheran Church, Quaker-
that God has first loved and forgiven me its energy and time and give resources to- town, PA, May 21, 2011.
to parish ministry as well as his visionary Hall of Fame on March 30.
unconditionally, and that truth has given ward building a public voice. I think many Afflerbach, who has served
leadership for 10 years as director of the Linders was New Jersey
me the freedom to be part of a plan to en- of them felt the church was only interested State Champion in the 800 at LTSP for over 10 years,
Lutheran Office for Governmental Min-
courage us to love one another. If God can in establishing a sense of piety, looking to- Meter Run in 1960 and also a has been extended a call by the seminary as Steven Wilco, MDiv 10, was ordained on
istry (LOGM/NJ), where he served as an the Lay Theological Education Coordinator. In
use me in service this way, then God can ward heaven, or exercising judgment member of the school’s Championship of February 5, 2011, at Grace
advocate to public officials and congrega- America Mile Relay team, winning that event this role she will be working towards provid- Lutheran Church in West
use anybody.” against folks such as those with a sexual
tions on behalf of the poor, homeless and in what was then the third fastest time in the ing continuing education opportunities for Springfield, MA, and has
He credits his parents and family life to orientation they don’t agree with. Instead developing and equipping lay leaders as well
disenfranchised before retiring this year. history of the Penn Relays. Both records have been called to serve as pas-
introducing him to this kind of truth. “In they heard a different message about how been unsurpassed after 50 years at his high as promoting and strengthening the current tor of Immanuel Lutheran
The recipient of many honors and
my family life it was made clear to me that people are challenged to live with a con- school, Northern Valley Regional in Demarest, NJ. lay theological education offerings of the Church in Amherst, MA.
awards over the years, Davidson received
it’s not right to value ourselves over others,” cern for justice and love for all.” He re- In 2001, Linders was inducted into the Gettys-
Faith and Life Institute at LTSP. Afflerbach will
two appointments from former New Jersey also connect to advisory planning groups
he said. While attending Temple Univer- called seminary professors like Ted Tappert burg College Hall of Fame. He still holds the
Gov. John Corzine: the Housing Transi- such as the Network for Lifelong Learning of Ray Ranker, MDiv ’11, has been called to be
sity (BA English, 1970), he recalled plans and Robert Hughes teaching him about 800 Meter record at Gettysburg of 1:50.0 set
tion Team and the New Jersey Inter- at the IC4A Championships at Villanova Uni-
the ELCA Eastern Cluster to develop pro- Lutheran Campus Pastor at
the University had to expand into its what it means to be a faithful believer. grams for lay theological education between the University of Maryland
Agency Team on Preventing and Reducing versity in May 1964. In June 1964, he repre-
neighborhood and being impressed by Davidson admits to being concerned the seminary, ELCA synods, and ecumenical (UMD), beginning July 1,
Homelessness. He is a founding member of sented the USA in dual meet against Great
neighbors who at forums were protesting that the passion for “protecting the vulner- Britain in London.
partners. 2011. He is a 2004 graduate
the New Jersey Advocacy Network to End
the removal of their homes. The passion of able” may be ebbing in the current political Afflerbach will continue her current responsi- of UMD, College Park.
Homelessness, the Anti-Poverty Network After graduation from Gettysburg College in
the neighborhood impressed him. “I have process. “As Lutherans it is helpful to re- 1964, and LTSP in 1967, Linders earned an MA
bilities as Director of Donor Services in the
of New Jersey, and the New Jersey Anti- Development Office.
also been impressed too over the years by member what Martin Luther wrote about in English from Monmouth University and both
Hunger Coalition.
the seminary’s commitment to its neigh- concerning the importance of government master’s and doctoral degrees from Princeton
Prior to his appointment to LOGM/ Daniel W. Brettell, MDiv, ’10, was ordained on
bors and its connection to the city even be- and how it has an appropriate responsibil- University. He has been a guest lecturer in
Saturday, February 19, 2011,
NJ, he served as pastor of Holy Trinity preaching at Catholic University and LTSP. WEB EXTRA!
W
fore it adopted its current language of ity to serve those in need.” at Arndt’s Lutheran Church,
Lutheran Church, Wildwood, New Jersey
teaching about Public Leadership,” he said. Among his many honors, as director of Easton, PA. Pastor Brettell is Visit Ltsp.edu/alumni-news for more alumni news!
(1974-1981), pastor of St. Paul Lutheran Gregory Shreaves, MDiv ’05, was installed as
now serving at St. Paul’s
Davidson said he first began to think of LOGM Davidson received the Equal Jus- pastor at Allegheny Evangel-
Church, Teaneck, New Jersey (1981- Lutheran Church, Fountain ALUMNI UPDATES:
becoming a pastor when at the age of 16 a tice Award from Legal Services of New Jer- ical Lutheran Church,
1992), as director of the Lutheran Hill, PA. Please keep us up to date on ministry
woman friend encouraged him to get in- sey in 2004 and a Community Service Knauers (Mohnton), PA, on
calls, ordinations, and other alumni
HIV/AIDS Ministry of New Jersey ( July Sunday, May 15, 2011.
volved in Christian Education at Redemp- Award at the 23rd Annual Awards Dinner news to be included in upcoming issues
1992-June 1996), and as pastor of St. John
tion Lutheran Church in Northeast of New Jersey Citizen Action in 2007. He of PS by emailing Ellen Anderson, Direc-
Lutheran Church, Summit, New Jersey, in tor of Alumni and Church Relations at
Philadelphia, where his family belonged. was honored as Humanitarian of the Year
continued on page 24 eanderson@Ltsp.edu.
We’d love to hear from you!

20 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu 21


ALUMNI NEWS✛
classNOTES
The Rev. Annemarie H. Cook, MDiv, 07, was James Goodyear, MDiv ’10, was ordained on
installed as pastor of Holy Sunday, April 10, 2011 at
Trinity Lutheran Church, Gloria Dei Lutheran Church,
Bruce H. Davidson, class of 1974, Maple Shade, NJ, on May 1,
2011.
Huntingdon Valley, PA. Pas-
tor Goodyear will be serving
at Trinity Lutheran Church,
this year’s Distinguished LTSP Alumnus Fort Washington, PA.

