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1.

KAUST GRADUATE PROGRAMS


KAUST offers several graduate programs leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. These include: 1. Applied Mathematics and Computational Science (AMCS) 2. Bioscience (B) 3. Chemical and Biological Engineering (CBE) 4. Chemical Sciences (ChemS) 5. Computer Science (CS) 6. Earth Science and Engineering (ErSE) 7. Electrical Engineering (EE) 8. Environmental Science and Engineering (EnSE) 9. Marine Science and Engineering (MarSE) 10. Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) 11. Mechanical Engineering (ME) Each program is administered by a Graduate Committee and a Graduate Chair. Courses for each program will be listed at the 100, 200, 300 or 400 level and designated as follows: 100 level: Remedial courses 200 level: M.S. program courses 300 level: Ph.D. program courses 400 level: Advanced seminars Grading Grading is based on a 4.0-point system as follows: A = 4.00 C = 2.00 AU = AUDIT A- = 3.67 C- = 1.67 I = INCOMPLETE B+ = 3.33 D+ = 1.33 IP = IN PROGRESS B = 3.00 D = 1.00 W = WITHDRAWN B- = 2.67 D- = 0.67 S = SATISFACTORY C+ = 2.33 F = 0.00 U = UNSATISFACTORY

PLEASE NOTE: INFORMATION IN THE GRADUATE PROGRAMS GUIDE IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

2. MASTERS PROGRAM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Admissions: Admission to the M.S. program requires the satisfactory completion of an undergraduate B.S. degree in a relevant or related area, such as Engineering, Mathematics or the Physical, Chemical and Biological Sciences. Requirements: A minimum of thirty (30) credit hours must be completed in graduate-level courses and directed research projects. These courses should be 200-level or above, and they must be approved by the program advisor. 1. At least twenty-four (24) credit hours must be earned in technical courses. 2. At least nine (9) credit hours must be earned from a major track. 3. At least three (3) credit hours must be earned in mathematics or qualitative methods course if required by the department 4. At most six (6) credit hours may be earned in Winter Enhancement (WE) courses. 5. At most six (6) credit hours may be earned in directed research projects. The final cumulative grade point average must be at least 3.0. Cognates: In order to ensure sufficient breadth of study, masters and doctoral students must satisfy a cognate requirement of at last one graduate course for a minimum of 3 hours of credit in areas outside ones own field. Course Transfer and Equivalency: Graduate credit hours taken from any KAUST program may be applied to other KAUST graduate programs. Graduate courses taken from another university or KAUST program that are equivalent in level and content to the designated courses in a major track maybe counted toward meeting the major track requirement if their equivalence is confirmed by the program chair. Policy for Adding and Dropping Courses: A course may be added during the first week of the semester. Students may add courses after the first week with the permission of the instructor. Instructors have the right to refuse admission to students if the instructor feels that the student will not have the time to sufficiently master the material due to adding late. A course may be dropped without penalty or changed to visitor status at any time during the first two weeks of the semester. Between the second and eighth week, students can drop a course but the course will appear on the students transcript with the grade of W (withdraw). After the eighth week of a full semester, courses may be dropped only under exceptional circumstances and with the approval of the course instructor, the program chair and the registrar.

