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“Where the lions roar!” Vol. 1, No. 7 May 2011 First-Ever Elementary School Production ‘Aladdin
“Where the lions roar!” Vol. 1, No. 7 May 2011 First-Ever Elementary School Production ‘Aladdin
“Where the lions roar!” Vol. 1, No. 7 May 2011 First-Ever Elementary School Production ‘Aladdin

“Where the lions roar!”

Vol. 1, No. 7

May 2011

“Where the lions roar!” Vol. 1, No. 7 May 2011 First-Ever Elementary School Production ‘Aladdin Jr.’

First-Ever Elementary School Production ‘Aladdin Jr.’ Casts a Spell Over Nearly 500 Attendees

‘Aladdin Jr.’ Casts a Spell Over Nearly 500 Attendees In the stage adapatation of the classic
‘Aladdin Jr.’ Casts a Spell Over Nearly 500 Attendees In the stage adapatation of the classic

In the stage adapatation of the classic Disney film, nearly 60 students comprised the cast of actors, singers and dancers. (Left) Aladdin (Felix Franke) and Pricess Jasmine (Christina Dahdal) sing “A Whole New World,” while riding the magic carpet (Yousef Al Ankar). (Center) Guard (Zeyad Yang), Jafar (Kevin Pyo), Razoul (Mustapha Boukornia) and Guard (Raj Raghu). (Right) The Genie (Yousef Korayem), Aladdin, Princess Jasmine, the Sultan (Omar Akkad) and Iago the Parrot (Khaled Korayem). / Photos courtesy Mrs. Pittman-Jones.

(Khaled Korayem). / Photos courtesy Mrs. Pittman-Jones. by Rawdha Al Mansouri (Grade 11, Arts & Culture)

by Rawdha Al Mansouri (Grade 11, Arts & Culture) Nearly 500 students, parents and staff were brought under the spell of the magic of Disney's famous animated film ”Aladdin” at “Aladdin Jr.,” the first-ever Elementary School performing arts production, held at Abu Dhabi University on April 14. Director Dr. Jones said the production was “exceptional.” “A school with a long history of drama productions would have

been proud to have produced something this good, but for a first-ever production it was outstanding,” he said. “The stu- dents showed great enthusiasm and skills, in acting, singing and dancing.” Out of a cast of nearly 60 students, the leads were fifth graders Felix Franke (Aladdin) and Christina Dahdal (Princess Jasmine), and fourth grader Yousef Korayem (Genie). Musical numbers included

"Arabian Nights," "One Jump Ahead," "Why Me?" and "A Whole New World." Staff who made this fabu- lous show happen were Ms. Al Jenaibi (Director), Mr. Lamar (Music Director), Ms. Crofts (Choreographer), Ms. Maika (Set Designer and Properties), Omar Khalil (Grade 11, Light- ning Designer), Mr. Abdelsalam (Stage Manager), Ms. Sambola (Public Relations and Fundrais- ing) and Mrs. Pittman-Jones

(Liaison Officer). Junior Latifa Al Khamairi said the event was very well-orga- nized, which showed that the cast and crew worked hard on it. "I enjoyed singing along to the songs during the play," she said . “The kids were very talented.” Ms. Al Jenaibi agreed, saying:

“They all worked very hard at rehearsals and at home.” There will be no more elemen- tary productions this year, but Ms. Al Jenaibi said she will be

putting on another not-yet-deter- mined musical next year “I am extremely pleased it went so well and I’m very proud of all the kids involved,” said Ms. Al Jenaibi. “I hope that next year’s pro- duction will be bigger and better with a lot more kids signing up.”

Yearbook on Sale June 5

More Pictures, Clubs, Events and Sports

by Tanya Tarazi (Grade 11) The yearbook is almost here! After a year of anticipation, the yearbook is on the way, and will go on sale on June 5. Publications teacher Mr. Baron said, “This is the best yearbook the school ever had.” There are significant changes to this yearbook, such as a lot more and better content, more

coverage on sports, clubs and events and due to thanks to the Publications students, the layout is much improved and many more social groups are featured. Promoting the yearbook has also been improved. There will be letters sent home to parents, banners posted around the school and be on the lookout for viral

videos made by the class The first yearbook distribu- tion will be during the Capping Ceremony on June 5 for juniors and seniors, then it can be pur- chased from the uniform shop. According to Steffanie Sanders (Grade 11) “I’m excited to see this year’s year- book, I know it will be a success.”

The prices of the yearbook are AED 250 for this year's yearbook, AED 75 for last year's yearbook and a special combination offer of AED 300 for both the 2010 and 2011 yearbooks. “It’s a unique limited edi- tion that holds your high school memories, which you will trea- sure for years to come.”

“It’s a unique limited edi- tion that holds your high school memories, which you will trea-

MS Wins Citywide Oil Trading Challenge

by Oshba Al Murar (Grade 12, Cosmo Editor) Grade 8 students won a citywide oil trading simula- tion held at AISA in March. AISA was one of seven groups from different Abu Dhabi schools that par- ticipated in the three-week Carbon Trading Challenge that simulated oil trading. The educational program teaches students about math, enterprise and commodi- ties strategies, according to

organization's website. Grade 8 teacher Ms. Meu- nier took 39 boys and 37 girls, and split them into teams of four or five students . Each group started with 100 barrels of oil and USD 5,000. Whoever earned the most money by the end of the two-hour challenge won for that day. Each student choose a role such as the accountant, the manager, the chair or the trader and analyze global market news and manage their budgets care- fully. By the end of the chal- lenge, AISA's team, nicknamed ADNOC after the oil company,

AISA's team, nicknamed ADNOC after the oil company, Grade 8 student Hazza al Boushelaibi, 13, debates

Grade 8 student Hazza al Boushelaibi, 13, debates with his team mem- bers during the challenge. / Photo courtesy The National.

raised AED 637,000 (USD

173,000).

