You are on page 1of 26

 

Faculty of Economics, Thammasat University
   
   

Is Manufacturing a 
Sustainable Growth Driver 
of Thailand? 
 
  Submitted to 

  Assoc. Prof. BHANUPONG NIDHIPRABHA 

 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL
Semester2, Academic Year 2009
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
Table of Contents 
Abstract ................................................................................................................................................... 2 
1. Thailand Industrialization in the last twenty years (1990 to present) ................................................ 2 
2. Sustainable Development concept ..................................................................................................... 8 
2.1 Necessity for sustainability ........................................................................................................... 9 
2.2 Headline Indicator of Sustainable Development ........................................................................ 10 
3. Thailand Manufacturing sector and sustainable development: case study of Map Ta Phut Industrial 
Estate .................................................................................................................................................... 10 
Background ....................................................................................................................................... 10 
3.1 Economically: Maintaining high and stable levels of economic growth ..................................... 11 
3.2 Environmentally: Reducing environmental problems and Effective protection of environment
 .......................................................................................................................................................... 13 
Air Pollution .................................................................................................................................. 13 
Pollution from Illegal Disposal of Industrial Waste ....................................................................... 16 
Water Resources ........................................................................................................................... 16 
Changing Marine and Coastal Ecosystems ................................................................................... 16 
3.3 Socially ........................................................................................................................................ 17 
Employment .................................................................................................................................. 17 
Crime rate ..................................................................................................................................... 17 
Household shortage of tap water ................................................................................................. 19 
Unbearable of Air pollution .......................................................................................................... 20 
Precarious Health of Rayong ......................................................................................................... 21 
4. Along the road of Thailand Manufacturing Development: Are we growing sustainably? ............... 21 
Concluding Remarks .............................................................................................................................. 22 
Bibliography .......................................................................................................................................... 24 
 

 
 


 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
Abstract 
Thailand has no longer been an agricultural country at least for the last two decades. Since 
the  early  1960s,  Thailand’s  economic  structure  has  been  dramatically  changed  in  accordance  with 
the first National Development Plan (1961 – 1966), which favored Import Substitution approach of 
Industrialization.  Magnificent  resources  have  been  diverted  from  agricultural  sector  to 
industrialization process and thus manufacturing sector through infrastructure investment, policies 
to  promote  private  investment,  and  other  government  promotions.  Manufacturing  sector  has 
become  the  main  sector  that  generates  income  to  Thailand  GDP  and  her  economic  growth.  The 
importance of manufacturing sector to Thai economy is obvious and this creates a need to evaluate 
the  performance  of  the  sector  if  it  has  a  potential  to  drive  Thai  economy  continuously  in  the  long 
run.  In  other  words,  whether  or  not  manufacturing  sector  is  a  sustainable  growth  driver  of  Thai 
economy is questionable. This paper will firstly provide the background and fundamental nature of 
Thailand  manufacturing  sector  in  the  last  twenty  years.  Secondly,  the  concept  of  Sustainable 
Development  will  be  discussed,  with  the  supporting  argument  of  the  need  for  sustainability  in 
manufacturing sector. The headline criteria of sustainability will be stated and used to evaluate the 
manufacturing sector. With the current environmental issues of Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate, it is 
selected to be a case study in this paper. 

1. Thailand Industrialization in the last twenty years (1990 to present) 
Throughout the last twenty years, figure1.1 and figure 1.2 illustrate that the manufacturing 
sector has been produced roughly one‐third of growing GDP of Thai economy each year. Agricultural 
sector also has produced growing real values of its products, however at a relatively lower rate. As a 
result the Agricultural share of GDP in the last twenty years has been roughly only 10 percent.  

GDP at 1988 prices by economic activities, 
1990‐2007
8000000
7000000
6000000
million Baht

5000000
Service and others
4000000
Manufacturing
3000000
2000000 Agriculture

1000000
0
1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2001 2003 2005 2007
 

Figure1.1 GDP at 1988 prices by economic activities, 1990 – 2007, (source: Office 


of the National Economic and Social Development Board, and National Statistical 
Offi )


 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
GDP share of each sector, 1990 ‐ 2008
0.60 
0.50 
0.40 
0.30 
0.20 
0.10 

1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
Agri/GDP Manu/GDP
Construction/GDP (Services and others)/GDP
 
Figure1.2 GDP share of each sector, 1990 ‐ 2008, (source: Office of the National 
  Economic and Social Development Board, and National Statistical Office) 

In terms of the contribution to Thailand’s annual economic growth, in figure1.3, during the 
normal  years  manufacturing  sector  generates  real  growth  to  economy  around  3  percents,  or  one‐
third  of  annual  economic  growth..  In  other  words,  one‐third  of  the  country’s  economic  growth 
comes from manufacturing sector. However, during the economic recession in 1997, manufacturing 
is  also  the  sector  that  drove  economy  down  as  it  generated  negative  growth  of  ‐3.86  percent  in 
1998,  causing  the  fluctuation  in  output  level.  Nonetheless,  the  sector  rebounded  sharply  in  the 
following  year.  In  1999  it  is  manufacturing  sector  that  generated  positive  growth  of  3.44  percent, 
driving the economy out of the slump. This additional productions were the result of the increase in 
exports  since  1997  (Nidhiprabha,  2009)  that  enables  the  manufacturing  sector  e.g.  automobile 
industry to export more to the world. 

Agricutural, Manufacturing, and Services growth contribution 
of annual Thailand real economic growth 1990 ‐ 2007 
12.00%
10.00%
8.00% Agricultural growth 
6.00% share
4.00%
2.00% Services & other 
economic activities 
0.00%
growth share
‐2.00%
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006

Manufacturing 
‐4.00% growth share
‐6.00%
‐8.00%
‐10.00%
‐12.00%
 
Figure1.3  Agricultural,  Manufacturing,  and  Services  &  other  economic  activities  growth 
contribution  of  annual  Thailand  real  economic  growth,  1990  –  2007,  excluding  2000  data, 
(source:  Office  of  the  National  Economic  and  Social  Development  Board  and  National 
Statistical Office) 


 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
Import to GDP and Manufacturing to GDP 1991 ‐ 2007
0.75
0.7 39.00%
0.65 37.00%
0.6
0.55 35.00%
Import to 
0.5 33.00% GDP
0.45
0.4 31.00%
Manufact
0.35 29.00% ure to 
0.3 GDP (RHS)
27.00%
0.25
0.2 25.00%

 
Figure1.4  Import  to  GDP  and  Manufacture  to  GDP,  1991  – 2007,  (source:  Bank  of  Thailand, 
  Office of the National Economic and Social Development Board and National Statistical Office) 

The manufacturing sector is an import dependent sector as figure1.4 shows the correlation 
between  import  and  manufacturing  products  to  GDP.  Because  we  need  to  import  machineries, 
capital  goods,  and  raw  materials  in  order  to  produce  the  manufacturing  products,  when 
manufacturing  sector  expands,  imports  increases  accordingly  as  more  imported  materials  are 
needed  and  more  capital  and  machineries  are  invested  since  investors  expect  the  economy  to 
expand.  While  in  1997  crisis,  there  was  a  sharp  reduction  in  domestic  consumption  of  goods  and 
services.  As  a  result  the  manufacturing  production  especially  for  income  sensitive  products  e.g. 
automobile halted. Manufacturing share to GDP dropped in 1997 (in figure1.4) as Demand dropped. 
The  capacity  utilization  rate  of  manufacturing  machine  shrank.  There  is  no  need  to  build  a  new 
factory or invest new machinery, so Import to GDP ratio dropped mainly because of the reduction in 
imports  of  machineries,  capital  goods,  and  materials,  and  reduction  in  demand  for  imported  final 
goods by public.  