For 10 years he advocated vigorously for New Jersey’s


Jennifer Kingstorf, MDiv ’07, was installed as Dana Heiserer, MDiv ‘10 was ordained on
poor, homeless, and disenfranchised associate pastor at Trinity Lutheran Church, Sunday, April 17, 2011 at St.
Robesonia, PA, on May 22, 2011. Petri-Hope Lutheran Church,
Philadelphia, PA, where she
THE REV. BRUCE H. DAVIDSON, class of an intentional three-year-interim call as “Without question my gifts and inter- Welcome Rowan Michael Wesch, born April is serving.
1974, was this year’s recipient of the Dis- full-time senior pastor and head of staff. ests were best used in these recent years 27, 2011 at 1:14 am, 7 lbs. 11 oz., 20 inches to
tinguished Alumnus/Alumna Award of Davidson credits the clarity of biblical with LOGM/NJ,” he felt. “I got to help The Rev. Dr. Ed Oestreich BD, ’58 has written Erika Wesch, MDiv '08, associate pastor at St.
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at and theological teaching at LTSP in aiding both those in the church and those in and published a book of original poetry enti- Paul’s Lutheran Church, Doylestown, PA, and
him to communicate clearly to others, in- elected office think about the importance tled Far From Home. (Goose River Press, 2010) Guenter M. Wesch.
Philadelphia (LTSP) and was honored at Mark Rigg, MDiv ’10, was ordained and in-
cluding sometimes unchurched politicians, of caring for the overlooked. I think some
the annual convocation banquet Tuesday The Rev. Dr. Robert H. Linders, BD ’67, senior Kathleen A. Afflerbach, MAR ’09, Service of stalled as the new pastor of
the essential importance of justice through in public office, especially those who had pastor of St. Paul’s Lutheran Commissioning as an Asso- Advent Lutheran Church,
May 3, at LTSP. ciate in Ministry in the ELCA
serving others. “I learned in the process of fallen away from the church, were really Church in Doylestown for West Lawn, PA, on January
Davidson, a resident of Stockton, New at St. John’s Evangelical
responding to my call to serve as a pastor surprised that a church body would devote the past 33 years, was in- 15, 2011.
Jersey, was recognized for his commitment ducted into his high school’s
Lutheran Church, Quaker-
that God has first loved and forgiven me its energy and time and give resources to- town, PA, May 21, 2011.
to parish ministry as well as his visionary Hall of Fame on March 30.
unconditionally, and that truth has given ward building a public voice. I think many Afflerbach, who has served
leadership for 10 years as director of the Linders was New Jersey
me the freedom to be part of a plan to en- of them felt the church was only interested State Champion in the 800 at LTSP for over 10 years,
Lutheran Office for Governmental Min-
courage us to love one another. If God can in establishing a sense of piety, looking to- Meter Run in 1960 and also a has been extended a call by the seminary as Steven Wilco, MDiv 10, was ordained on
istry (LOGM/NJ), where he served as an the Lay Theological Education Coordinator. In
use me in service this way, then God can ward heaven, or exercising judgment member of the school’s Championship of February 5, 2011, at Grace
advocate to public officials and congrega- America Mile Relay team, winning that event this role she will be working towards provid- Lutheran Church in West
use anybody.” against folks such as those with a sexual
tions on behalf of the poor, homeless and in what was then the third fastest time in the ing continuing education opportunities for Springfield, MA, and has
He credits his parents and family life to orientation they don’t agree with. Instead developing and equipping lay leaders as well
disenfranchised before retiring this year. history of the Penn Relays. Both records have been called to serve as pas-
introducing him to this kind of truth. “In they heard a different message about how been unsurpassed after 50 years at his high as promoting and strengthening the current tor of Immanuel Lutheran
The recipient of many honors and
my family life it was made clear to me that people are challenged to live with a con- school, Northern Valley Regional in Demarest, NJ. lay theological education offerings of the Church in Amherst, MA.
awards over the years, Davidson received
it’s not right to value ourselves over others,” cern for justice and love for all.” He re- In 2001, Linders was inducted into the Gettys-
Faith and Life Institute at LTSP. Afflerbach will
two appointments from former New Jersey also connect to advisory planning groups
he said. While attending Temple Univer- called seminary professors like Ted Tappert burg College Hall of Fame. He still holds the
Gov. John Corzine: the Housing Transi- such as the Network for Lifelong Learning of Ray Ranker, MDiv ’11, has been called to be
sity (BA English, 1970), he recalled plans and Robert Hughes teaching him about 800 Meter record at Gettysburg of 1:50.0 set
tion Team and the New Jersey Inter- at the IC4A Championships at Villanova Uni-
the ELCA Eastern Cluster to develop pro- Lutheran Campus Pastor at
the University had to expand into its what it means to be a faithful believer. grams for lay theological education between the University of Maryland
Agency Team on Preventing and Reducing versity in May 1964. In June 1964, he repre-
neighborhood and being impressed by Davidson admits to being concerned the seminary, ELCA synods, and ecumenical (UMD), beginning July 1,
Homelessness. He is a founding member of sented the USA in dual meet against Great
neighbors who at forums were protesting that the passion for “protecting the vulner- Britain in London.
partners. 2011. He is a 2004 graduate
the New Jersey Advocacy Network to End
the removal of their homes. The passion of able” may be ebbing in the current political Afflerbach will continue her current responsi- of UMD, College Park.
Homelessness, the Anti-Poverty Network After graduation from Gettysburg College in
the neighborhood impressed him. “I have process. “As Lutherans it is helpful to re- 1964, and LTSP in 1967, Linders earned an MA
bilities as Director of Donor Services in the
of New Jersey, and the New Jersey Anti- Development Office.
also been impressed too over the years by member what Martin Luther wrote about in English from Monmouth University and both
Hunger Coalition.
the seminary’s commitment to its neigh- concerning the importance of government master’s and doctoral degrees from Princeton
Prior to his appointment to LOGM/ Daniel W. Brettell, MDiv, ’10, was ordained on
bors and its connection to the city even be- and how it has an appropriate responsibil- University. He has been a guest lecturer in
Saturday, February 19, 2011,
NJ, he served as pastor of Holy Trinity preaching at Catholic University and LTSP. WEB EXTRA!
W
fore it adopted its current language of ity to serve those in need.” at Arndt’s Lutheran Church,
Lutheran Church, Wildwood, New Jersey
teaching about Public Leadership,” he said. Among his many honors, as director of Easton, PA. Pastor Brettell is Visit Ltsp.edu/alumni-news for more alumni news!
(1974-1981), pastor of St. Paul Lutheran Gregory Shreaves, MDiv ’05, was installed as
now serving at St. Paul’s
Davidson said he first began to think of LOGM Davidson received the Equal Jus- pastor at Allegheny Evangel-
Church, Teaneck, New Jersey (1981- Lutheran Church, Fountain ALUMNI UPDATES:
becoming a pastor when at the age of 16 a tice Award from Legal Services of New Jer- ical Lutheran Church,
1992), as director of the Lutheran Hill, PA. Please keep us up to date on ministry
woman friend encouraged him to get in- sey in 2004 and a Community Service Knauers (Mohnton), PA, on
calls, ordinations, and other alumni
HIV/AIDS Ministry of New Jersey ( July Sunday, May 15, 2011.
volved in Christian Education at Redemp- Award at the 23rd Annual Awards Dinner news to be included in upcoming issues
1992-June 1996), and as pastor of St. John
tion Lutheran Church in Northeast of New Jersey Citizen Action in 2007. He of PS by emailing Ellen Anderson, Direc-
Lutheran Church, Summit, New Jersey, in tor of Alumni and Church Relations at
Philadelphia, where his family belonged. was honored as Humanitarian of the Year
continued on page 24 eanderson@Ltsp.edu.
We’d love to hear from you!