“The students were defi- nitely engaged and were yelling, screaming, and that’s real life,” said Ms. Meunier. “They also realized how math, science and humanities are used by adults,” she said. “This training was really good for our curriculum, it showed real life events into real life situations.” One of the winning students, Saeed Al Dhahiri, told “The National” newspaper, “I would

like to work in oil after this because it would be such an exciting job.” Fadhel Al Marar, the manager of the real-life ADNOC, had fun playing the game with the students . “It’s really important for us to learn how to trade oil, especially living in Abu Dhabi, the UAE is our country and we know these things,” he told “The National.”

Publications Class Learns Filmmaking at NYFA P2

MS Students in Fast Lane with F1 in Schools P3

Bollywood Dance Club Brings the Beat P4

Hundreds Enjoy International Night P5

Fond Farewell for Long- time Athletic Director P6

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The Express

May 2011

Lights, Camera, Action! Publications Class Learns Filmmaking Basics at

by Sheikha Al Meraikhi (Grade 11) Nearly 20 students from Publications class learned about filmmaking
by Sheikha Al Meraikhi (Grade 11) Nearly 20 students from Publications class learned about filmmaking
by Sheikha Al Meraikhi (Grade 11) Nearly 20 students from Publications class learned about filmmaking
by Sheikha Al Meraikhi (Grade 11) Nearly 20 students from Publications class learned about filmmaking

by Sheikha Al Meraikhi (Grade 11) Nearly 20 students from Publications class learned about filmmaking on a recent field trip to the New York Film Academy in Abu Dhabi. Filmmaking veteran Norman Schwartz showed the 18 students and staff different cameras and that filming one scene in a movie takes a lot of time as actors have to reinact the same scene several times. Publications teacher Mr. Baron, Secondary School Principal Mr. Godley and Girls As- sistant Principal Ms. Spegele also attended.

Juniors Farida Nassar and Menat El Abd practiced a scene about an employee asking her boss for a raise, and later on juniors Amelia Fox and Aria Pavlic re-acted the same scene in a professional set. El Abd said, “I never thought it takes this long to film a scene. The field trip was successful for students who are considering filmmaking or broad- cast media in university, and for making building blocks for next year’s class. “It was great that students could learn the basics from professionals today,” said Mr. Baron. “We’re considering adding broadcast journalist to nex year’s curriculum.”

(Top Left) Juniors Aria Pavlic (left) and Ameilia Fox act in a scene on a set, as NYFA-AD teacher Norman Schwartz directs. (Below) Publications students pose on national dress day. / Photos courtesy Mr. Baron.

School Enjoys Spirit Week

 

MS Sees Ancient Artifacts at Saadiyat Is.

by Mona Al Amry (Grade 12) Students and teachers en- joyed the annual Spirit Week, the annual free themed dress week to s. from Sunday April 17 through Thursday April 21. Sunday was Pajama Day (dress for comfort) Monday was lion Spirit Day (wear your best lion gear). But many students and staff dressed as Athletic Director Mr. Synoground, who is leav- ing AISA to join the American British Academy (ABA) in Oman. There was also an assembly for Mr. Synoground to hon-

 

orhow effort he has put in to AISA for the past 15 years (see Aria Pavlic’s Sports section article). Tuesday was Blast from the Past (dress as your favorite decade), with many students dressing as hippies from the 1960s, while many Emirati boys wore the traditional Kan- doora. Wednesday was Wacky Dress Day or Dress Like a Teacher Day). Thursday was Celebrity or Character Day. Also on Thursday students who had the highest bid for a teacher dressed them up who signed up for the “dress a teacher” bid.

by Fatma Al Khazraji (Grade 12) AISA teachers usually take their students on field trips to en- lighten them more on whatever topic they are learning about. This year, the Grade 6 students went to Manarat al Saadiyat on May 9-10 to visit the Splendours of Mesopotamia exhibition, held under the support of Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi. This trip took place during the Grade 6’s early study of the an- cient civilizations that inhabited this region. The exhibition displays the treasures of the ancient civiliza-

of the an- cient civilizations that inhabited this region. The exhibition displays the treasures of the

according to the exhibition web- site. “I saw many [things] such as jewelry, everyday tools and the designs on walls,” said Maitha Al Khazraji. “It was interesting.” The exhibit has traveled from the National Museum in London,

"This was a fantastic opportu- nity for students to have their textbooks come alive,” said Ms. Lawson, a Grade 6 Humani- ties teacher. “Viewing ancient artifacts up close and to this high standard is a very special occa- sion."

The Express Masthead

 

Help

tion of Mesopotamia, which is modern Iraq and parts of Syria,

England and will be on display until June 27.

Our Mission:

   

die if there is little ice.

• Help animals when they need

 

Animals!

 

should help animals – if they are extinct, then plants and humans will die. If animals die, it can affect all the other living things in the food chain. Here are tips on how to help animals:

• Animals die because of gasoline, so try to drive less than before to stop global warming. Global warming can melt places where it is frozen, and animals

The Express produces an up-to- date, fun, fresh, fierce newspaper that will be liked by many, cussed by some, read by all!

 

Stop littering! When animals

are badly injured by calling the vet or shelters. When animals need help, you can feed and give

by Lyana Anthonijsz (Grade 5) Grade Five students are having an exhibition, and my group's topic is animal victims. Every day, animals die because of what people do to them, like cutting down trees, littering, not recycling and driving a lot of cars. We

see garbage, they eat it but can- not digest the garbage and die.