The Manufacturing Production Index (MPI) has a positive trend in long run represented by 
the green line in figure 1.5. As every shock is followed by a rebound to the long term path, it seems 
that  the  manufacturing  sector  could  continuously  keep  growing  in  the  long  run.  This  conclusion 
should not be raised before looking into the detailed characteristics of the product categories that 
make up the whole sector. 


 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 

Figure1.5 Thailand Manufacturing 
Production Index (MPI), January 2001 ‐ 
March 2010, monthly,  
(source: Bank of Thailand) 
 

 
Manufacturing Production Index (MPI) MPI of Domestic Market oriented products 
(X<30%) 

 
MPI of Export oriented products  MPI of Ultra Export oriented products 
  (30%<X<60%)  (X>60%) 

Figure1.6 Manufacturing Production Index of overall sector, domestic market oriented, export oriented, and ultra export 
oriented product, Jan 2001 to Mar 2010, monthly  (Source: Bank of Thailand)  5 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
 

Not  only  import  dependent,  the  manufacturing  sector  depends  heavily  on  export  as  two‐
thirds of total manufacturing production are ‘export‐oriented products’, which include the product 
categories that are exported by more than 30% less than 60%, and ‘ultra‐export oriented products’, 
of  which  the  product  categories  are  exported  by  more  than  60%  of  their  production.  The  level  of 
manufacturing  production  is  then  affected  by  world  economic  condition  and  export 
competitiveness.  Manufacturing  sector  is  import  dependent,  export  dependent,  and  is  affected  by 
the world economy. It is then highly dependable on external factors that are uncontrollable. 

Figure1.6  provides  a  deeper  detail  behind  the  upward  trend  of  the  overall  MPI.  The 
Domestic  market  oriented  production  is  the  least  fluctuating  as  it  is  driven  mainly  by  domestic 
consumption, but also grows at slower rate than Ultra‐export oriented production as its production 
is limited by domestic market size. The export oriented production comes with more fluctuation as it 
depends more on world market demand, which consequently depends on the world business cycle 
and foreign income elasticity of demand for Thai export (Nidhiprabha, Macroeconomic Perspective 
on  Thailand's  Post‐Crisis  Recovery,  2000).  The  Ultra  export  oriented  category  grows  at  the  fastest 
rate. Its production in 2010 is triple of its level in 2001. However as Ultra export oriented category is 
highly  dependent  on  the  world  economic  condition.  The  current  US  financial  crisis  badly  hit  its 
production level as shown in the bottom‐right figure in figure1.6. There is a sharp drop in MPI in the 
last quarter  of 2008 and  beginning of  2009. The sharp rebound  came afterwards. Figure1.6 is also 
evident that the manufacturing sector in each category is resilient. A rebound always follows a slump 
in all categories of manufacturing productions. The slump is then just a temporary event. In long run 
the manufacturing sector still keeps on growing. 

As  export  is  the  main  factor  that  drive  manufacturing  sector.  The  rate  of  growth  in 
manufacturing has a lot to do with the export competitiveness. To be able to compete in the world 
competition, the ability to differentiate our products, the bilateral and multilateral trade agreement 
with trade partners, the level of market and product diversification are among the keys that we need 
to  improve.  Additionally  according  to  Nidhiprabha(2007),  “Foreign  direct  investment  has 
transformed  Thailand’s  Traditional  agriculture‐based  economy  into  a  modern  manufacturing 
economy”,  the  ability  to  attract  the  flow  of  foreign  direct  investment  into  manufacturing  sector  is 
crucial as well.  

When  looking  at  the  economy  by  economic  activities,  manufacturing  sector  is  obviously  a 
crucial  sector  of  Thai  economy.  Table1.1  shows  the  Gross  Provincial  Products  (GPP)  at  current 
market  prices  in  2002  of  the  top  per  capita  GPP  provinces  in  Central,  Eastern,  and  Northeastern 
Regions of Thailand. The highlighted provinces are those that have the greatest number of licensed 
manufactories located in. These provinces account for the highest per capita GPP in their region and 
also some are among the highest per capita GPP of the country. The highest per capita GPP is from 
Rayong  province,  where  eight  industrial  estates  (including  Map  Ta  Phut  Industrial  Estate),  five 
industrial  districts,  and  two  industrial  communities,  or  1,720  manufactories  in  total  (Chiangmai 
University,  2007)  are  located  in.  The  manufacturing  production  in  Rayong  accounts  for  more  than 
one‐third  of  the  Gross  Regional  Products  (GRP)  of  manufacturing  in  Eastern  region,  and  also 
generates 8  percent of GDP of manufacturing sector (Macroeconomic Analysis Group, 2009). With 
the current environmental and social issues in Map Ta Phut, Rayong, Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate is 


 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
selected  as  a  case  study  of  Thailand  manufacturing  sector  in  evaluating  the  performance  of 
Thailamanufacturing sector. 

GROSS PROVINCIAL PRODUCT AT CURRENT MARKET PRICES BY REGION AND PROVINCES: 2002

Gross Provincial Per capita GPP. Per capita GPP. rankings


Province
Product (GPP.) (Baht)
(Million Baht) Of the Region Of the Country
Bangkok And Vicinities
Samut Sakhon 171,521 369,657 1 2
Samut Prakan 365,731 338,326 2 3
Bangkok 1,653,510 208,856 3 7
Pathum Thani 116,068 192,803 4 8
Nakhon Pathom 88,033 97,060 5 13
Nonthaburi 69,227 82,708 6 15
Central Region
Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya 197,078 268,498 1 4
Saraburi 79,831 148,109 2 9
Lop Buri 56,038 73,540 3 19
Sing Buri 14,849 61,358 4 27
Chai Nat 20,184 54,113 5 32
Ang Thong 14,722 53,534 6 33
Eastern
Rayong 277,896 515,577 1 1
Chon Buri 268,622 263,873 2 5
Chachoengsao 95,299 147,066 3 10
Prachin Buri 51,298 101,379 4 11
Trat 13,628 66,803 5 24
Chanthaburi 22,481 48,554 6 36
Nakhon Nayok 12,696 48,460 7 37
Sa Kaeo 20,057 46,754 8 40
Northeastern Region
Khon Kaen 76,494 42,053 1 46
Nakhon Ratchasima 100,494 37,624 2 48
Loei 18,655 31,247 3 58
Udon Thani 46,477 31,089 4 59
Mukdahan 8,533 28,827 5 62
Ubon Ratchathani 49,057 28,423 6 63
Chaiyaphum 28,493 25,463 8 65
Buri Ram 37,093 24,355 9 66
Roi Et 30,506 24,211 10 67
 
Table1.1  Gross  Provincial  Products  at  current  market  prices:  2002,  top  per  capita  GPP  ranking 
  provinces in Central, Eastern, and Northeastern Region, (source: Office of the National Economic 
and Social Development Board) 


 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
The aforementioned overview of Thailand manufacturing sector reviews a positive long term 
growth trend and the resilience of manufacturing sector. However, this is an only one side of a big 
picture.  Whether  or  not  manufacturing  sector  could  be  a  long  term  growth  driver  that  would 
actually  benefits  the  country  is  still  questionable.  To  see  whether  the  manufacturing  sector  is  a 
sustainable  growth  driver  of  Thai  economy,  there  is  a  need  for  the  criteria  to  judge.  Next,  the 
concept of sustainable development will be discussed. Together with the argument for the need of 
sustainable  manufacturing  sector,  the  criteria  to  be  used  will  be  proposed.  With  the  overall 
manufacturing sector data, Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate will be used as a case study to evaluate the 
whole sector.  