20 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu 21


NEWS✛NOTES
FACULTY/STAFF ACTIVITIES
DR. WAYNE E. CROFT, SR. Womanist Midrash: A (Re-) Intro- REVIEWS The Coptic Papacy in of Dialog; two-week series on
Jeremiah A. Wright, Sr. Associate duction to the Hebrew Scriptures Islamic Egypt 641-1517, Mark N. “How Lutherans Read the Bible”
Professor of Homiletics and Litur- (Fortress Press); January 2011: Swanson (New York: The Ameri- at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church,
gics in African American Studies lectured for the Episcopal Club of can University in Cairo Press, Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania;
November 2010: served as guest Philadelphia on “The Jewish Jesus 2010): International Bulletin of preached and taught Adult Forum
lecturer at the How Shall They and Gentile Christians”; March Missionary Research, 35, Issue 1 on “Shopping and Salvation” at St.
Hear Without A Preacher confer- 2011: lectured at McCormick ( Jan 2011); ARTICLES “The Luke Lutheran Church, Devon,
ence in Morristown, New Jersey, Theological Seminary for MLK Youth Revolution in Egypt and Pennsylvania; in-depth workshop
lecture was “Hope and Restora- Heritage and History Lecture and the Church’s Response,” The Jour- on “Abundant Living: Youth Min-
tion: Necessary Elements for Community Bible Study, “The nal of Lutheran Ethics 11, no. 2 istry in a Consumer Society,” at
Prophetic Preaching”; January Day the Sun Stood Still for (March/April 2011) found at the Gathering in the East of the
2011: guest preacher for The Mar- Sheerah the City-Builder,” led Ltsp.edu/Grafton-egyptyouth. ELCA Youth Ministry Network;
tin Luther King, Jr. Day at Prince- bible study, “Begetting the Begats: keynote speaker at 2011 retreat of
ton Theological Seminary in Gender and Genealogy”; April DR. ERIK M. HEEN John H.P. the Virginia Synod Lutheran Men
Princeton, New Jersey; guest 2011: Scholar/Priest-in-Residence Reumann Professor of Biblical in Mission on the theme “Ambas-
preacher at St. Paul’s Baptist Church at All Saints Episcopal Church in Studies sadors of Christ — Empowered by
in West Chester, Pennsylvania for Kapaa on the island of Kauai, January 2011: presented, “Hospi- Our Triune God.”
Erik Heen bestowed the the 124th Church Anniversary;
March 2011: guest preacher for
Hawaii (phase one); presented for
the Clergy Theological Day of
tality and the New Testament”
(three sessions), Bryn Mawr Pres- JOHN KAHLER, Director of
Storm Swain Promoted to
John H.P. Reumann Chair in the Baptist Ministers Conference
of Philadelphia and Vicinity.
Study in the Diocese of Hawaii. byterian Church, Bryn Mawr,
Pennsylvania; presented, “The
Communications/Manager of
the Media Center Member of the
Associate Professor
Biblical Studies DR. DAVID D. GRAFTON
Associate Professor, Islamic
New Testament Theology of Dia-
conia,” Diaconal Ministry Forma-
organizing committee and presen-
ter, first Association of Theologi-
THE REV. DR . STORM SWAIN was promoted to the position of
Associate Professor of Pastoral Care and Theology by action of
DR . ERIK HEEN, LTSP PROFESSOR OF NEW TESTAMENT Studies and Christian-Muslim tion Event, the Lutheran cal Schools joint CFO/Technology the LTSP Board of Trustees at its Spring 2011 meeting in April.
AND GREEK, was bestowed the John H.P. Reumann Chair in Relations and Director of Gradu- Theological Seminary at Gettys- in Theological Education Group She remains Director of Anglican Studies at LTSP.
Biblical Studies at a festive celebration event on April 5, 2011. ate Studies PRESENTATIONS burg; presented, “The Gospel of conference, Orlando, Florida, No-
January 2011: “Responding to the Matthew” (2 sessions), Trinity vember 2011, co-presenter of ses-
Prof. Swain joined the LTSP faculty in July 2009 as an
After presentation of the chair by LTSP President The Rev. Dr. Assistant Professor. A native of New Zealand, Dr. Swain earned
American Media View of Islam,” Lutheran Church, Reading, Penn- sions on Learning Management
Philip D. Krey, Dr. Heen presented his first lecture as Reumann at the Lancaster Inter-Faith Peace sylvania; February 2011: preached Systems and Using Social Media in the Bachelor of Theology at the University of Otago, Dunedin,
Chair entitled “The Antikythera Mechanism, the Bible and the Witness program, Lancaster, and presented sermon on the Teaching and Learning. NZ in 1992; an STM in 1999, MPhil in 2004 and a PhD in
Cross.” The Antikythera Mechanism is an ancient mechanical Pennsylvania; “America as a Multi- Eighth Sunday After the Epiphany, 2009, all from Union Theological Seminary, New York.
computer designed to calculate astronomical positions. It was Religious Country,” at St. Paul’s Year A, adult forum, “Lutheran In- DR. J. PAUL RAJASHEKAR Her accreditations include NZHCA Hospital Chaplain
recovered in 1900-01 from the bottom of the sea near the Greek Lutheran Church, Doylestown, terpretation of Scripture,” St. John’s Dean; Luther D. Reed Professor, 1995; NZACPE Supervisor in Training 1994, Provisional Su-
island of Antikythera. LTSP President Philip D. Krey presented Pennsylvania; March 2011: “Reli- Evangelical Lutheran Church, Systematic Theology December
pervisor 1996, Certified ANZACPE Full Supervisor, 2000. She
the chair to Heen. Before the chairing, LTSP Dean J. Paul Ra- gion and Identity in the Middle Ambler, Pennsylvania; presented, 2010: led a four part series on
East,” Theologian in Residence “Lenten Texts (Year A of the Re- “The Coming of Jesus in the earned a Certificate Theory of Psychotherapy, Ashburn Hall Re-
jashekar offered remarks on the Reumann Chair and Prof. Program at St. John’s Lutheran vised Common Lectionary),” Gospels” at Upper Dublin search and Education Foundation, Dunedin NZ in, 1996, and a
Reumann; other speakers included The Rev. Dr. Robert B. DR. WIL C.M. GAFNEY Associ- Church, Phoenixville, Pennsylva- Upper Montgomery Conference Lutheran Church, Ambler, Penn- Graduate Certificate in Pastoral Psychotherapy, Graduate Cer-
Robinson, Anna Burkhalter Professor of Old Testament and He- ate Professor, Hebrew and Old nia; “The Youth Revolution in the of SEPA Synod, ELCA, Grace sylvania. January/February 2011: tificate in Psychoanalysis, Blanton Peale Graduate Institute, 2004.
brew and senior member of the faculty, who paid tribute to Testament Arab Middle East,” University Lutheran Church, Pottstown, led LTSP’s global travel seminar to Dr. Swain completed her PhD in the Psychiatry and Religion
Heen and to John Reumann; The Rev. Dr. John Richter, Board “Intoxicating Teaching as Trans- Lutheran Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; March 2011: pre- Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thai- program at Union Theological Seminary in New York, with her
chair at LTSP who shared anecdotes about Reumann and Heen, formational Pedagogy” Transform- Pennsylvania; Interfaith Center sented “Hospitality and the Bible,” land. Keynote speaker at the Sixth
dissertation topic “Trinity, Trauma, and Transformation: A
and The Rev. Dr. J. Jayakiran Sebastian, H. George Anderson ing Graduate Biblical Education: Alternative Spring Break Program, four week adult forum, Upper Asian Lutheran International
Ethos and Discipline, Society of “An overview of Christian-Muslim Dublin Lutheran Church, Ambler, Conference in Pattaya, Thailand, Trinitarian Pastoral Theology reflected in the experience of the
Professor of Mission and Cultures, who offered the opening Chaplains at the 9/11 Temporary Mortuary at Ground Zero,”
Biblical Literature Global Perspec- Relations”; March/April 2011: “A Pennsylvania. on the theme, “Reading the Bible
prayer. tive Series, eds., Elisabeth Muslim View of Good Friday,” in Asian Contexts”; April 2011: under Dr. Ann Ulanov.
Dr. Heen earned a BA from Harvard College, 1973; an MDiv Schüssler Fiorenza and Kent Lenten Book Study at Upper DR. JOHN F. HOFFMEYER led a three part Lenten series on Canonically resident in the Episcopal Diocese of New York,
from Harvard Divinity School, 1982; MTh from Luther Theo- Harold Richards, 2010; “Terroris- Dublin Lutheran Church, Ambler, Associate Professor, Systematic the theme “Cross and the Human Dr. Swain most recently served the church as Canon Pastor at
logical Seminary, 1990; MPhil from Columbia University, 1993; tic Threats: A Woman-Prophet Pennsylvania; PARTICIPATION Theology Auxiliary editor of the Rights” at Upper Dublin Lutheran the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York (2002-7). She
and PhD from Columbia University, 1997. His dissertation, Takes on an Imperial Imposter in March 2011: LTSP International Winter 2010 issue of Dialog on Church in Ambler, Pennsylvania. has served as the Diocese’s representative on the Board of New
“Saturnalicius Princeps: The Enthronement of Jesus in Early an Anti-Poverty Campaign, The Student Dinner at St. Paul’s the theme “Theology in a Con-
No‘adiah/Nehemiah Conflict,” Lutheran Church, Glenside, Penn- sumer Society:” article “Thinking
York Disaster Interfaith Services. She now oversees Anglican
Christian Discourse” (UMI Microfilm Number 9728216), Studies at LTSP in addition to her Pastoral Care and Theology
Journal of Black Theology (Spring sylvania; PC-USA/Muslim Amer- Theologically About Consumer
continued on page 24 2011); on sabbatical writing A ican Society Dialogue; BOOK Society” in the Winter 2010 issue academic responsibilities.
continued on next page