 

Recycling is also a way to

water to it. When we help animals, many things can change. You will not only save animals, but also your- self and other people, so start helping and saving animals.

Staff Advisers Mr. Baron, Mr. Kandil AISA’s Voice Editor: Shaika Al Qassimi Mona Al Amry Fatma Al Khazraji Sheikha Al Meraikhi Arts & Culture

 

help animals. Then people don't have to cut down more trees and animals that live in trees will still have a place to live. Cutting down fewer trees can decrease carbon dioxide and replace it with oxygen.

 

Seniors: AISA Will Always Be Home

Editor: Maitha Al Mansoori Hana Al Ameri Rawdha Al Mansouri Menat El Abd Cosmopolitan Editor: Oshba Al Murar Hanna Al Hassen Shamma Al Khouri Farah Al Suwaidi News! Editor: Rana Alsaadi Alyazia Al Hamed Farida Nassar Tanya Tarazi Sport:

Editor: Jessica van der Walt Ameilia Fox Paula Fronda Aria Pavlic

Copyright © 2011 AISA No portion of this newspaper or related online content may be reproduced for public or comercial purposes without prior written permission.

Students Learn to Knit in New Arts and Crafts Club

by Shaika Al Qassimi (Grade 11, AISA’s Voice Editor) The new Arts and Craft Club, in which students learn how to knit simple things like scarfs and key rings, started in late April. It is called the "Arts and Crafts Club because be- tween time to time they change the activities. The leaders for the girls- only club are juniors Danielle Cobrand and Sonu Mathew,

and this counts towards their IB Creativity, Action, Service (CAS) community service hours. After Cobrand and Mathew put up posters in late April, the club now has six members

including freshmen Meera Al Shamsi, Sahar Al Haddad and Hind Al Hameli, and juniors Yu Xin, Delia Smith and Joumana Asfour. But the only members who know how to knit are Cobrand and Smith. "It's hard to teach how to knit," said Cobrand. The club is supervised by two librarian Mrs. Morley, who pro- vides space for the club to knit, and elementary school teacher Ms. Fairbarn.

"This club is a nice way of relaxing after school, and it's for a good cause." said Yu Xin. Proceeds from their finished products -- on sale at the AISA Bazaar -- will go toward a char- ity.

 

by Mr. Godley It is hard to believe but Senior Exams are now upon us and on June 7 at Emirates Palace Hotel, our Graduates will be walking across the stage and receiving their AISA Diplomas. Over the past few weeks I have visited with a number of our graduates who have returned to AISA after having a successful first year of University studies. In all cases, I was proud to hear how well prepared they felt and how successful they have been. It is anecdotal, but it is great to hear that we are doing the fine job that we think we are in preparing students for lives out- side of AISA. It is also great to see how many of our graduates come back each year to say hi and check in with us. Some visit campus personally and some

keep in contact via email, but in all cases our graduates report missing AISA and the people who make up our community. To our current Seniors, you too will feel this way…in time. It may be hard for some of you to believe that you will miss being here as you are ready to head out on your own and fly. The good news is, we have done our jobs and are ready to let you go off and become who you are meant to be. This time of year always reminds me of a talk I had with my father as I consid- ered heading out for University studies when he said, “How can I miss you if you won’t go away?” Go out, do well and keep in touch with us. AISA will always be a home for all of our gradu- ates and…if you don’t go, we won’t miss you.

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F1 in Schools: Middle School Students Build, Race and Market Cars

by Farah Al Suwaidi (Grade 12) Middle School students and staff revved up the fun

by Farah Al Suwaidi (Grade 12) Middle School students and

staff revved up the fun by partici- pating in the F1 in Schools chal- lenge, which used Formula One racing to teach students about managing a business. During the nine-week F1 in Schools program, students used software to design, build and race

points for each aspect of their project and winners get a trophy and a four year scholarship to university. Since awards are announced at the end of the school year, AISA will not know how its team placed for about another month. Grade 7 teacher Ms. Spies said, “It was an excellent learning

experience. “I liked it because it was exciting and not something you do every day. It was also beneficial for education since we learned a lot about the laws of aerodynamics.” Two classes worked together in groups, overcoming silly fights and sponsorship and budgeting

issues. “They actually enjoyed

a

miniature Formula 1 car made

from balsa wood and powered by

single compressed air cylinder. Students also worked together in small teams to develop busi- ness and marketing plans, which they presented to a panel of judges. Teams were then awarded

a

experience for the students. They experienced concepts such as

keeping to a deadline, sending out letters to businesses, setting up a budget and working together to achieve goals and resolve problems.” Her seventh grade student Megan Jackson also enjoyed

themselves and learned a lot,” said Ms. Spies. “The teams who are moti- vated will possibly continue their project as an after-school activity and eventually work their way to becoming champions. We will definitely do it again next year.”