2. Sustainable Development concept 
“Sustainable  Development  delivers  basic  environmental,  social  and  economic  services  to  all 
residents  of  a  community  without  threatening  the  viability  of  the  natural,  built  and  social  systems 
upon  which  the  delivery  of  these  services  depends.”  ‐  International  Council  for  Environmental 
Initiatives (ICLEI), 1994 

Proposed  by  the  International  Council  for  Environmental  Initiatives  (ICLEI),  the  concept  of 
Sustainable Development is a pattern of economic development that needs to go together with the 
social  and  environmental  development  in  order  to  utilize  the  limited  resources  to  meet  human 
needs  with  regard  of  social  cost,  and  sufficient  maintenance  of  environment  so  that  the  human 
needs  can  be  met  not  only  in  the  present,  but  also  for  future  generations.  In  order  to  become 
‘sustainable’,  the  three  main  dimensions;  economic,  social,  and  environment  must  be  mutually 
concerned  in  the  sense  that  the  long  term  development  of  one  dimension  could  lead  to  the 
improvement of the others two dimensions or at least will not harm or worsen the being of another 
dimension. For example, the expansion of economy (Economic Dimension) reduces overall poverty 
level  (Social  Dimension)  and  also  increases  people’s  concern  about  environment  preservation 
(Environmental Dimension). 

Economic

Social Environ.

 
Figure2.1 Illustration of Sustainable Development concept for simplicity, the scope of each 
  dimension is not necessarily equal. 


 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
For simplicity the Sustainable Development concept is illustrated in figure2.1. Sustainable 
Development  is  the  triangle  area  where  the  three  dimensions  intersect.  The  scope  of  each 
dimension  (represented  by  the  size  of  the  circle)  needs  not  to  be  perfectly  equal.  However  in 
order to be sustainable the three dimensions must be considered altogether.  

2.1 Necessity for sustainability 

Growing importance of Trade of Thai Economy
Degree of Openness to trade = (X+M)/GDP
Exports/GDP Imports/GDP

1.4
1.2
1
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2
0

Figure2.2 Growing Importance of Trade of Thai Economy, 1979 – 2009, (source: Bank of 
Thailand) 
As  the  world  is  moving  toward  globalization,  the  markets  and  trade  have  very  strong 
implications  socially,  environmentally,  and  economically  for  both  developed  and  developing 
countries. This social and economic recognition could lead to the ethical dilemmas when the topic of 
human  right  violation  becomes  another  factor  in  determining  the  trade.  There  is  an  increasing 
number of issues of whether or not the countries that respect human rights should trade with those 
countries  that  do  not  respect,  or  should  the  countries  that  abide  by  international  environmental 
agreement  trade with the countries that violate.  The Organization for Economic Co‐Operation and 
Development (OECD) members, for example, has included the social and environmental issue when 
making economic decision. The  globalization then is moving toward the moral dimension together 
with economic dimension. Consequently, there is an increasing interest widely in ensuring that the 
human  rights  dimensions;  social  and  economic  responsibility,  are  included  in  decision‐making  and 
benefit  (Munoz,  2006).  As  a  small  economy  that  depends  considerably  on  international  trade, 
Thailand  could  not  ignore  this  global  trend  either.  Figure  2.2  indicates  the  growing  degree  of 
openness to trade of Thai economy in the last thirty years. The annual volume of trade, which is the 
sum  of  exports  and  imports,  has  exceeded  Thailand  annual  GDP  since  2000.  The  need  to  evaluate 
Thailand’s sustainability especially in manufacturing sector becomes evident.  

The  evaluation  of  sustainability  in  dimensions  of  social  and  environmental  is  rather 
qualitative.  As  a  result  there  is  no  clear  critical  point  that  could  be  used  to  judge  whether  the 
manufacturing sector has reached the sustainability level or not. The concept of sustainability used 
in this research paper is the ongoing process rather than the end goal. In other words, the objective 
of sustainable evaluation is to see a direction of Thailand manufacturing sector; is it moving toward 

 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
sustainable development or not? The judgment of sustainability of manufacturing sector will base on 
its historical performance up until now to see if the sector has been being on the path of sustainable 
development. Have we fallen out of the path sometimes? If so are we going to get back on the track 
again? 

2.2 Headline Indicator of Sustainable Development 
The  headline  indicator  of  Sustainable  Development  to  be  used  in  this  research  paper  is 
modified  from  the  headline  indicators  proposed  and  implemented  by  the  National  government’s 
Department  of  Environment,  Transport  and  Regions  of  the  United  Kingdom  (UK)  in  1999.  The 
headline indicators are split into three main criteria as follows; 

1. Maintaining High and stable levels of economic growth – high and stable growth level of 
manufacturing, high and stable GDP per capita of manufacturing sector, high and stable 
level of Foreign Investment 
2. Reducing environmental problems and Effective protection of environment – emission 
of harmful chemical gas, air pollution, water pollution, whole ecosystem, etc. 
3. Social  progress  which  recognizes  the    needs  of  everyone  –  success  in  tackling  poverty, 
health, crime rate, social well‐being 

We will use Map Ta Phut, which is one of main industrial estate of Rayong, as a case study. 
Each  criteria  of  sustainability  will  be  applied  by  firstly  looking  at  each  dimension;  economic, 
environmental, and social respectively, then combining the three dimensions to see if manufacturing 
sector has balanced these three or has been biased toward some dimension. 

3. Thailand Manufacturing sector and sustainable development: case study of 
Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate 
Background 
Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate is located in municipal area, Rayong province. The industrial 
estate  started  operating  in  1982  with  initial  area  of  11,347,200  square  meters.  Since  1988  it  has 
received the development aid according to the East‐Coast‐development policy from the government 
and  has  been  under  the  control  of  Industrial  Estate  Authority  of  Thailand  (I‐EA‐T).  As  the  main 
production base of petrochemical, chemical products, steel and metal, and oil refinery, Map Ta Phut 
Industrial Estate area was enlarged to cover 32,000,000 square meters area. This enlargement has 
potentially  provides  agglomerating  benefits,  increases  the  efficiency,  lowers  production  and 
transportation costs, and consequently enabled Thailand to compete in the global market (Industrial 
Estate Authority of Thailand, 2009). 