22 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu 23


NEWS✛NOTES
FACULTY/STAFF ACTIVITIES
DR. WAYNE E. CROFT, SR. Womanist Midrash: A (Re-) Intro- REVIEWS The Coptic Papacy in of Dialog; two-week series on
Jeremiah A. Wright, Sr. Associate duction to the Hebrew Scriptures Islamic Egypt 641-1517, Mark N. “How Lutherans Read the Bible”
Professor of Homiletics and Litur- (Fortress Press); January 2011: Swanson (New York: The Ameri- at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church,
gics in African American Studies lectured for the Episcopal Club of can University in Cairo Press, Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania;
November 2010: served as guest Philadelphia on “The Jewish Jesus 2010): International Bulletin of preached and taught Adult Forum
lecturer at the How Shall They and Gentile Christians”; March Missionary Research, 35, Issue 1 on “Shopping and Salvation” at St.
Hear Without A Preacher confer- 2011: lectured at McCormick ( Jan 2011); ARTICLES “The Luke Lutheran Church, Devon,
ence in Morristown, New Jersey, Theological Seminary for MLK Youth Revolution in Egypt and Pennsylvania; in-depth workshop
lecture was “Hope and Restora- Heritage and History Lecture and the Church’s Response,” The Jour- on “Abundant Living: Youth Min-
tion: Necessary Elements for Community Bible Study, “The nal of Lutheran Ethics 11, no. 2 istry in a Consumer Society,” at
Prophetic Preaching”; January Day the Sun Stood Still for (March/April 2011) found at the Gathering in the East of the
2011: guest preacher for The Mar- Sheerah the City-Builder,” led Ltsp.edu/Grafton-egyptyouth. ELCA Youth Ministry Network;
tin Luther King, Jr. Day at Prince- bible study, “Begetting the Begats: keynote speaker at 2011 retreat of
ton Theological Seminary in Gender and Genealogy”; April DR. ERIK M. HEEN John H.P. the Virginia Synod Lutheran Men
Princeton, New Jersey; guest 2011: Scholar/Priest-in-Residence Reumann Professor of Biblical in Mission on the theme “Ambas-
preacher at St. Paul’s Baptist Church at All Saints Episcopal Church in Studies sadors of Christ — Empowered by
in West Chester, Pennsylvania for Kapaa on the island of Kauai, January 2011: presented, “Hospi- Our Triune God.”
Erik Heen bestowed the the 124th Church Anniversary;
March 2011: guest preacher for
Hawaii (phase one); presented for
the Clergy Theological Day of
tality and the New Testament”
(three sessions), Bryn Mawr Pres- JOHN KAHLER, Director of
Storm Swain Promoted to
John H.P. Reumann Chair in the Baptist Ministers Conference
of Philadelphia and Vicinity.
Study in the Diocese of Hawaii. byterian Church, Bryn Mawr,
Pennsylvania; presented, “The
Communications/Manager of
the Media Center Member of the
Associate Professor
Biblical Studies DR. DAVID D. GRAFTON
Associate Professor, Islamic
New Testament Theology of Dia-
conia,” Diaconal Ministry Forma-
organizing committee and presen-
ter, first Association of Theologi-
THE REV. DR . STORM SWAIN was promoted to the position of
Associate Professor of Pastoral Care and Theology by action of
DR . ERIK HEEN, LTSP PROFESSOR OF NEW TESTAMENT Studies and Christian-Muslim tion Event, the Lutheran cal Schools joint CFO/Technology the LTSP Board of Trustees at its Spring 2011 meeting in April.
AND GREEK, was bestowed the John H.P. Reumann Chair in Relations and Director of Gradu- Theological Seminary at Gettys- in Theological Education Group She remains Director of Anglican Studies at LTSP.
Biblical Studies at a festive celebration event on April 5, 2011. ate Studies PRESENTATIONS burg; presented, “The Gospel of conference, Orlando, Florida, No-
January 2011: “Responding to the Matthew” (2 sessions), Trinity vember 2011, co-presenter of ses-
Prof. Swain joined the LTSP faculty in July 2009 as an
After presentation of the chair by LTSP President The Rev. Dr. Assistant Professor. A native of New Zealand, Dr. Swain earned
American Media View of Islam,” Lutheran Church, Reading, Penn- sions on Learning Management
Philip D. Krey, Dr. Heen presented his first lecture as Reumann at the Lancaster Inter-Faith Peace sylvania; February 2011: preached Systems and Using Social Media in the Bachelor of Theology at the University of Otago, Dunedin,
Chair entitled “The Antikythera Mechanism, the Bible and the Witness program, Lancaster, and presented sermon on the Teaching and Learning. NZ in 1992; an STM in 1999, MPhil in 2004 and a PhD in
Cross.” The Antikythera Mechanism is an ancient mechanical Pennsylvania; “America as a Multi- Eighth Sunday After the Epiphany, 2009, all from Union Theological Seminary, New York.
computer designed to calculate astronomical positions. It was Religious Country,” at St. Paul’s Year A, adult forum, “Lutheran In- DR. J. PAUL RAJASHEKAR Her accreditations include NZHCA Hospital Chaplain
recovered in 1900-01 from the bottom of the sea near the Greek Lutheran Church, Doylestown, terpretation of Scripture,” St. John’s Dean; Luther D. Reed Professor, 1995; NZACPE Supervisor in Training 1994, Provisional Su-
island of Antikythera. LTSP President Philip D. Krey presented Pennsylvania; March 2011: “Reli- Evangelical Lutheran Church, Systematic Theology December
pervisor 1996, Certified ANZACPE Full Supervisor, 2000. She
the chair to Heen. Before the chairing, LTSP Dean J. Paul Ra- gion and Identity in the Middle Ambler, Pennsylvania; presented, 2010: led a four part series on
East,” Theologian in Residence “Lenten Texts (Year A of the Re- “The Coming of Jesus in the earned a Certificate Theory of Psychotherapy, Ashburn Hall Re-
jashekar offered remarks on the Reumann Chair and Prof. Program at St. John’s Lutheran vised Common Lectionary),” Gospels” at Upper Dublin search and Education Foundation, Dunedin NZ in, 1996, and a
Reumann; other speakers included The Rev. Dr. Robert B. DR. WIL C.M. GAFNEY Associ- Church, Phoenixville, Pennsylva- Upper Montgomery Conference Lutheran Church, Ambler, Penn- Graduate Certificate in Pastoral Psychotherapy, Graduate Cer-
Robinson, Anna Burkhalter Professor of Old Testament and He- ate Professor, Hebrew and Old nia; “The Youth Revolution in the of SEPA Synod, ELCA, Grace sylvania. January/February 2011: tificate in Psychoanalysis, Blanton Peale Graduate Institute, 2004.
brew and senior member of the faculty, who paid tribute to Testament Arab Middle East,” University Lutheran Church, Pottstown, led LTSP’s global travel seminar to Dr. Swain completed her PhD in the Psychiatry and Religion
Heen and to John Reumann; The Rev. Dr. John Richter, Board “Intoxicating Teaching as Trans- Lutheran Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; March 2011: pre- Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thai- program at Union Theological Seminary in New York, with her
chair at LTSP who shared anecdotes about Reumann and Heen, formational Pedagogy” Transform- Pennsylvania; Interfaith Center sented “Hospitality and the Bible,” land. Keynote speaker at the Sixth
dissertation topic “Trinity, Trauma, and Transformation: A
and The Rev. Dr. J. Jayakiran Sebastian, H. George Anderson ing Graduate Biblical Education: Alternative Spring Break Program, four week adult forum, Upper Asian Lutheran International
Ethos and Discipline, Society of “An overview of Christian-Muslim Dublin Lutheran Church, Ambler, Conference in Pattaya, Thailand, Trinitarian Pastoral Theology reflected in the experience of the
Professor of Mission and Cultures, who offered the opening Chaplains at the 9/11 Temporary Mortuary at Ground Zero,”
Biblical Literature Global Perspec- Relations”; March/April 2011: “A Pennsylvania. on the theme, “Reading the Bible
prayer. tive Series, eds., Elisabeth Muslim View of Good Friday,” in Asian Contexts”; April 2011: under Dr. Ann Ulanov.
Dr. Heen earned a BA from Harvard College, 1973; an MDiv Schüssler Fiorenza and Kent Lenten Book Study at Upper DR. JOHN F. HOFFMEYER led a three part Lenten series on Canonically resident in the Episcopal Diocese of New York,
from Harvard Divinity School, 1982; MTh from Luther Theo- Harold Richards, 2010; “Terroris- Dublin Lutheran Church, Ambler, Associate Professor, Systematic the theme “Cross and the Human Dr. Swain most recently served the church as Canon Pastor at
logical Seminary, 1990; MPhil from Columbia University, 1993; tic Threats: A Woman-Prophet Pennsylvania; PARTICIPATION Theology Auxiliary editor of the Rights” at Upper Dublin Lutheran the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York (2002-7). She
and PhD from Columbia University, 1997. His dissertation, Takes on an Imperial Imposter in March 2011: LTSP International Winter 2010 issue of Dialog on Church in Ambler, Pennsylvania. has served as the Diocese’s representative on the Board of New
“Saturnalicius Princeps: The Enthronement of Jesus in Early an Anti-Poverty Campaign, The Student Dinner at St. Paul’s the theme “Theology in a Con-
No‘adiah/Nehemiah Conflict,” Lutheran Church, Glenside, Penn- sumer Society:” article “Thinking
York Disaster Interfaith Services. She now oversees Anglican
Christian Discourse” (UMI Microfilm Number 9728216), Studies at LTSP in addition to her Pastoral Care and Theology
Journal of Black Theology (Spring sylvania; PC-USA/Muslim Amer- Theologically About Consumer
continued on page 24 2011); on sabbatical writing A ican Society Dialogue; BOOK Society” in the Winter 2010 issue academic responsibilities.
continued on next page

22 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu 23


FACULTY/STAFF ACTIVITIES PASSAGES IN MEMORIAM
DR. J. JAYAKIRAN SEBASTIAN
H. George Anderson Professor of
DR. TIMOTHY J. WENGERT
Ministerium of Pennsylvania
Erik Heen continued from page 22