(Left) Grade 7 students Celine Ghosn, Solange Padilla, Brighid Hurtibise, Ivanna Castro, Melinda Knowling helped the school in a Formula One simulation. / Photo courtesy Ms. Spies.

in a Formula One simulation. / Photo courtesy Ms. Spies. South African Students, Staff Celebrate Freedom

South African Students, Staff Celebrate Freedom Day

 

IB Teacher Nominated for City’s Best Teacher in Abu Dhabi Week Contest

by Shamma Al Khouri (Grade 11) More than 30 South African students and staffs enjoyed celebrat- ing Freedom Day, is held on April 27. Since 1994, it has celebrated the first democratic election that brought an end to the racial segregation policies of Apartheid . Though the school did not mark the event since it oc- curred during spring break, and celebrations tended to be in Dubai rather than in Abu Dhabi, a handful of students and staff interviewed said they celebrated mostly by having barbecues with friends and relatives. Dorien Van Heerden (Grade 11) said "Usually we celebrate by having some delicious tradi- tional dishes and either listening to our music or watching some South African movies, it's a family day." Senior Nelmari Holloway agreed. "Food, family and fun

Senior Nelmari Holloway agreed. "Food, family and fun Music teacher Ms. Van Rens- burg and Cherene

Music teacher Ms. Van Rens- burg and Cherene Leyland (Grade 10) said they held a “braai,” a barbecue of grilled meats. added Her sister Allesia Leyland (Grade 9) said, “We all played South African music and had a big dinner.” Some students like Rabia Abba Omar (Grade 9) were traveling, but still found ways to celebrate. “We were in India, so my par- ents took us to a fancy restaurant and my sister and I played South African music on our iPods in the bus.,” Omar said. Next year there may be a celebration at school. Girls Assistant Principal Ms.

by Mr. Baron In a citywide best teacher contest, Abu Dhabi Week gave an honorable mention award to Ms. Farrell, the high school In- ternational Baccalaureate (IB)

Diploma Programme coordina- tor and IB English teacher Ms. Farrell. Senior Naomi Nasrallah nominated Ms. Farrell, who is leaving after spending the past six years at AISA. "I have never met a more determined and strong-minded woman in my life," Nasral- lah wrote. "[She] encourages her students to think outside the box, and pushes us to go further than we think possible. Her countless stories and great memory never cease to enter- tain us." Ms. Farrell, who has also taught classes in Grades 8-12, was grateful and surprised by the nomination.

Grades 8-12, was grateful and surprised by the nomination. “I thank Naomi and Abu Dhabi Week
Grades 8-12, was grateful and surprised by the nomination. “I thank Naomi and Abu Dhabi Week

“I thank Naomi and Abu Dhabi Week for allowing not only myself, but also other

teachers throughout Abu Dhabi to be featured," she said. "[I]t makes leav- ing even harder because I feel like we have such wonderful

students here at AISA." When asked how she has stu- dents "think outside the box," Ms. Farrell replied:

"We have such a fantastic opportunity here at AISA by having really international classrooms, and this allows for discussions that have to be "outside of the box" for all of us since we are all bringing our

Senior Naomi Nasrallah (left) nominaed Ms. Far- rell, the school’s IB coordinator and IB English teacher, for Abu Dhabi’s best teacher. / Photos courtesy AISA.

different cultures and back- grounds to the table." While Ms. Farrell is headed back to the United States, she plans on continuing in educa- tion. "I can't imagine my life with- out a classroom," she said. "I'm positive it's where I a meant to be."

is how we spend the day. it's a time for celebration and it's no good if you do it alone."

Spegele said, “ I hope that next year the students and teachers from South Africa plan more to celebrate this day.”

 
   
Students Learn University and ‘13th Year’ Options at School Fairs by Hanna Al Hassen (Grade
Students Learn University and ‘13th Year’ Options at School Fairs by Hanna Al Hassen (Grade
Students Learn University and ‘13th Year’ Options at School Fairs by Hanna Al Hassen (Grade
Students Learn University and ‘13th Year’ Options at School Fairs by Hanna Al Hassen (Grade
Students Learn University and ‘13th Year’ Options at School Fairs by Hanna Al Hassen (Grade
Students Learn University and ‘13th Year’ Options at School Fairs by Hanna Al Hassen (Grade

Students Learn University and ‘13th Year’ Options at School Fairs

by Hanna Al Hassen (Grade 12) Nearly 200 sophomores and juniors started their university application process by attending the Council of International Schools university fair in the gym on March 29. Sophomores and juniors, whose attendance was mandatory , viewed booths from 24 different universities from the U.S., Spain, France, Nether- lands, England and the UAE . On April 18, students attended the Linden Boarding Schools Tour, with 10 schools from the United States, Canada and Jordan. Singapore’s United World Colleges has 12 global

campuses.

Singapore’s United World Colleges has 12 global campuses. New York University was one of two dozen

New York University was one of two dozen universities at a recent fair. Above, former U.S. President Bill Clinton gave the 2011 NYU commencement speech. / Photo courtesy Getty Images.

A sampling of the South African staff and students who celebrated Freedom Day: Music teacher Ms. Van Rensburg, senior Nelmari Holloway, junior Dorien Van Heerden, sophomore Cherene Leyland, freshmen Allesia Leyland and Rabia Omar. / Photos courtesy AISA.

These schools are gerad towards students who want to take a “gap year” or who need a “13th or postgraduate” year to help adjust to university or improve their grades.

Ms. Merrell, the high school counselor said,“It's an opportunity for 10th and 11th grade students to begin collecting information on colleges that they wish to attend.”

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The Express

May 2011

Pop Stars Shakira and Amr Diab Wow Hip-Shaking Yas Is. Crowd

by Menat El Abd (Grade 11) Many students were excited by Latin pop star Shakira’s wonder- ful and energetic concert with fa- mous Egyptian singer Amr Diab on April 29– and their reviews were all great! Returning to UAE shores fol- lowing her breath-taking 2008 New Year’s Eve performance at Emirates Palace, Shakira brought 'The Sun Comes Out World Tour' along with her distinctive pop/folk sound and incredible Middle Eastern Latin- inspired dance moves to Abu Dhabi’s Yas Island, according to “Time Out Abu Dhabi.“ Diab revealed his latest songs while reminding fans of his hit songs: “Nour El Ain” and “Aktar Wahed,” which established his multi-platinum sound, .according to “Time Out Abu Dhabi.”