  However, this rapidly growing industry and increasing manufacturing cooperation in Map Ta 
Phut  area  have  been  causing  surrounding  areas  the  environmental  problems  and  people  in 
surrounding  community  the  health  problems  such  as  air  pollution,  shortage  of  water,  etc.  Such 
problems  have  accumulated  and  exposed  continuously  during  the  last  ten  years  and  the  intensity 

10 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
tends  to  rise  over  time.  The  latest  problem  has  appeared  since  2007  when  the  non‐governmental 
organization with people in surrounding community requested for the verdict of declaring Map Ta 
Phut Industrial Estate the ‘Pollution Control zone’ from the administrative court. On 29th September 
2009, the administrative court released the verdict of holding 76 industrial projects to invest in Map 
Ta Phut and surrounding area with the total investment of 2.9 hundred thousand million baht. Then 
on 2nd December 2009, 11 projects were allowed to continue while the rest of 65 projects were still 
on hold, delaying the investment of 2.3 hundred thousand million baht into the region. The reasons 
why  this  enormous  investment  is  very  essential  to  the  economy  are  that  most  of  these  on  hold 
project are petrochemical industry, steel industry, industrial estate, port, power factory and so on, 
which all have high forward and backward linkages (Macroeconomic Analysis Group, 2009). 

3.1 Economically: Maintaining high and stable levels of economic growth 
For overall manufacturing sector, the sub criteria of high and stable of manufacturing share 
of GDP is met as shown in figure1.2. Throughout the last twenty years, the manufacturing share of 
GDP  has  been  roughly  stable  with  gradual  increasing  share  from  28.62  percent  in  1990  to  34.52 
percent in 2007. The manufacturing growth share of GDP growth in figure1.3 reflects the relatively 
stable high growth share in normal years, but in recession year it is then fluctuating. 

From Rayong case study, figure3.1 shows that Rayong GPP per capita is enormously greater 
than the Sub‐Central, Eastern, Western, and Northern GRP, and the country GDP per capita. Rayong 
GPP per capita is six times higher than Thailand GDP per capita with an increasing trend as shown in 
table3.1. The growth rate of Rayong GPP is high but its stability is questionable. 

The  levels  of  net  flow  of  Foreign  Direct  Investment  (FDI)  into  Thai  economy  in  various 
sectors  in  1996  –  2005  are  shown  in  figure3.2.  The  level  of  net  flow  of  FDI  into  Thailand 
manufacturing sector is not stable as volatility is the nature of FDI. The volatile characteristic of FDI 
could  cause  a  virulent  impact  on  stability  of  economy  at  macro  level  as  evidenced  by  the  1997 
currency  crisis    (Nidhiprabha,  Thailand  and  New  Regionalism,  2007).  Additionally  the  unstable  FDI 
could impede the consistency development of manufacturing sector as well. 

450,000 
400,000 
350,000 
Rayong GPP per capita
300,000 
Sub‐Central GRP per capita
250,000 
Baht

Eastern GRP per capita
200,000 
Western GRP per capita
150,000 
Northern GRP per capita
100,000  GDP per capita
50,000 

2005 2006 2007
 

  Figure 3.1 Rayong GPP per capita, GRP per capita, and GDP per capita, 2005 – 2007, (source: 
Office of the National Economic and Social Development Board,  Office of the Prime Minister)  11 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
 

Year GPP of Rayong (Million Baht) GPP growth of Rayong


1996 112,408 -
1997 133,547 18.81%
1998 155,799 16.66%
1999 219,105 40.63%
2000 276,261 26.09%
2001 - -
2002 515,577 -
2003 - -
2004 - -
2005 451,884 -
2006 536,897 18.81%
2007 604,896 12.67%  

Table3.1 Gross Provincial Product of Rayong (million Baht) and GPP growth of Rayong, 
1996 – 2007, (source: Office of the National Economic and Social Development Board) 

Net Flow of Foreign Direct Investment to GDP in various 
sectors, 1996 ‐ 2005
2.50%

2.00%
Industry
1.50%
percent to GDP

Financial institutions

1.00% Trade
Agriculture
0.50% Services
Real estate
0.00%
(1996)
(1997)
(1998)
(1999)
(2000)
(2001)
(2002)
(2003)
(2004)
(2005)
(2006)
(2007)
(2008)

‐0.50%
 

Figure3.2 Net Flow of Foreign Direct Investment to GDP classified by sector, 1996 – 2005, (source: Bank 


of Thailand) 

Note:  1. The figures cover investment in non‐bank sector 
2. Direct Investment = Equity Investment plus loans 
3. From April 2004 onwards inputs for private financial flow data are obtained through data sets 
electronically 
4. From April 2004 onwards inputs for private financial flow data are obtained through data sets 

12 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
 

3.2 Environmentally: Reducing environmental problems and Effective protection of 
environment 

Air Pollution 
According  to  the  research  report  of  Chiangmai  University  (2007),  the  highly  condensed  of 
industries  in  Rayong  can  collectively  release  Nitrogen  Oxides(NoX)  and  Sulfer  Dioxide  to  the  air  by 
more than the capacity of the air to absorp, causing the air pollution. 

Thailand National Annual report of pollution in 2006 revealed the detection of more than 40 
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Map Ta Phut area. Twenty one of these can cause cancer. The 
empirical data in 2006 ‐ 2009 from Pollution Control Department revealed the three VOCs that can 
cause cancer; 1,3 Butadiene, 1,2‐Dichloroethane, and Benzene, are emitted more than the standard 
values as shown in figure3.3, figure3.4, and figure3.5. 

• 1,3 Butadiene (Standard Value  = 0.33 microgram/cubicmetre) 
 
1,3 Butadiene is a colorless gas with a mild aromatic or gasoline‐like odor. It is widely used in 
styrene‐butadiene polymers, acrylonitrile‐butadiene‐styrene resins, and other compounds (Brown J. 
A., 2009). There is a record that the  
 
Synthetic rubber workers in the past had increased incidence of leukemia attributed to chronic 
and heavy exposure to 1,3‐butadiene. Acutely, it is not very toxic. [Lewis R. "Overview of the Rubber 
Industry and Tire Manufacturing." in Occupational Medicine STAR 14(4): 710, 1999.] In reproductive 
studies  of  mice,  1,3‐butadiene  causes  testicular  damage.  Some  animal  studies  found  birth  defects 
after  high  doses  during  early  pregnancy.  [Frazier,  p.  277‐8]  Causes  CNS  depression  at  high 
concentrations;  May  have  effects  on  the  bone  marrow…  in  Human data:  Narcosis  did not  occur  in 
volunteers exposed to 8,000 ppm for 8 hours [Carpenter et al. 1944].  (Brown J. A., 2009)  
 
 
From  figure  3.3,  4  out  of  6  stations  (including  Map  Ta  Phut  Health  Office  and  Muang  Mai 
Map Ta Phut Health Office) detected the excess emission of 1,3 Butadiene as high as 6,000 ppm in 
2006  and  2008.  The  emission  detected  in  three  stations  has  a  declining  trend  and  go  below  the 
standard  value  again  in  2008.  In  the  beginning  of  2009,  there  are  only  two  stations  left  that  still 
violate the standard value.  
 