investigated the motif of Jesus’ enthronement in the New Testament


Bishop Lee Miller Miriam Eileen Recker White, died
on April 14, 2011 in her home. She
was the wife of LTSP Emeritus Pro-
Mission and Cultures; Director, Professor, Reformation History
Multicultural Mission Resource January 2011: led adult forum on as well as the manner in which it critiqued the local imperial cults in fessor the Rev. Dr. Andrew J. (Jack)
LTSP ALUMNUS THE REV. DR . LEE M. MILLER White. They were married on May
Center PUBLICATIONS “Over- prayer at St. Matthew Lutheran the cities of the Ancient Greek East.
(MDiv ’63) died January 31, 2011 in East Syracuse, New 30, 1953, in Cleveland Heights, OH.
coming Ignorance and Arrogance: Church, Moorestown, New Jersey; The John H.P. Reumann Chair in Biblical Studies was estab-
York at the age of 72. He served as Bishop of the Upstate She taught general science and
Public Theology in a Multicul- led retreat for New Jersey Synod lished as a memorial for the late Rev. Dr. John H. P. Reumann, the
tural Context,” in V.J. John, ed., Diakonia; February 2011: led re-
Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America chemistry for thirty years at Chest-
Ministerium of Pennsylvania Professor Emeritus of New Testament
Many Ways of Pluralism: Essays in treat on Large Catechism for from 1992 to 2002, during which time he was a member nut Hill Academy, a boys’ prep
and Greek at LTSP, who was known for encyclopedic knowledge of school in Philadelphia. She held the
Honour of Kalarikkal Poulose Lower Susquehanna Synod Pastors of LTSP’s Board of Trustees. Bishop Miller was recog-
the Bible, and whose influence ranged from the seminary classroom Baird Chair, was made an honorary
Aleaz (Delhi: ISPCK, 2010), pp. at Camp Nawakwa, Pennsylvania; nized with LTSP’s Distinguished Alumnus award in 2008. alumna of the Academy, and received
320-329; “‘… not hurrying on to a preached and introduced the
to national and international ecumenical and interfaith circles. Dr.
Prior to being elected bishop, Dr. Miller served from a fan appreciation award, the Corn-
receding future, nor hankering Muhlenberg Exhibit at Christ the Reumann died in 2008.
1976 to 1988 as Assistant to the Bishop of the Upper ing Pearson Award for Distinguished
after an imagined past’: Edin- King Lutheran Church, Houston, New York Synod of the Lutheran Church in America, an Service, and several other recogni-
burgh 1910, T.S. Eliot, Postcolo- Texas; March 2011: retreat with WEB EXTRA!
W tion awards.
ELCA predecessor church body, and was assistant to the
nial Missiology, and Our Mission NEPA Synod rostered leaders in Always active in her churches, St.
to God,” in Journal of Postcolonial Skytop, Pennsylvania; led a session bishop in the Upstate New York Synod from 1988 to
A recording of the ceremony and lecture along with photos and more Luke Lutheran in Chambersburg and
Theory and Theology, Volume 2, at the Conference for Congrega- 1992, as well as Mission Director on behalf of the ELCA. Reformation Lutheran, Philadelphia,
information can be found online at Ltsp.edu/ReumannChair.
Issue 1.4 (March 2011), pp. 1-22; tional Ministries for the New Jer- He served as pastor at First English Lutheran Church, as teacher, leader and choir mem-
BOOK REVIEW The Truth, the sey Synod in Trenton, New Jersey; Lockport, New York, from 1971 to 1976 and assistant ber, she will be remembered as the
Way, the Life: Christian Commen- April 2011: presented a paper at a pastor at First Lutheran Church, Jamestown, New York, consummate team player in every
tary on the Three Holy Mantras of joint meeting of the North Ameri- endeavor of life.
Bruce Davidson continued from page 20
from 1965 to 1971.
the Srivaisnava Hindus, Christian can Luther Academy and the Calvin Miriam was active in the American
He served as a school board member in Jamestown and Lockport, convener of the Collegium of the
Commentaries on Non-Christian Studies Forum in Minneapolis, Chemical Society and was the first
by the Immigration and Refugee Department of Lutheran Social New York State Council of Churches. In addition to LTSP, he served on the boards of trustees of high-school teacher ever elected
Sacred Texts, Francis X. Clooney Minnesota; May 2011: led an
(Eerdmans, 2008), in Journal of adult forum on Henry Melchior Ministries of New Jersey in 2007. In 2009, he was one of five hon- Lutheran Social Services of Upstate New York in Jamestown and Augsburg Fortress Publishing House, chair of the large Philadelphia Section
Ecumenical Studies, Vol. 45, No. 3 Muhlenberg at St. David’s Lutheran orees at the 20th anniversary banquet of the Housing and Commu- Minneapolis, Minnesota. of ACS. In 1987, she was one of
nity Development Network of New Jersey. In 1995 he was named a four teachers in the United States to
(Summer 2010), pp. 519-520; Church in Robesonia, Pennsylvania. His successor as bishop of the Upstate New York Synod, The Rev. Marie C. Jerge, told the Syracuse
be granted the prestigious Catalyst
ENGAGEMENTS December 2010: Distinguished Alumnus of the Community College of Philadelphia, Post-Standard that Miller was known for being very playful. “His favorite thing to do on a vacation was Award by the Chemical Manufactur-
presenter, Adult Forum at St. DR. KARYN L. WISEMAN from which he received an AA degree in 1968. He also has been to go to Disney World and ride the rides. We would even have staff meetings and go play miniature ers’ Association.
Paul’s Lutheran Church, Telford, Assistant Professor of Homiletics honored for his HIV/AIDS ministry by the National Inter-Faith golf,” she said. She spent three months in the fall
Pennsylvania, on the theme: “Full- Interview with AARP Bulletin for AIDS Alliance.
ness of Life: Learning from a Vil- an article on “Baby Boomers and
In her prepared remarks, Jerge noted that “Pray First” became the synod’s slogan in the late 1990s, of 2002 as a volunteer at the Evan-
thanks to Miller. gelical Lutheran Church in America
lage Congregation in India”; the Church” (April 21, 2011); Wittenberg Center in Germany. She
February 2011: faculty leader, preached at St. Paul Lutheran “Lee knew that spiritual growth and outreach could not happen apart from the work of God’s Holy also served as a recruiter for mis-
Project Connect, Annual Gather- Church, Ardmore, Pennsylvania, Spirit. He encouraged, cajoled, pushed, and modeled for us what it means to pray first instead of last,” sionaries for the Global Mission divi-
ing of Pre-Seminary Young Adults, for Lenten series, “Light in the she said. sion of the church body. In her
the Lutheran Theological Semi- Darkness”; April 2011: book re- He is survived by his wife Joan, to whom he was married more than 45 years, and their children: lifetime, she traveled in 45 countries
nary at Gettysburg, presentation view of Audrey Borschel’s Preach- on six continents.
daughter Beth Ann and her husband Phillip McCollum, and grandchildren Amelia and Damon, and
on “Blessed be the tie that binds ing Prophetically When the News Gifts may be directed to Lutheran
son The Rev. Lee M. Miller II and his wife Heather and grandson Griffin; his brother Frank Miller,
— a global and theological per- Disturbs: Interpreting the Media in Home Care and Hospice or Chest-
spective on Christian commu- Encounter, Rebecca Furnish, editor. aunts, cousins, nieces, nephews and in-law relatives. nut Hill Academy in Philadelphia,
nity”; March 2011: resource Services were Saturday, February 5, 2011, at St. John’s Lutheran Church, Philadelphia, PA, where where Miriam has set up a special
person, “Troubling the Water,” The Rev. Lee M. Miller II is pastor. A second service was held on Sunday, February 13, 2011, at St. scholarship fund.
Theological Education with Stephen Lutheran Church, Syracuse, New York.
Youth, Atonement Lutheran The family suggests memorials to Upstate New York Synod, Bishop Lee M. Miller; Equipping the The Rev. Dr. George W. Forell, DIP
Church, Wyomissing, Pennsylvania. Saints Fund, 110 Hinsdale Road, Camillus, NY, 13031; St. Stephen Lutheran Church, 873 Dewitt ’41, died April 29,2011.
Street, Syracuse, NY, 13203; or St. John’s Lutheran Church, 3101 Tyson Avenue, Philadelphia, PA, 19149. The Rev. Rollin G. Shaffer, BD ’42,
died November 23, 2010. Pastor
Shaffer, prior to his retirement, was
the Director of Lutheran World Ac-
tion within the USA National Com-
mittee of the Lutheran World
Federation. During his 33 years of
continued

24 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu 25


FACULTY/STAFF ACTIVITIES PASSAGES IN MEMORIAM
DR. J. JAYAKIRAN SEBASTIAN
H. George Anderson Professor of
DR. TIMOTHY J. WENGERT
Ministerium of Pennsylvania
Erik Heen continued from page 22