Junior Lamees Al Makkawy,

a fan of Diab, said, “Overall it

was

Although, some aspects of it

disappointed me, such as the fact

that

for 45 minutes before Shakira

had

Egyptian, I was hoping to see

him

of time.” Grade 8 student Yara Hisham

also liked the concert, she also stated,saying, “I liked how her voice sounded exactly like the

CD

said bye and she came back and sang two more songs when some people already left!” During the encore, Shakira en- ergized the crowd with hits “Hips Don't Lie” and the 2010 World Cup theme song “Waka Waka (This Time for Africa). -30-

an excellent performance.

Amr Diab only performed

her full two hours. Being an

perform for a longer amount

but I didn’t like how she

an perform for a longer amount but I didn’t like how she Shakira and Amr Diab
an perform for a longer amount but I didn’t like how she Shakira and Amr Diab

Shakira and Amr Diab performed their hits for thousands. / Photos courtesy Arab News.

Bollywood Dance Club Brings the Beat at International Night

by Hana Al Ameri (Grade 11) After the Bollywood Dance Group performed at Internation- al Night, dancing for three-and- a-half minutes to a mix of Bol- lywood songs "Dhatad Tadad" and "I Hate Love Stories," the standing-room-only crowd of more than 600 students and staff erupted in applause. It was a moment of relief for the six multinational students

Christine Desroches, Grainne McClean, Coralie Wojciule- witsch, Malak Yacout Saleh, and junior Nimra Parveen – since they had been practicing for two hours a week, every week since

October. For all but one of them, this was their final high school

seniors Sharon Albuquerque,

performance after Albuquerque founded the club in 2010 to rep- resent her Indian heritage . The group, which earns hours for the IB CAS community service program, had previously played at last year's International Night and this year at a March 30 preview performance for more than 100 staff. "Performing for international Night was an amazing experi-

ence,” said Parveen. “I felt really nervous right before we had to go on stage but while we were dancing I felt excited and I think everyone really enjoyed our dance and got into it!" Staff members such as econom- ics teacher Mr. Mirza enjoyed the dance. "It was well choreo- graphed and they did a great

job," he said. Albuquerque said she and the group members have enjoyed being part of the club. "It was a lot of fun, preparing, practicing, and performing,” she said.“We have all become closer friends and it's truly an enjoyable experience. As group leader, I'm really proud of the group and how well we've done the last two years.”. " Music teacher Ms. Van Rens- burg helped with the choreog- raphy. "The girls were a very good group and great fun to work with,” she said. “Their dance was very entertaining and they put a lot of effort in the cos- tumes and props." -30-

(Left to Right): Seniors Grainne McClean and Coralie Wojciulewitsch, junior Nimra Parveen, and seniors Sharon

(Left to Right): Seniors Grainne McClean and Coralie Wojciulewitsch, junior Nimra Parveen, and seniors Sharon Albuquerque, Christine Desroches and Malak Yacout. / Photo courtesy Ibrahim Al Hashidi (Grade 12)

Int’l Night Performers

Photos courtesy Ibrahim Al Hashidi (Grade 12)

Performers Photos courtesy Ibrahim Al Hashidi (Grade 12) Ms. Laughran’s IB-2 Spanish class performs “La Bamba.”

Ms. Laughran’s IB-2 Spanish class performs “La Bamba.” (Left to Right):

 

Future Fashion Designers Leila Allaf Model and Make Clothes at

by Maitha Al Mansoori (Grade 11,

ing fashion designing courses at the Abu Dhabi Art Institute. Now she is learning fashion

she prefers to design clothes. “I would rather design because I have such a creative mind and

Arts & Culture Editor) Since her childhood ofcruis-

ing through malls and fashion boutiques and being dressed in glamorous clothing by her mother, junior

figure and anatomy, the basic drawing, contouring and sewing and pattern making where she gets to identify different fashion

want to the show the world my designs.” Allaf also interested in interior design and online design for fashion blogs .

Leila Allaf has aspired to become a fa-

 

Grainne McClean, Sharon Albuquerque, Nour Chehabeddine, Sana Sam- houri and Malak Yakout Saleth.

Nour Chehabeddine, Sana Sam- houri and Malak Yakout Saleth. Bollywood dance group DesiPaarDesi: Junior Akshaay Hendrick

Bollywood dance group DesiPaarDesi: Junior Akshaay Hendrick and freshmen Pragya Gupta and Varun Patni.

Akshaay Hendrick and freshmen Pragya Gupta and Varun Patni. Middle School students sing and dance to

Middle School students sing and dance to Shakira’s 2010 South Africa World Cup theme song “Waka Waka (This Time for Africa).” Mathilde Bienseant (Grade 7) on vocals, Reza-Ali Fassa (Grade 6) on drums, and dancers Haidy Badreldin (Grade 8), Ewa Sepiolo (Grade 7), Yara Hashem (Grade 8) and Lovisa Fjallskog (Grade 7).

fabrics and sew- ing them together to make patterns. Allaf is also inspired by how

fabrics and sew-

ing them together to make patterns. Allaf is also inspired by how celebrities dress. “I'm always up to date with ce- lebrities’ cloth- ing and where

mous fashion designer.