13 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
Annual Average Emission of 1,3 Butadiene in Map Ta Phut, Rayong
0.70
Standard Value 
0.60 (Microgram/cubicmetre)
Microgram/cubic metre

Map Ta Phut Health Office, 
0.50 Mueang District

0.40 Mabchalut temple

0.30
Wat Nong Faeb School
0.20
Muang Mai Map Ta Phut 
0.10 Health Office

0.00 Baan Plong Community
Sept  Nov  Jan  Mar  May  Jul  Sept  Nov  Jan  Mar  May  Jul  Sept  Nov  Jan 
06 ‐ 06 ‐ 07 ‐ 07 ‐ 07 ‐ 07 ‐ 07 ‐ 07 ‐ 08 ‐ 08 ‐ 08 ‐ 08 ‐ 08 ‐ 08 ‐ 09 ‐
Aug  Oct  Dec  Feb  Apr  Jun  Aug  Oct  Dec  Feb  Apr  Jun  Aug  Oct  Dec  Baan Tak Won Health Office
07 07 07 08 08 08 08 08 08 09 09 09 09 09 09

 
Figure3.3 Annual Average Emission of 1,3 Butadiene in Map Ta Phut, Rayong, September 2006 – December 2009, 
  (source: Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment) 

• 1,2‐Dichloroethane (Standard Value  = 0.4 microgram/cubicmetre) 

1,2‐Dichloroethane  is  a  colorless  viscous  liquid,  with  characteristic  odor,  turns  dark  on 
exposure to air, moisture and light. The vapor is heavier than air and may travel along the ground; 
distant  ignition  possible.    The  substance  can  be  absorbed  into  the  body  by  inhalation  of  its  vapor, 
through  the  skin  and  by  ingestion  and  a  harmful  contamination  of  the  air  can  be  reached  very 
quickly on evaporation of this substance at 20 Celsius degree. The effects of short‐term exposure to 
the  vapor  are  eyes  irritation,  skin  tract,  and  respiratory  tract.  The  vapor  hay  cause  lung  edema  or 
cause effects on the central nervous system, kidneys, and liver, resulting in impaired functions. If a 
human gets exposed to the vapor in long‐term, the repeated contact with skin may cause dermatitis 
(NIOSH, 2010). 

Figure3.4  revealed  incredibly  huge  excess  emission  of  1,2‐Dichloroethane  in  the  air 
surrounding  Muang  Mai  Map  Ta  Phut  health  office  area  in  2006  –  2009.  The  average  annual 
emission reached its peak at 24 microgram/cubic meters, sixty times higher than the safety standard 
value in 2006. Though  there is a  declining sign, the current average emission is four  times greater 
than  standard.  The  average  emission  of  1,2‐Dichloroethane  in  Map  Ta  Phut  health  office  also  four 
times exceeds the standard. 

14 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 

Annual Average Emission of 1,2‐Dichloroethane in 
Map Ta Phut, Rayong
24.00
22.00 Standard Value 
20.00 (Microgram/cubicmetre)
Microgram/cubic metre

18.00 Map Ta Phut Health 
Office, Mueang District
16.00
Mabchalut temple
14.00
12.00
Wat Nong Faeb School
10.00
8.00 Muang Mai Map Ta Phut 
6.00 Health Office
4.00 Baan Plong Community
2.00
0.00 Baan Tak Won Health 
Office

Figure3.4 Annual Average Emission of 1,2‐Dichloroethane in Map Ta Phut, Rayong, September 2006 – December 
2009, (source: Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment) 
 

• Benzene (Standard Value  = 1.7  microgram/cubicmetre) 

Benzene is a colorless to light‐yellow liquid with an aromatic odor. Today it is used mainly in 
closed processes to synthesize organic chemicals. As an organic solvent, benzene can induce narcosis 
and anesthesia acutely. After chronic exposure, it can cause aplastic anemia and leukemia. [ACGIH] 
Significant benzene exposure increases the risk of leukemia during the 10 years following exposure. 
In other human data: It has been stated that 3,000 ppm is endurable for 0.5 to 1 hour [Flury 1928]. It 
has also been stated that exposure at 19,000 to 20,000 ppm for 5 to 10 minutes is fatal;  exposure at 
7,500  ppm  for  30  minutes  is  dangerous;  exposure  at  1,500  ppm  for  60  minutes  induces  serious 
symptoms (Brown J. A., 2009) 

With  safety  standard  of  1.7  microgram/cubicmetre,  most  of  stations  have  been  finding  the 
excess level of emission most of the time. In 2009, Muang Mai Map Ta Phut health office and Map 
TA  Phut  Health  Office  are  the  stations  that  find  the  highest  excess  emission  by  3.9  and  3.1 
microgram/cubicmetre  respectively,  doubling  the  safety  standard  value.  This  is  one  of  the  sound 
evidence  showing  that  Map  Ta  Phut  Industrial  Estate  could  not  support  the  next  phrase  of 
petrochemical projects that are on hold by the court on 29th September 2009 since the emission of 
Benzene of initial petrochemical industries has already violated the safety level. 

15 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
Annual Average Emission of Benzene in 
Map Ta Phut, Rayong
5.0
4.5 Standard Value 
(Microgram/cubicmetre)
4.0
Microgram/cubic metre

3.5 Map Ta Phut Health 
Office, Mueang District
3.0
Mabchalut temple
2.5
2.0
Wat Nong Faeb School
1.5
1.0 Muang Mai Map Ta Phut 
0.5 Health Office

0.0 Baan Plong Community
Sept  Nov  Jan  Mar  May  Jul  Sept  Nov  Jan  Mar  May  Jul  Sept  Nov  Jan 
06 ‐ 06 ‐ 07 ‐ 07 ‐ 07 ‐ 07 ‐ 07 ‐ 07 ‐ 08 ‐ 08 ‐ 08 ‐ 08 ‐ 08 ‐ 08 ‐ 09 ‐
Aug  Oct  Dec  Feb  Apr  Jun  Aug  Oct  Dec  Feb  Apr  Jun  Aug  Oct  Dec  Baan Tak Won Health 
07 07 07 08 08 08 08 08 08 09 09 09 09 09 09 Office
 
Figure3.5 Annual Average Emission of Benzene in Map Ta Phut, Rayong, September 2006 – December 2009, 
(source: Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment) 

Pollution from Illegal Disposal of Industrial Waste 
Even  during  the  hot  issue  of  Map  Ta  Phut  environmental  problem  since  2006,  the  illegal 
disposal of industrial waste still continues. Within four years there are at least seven case of illegal 
disposal detected in surrounding communities and outside municipal areas. For example, the case of 
unknown chemical waste disposal that has similar odor to thinner in Nikom Pattana sub district the 
chemical  waste  causes  skin  irritation  and  spread  the  filthy  smell  throughout  the  community. 
(Pollution Control Department, การดําเนินการแก้ ไขปั ญหามลพิษในพื ้นที่มาบตาพุด, 2010). 

Water Resources 
In  2009,  Pollution  Control  Department  detected  more  than  240,000  MPN  per  100  cc  of 
coliform and fecal‐coliform bacteria in public canal where the household and industrial used water 
are  disposed  into.  High  level  of  Total  Dissolved  Solid  (TDS)  substance  is  found  in  canals  where 
industrial  used  water  is  poured  in.  However  the  level  of  TDS  is  still  below  the  standard  value.  No 
significant harm of heavy metal or TDS contamination is found in surface water but in ground water. 
There is heavy metal contamination e.g. lead manganese, arsenic, and selenium in the ground water 
found  in  2009.  All  the  sea  water  quality  detecting  stations  nearby  the  end  of  canals  find  the  over 
limit  of  phosphate  contamination  of  769  –  4,031  milligram  per  liter  (Chiangmai  University,  2007). 
However, still there is no clear sign of severe harm that’s sufficient to ruin water resource beyond 
replenishment 

Changing Marine and Coastal Ecosystems 
The  rapid  expansion  of  industrial  estate  area  on  land  and  into  the  sea  in  Eastern  coasts 
especially in Rayong leads to coastal erosion in surrounding coasts. In 2005, Department of Mineral 
Resources indicated Rayong as a red zone has a risk of severe coastal erosion. Rayong has already 
16 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
lost the area of 422 rai from coastal erosion and 3,188 rai of coastal aqua culturing area. Also the sea 
water  quality  has  long  been  contaminated  by  the  disposal  of  used  water  of  household  and 
expanding industries into the canals (Chiangmai University, 2007). 