investigated the motif of Jesus’ enthronement in the New Testament


Bishop Lee Miller Miriam Eileen Recker White, died
on April 14, 2011 in her home. She
was the wife of LTSP Emeritus Pro-
Mission and Cultures; Director, Professor, Reformation History
Multicultural Mission Resource January 2011: led adult forum on as well as the manner in which it critiqued the local imperial cults in fessor the Rev. Dr. Andrew J. (Jack)
LTSP ALUMNUS THE REV. DR . LEE M. MILLER White. They were married on May
Center PUBLICATIONS “Over- prayer at St. Matthew Lutheran the cities of the Ancient Greek East.
(MDiv ’63) died January 31, 2011 in East Syracuse, New 30, 1953, in Cleveland Heights, OH.
coming Ignorance and Arrogance: Church, Moorestown, New Jersey; The John H.P. Reumann Chair in Biblical Studies was estab-
York at the age of 72. He served as Bishop of the Upstate She taught general science and
Public Theology in a Multicul- led retreat for New Jersey Synod lished as a memorial for the late Rev. Dr. John H. P. Reumann, the
tural Context,” in V.J. John, ed., Diakonia; February 2011: led re-
Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America chemistry for thirty years at Chest-
Ministerium of Pennsylvania Professor Emeritus of New Testament
Many Ways of Pluralism: Essays in treat on Large Catechism for from 1992 to 2002, during which time he was a member nut Hill Academy, a boys’ prep
and Greek at LTSP, who was known for encyclopedic knowledge of school in Philadelphia. She held the
Honour of Kalarikkal Poulose Lower Susquehanna Synod Pastors of LTSP’s Board of Trustees. Bishop Miller was recog-
the Bible, and whose influence ranged from the seminary classroom Baird Chair, was made an honorary
Aleaz (Delhi: ISPCK, 2010), pp. at Camp Nawakwa, Pennsylvania; nized with LTSP’s Distinguished Alumnus award in 2008. alumna of the Academy, and received
320-329; “‘… not hurrying on to a preached and introduced the
to national and international ecumenical and interfaith circles. Dr.
Prior to being elected bishop, Dr. Miller served from a fan appreciation award, the Corn-
receding future, nor hankering Muhlenberg Exhibit at Christ the Reumann died in 2008.
1976 to 1988 as Assistant to the Bishop of the Upper ing Pearson Award for Distinguished
after an imagined past’: Edin- King Lutheran Church, Houston, New York Synod of the Lutheran Church in America, an Service, and several other recogni-
burgh 1910, T.S. Eliot, Postcolo- Texas; March 2011: retreat with WEB EXTRA!
W tion awards.
ELCA predecessor church body, and was assistant to the
nial Missiology, and Our Mission NEPA Synod rostered leaders in Always active in her churches, St.
to God,” in Journal of Postcolonial Skytop, Pennsylvania; led a session bishop in the Upstate New York Synod from 1988 to
A recording of the ceremony and lecture along with photos and more Luke Lutheran in Chambersburg and
Theory and Theology, Volume 2, at the Conference for Congrega- 1992, as well as Mission Director on behalf of the ELCA. Reformation Lutheran, Philadelphia,
information can be found online at Ltsp.edu/ReumannChair.
Issue 1.4 (March 2011), pp. 1-22; tional Ministries for the New Jer- He served as pastor at First English Lutheran Church, as teacher, leader and choir mem-
BOOK REVIEW The Truth, the sey Synod in Trenton, New Jersey; Lockport, New York, from 1971 to 1976 and assistant ber, she will be remembered as the
Way, the Life: Christian Commen- April 2011: presented a paper at a pastor at First Lutheran Church, Jamestown, New York, consummate team player in every
tary on the Three Holy Mantras of joint meeting of the North Ameri- endeavor of life.
Bruce Davidson continued from page 20
from 1965 to 1971.
the Srivaisnava Hindus, Christian can Luther Academy and the Calvin Miriam was active in the American
He served as a school board member in Jamestown and Lockport, convener of the Collegium of the
Commentaries on Non-Christian Studies Forum in Minneapolis, Chemical Society and was the first
by the Immigration and Refugee Department of Lutheran Social New York State Council of Churches. In addition to LTSP, he served on the boards of trustees of high-school teacher ever elected
Sacred Texts, Francis X. Clooney Minnesota; May 2011: led an
(Eerdmans, 2008), in Journal of adult forum on Henry Melchior Ministries of New Jersey in 2007. In 2009, he was one of five hon- Lutheran Social Services of Upstate New York in Jamestown and Augsburg Fortress Publishing House, chair of the large Philadelphia Section
Ecumenical Studies, Vol. 45, No. 3 Muhlenberg at St. David’s Lutheran orees at the 20th anniversary banquet of the Housing and Commu- Minneapolis, Minnesota. of ACS. In 1987, she was one of
nity Development Network of New Jersey. In 1995 he was named a four teachers in the United States to
(Summer 2010), pp. 519-520; Church in Robesonia, Pennsylvania. His successor as bishop of the Upstate New York Synod, The Rev. Marie C. Jerge, told the Syracuse
be granted the prestigious Catalyst
ENGAGEMENTS December 2010: Distinguished Alumnus of the Community College of Philadelphia, Post-Standard that Miller was known for being very playful. “His favorite thing to do on a vacation was Award by the Chemical Manufactur-
presenter, Adult Forum at St. DR. KARYN L. WISEMAN from which he received an AA degree in 1968. He also has been to go to Disney World and ride the rides. We would even have staff meetings and go play miniature ers’ Association.
Paul’s Lutheran Church, Telford, Assistant Professor of Homiletics honored for his HIV/AIDS ministry by the National Inter-Faith golf,” she said. She spent three months in the fall
Pennsylvania, on the theme: “Full- Interview with AARP Bulletin for AIDS Alliance.
ness of Life: Learning from a Vil- an article on “Baby Boomers and
In her prepared remarks, Jerge noted that “Pray First” became the synod’s slogan in the late 1990s, of 2002 as a volunteer at the Evan-
thanks to Miller. gelical Lutheran Church in America
lage Congregation in India”; the Church” (April 21, 2011); Wittenberg Center in Germany. She
February 2011: faculty leader, preached at St. Paul Lutheran “Lee knew that spiritual growth and outreach could not happen apart from the work of God’s Holy also served as a recruiter for mis-
Project Connect, Annual Gather- Church, Ardmore, Pennsylvania, Spirit. He encouraged, cajoled, pushed, and modeled for us what it means to pray first instead of last,” sionaries for the Global Mission divi-
ing of Pre-Seminary Young Adults, for Lenten series, “Light in the she said. sion of the church body. In her
the Lutheran Theological Semi- Darkness”; April 2011: book re- He is survived by his wife Joan, to whom he was married more than 45 years, and their children: lifetime, she traveled in 45 countries
nary at Gettysburg, presentation view of Audrey Borschel’s Preach- on six continents.
daughter Beth Ann and her husband Phillip McCollum, and grandchildren Amelia and Damon, and
on “Blessed be the tie that binds ing Prophetically When the News Gifts may be directed to Lutheran
son The Rev. Lee M. Miller II and his wife Heather and grandson Griffin; his brother Frank Miller,
— a global and theological per- Disturbs: Interpreting the Media in Home Care and Hospice or Chest-
spective on Christian commu- Encounter, Rebecca Furnish, editor. aunts, cousins, nieces, nephews and in-law relatives. nut Hill Academy in Philadelphia,
nity”; March 2011: resource Services were Saturday, February 5, 2011, at St. John’s Lutheran Church, Philadelphia, PA, where where Miriam has set up a special
person, “Troubling the Water,” The Rev. Lee M. Miller II is pastor. A second service was held on Sunday, February 13, 2011, at St. scholarship fund.
Theological Education with Stephen Lutheran Church, Syracuse, New York.
Youth, Atonement Lutheran The family suggests memorials to Upstate New York Synod, Bishop Lee M. Miller; Equipping the The Rev. Dr. George W. Forell, DIP
Church, Wyomissing, Pennsylvania. Saints Fund, 110 Hinsdale Road, Camillus, NY, 13031; St. Stephen Lutheran Church, 873 Dewitt ’41, died April 29,2011.
Street, Syracuse, NY, 13203; or St. John’s Lutheran Church, 3101 Tyson Avenue, Philadelphia, PA, 19149. The Rev. Rollin G. Shaffer, BD ’42,
died November 23, 2010. Pastor
Shaffer, prior to his retirement, was
the Director of Lutheran World Ac-
tion within the USA National Com-
mittee of the Lutheran World
Federation. During his 33 years of
continued