“I want to have my own line, and have stores in cities around the world,” she said. Allaf, who plans on go- ing to a top fashion de-

sign univer- sity such as Miami International

University of Design or Parsons Paris School of Art and Design, wants to design her own line of elegant and modern clothing for Muslim women. “I want to give the woman a little bit of everything and very high fashion which I would like

bit of everything and very high fashion which I would like Junior and aspiring fashion designer

Junior and aspiring fashion designer Leila Allaf (right) wears the traditional clothes of Morocco (with Juniors Rana Alsaadi (left; also Express News! editor) at the International Night Fashion Show. / Photo courtesy Ibrahim Al Hashidi (Grade 12).

to call it glamorous!” she said. Before this year, Allaf, an American of Syrian ethnicity, was with her family iin Miami, Florida, where she used to draw different items such as wildlife, lamps, wine bottles and birds. When she arrived in Abu Dhabi this year, she began tak-

they get them from,” she said. Allaf also saed she is obsessed with shopping and helps her friends in picking outfits. Though Allaf modeled several outfits at the recent International Night Fashion Show at AISA,

Her friends think she has the potential to reach her dreams. Judy Mallah (Grade 11) said:

“Leila’s an amazing fashion designer and she will be famous and successful in the future.”

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May 2011

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Sold-Out Fourth Annual International Night Smashing Success

 

More Than 500 Attendees Toured the World Through Song, Dance, Fashion and Food

Toured the World Through Song, Dance, Fashion and Food (Left to Right): Middle School students Fahad,
Toured the World Through Song, Dance, Fashion and Food (Left to Right): Middle School students Fahad,
Toured the World Through Song, Dance, Fashion and Food (Left to Right): Middle School students Fahad,

(Left to Right): Middle School students Fahad, Rashed and Suhail perform the traditional Emirati dance, the juniors’ dance club Paranoize performed global dances and the Syrian booth with Judy Mallah, Leila Allaf, Rana Alsaadi and Dania Mallah offered tabooleh and shawarma. / Left and right photos courtesy Ibrahim Al Hashidi (Grade 12), center photo courtesy Mr. Baron.

by Rana Alsaadi (Grade 11, News! Editor) More than 500 students and staff enjoyed the sold out fourth annual International Night on April 20, an event that show- cased the school's diversity with more than 30 cultures repre- sented in performances, a fashion show, and food stalls while rais- ing more than AED 15,000 for an African village. Attendees said this was the big- gest and best International Night yet. Ms. Van Rensburg said, “The performers did an awesome job, the fashion is a great event and just seeing all the effort students and parents put into the booths made me proud to be a part of it,” said music teacher Ms. Van Rensburg. While science teacher Mrs. Fairbarn,was the event's main or- ganizer, final arrangements were made by music teacher Ms. Van Rensburg, English teacher Ms. Martin, and science teacher Ms.

Moloney. The student leaders were seniors Sharifa Al-Hinai, Hind Al Zaabi, and Aleya Lari. Attendees paid AED 30 to attend, and about AED 16,000-- nearly double the fundraising goal of AED 9,000 – will be do- nated to the Red Crescent charity to build two wells at a village without water in the African country of Chad. In preparation for the night, girls’ advisories dressed up paper dolls in students' national clothes, while boys’ advisories created a canvas symbolizing diversity. The paper dolls were posted along the stage for the event.

Performances The night started with the singing of the national anthem and traditional dances. Middle School students represented Africa by dancing to Shakira's World Cup hit “Waka, Waka (This Time for Africa)” followed by Melinda Knowling (Grade 7)

playing a classical piano piece. Freshmen represented India with a fast and fun Bollywood dance, followed by junior Stef- fanie Sanders, in a red-white- and-blue outfit, singing “The Star Spangled Banner.” Seniors repre- sented Latin America by dancing to the classic Rock and Roll hit “La Bamba,” followed by middle school girls reciting a beautiful Arabic poem about Palestine . Then there was a brief Eu- ropean tour, as French student Mathilde Bienseant (Grade 7) represented her country by sing- ing a Celine Dion and science teacher Ms. Moloney performed Irish music on her tin whistle. Diana Sholi (Grade 6) read a poem about Palestine in Eng- lish, then the senior Bollywood dance club (profiled in the Arts &

Culture section) danced to upbeat

songs. To represent students' own cultural identities, senior Farrah Abu Hijleh sang “True Colors,”

followed by the final act: the show stopping junior dance club Paranoize, which performed Arab belly dancing, a Chinese fan dance, an African dance and break dancing. Fashion Show The Fashion Show followed, with pairs of students walk- ing down the runway wearing traditional clothing of countries such as Peru, Syria and Pakistan. Juniors Leila Allaf and Meenesh- wer Madhu, also profiled in this issue, were the highlights. At the end, Madhu, who designed junior Tanya Tarazi's flowing white dress symbolizing world peace, bowed to the crowd. International Food Booths Afterwards attendees chowed down on world foods . Seniors Maryam Al Mannaie and Ash- wag Al Neaimi’s Emirati booth served harees, a traditional dish, and lgaimat, a sweet ball pastry eaten with Arabic coffee. At the Syrian booth, which this reporter

staffed, traditional food included tabooleh and shawarma. Students ate apple pie at Brad Bixler’s American booth, seafood stew at Nicole Gurgel’s Brazilian booth, melktart (des- sert) at the South African booth, frites at Coralie Wojciulewitsch’s Belgium booth, and mandu (dumplings) at the South Korean booth. At the Nepal booth, juniors Dorien Van Heerden and Claudia Oswald raised awareness and AED 200 for the Nagajuna Boarding School for orphans, at which they volunteered during the World Challenge trip in No- vember (see The Express, Feb.

2011).