3.3 Socially 

Employment 
E mployme nt by
E c onomic 1999 2000 2001 2002
Ac tivitie s (% )

Agriculture 48.4 48.7 46.6 46.2


Manufacturing 18.4 19.1 19.5 21.1
Services 33.2 32.2 33.9 32.7  

  Table3.2 Percentage of total Employment in each economic activities, 1999 
– 2002, (source: National Statistical Office) 
With GDP share of more than 30 percent for manufacturing sector (figure1.2), it generates 
employment roughly only 20 percent as shown in table3.2.  In terms of employment, the sector does 
not generate as much employment as service and agricultural sector because manufacturing sector 
is moving toward capital intensive production, rather than labor intensive. 

Crime rate 
As  the  new  investment  keeps  flowing  into  new  projects  in  Rayong  Industrial  Estate,  it 
generates  employment  and  induces  a  flow  of  immigrants  into  the  province.  As  shown  in  figure3.6 
the number of in‐migrants into Rayong municipal area exceeds the number of out‐migrants in 2000 
–  2003  resulting  in  more  condensed  population  in  municipal  area.  The  more  crowded  population 
however  does  not  have  clear  relationship  with  increasing  number  of  crimes  in  figure3.6.  In  other 
words  the  increase  in  population  does  not  lead  to  huge  increase  in  number  of  crimes.  Table3.3 
shows  the  problems  of  poor  households  in  4  Eastern  provinces.  For  Rayong,  piped  water  drinking 
and supply is the main problem rather than crime. Lack of money for education is the second, then 
followed by crime problem 

17 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
In-migrants, Out-migrants, and Population Density in
Municipal area, Rayong
12,000 800
700
10,000 In‐migrants
600
8,000
500 Out‐migrants
6,000 400
300 Population 
4,000 Density (per 
200 sq.km.) (RHS)
2,000
100
0 0
1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003
 

Figure3.6  In‐migrants,  out‐migrants,  and  population  density  in 


municipal area, Rayong (source: Department of Local  Administration, 
Ministry of  Interior) 
 

Cases known in Rayong province, 1994 ‐ 2003
800

700

600

500 Violent crime


Number of cases

400
Offences against life
300 and body, safety of
persons, morality
200 Offences against
property
100

0
1994 1996 1998 2000 2002  

Figure3.7  Cases  known  in  Rayong  province,  1994  –  2003,  (source:  Rayong  Provincial 
Statistical Office) 

18 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLDS IN POOR COMMUNITIES WHICH RESPONSE THE IMPORTANCE PROBLEMS IN
COMMUNE BY TYPE OF PROBLEMS, CENTRAL REGION (EXCLUDING BANGKOK) AND PROVINCES: 2006

Central and Provinces


Households and type of
Total Chachoengsao Chon Buri Rayong Sara Buri
problems
Households Percent Households Percent Households Percent Households Percent Households Percent
Households 30,247 4,122 6,107 13,584 6,434
Type of problems
To chase away 1,504 5.0 210 5.1 741 12.1 169 1.2 384 6.0
The dwelling degenerate 4,560 15.1 405 9.8 1,843 30.2 889 6.5 1,423 22.1
High rental on land and house 3,589 11.9 261 6.3 894 14.6 1,157 8.5 1,277 19.9
Census registration to be absen 3,104 10.3 311 7.5 748 12.2 738 5.4 1,307 20.3
the welfare
Electric 3,451 11.4 460 11.2 371 6.1 1,652 12.2 968 15.0
Piped water drinking and 7,339 24.3 728 17.7 1,534 25.1 4,095 30.2 982 15.3
supply
Drain away water 4,299 14.2 601 14.6 1,115 18.3 1,761 13.0 822 12.8
Manage of garbage 3,120 10.3 150 3.6 1,102 18.0 1,571 11.6 297 4.6
Crime 4,661 15.4 904 21.9 1,279 20.9 2,139 15.7 339 5.3
Drug 5,584 18.5 667 16.2 2,680 43.9 1,582 11.6 655 10.2
Aids 991 3.3 16 0.4 411 6.7 429 3.2 135 2.1
Lack of money for education 6,189 20.5 303 7.4 1,315 21.5 2,355 17.3 2,216 34.4
In need of child care 1,687 5.6 12 0.3 430 7.0 462 3.4 783 12.2
 

Table3.3 the characteristics of population and social problems in poor communities in 4 provinces of Central 
Region, 2006, (source: National Statistical Office, Ministry of Information and Communication Technology) 

Household shortage of tap water 
Household shortage of tap water has long been a problem of Rayong municipal residents as 
more  and  more  of  water  capital,  especially  surface  water,  are  used  in  the  expanding  several 
industrial  estates  around  municipal  area.  A  severe  sign  of  shortage  became  clear  in  March  2003 
when there was a competing strive for water supply between farmers and industries. Though there 
have been a number of government projects aiming at increasing the supply of surface water capital 
to meet the skyrocketing demand of water, it could only reduce the amount of shortage with if there 
are  no  such  projects.  Three  hundred  seventy‐four  projects  are  proposed  to  enlarge  the  surface 
water storage capacity by 1,534 million cubic meters in 2007 – 2010. The other two hundred and ten 
projects in 2011 – 2015 are to add additional of 1.848 million cubic meters. Given the same rate of 
investment growth that flows into industrial projects in the future as in 2007, the increasing supply 
of surface water still could not meet the faster increasing demand. It is estimated that the shortage 
however would still exist and might be even more acute (Chiangmai University, 2007). 

19 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
Unbearable of Air pollution 
For  industrial  development  objective,  the  planned  residential  area  in  Rayong  city  plan  was 
changed  into  industrial  development  area.  Buffer  zone  between  residential  community  and 
manufactories was transformed into an oil refinery. Without buffer zone, there is no absorption area 
of  pollution  from  industries  to  community.  It  was  eventually  too  hard  to  bear  for  the  students  in 
Maptaphut Pittaya School as more than one hundred students get ill as a result of air pollution from 
manufactories  and  oil  refinery.  The  school  then  had  to  move  out  of  the  area  in  1997  (Weekly‐
Manager,  2009).  This  could  be  the  evidence  that  the  pollution  problem  in  Rayong  has  long  been 
accumulated at least for twenty years. 