24 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu 25


around

✛ADMISSIONS
IN MEMORIAM Muhlenberg College and The Lutheran
service he directed various offices of Cuban Missile Crisis. After retire- Theological Seminary at Philadelphia: AS WE CELEBRATE THE 300TH ANNIVERSARY OF MUHLEN- The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia will be the
the agency primarily in promoting its ment from the military, Chaplain
overseas relief and development Spohn served at the Philadelphia
Reasserting the Relationship BERG’S BIRTH, we celebrate our historic and renewed partnership beneficiaries of an outstanding education and the inheritors of a
programs. He made many overseas State Hospital for a decade. with Muhlenberg College. For many years, the majority of the stu- theological and civic tradition that will help them discover a zeal
trips visiting over 60 countries for The relationship between Muhlenberg College and The Lutheran dent body at LTSP was comprised of “Muhlenberg men,” reflecting for innovative church leadership in challenging times. The oppor-
The Rev. Dr. Franklin L. Jensen,
consultation and the development of
BD ’43, died February 15, 2011. Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP) did not begin with the deep connection between the two institutions forged by Henry tunity to study at two world-class institutions and to be further
mission programs. He was an or- Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, but is a testament to his motto “Ec-
dained Lutheran Minister for 70 The Rev. Walter P. Fetterly, BD ’45, Melchior Muhlenberg. Today, we count several Muhlenberg men supported by the church’s resources is indeed a worthy tribute to
years. In his early ministry, he was died on February 21, 2011. During clesia Plantanda” (planting the church). The college and seminary and women among the ranks of those preparing for public leader- Henry Melchior Muhlenberg and the Lutheran tradition in today’s
the Pastor of Holy Trinity Lutheran his ministry, he served as pastor of have been working together to plant churches and to plant leaders ship in the church and world. In celebration of this continuing world. We are delighted by this partnership and look forward to
Church in Manasquan, NJ, and Grace Trinity Lutheran Church, Verone; for those churches for almost 150 years. partnership, the two institutions will sign a new agreement pledg- welcoming a new generation of leaders who will bear the faithful,
Lutheran Church in Shamokin, PA. Scenery Hill Pastoral Charge,
Scenery Hill; St. Mark and St. Paul
Academic excellence in the Lutheran tradition is foremost at ing financial support, discernment resources, and a deep partner- creative, persistent spirit that is Muhlenberg’s legacy.
Pastor Shaffer served on commit- both schools, and Henry Melchior Muhlenberg plays a prominent ship that will form public leaders for the mission of the gospel in
Lutheran Churches, Scranton; and
tees of the World Council of — The Rev. Louise N. Johnson, Director of Admissions
Bethany, West Reading, all in Penn- role in their histories. Muhlenberg College was founded in 1848 the world. Students who matriculate at Muhlenberg College and
Churches and the National Council
sylvania. He then served as interim and renamed in 1867 for this fine German immigrant, influential
of Churches. He was a former Chair-
pastor of St. Paul Lutheran Church in
man of the National Council of
Hamburg, PA from 1985 to 1994.
pastor, and beloved father. LTSP is the manifestation of the “semi-
Churches “One Great Hour of Shar- nary in the great city” of Muhlenberg’s vision, and the statue of
ing,” the annual overseas aid appeal The Rev. Richard H. Schaefer, BD
’54, died on April 29, 2011. Follow-
Muhlenberg greets all who enter the seminary’s campus.
of Protestant and Orthodox
churches through Church World ing his ordination, Pastor Schaefer The tie between the two schools goes beyond a shared historical
Service. served the Niantic-Bechtelsville figure. For the past 147 years, they have shared alumni — more
Parish (1954-1958), New Tripoli than 1,060 LTSP students received their undergraduate degree
He was a native of Williamsport, PA,
Parish (1958-1965), and Calvary, Lau-
and graduated Summa Cum Laude
reldale from 1965 until his retire-
from Muhlenberg College. With the Muhlenberg Tercentenary
and Valedictorian from Muhlenberg year, there is renewed energy in the partnership as we work to-
ment in 1998. In retirement he was
College in 1937. He earned his MA
from Syracuse University where he
the interim pastor of numerous gether to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the birth of Henry
churches and oversaw the synod's Melchior Muhlenberg.
met his wife of 70 years, Ethel. He
farm ministry program.
also earned a BD from LTSP. Muhlenberg College has already hosted the traveling exhibit
The Rev. A. George Guba, BD ’55, from the Francke Foundations in Halle, Germany. The exhibit out-
Pastor Shaffer lived for nearly 40
died March 1, 2011.
years in Nutley, NJ, and for the past lines the work of the Foundations in forming the life of Muhlen-
22 years in Venice, FL, at the Village The Rev. Edward L. O’Shea, BD ’56,
berg, his life and travels in the colonies, and the work of his sons to
on The Isle retirement community died October 30, 2010. His calls in-
where he was an active member of cluded St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church, carry on the family legacy. LTSP will host this exhibit in its
Emmanuel Lutheran Church and in Summit Lawn, PA; Army Chaplain; Philadelphia debut September 6, 2011, as the seminary kicks off its
the community. and Prince of Peace Lutheran part of the Tercentenary celebration, and at other times later in the
Church, Fernandina Beach, FL.
He is survived by his wife, Ethel, celebration year.
two sisters, his son Gregory and his The Rev. Leslie E. Evans, MDiv ’82, As part of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Synod of the ELCA’s
wife, one granddaughter, two great died November 2, 2010 at Lower
Bucks Hospital in Bristol, PA. Evans
annual synod assembly in June 2011, being hosted at Muhlenberg
grandchildren, and numerous nieces
and nephews. was born in Bethlehem, PA, at- College, LTSP Professor Jon Pahl will keynote the assembly theme
tended Shimer College, and was a of “Muhlenberg, Malls, and Mission.” There will also be the sign-
The Rev. Arnold P. Spohn, BD ’42,
graduate of Temple University ing of an articulation agreement between Muhlenberg College and
died January 2, 2011. Pastor Spohn
School of Nursing. She became an
had a twenty-four year career of
ordained Episcopal Priest in 1984.
LTSP to reassert the long-term partnership of training leaders for
service in the Navy as chaplain with public ministry.
tours of duty in Europe, the Middle The Rev. Frederick J. Bryant, Jr.,
East, the Persian Gulf, India, and MDiv, ’91, died April 15, 2011. Pas- Visit Ltsp.edu/Muhlenberg300 for more information.
Africa, and participated in the last tor Bryant was born in Philadelphia,
two battles of World War II (Iwo PA, and ordained at Trinity Lutheran
Jima and Okinawa), ministering to Church in Philadelphia on May 26,
war crimes prisoners on Guam at 1991. He served as pastor of Media-
the end of the war. He served as tor Lutheran Church in Philadelphia,
chaplain with the US Marines serv- June 1991 through December 1993,
ing on the front lines of the Korean before transferring to the New Jersey
War through the winters of 1951 Synod and accepting a call to serve
and 1952, and served during the Trinity Lutheran Church in Jersey City.
cold war with Russia during the