Senior Serene Harb said, “It never fails to show the vast di- versity between the cultures that our school is made up of. Next year's International Night will be even better and hopefully new countries will join!” -30-

and Meenshwer Madhu Int’l Night Fashion Show

 

Environmental Science Students Win Public Speaking Awards

 

by Farida Nassar (Grade 11) Inspired by famous men’s fashion line Armani, Indian junior Meensh- wer Madhu plans on being a fashion designer. He already has a strong start, after designing the flowing, cream-colored

lated to his sketches. The project was so successful that the teacher signed him up for his first fashion show at only 16 years of age, for which he designed two garments. Although Armani is Madhu’s favorite designer, he said he is not often inspired by designers

designer, he said he is not often inspired by designers (Left) At the International Night Fashion

(Left) At the International Night Fashion Show,

and said his Indian ethnic- ity has not influenced his designs. Most of his designs are for women and rarely for men; he prefers design-

by Alyazia Al Hamed (Grade

11)

city

Juniors from the Envi- ronmental Science class won third place in the Abu Dhabi Environmental Agency (EAD), and participated in the Emirates Environmental Group At the Emirates Environ- mental Group's 11th annual environmental public speak- ing competitionin Dubai's Knowledge Village , the school finished in the top third out of 18 schools in the Emirates on April 21. Students presented on themes surrounding the topic,

“GCC countries: 25 years

Lari gave a speech.in which she talked about the effects of cities, pollution and water con- sumption, en- ergy conserva- tion , the three R’s (reduce, reuse, recycle) and ways to help maintain a sustained envi- ronment. “I think we did very well. ” said Drama and English teacher Mr. Gallichan,

think we did very well. ” said Drama and English teacher Mr. Gallichan, (Left to Right):

(Left to Right): Environmental Science juniors

from now, or Development without destruction: Is it pos- sible?” Reem Lari represented Mrs. Fairbarn's class, which also includes Leila Allaf, Rana Alsaadi (also the section editor), Kairine Maharajh and Steffanie Sanders and Tanya

who accompanied the girls. Juniors Rana Alsaadi and Reem Lari won third place at the Abu Dhabi Environ- mental Agency's 10th annual environmental competition on April 17-18 .

Rana Alsaadi, Reem Lari and Leila Allaf.

“Who knows, maybe I'll end up becoming a part of the media.” “I was very excited to hear that we had won not only one award but two!” said Envi- ronmental Science teacher

Tarazi (section reporter). The competition involved

Alsaadi surveyed more

Ms. Fairbarn. “Having them be my students was an added bonus, as I saw all of the hard work the girls put into their projects.” Under the patronage of Sheikh Hamdan bin Zayed Al Nahyan, students and staff were recognized at an exhibition ceremony at Abu Dhabi's Corniche on April 25. Students met education officials along with Sheikhs Hazza and Yas.

 

37

schools, from all around

junior Meenshwer Madhu poses with fellow juniors Marcela Azucar (left) and Express News! reporter Tanya Tarazi. / Photo courtesy Ibrahim Al Hashidi (Grade 12). (Right) Madhu and Tarazi afterwards.

dress symbolizing World Peace, worn by junior (and Express reporter) Tanya Tarazi wore at the recent Inter- national Night Fashion Show. Madhu's passion for fashionstarted in Grade 8, when his math teacher was amazed by his sketchbook and asked him to do a math project re-

ing drapes, the way that loosely hung cloth falls, especially on dresses

For university, Madhu plans on studying market- ing and fashion design. His parents plan on sending him to the Italian fashion capital of Milan, he wants to go to Bangkok, Thailand. “Bangkok is also a fashion capital and it has high exposure and a lot of fashion shows,” he said.

the Emirates, which were divided into two groups de- pending on the question they presented. AISA, along with eighteen other schools, had to write about the idea of “Develop- ment without Destruction”. Together, the class created a Power Point presentation, a video and a model of an ideal new environmentally-friendly

than 90 people about improv- ing the environment, while Lari wrote a speech about how people are becom- ing disconnected from the natural environment. Science teachers Mr. Deschamps and Mrs. Livingston accompanied students. “Winning third place is such an honor and this experience opened a lot of new doors for me,” said Lari.

 

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The Express

6

May 2011

Students and Staff Wish Athletic Director Fond Farewell After Nearly 15 Years at School

by Aria Pavlic (Grade 11, Sport) AISAs’ athletic director, Mr. Syno- ground, after being at AISA for more than a decade, is leaving to work in Oman at ABBA,he officially announced at the annual sports awards assembly on April 18. After having been here for 14 of the past 16 years, including the past 11 as Athletic Director, Synoground will be leaving AISA on a “slam dunk.” The school won the ISAC JV Cham- pions and Overall Sports Champions Awardsfor 2010-2011. Out of the 16 ISAC teams, AISA won the most points (points given for wins), and the school has won this award three out of the past four years. This year, several teams won ISAC championships: Girls Varsity Basketball (three straight seasons), Boys Varsity and JV Soccer and the Boys and Girls Varsity and JV Badminton. In honor of Synoground, the Athlete of the Year award has been renamed the Tim "Syndy" Synoground Award. This year's winners are seniors Karim Abu Eicha and Nelmari Holloway. AISA’s top athletes by grade are fresh-

men Zeid Sharif and Dara Al Kayyali,

ners by sport can be found on the AISA website (aisa.sch.ae/page.cfm?p=444). Cobrand, who was the captain and MVP of the varsity soccer team, and also played varsity volleyball, said:

“This is my first time winning this award, there are many good athletes in our school and I’m honoured to be among one of them.” Al Aghbari, who was the school's sports representative and varsity vol- leyball captain, said: “I’m going to miss playing soccer here at AISA however still I plan to play in university.” Overall athletes of the year were seniors Karim Abu Eicha (also varsity track and field MVP) and Nelmari Hol- loway , and received the first annual Tim "Syndy" Synoground Award. They will have their names engraved on the award which will be featured in the rotunda. Both said they will miss the athletic director. Holloway has played alongside Synoground since Grade 5, and this year

played varsity volleyball and basketball. Abu Eicha played sports for the first time this year, and participated in vol- leyball, soccer and track and field. He agreed that Synoground will be missed. “I know I'm going to miss him so much, because I've known him since

the annual coach's dinner on May 12, PE teacher Mr. Holloway said Synoground inspired him

the annual coach's dinner on May 12, PE teacher Mr. Holloway said Synoground inspired him to become a coach and teacher. “Most of us don't see most of what he's doing,” Holloway said. “He gets to school at 7 am and doesn't leave until 4 or 5 p,m. most days. He's at the school on the weekends and during breaks, arranging schedules, filling out paperwork and painting lines on the football field.” Synoground ended the assembly saying, "Give a big hand

to your coaches, without them we'd have noth- ing. In the past six years, we've won the ISAC tournament in every sport. Next year I'm ex- pecting it to be the same. “I've had a great time at AISA. When you see all these banners (in the gym), remember that you've been on these teams. But don't think this will

be the end -- we'll be

(in the gym), remember that you've been on these teams. But don't think this will be

back next year when you play

ABA-

Oman."

sophomores Zaid Salamahand Claire

I

was a kid,” he said. “I'll never forget

him for his hard work and for who he is.

Taylor, juniors Sam Jovanovic and Dan- ielle Cobrand and seniors Abdul Quddos Al Aghbari and Lilya Boukornia. Win-

I

hope wherever he goes, he deserves it.” Staff will also miss Synoground. At

Top to Bottom: Mr. Synoground (second from right) receives a commemorative plaque from the Admin (dressed as the athletic director) Ms. Spegele, Mr. Morley and Mr. Godley, and poses with the girls and boys winners by grade. / Photos courtesy Ibrahim Al Hashidi (Grade 12).

and Mr. Godley, and poses with the girls and boys winners by grade. / Photos courtesy

Girls Varsity and JV Teams Win ISAC Titles

Girls Varsity and JV Teams Win ISAC Titles by Ameilia Fox (Grade 11) The Girls Varsity

by Ameilia Fox (Grade 11) The Girls Varsity and JV bad- minton teams won first place in the ISAC tournaments held at Al Nahda School on April 16. The Varsity team of eight play- ers set a final score of 54, easily outpacing the Al Batin Bilingual

School of Kuwait (37), Al Nahda School for Girls (27) and UAS- Dubai (20) and UAS-Kuwait (20). “I loved my team and they loved to play so they made my job easier,” said Coach Ms. McLeod. Nicole Gurgel (Grade 12) said, “Everybody had a potential of winning and we all worked hard to do our best.” The Varsity MVP, Mariam Al Hammadi (Grade 11), said of the win: "I was very proud of myself and my friends."

For the JV team, Coach Mr. Berzinssaid he was very proud of the final score of 49, narrowly beating Al Nahda (40), but far ahead of the three other schools that scored in the 20s. "The players who have been playing for a long time improved their serves and strategy," he said. “The newer players did a great job of learning how to play the game." The team had only five girls, theMVP was Sheren Abou-Ouf (Grade 10). Jude Al Hajeri (Grade 8) was proud of winning, saying “The most exciting thing was getting to play doubles with the other JV girls and meeting new girls and boys from the other schools.”

Boys Varsity and JV Badminton Teams Win ISAC Titles

Boys Varsity and JV Badminton Teams Win ISAC Titles tournament. Though the tournament, hosted by the

tournament. Though the tournament, hosted by the Al Nahda School of Abu Dhabi, had different badminton rules than AISA was used to, they still ended successfully. Coaches Mr. Crowe and Mr. McKenzie were proud of the boys, as were the players. “It was an amazing season, hopefully next

by Paula Fronda (Grade 12) The Boy's Varsity and JV badminton teams won the ISAC title after going undefeated in the

year we'll have a better one for next year!” said varsity player Fares Salamah (Grade 11).

 

Softball Players Build Skills in First Full Season

 
(Far Left) Co-coach Mr. Hornblower warms up players. (Left) This year’s MVP was pitcher Emilia
(Far Left) Co-coach Mr. Hornblower warms up players. (Left) This year’s MVP was pitcher Emilia
(Far Left) Co-coach Mr. Hornblower warms up players. (Left) This year’s MVP was pitcher Emilia

(Far Left) Co-coach Mr. Hornblower warms up players. (Left) This year’s MVP was pitcher Emilia Repo (Grade 10), who is warming up before a game. (Below) Pitcher Dahnia Asfour (Grade 9) in the last game against UAS-Dubai on

One of their biggest achievements was nearly beating rival the American Community School, but after a close game AISA lost by a score of 12-7. The Most Valuable Player this year was start- ing pitcher Emilia Repo (Grade 10), “Though she had never played softball before, she

by Jessica van der Walt (Grade 11, Sport Editor) The softball team finished its first full season with big improvements in skills, and next year hope to be even better – and beat rival the American Commu- nity School after a close loss.

April 18. / Left photos courtesy Emilia Repo, team photo Mr. Baron.

Though the team lost all of its games for the second straight season, few of AISA's players have played before or even come from countries where baseball or softball is a major sport, com-

pared to the region's American and international schools that have many students from North America. Co-coach Mr. (with Mr. Mill- er) said the team of more than 15 girls, mainly from the Middle

School, significantly improved their game and skills, “Seventy percent of the start- ers can hit to the outfield now and their basic throwing and catching skills improved [signifi- cantly],” he said.

improved greatly throughout the season. “I'm very proud of our team as a whole and of the progress we've been making,” Repo said. “I think it is a good place to continue from for next year.”