Srisuwan  Chanya,  chairman  of  Stop  Global  Warming  Association,  and  Environmental 
Committee  member  of  Lawyers  Council  of  Thailand,  suggested  that  the  natural  wind  direction  in 
Rayong plays a role in magnifying the adverse effect of air pollution in Rayong. Geographically the 
wind flows from the sea to land, from the industrial area in the south to the residential community 
in  the  north,  thus  bringing  the  VOCs  and  industrial  dusts  to  the  community  (Chanya,  2009).  The 
empirical data in figure3.8 supports his argument. The dark green area represents the area where 
the residents have the least level of Benzene contamination in urinal test, while the red is the area 
with highest Benzene contamination in the residents’ urine. Most of the red zones are in the North 
of the Industrial Estates. 

 
Figure3.8 the Voronoi map illustrating the level of benzene contamination in urinal test of 
population in various areas in Rayong (source: Faculty of Law, Chulalongkorn University) 
 
 

20 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
Precarious Health of Rayong 

Number of patients per 1000 population and Total patients in Eastern region, by province in 2008
Number of patients per 
Rayong Chonburi Chachoengsao Pra Cheen Buri Sa Kaew Chantaburi Trat
1000 population

Neoplasm and Cancer 16.80 10.13 ‐ ‐ ‐ 16.37 15.13


Respiratory system 695.82 451.79 603.55 443.13 315.14 495.37 577.90
Neuropathy 48.36 30.72 45.71 36.61 28.13 28.13 53.83
Total patients 2866.96 1794.97 2528.02 1982.12 1263.93 1263.93 2776.08
 
Table3.3 Number of patients per 1000 population and Total patients in Eastern region, by province in 2008 
(source: National Statistical Office) 
 

The  listed  three  diseases  in  table3.3;  neoplasm  and  cancer,  respiratory  disease,  and 
neuropathy,  are  the  possible  diseases  a  person  could  have  higher  risk  to  get  if  he  or  she  gets 
exposed to hazardous chemical gases for a long time, ceteris paribus. In 2008 Rayong ranks number 
1  of  having  highest  total  patients  per  1000  population  in  Eastern  Region.  It  is  also  among  the  top 
three  provinces  that  have  highest  number  of  the  patients  of  the  three  diseases.  With  remarkably 
high  number  of  patients  with  respiratory  disease  of  695.82  per  1000  population,  nearly  seventy 
percent of Rayong residents have problem with respiratory illness. This number coincides with the 
evidence  of  long  term  over  limit  emission  of  Volatile  Organic  Compounds  (VOCs)  from  industrial 
factories  in  the  atmosphere.  Especially  in  Map  Ta  Phut  district,  the  Ministry  of  Public  Health  of 
Thailand indicates that the number of patients with respiratory disease and Cellulitis patients in Map 
Ta Phut district increases by 88 and 57 percent respectively  (Matichon, 2007).  

Cancer  is  another  disease  that  is  claimed  to  be  another  adverse  effect  of  the  expanding 
industrial  projects  in  Rayong.  During  2001  –  2003,  the  National  Cancer  Institute  revealed  that 
Rayong is one of the provinces that the residents get cancer the most, especially lung  cancer. The 
smoking  behavior  of  Rayong  residents  cannot  be  claimed  as  a  main  cause  of  lung  cancer  as  the 
percentage of Rayong people who smoke is below the country average.  

4. Along the road of Thailand Manufacturing Development: Are we growing 
sustainably?  
The  aforementioned  three  pillars  of  sustainable  concepts;  economic,  environmental,  and 
social,  are  interrelated.  The  summary  of  evaluation  of  Thailand  manufacturing  sector  in  each 
dimension is presented in table3.4. The manufacturing sector has been achieving its high and stable 
economic growth, historical data and the nature of manufacturing structure predicts a good future 
of manufacturing sector in the long run. The economic dimension of manufacturing sector has been 
doing well. Environmentally, there exist environmental problems. The marine and coastal ecosystem 
is  changing  as  a  result  of  the  long  term  environmental  pollution.  The  over  limit  emission  of 
hazardous  Volatile  Organic  Compounds  to  the  atmosphere  has  been  detected  for  more  than  two 
years and still keep occurring, reflecting the ignorance of the firms, government, and other relating 
sectors. Even though there are a number of regulations and articles in the constitution that clearly 
states  about  the  protection  of  environment  and  the  right  to  participate  and  human  right  of  the 
affected community, they are barely used and practically ineffective. The case of Article 67 of 2007 
Constitution can be a good example of the ignorance of environment and social dimensions of the 
21 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
government.  Illegal  hazardous  industrial  waste  disposal  are  continuously  found,  reflecting  the 
ineffectiveness  of  enforcing  the  regulations  and  the  ignorance  of  firms.  However  this  might  be  a 
good sign that the public are becoming more active in monitoring the environment. Historical data 
does not show that there is a permanent serious concern of environment. For social dimension, the 
emission  of  pollution  has  long  eradicated  people’s  health.  The  shortage  of  water  supply  of 
households  as  a  result  of  a  continually  increasing  demand  for  water  of  industries  has  never  been 
eliminated.  Human  rights  according  to  Article  57  in  2007Constitution  clearly  states  the  right  of  a 
person  to  the  information  and  reason  of  the  government  about  any  projects  that  might  harm  the 
environment, health, or the interest of community, and the government must listen to them before 
approving  or  implementing  such  projects.  This  is  practically  ignored.  The  community  does  not 
actually have such rights. The economic dimension seems to be the only dimension that meets the 
criteria  of  sustainability  and  gains  most  of  interest  by  the  sectors  that  benefit  from  it.  Obviously, 
using the aforementioned criteria, we conclude that up until now Thailand manufacturing sector has 
not been growing sustainably. There is no clear sign that we are really moving toward sustainability 
in the long term but toward economically biased growth. Though Map Ta Phut has recently gained 
the  attention  from  the  public  and  there  are  a  number  of  new  committee  and  projects  aiming  at 
solving the social and environmental problems in Map Ta Phut, it is uncertain whether or not this is 
simply a temporary policy that comes and goes like in the past. Consequently, we need to take time 
to see if such efforts really aim to eliminate the root of the problems. If so, then this could be said 
that at least Thailand manufacturing sector is one step closer to the path of sustainable growth. 

Economic Environmental Social


• high and stable GDP  • environmental  • unsolved shortage of 
share problems have existed water problems
• high but unstable GDP  • no evidence of  • remarkable number of 
growth share effective protection of  chronic health 
• unstable level of FDI environment problems
• etc. • ecosystem is  • poor living 
worsening environment

Table3.4 evaluation of manufacturing sector in terms of economic, environmental, and social aspects
 

Concluding Remarks 
Sustainable development concept is not only important to manufacturing sector in the sense 
that it implicitly goes together with globalization trend, it is also the way that enables manufacturing 
sector to grow together with the betterment of country in all aspects. The high and stable growth 
does not necessarily come with the cost of impaired environmental and social suffering as Thailand 
manufacturing  sector  recently  experiences.  When  Economic  growth  of  the  country  is  the  only 