26 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu 27


around

✛ADMISSIONS
IN MEMORIAM Muhlenberg College and The Lutheran
service he directed various offices of Cuban Missile Crisis. After retire- Theological Seminary at Philadelphia: AS WE CELEBRATE THE 300TH ANNIVERSARY OF MUHLEN- The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia will be the
the agency primarily in promoting its ment from the military, Chaplain
overseas relief and development Spohn served at the Philadelphia
Reasserting the Relationship BERG’S BIRTH, we celebrate our historic and renewed partnership beneficiaries of an outstanding education and the inheritors of a
programs. He made many overseas State Hospital for a decade. with Muhlenberg College. For many years, the majority of the stu- theological and civic tradition that will help them discover a zeal
trips visiting over 60 countries for The relationship between Muhlenberg College and The Lutheran dent body at LTSP was comprised of “Muhlenberg men,” reflecting for innovative church leadership in challenging times. The oppor-
The Rev. Dr. Franklin L. Jensen,
consultation and the development of
BD ’43, died February 15, 2011. Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP) did not begin with the deep connection between the two institutions forged by Henry tunity to study at two world-class institutions and to be further
mission programs. He was an or- Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, but is a testament to his motto “Ec-
dained Lutheran Minister for 70 The Rev. Walter P. Fetterly, BD ’45, Melchior Muhlenberg. Today, we count several Muhlenberg men supported by the church’s resources is indeed a worthy tribute to
years. In his early ministry, he was died on February 21, 2011. During clesia Plantanda” (planting the church). The college and seminary and women among the ranks of those preparing for public leader- Henry Melchior Muhlenberg and the Lutheran tradition in today’s
the Pastor of Holy Trinity Lutheran his ministry, he served as pastor of have been working together to plant churches and to plant leaders ship in the church and world. In celebration of this continuing world. We are delighted by this partnership and look forward to
Church in Manasquan, NJ, and Grace Trinity Lutheran Church, Verone; for those churches for almost 150 years. partnership, the two institutions will sign a new agreement pledg- welcoming a new generation of leaders who will bear the faithful,
Lutheran Church in Shamokin, PA. Scenery Hill Pastoral Charge,
Scenery Hill; St. Mark and St. Paul
Academic excellence in the Lutheran tradition is foremost at ing financial support, discernment resources, and a deep partner- creative, persistent spirit that is Muhlenberg’s legacy.
Pastor Shaffer served on commit- both schools, and Henry Melchior Muhlenberg plays a prominent ship that will form public leaders for the mission of the gospel in
Lutheran Churches, Scranton; and
tees of the World Council of — The Rev. Louise N. Johnson, Director of Admissions
Bethany, West Reading, all in Penn- role in their histories. Muhlenberg College was founded in 1848 the world. Students who matriculate at Muhlenberg College and
Churches and the National Council
sylvania. He then served as interim and renamed in 1867 for this fine German immigrant, influential
of Churches. He was a former Chair-
pastor of St. Paul Lutheran Church in
man of the National Council of
Hamburg, PA from 1985 to 1994.
pastor, and beloved father. LTSP is the manifestation of the “semi-
Churches “One Great Hour of Shar- nary in the great city” of Muhlenberg’s vision, and the statue of
ing,” the annual overseas aid appeal The Rev. Richard H. Schaefer, BD
’54, died on April 29, 2011. Follow-
Muhlenberg greets all who enter the seminary’s campus.
of Protestant and Orthodox
churches through Church World ing his ordination, Pastor Schaefer The tie between the two schools goes beyond a shared historical
Service. served the Niantic-Bechtelsville figure. For the past 147 years, they have shared alumni — more
Parish (1954-1958), New Tripoli than 1,060 LTSP students received their undergraduate degree
He was a native of Williamsport, PA,
Parish (1958-1965), and Calvary, Lau-
and graduated Summa Cum Laude
reldale from 1965 until his retire-
from Muhlenberg College. With the Muhlenberg Tercentenary
and Valedictorian from Muhlenberg year, there is renewed energy in the partnership as we work to-
ment in 1998. In retirement he was
College in 1937. He earned his MA
from Syracuse University where he
the interim pastor of numerous gether to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the birth of Henry
churches and oversaw the synod's Melchior Muhlenberg.
met his wife of 70 years, Ethel. He
farm ministry program.
also earned a BD from LTSP. Muhlenberg College has already hosted the traveling exhibit
The Rev. A. George Guba, BD ’55, from the Francke Foundations in Halle, Germany. The exhibit out-
Pastor Shaffer lived for nearly 40
died March 1, 2011.
years in Nutley, NJ, and for the past lines the work of the Foundations in forming the life of Muhlen-
22 years in Venice, FL, at the Village The Rev. Edward L. O’Shea, BD ’56,
berg, his life and travels in the colonies, and the work of his sons to
on The Isle retirement community died October 30, 2010. His calls in-
where he was an active member of cluded St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church, carry on the family legacy. LTSP will host this exhibit in its
Emmanuel Lutheran Church and in Summit Lawn, PA; Army Chaplain; Philadelphia debut September 6, 2011, as the seminary kicks off its
the community. and Prince of Peace Lutheran part of the Tercentenary celebration, and at other times later in the
Church, Fernandina Beach, FL.
He is survived by his wife, Ethel, celebration year.
two sisters, his son Gregory and his The Rev. Leslie E. Evans, MDiv ’82, As part of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Synod of the ELCA’s
wife, one granddaughter, two great died November 2, 2010 at Lower
Bucks Hospital in Bristol, PA. Evans
annual synod assembly in June 2011, being hosted at Muhlenberg
grandchildren, and numerous nieces
and nephews. was born in Bethlehem, PA, at- College, LTSP Professor Jon Pahl will keynote the assembly theme
tended Shimer College, and was a of “Muhlenberg, Malls, and Mission.” There will also be the sign-
The Rev. Arnold P. Spohn, BD ’42,
graduate of Temple University ing of an articulation agreement between Muhlenberg College and
died January 2, 2011. Pastor Spohn
School of Nursing. She became an
had a twenty-four year career of
ordained Episcopal Priest in 1984.
LTSP to reassert the long-term partnership of training leaders for
service in the Navy as chaplain with public ministry.
tours of duty in Europe, the Middle The Rev. Frederick J. Bryant, Jr.,
East, the Persian Gulf, India, and MDiv, ’91, died April 15, 2011. Pas- Visit Ltsp.edu/Muhlenberg300 for more information.
Africa, and participated in the last tor Bryant was born in Philadelphia,
two battles of World War II (Iwo PA, and ordained at Trinity Lutheran
Jima and Okinawa), ministering to Church in Philadelphia on May 26,
war crimes prisoners on Guam at 1991. He served as pastor of Media-
the end of the war. He served as tor Lutheran Church in Philadelphia,
chaplain with the US Marines serv- June 1991 through December 1993,
ing on the front lines of the Korean before transferring to the New Jersey
War through the winters of 1951 Synod and accepting a call to serve
and 1952, and served during the Trinity Lutheran Church in Jersey City.
cold war with Russia during the

26 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu 27


from the

✛FOUNDATION
Seize the Opportunity to Continue Henry Melchior Muhlenberg’s
Legacy of Educating Leaders for the Church by Contributing to
The Muhlenberg Legacy Scholarship
THE NEED
Church leaders must be prepared for the challenges of leadership both in their congregations
and their communities. To recognize the contribution Muhlenberg made to theological edu-
cation, and on the occasion of the 300th anniversary of his birth, LTSP is working to estab-
lish and endow The Muhlenberg Legacy Scholarship. This scholarship will be awarded
annually to an LTSP student who embodies the characteristics that defined Muhlenberg: a
commitment to academic excellence, strong leadership skills, and a distinct pioneering ap-
proach to ministry. ese qualities are intrinsic to the mission of LTSP as well as defining
characteristics of Muhlenberg, whose dedication to language and study made him the in-
novative leader we celebrate today. Preference will be given to the candidate who is a
daughter/son of a “Muhlenberg congregation” and/or a graduate of Muhlenberg College.

THE FUTURE
Muhlenberg arrived in America committed to the idea of planting the church, “ecclesia
plantanda,” and providing those churches with educated leaders to help them grow, oen
replacing uneducated, self appointed “pastors” with formally trained clergy. Recognized for
its academic tradition, LTSP seeks to educate and form public leaders who are committed to
developing and nurturing individual believers and communities of faith for engagement in the
world.

HOW YOU CAN HELP


LTSP seeks to educate the next generations of leaders for the church, and we need your help. Make a
gi to endow The Muhlenberg Legacy Scholarship and continue in the tradition of Henry Melchior
Muhlenberg. Ensure that the Lutheran church will have leaders who have received the classroom and practical
training needed to serve.
Go to www.Ltsp.edu/muhlenberglegacy to donate online.

28 PS ✛ SPRING 2011 www.Ltsp.edu


YOU are the LIVING LEGACY of
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg
A committee of LTSP faculty and staff first met four years ago with the intention of using the academic year 2011-
2012 as a celebratory year to mark the Tercentenary of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg. We hoped that through
special programs and events we could use the occasion as a lens to reflect on the heritage of Muhlenberg’s
leadership and legacy within the church, and to reinterpret it for the larger community and interested
audiences. What began as a modest undertaking among a few has grown to include a multitude of
people, congregations, and organizations working together on what promises to be a fabulous year.
In addition to those listed who are serving in leadership positions, we have partnered with 125
“Muhlenberg legacy churches” from Georgia to Canada representing Lutheran, Episcopalian,
United Church of Christ, and Union congregations who trace their roots to the figure of
Muhlenberg. We are involved with universities, museums, historical societies, and German
interest organizations throughout the United States and in Germany. This story of the
patriarch and pillar of Lutheranism in North America, this immigrant father, this influen-
tial historical figure is, in the end, our story. We are Muhlenberg’s living legacy. Without
your voice and involvement, the story will be incomplete. We invite you to join us during
the year in the events and programs being planned. We encourage you to learn about this
most important figure in the history of our country and our church.

Steering Committee
Natalie K. Hand, Director of Grants, LTSP, Chair

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia


The Rev. Ellen Anderson, Director, Alumni and Church Relations
John Kahler, Director of Communications
The Rev. Dr. Karl Krueger, Director of Krauth Memorial Library;
Associate Professor, History of Christianity
Dr. Jon Pahl, Professor, History of Christianity in North America;
Director, MA Programs
Mary Redline, Consultant
The Rev. Dr. Timothy Wengert, Ministerium of Pennsylvania Professor,
Reformation History

Muhlenberg College
The Rev. Peter Bredlau, College Chaplain
Michael Bruckner, Vice President for Public Relations
Susan Clemens-Bruder, Lecturer in History
Diane Koch, Archives Librarian
Dr. Judith Ridner, Associate Professor of History

Congregation Committee
The Rev. Herbert H. Michel, Chair The Rev. Vivian Roberts
The Rev. John A. Barichivich The Rev. Carl D. Shankweiler
Richard Buckmaster The Rev. Karl-John Stone
Dr. Jean Godsall-Myers The Rev. John H. Van Haneghan
The Rev. James C. Kniseley R. Leland Wesner, Jr.
The Rev. Martha Kriebel
7301 Germantown Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19119-1794
www.Ltsp.edu

Muhlenberg Tercentenary
C A L E N DA R O F E V E N T S

Tuesday, September 6, 2011


MUHLENBERG 300 YEAR KICK OFF/OPENING DAY
Lecture and workshops open to the public!
Martin Marty lecture: “Henry Melchior Muhlenberg and the Current
American Church Scape”
Questions? Call The Rev. Ellen Anderson at 215.248.7301

Saturday, October 15, 2011


Congregation Day

Monday, November 7, 2011


Fall Forum

Sunday, December 4, 2011


Advent Vespers

Saturday, March 17, 2012


Women’s Day of Rest, Refreshment, and Renewal

Tuesday-Wednesday, May 1-2, 2012


Spring Convocation 2012

Monday-Friday, June 18-22, 2012


Lutherhostel

Visit Ltsp.edu/Muhlenberg300 for more information, and sign up for the


Muhlenberg 300 eNewsletter at Ltsp.edu/Muhlenberg300Signup.