22 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
utmost  objective  of  the  government,  with  sole  profit‐oriented  investors  and  shareholders,  the 
Economic dimension seems to be the only dimension that gains most of interest by the people who 
benefits  from  the  Map  Ta  Phut  Industrial  Estate.  The  lack  of  effective  enforcement  of  law  and 
regulation,  transparency  and  accountability  of  government  and  firms  make  it  impossible  to 
effectively control the external cost of manufacturing sector on environment and society. According 
to Lucio Munoz (2006), if corporations operate in an environment where nonmarket pressures (e.g., 
effective  laws  and  regulations)  or  market  pressures  are  weak  or  ineffective,  such  as  in  the  case  of 
developing  countries,  the  corporations  will  tend  to  display  more  unsustainable  development 
patterns.  The  World  Development  Report  (WDR,  2003)  indicates  that  to  promote  growth  that  is 
socially  and  environmentally  responsible,  we  need  to  create  efficient  institutions  supported  by  a 
process  based  on  equity  and  inclusion.  Without  economic  incentive  or  strict  regulation,  the  firms 
have no incentive to concern the social costs but only their private costs. In order to survive in the 
world competition, sustainable development becomes more and more important for manufacturing 
sector.  To  find  the  way  for  sustainable  developing  of  Thailand  manufacturing  sector,  the  root  of 
problems  needs  to  be  eliminated  directly.  What  we  actually  need  is  the  real  action  of  law, 
transparency of government and private sector, and real power of people to participate and monitor 
the  actions  of  firms  and  government.  Without  sustainable  development,  the  manufacturing  sector 
would generate only minimal real value added to the society after the incurred cost of environment 
and society are taken into account. 

 
23 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
Bibliography 
Brown, J. A. (2009, December). 1,3‐Butadiene. Retrieved May 20, 2010, from Haz‐Map: Occupational 
Exposure  to  Hazardous  Agents:  http://hazmap.nlm.nih.gov/cgi‐
bin/hazmap_generic?tbl=TblAgents&id=318 

Brown,  J.  A.  (2009,  December).  Benzene.  Retrieved  May  20,  2010,  from  Haz‐Map:  Occupational 
Exposure  to  Hazardous  Agents:  http://hazmap.nlm.nih.gov/cgi‐
bin/hazmap_generic?tbl=TblAgents&id=5 

Chanya, S. (2009, May 26). Retrieving the lessons: Solution of Maptaphut problems and/or solution 
for temporary Act according to article 67 of the Constitution. Retrieved March 15, 2010, from Faculty 
of Law, Chulalongkorn University: www.law.chula.ac.th/web/pdf/S20091217‐D3.pdf 

CHEMICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT UNIT, E. a. (n.d.). 1,2‐Dichloroethane . Retrieved May 20, 
2010,  from  ฐานความรู้เรื่ องความปลอดภัยด้านสารเคมี:  http://www.chemtrack.org/Chem‐
Abstract.asp?ID=00709&NAME=1,2‐Dichloroethane 

CHEMICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT UNIT, E. a. (n.d.). 1,3‐Butadiene . Retrieved May 20, 2010, 
from  ฐานความรู้เรื่ องความปลอดภัยด้านสารเคมี:  http://www.chemtrack.org/Chem‐
Abstract.asp?ID=02483&NAME=1,3‐Butadiene 

Chiangmai  University,  F.  o.  (2007).  รายงานผลการศึกษาเพื่อจัดทําข้ อเสนอในการปรั บปรุ งแก้ ไขกฎหมายที่เป็ น
อุปสรรคต่ อการส่ งเสริ มคุณภาพสิ่ งแวดล้ อมในเขตมาบตาพุดและจังหวัดระยอง. Chiangmai: Chiangmai University. 

Kaewphongphan,  T.  (2010).  The  Standard  value  of  Pollution:  Use  Quality  of  Life  to  measure. 
Retrieved Mar 16, 2010, from Institute of Public Policy Studies (IPPS): http://www.fpps.or.th/news‐
printversion.php?detail=n1263172789.news 

Limthai, S. (2010, May 7). Rayong Governor meets the public on Radio. 

Macroeconomic  Analysis  Group,  F.  P.  (2009,  December  3).  Economic  effect:  Map  Ta  Phut  Case. 
Retrieved  January  29,  2010,  from  Fiscal  Policy  Office: 
http://www.fpo.go.th/scripts/getpdf.php?id=5322 

Matichon. (2007, August 19). Maptaphut when Health is after Economic growth. Retrieved May 20, 
2010, from One Ton: http://www.sarakadee.com/blog/oneton/?p=18 

Mawhinney,  M.  (2002).  Sustainable  Development:  Understanding  the  Green  Debates.  Oxford: 
Blackwell. 

Munoz, L. (2006). Private and Public Sector Interfaces: Prerequisites for Sustainable Development. In 
G. M. Mudacumura, D. Mebratu, & M. S. Haque, Sustainable Development Policy and Administration 
(pp. 591‐607). Florida: CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group. 

Nidhiprabha, B. (2000). Macroeconomic Perspective on Thailand's Post‐Crisis Recovery. Thammasat 
Review , 51‐77. 

24 
 
Is Manufacturing a Sustainable Growth Driver of Thailand? 
5004640925  ROONGTHIP SRISETHKUL 
 
Nidhiprabha, B. (2007). Thailand and New Regionalism. In M. Fujita, Regional Integration in East Asia 
(pp. 137‐161). New York: Palgrave Macmillan. 

Nidhiprabha,  B.  (2009).  The  Hard  Road  Ahead  for  Thailand's  Economic  Recovery.  Asian  Economic 
Papers , 113‐137. 

NIOSH,  N.  I.  (2010,  May  21).  ICSC:NENG0250  International  Chemical  Safety  Cards  (WHO/IPCS/ILO). 
Retrieved  May  22,  2010,  from  Centers  for  Disease  Control  and  Prevention: 
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/ipcsneng/neng0250.html 

Pollution  Control  Department,  M.  o.  (2010,  May  20).  การดําเนิ นการแก้ ไขปั ญหามลพิษในพืน
้ ที่มาบตาพุด. 
Retrieved  May  2010,  21,  from  Pollution  Control  Department,  Bangkok,  Thailand: 
http://www.pcd.go.th/Info_serv/pol_maptapoot_waste.html 

Pollution  Control  Department,  M.  o.  (2010,  May  20).  การดําเนิ นการแก้ ไขปั ญหามลพิษในพืน
้ ที่มาบตาพุด. 
Retrieved  May  20,  2010,  from  Pollution  Control  Department,  Bangkok,  Thailand: 
http://www.pcd.go.th/Info_serv/pol_Maptapoot_wastegait.html 

Rayong  Economic  Perspective.  (n.d.).  Retrieved  May  21,  2010,  from  Rayong  Province: 
http://www.rayong.go.th/channal5.html 

Thailand,  I.  E.  (2009).  Source  of  Map  Ta  Phut  Environmental  problem.  Retrieved  March  15,  2010, 
from  Industrial  Estate  Authority  of  Thailand: 
http://www.ieat.go.th/ieat/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=154&Itemid=220&lan
g=th 

Visetsri, A. (2009, September 21). Rayong..DSI investigate illegal disposal of hazardous waste in Map 
Ta  Phut.  Retrieved  May  20,  2010,  from  76  Channels  76  Provinces: 
http://76.nationchannel.com/playvideo.php?id=56443 

Weekly‐Manager.  (2009,  November  5).  เปิ ดโปงปมผลประโยชน์ มหาศาลมาบตาพุด  สารพัดบิ๊กมีเอี่ ยว!  ตัวการก่ อ
มลพิษ.  Retrieved  May  20,  2010,  from  Weekly  ‐  Manager  Online: 
http://www.muslimthairadio.com/index.php?page=content&id=111 

25