3. DOCTORAL PROGRAM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


Admissions: PhD students apply for and enter a specific degree program. A faculty advisor is either immediately designated (in the case of a student being recruited by a specific faculty member) or temporarily assigned (in the case of KAUST fellowship students); in the latter case, the student is expected to identify a research advisor by (at the latest) the end of the first year. There are two phases and associated milestones for PhD students: (i) a qualification phase with a candidacy milestone and (ii) a dissertation phase with a final defense milestone. Requirements: Qualification and advancement to candidacy are contingent upon: (i) successfully passing PhD coursework, (ii) designating a research advisor, and (iii) preparing a written, and orally defending, a research proposal. Individual degree programs may, at their discretion, also require a subject-comprehensive examination (probing coursework and knowledge of other relevant subject areas); possible outcomes include pass, failure with complete retake, failures with partial retake, and failure with no retake. The maximum time for advancement to candidacy for a student entering with an MS degree is two years, three years for the BSc-degree entry option. A minimum of 6 credit hours of actual PhD coursework (300 or 400 level) is required (not including directed research) beyond the MS degree. For students who enter with a BSc degree, 30 additional credit hours are required, equivalent to MS degree coursework and can include a thesis. However, individual degree programs may, at their discretion, require a higher number of credit hours (including directed research). Some degree programs may implement a diagnostic entrance exam as a basis for admission, and students may be required to complete additional coursework depending on their degree-granting institution. In the case of the MS degree being from another major/degree program, there may be additional deficiency courses required specified by the advisor. Courses designated should be relevant to the dissertation topic, if defined, and/or proposed general area of research. A minimum GPA of 3.0 must be achieved on all doctoral coursework. Besides actual coursework (6 or more credit hours), 60 credit hours of dissertation research (397) credit must be earned during the first (proposal preparation and defense) and second phases. A full-time workload for PhD students is considered to be 12 credit hours per semester (course and 397) and 6 credit hours in summer (397). There is a minimum residency requirement (enrollment period at KAUST) of 2.5 years for students entering with an MS degree, 3.5 years for students entering with a BSc degree. The maximum enrollment period is 5.0 years, extendable upon approval of both the faculty research advisor and division dean. Candidacy: Achieving candidacy is contingent upon successfully passing both parts of a two-part qualification examination consisting of acceptance by the research advisor of a written research proposal and successfully passing an oral examination thereof. The proposal

examination committee shall consist of a minimum of three KAUST faculty members, one of whom must be external to the degree program. There are four possible outcomes: pass, conditional pass, failure with retake permitted, and failure. Passing the qualification phase is achieved by acceptance of all committee members of the written proposal and a positive vote of all but, at most, one member of the oral exam. If more than one member casts a negative vote, one retake of the oral defense is permitted if the entire committee agrees. A conditional pass involves conditions (e.g., another course in a perceived area of weakness) imposed by the committee, with the conditional status removed when the conditions have been met. Once constituted, the composition of the qualification phase committee can only be changed upon approval by both the faculty research advisor and the division dean. Dissertation: The final (dissertation) phase involves acceptance of the written dissertation and an oral defense thereof. The final examination committee shall consist of a minimum of four members, one of whom should be a KAUST faculty member external to the degree program and one of whom should be external to KAUST (holding a faculty position or equivalent position at another institution, with approval by both the faculty research advisor and division dean). The only requirement for commonality with the proposal examination committee is the research advisor, although it is expected that other members will carry forward to the dissertation committee. Passing the dissertation phase is achieved by acceptance of all committee members of the written dissertation, with a minimum of a positive vote of all but, at most, one member of the oral defense. If more than one member casts a negative vote, one retake of the oral defense is permitted if the entire committee agrees. A fifth non-voting KAUST faculty member, appointed by the division dean, shall serve as a faculty monitor to ensure that the established protocol is followed, and the required forms are completed. Note: Students transferring from other PhD programs may receive some dissertation research and coursework credit, on a case by case basis, for related work performed at their original institution. However, such students still must satisfy the written and oral requirements for a research proposal (if this phase was passed at the original institute, the proposal may be the same). The minimum residency requirement for enrollment of such students at KAUST is 2.0 years.

4. APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE PROGRAM


The Applied Mathematics and Computational Sciences (AMCS) program trains students in constructing mathematical and computational models of real-world problems. The program in AMCS includes five tracks, each of which leads to a frontier of applied and computational mathematics. The five track areas are: Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) Geometric Modeling and Scientific Visualization (GMSV) Information Science (IS) Modeling and Numerical Simulation (MNS) Computational Geoscience (CG) Three degree programs are offered: the MS degree without thesis, the MS degree with thesis, and the PhD degree. The Core course requirements for all students in the AMCS program are: Numerical Optimization (AMCS 211) or Linear and Nonlinear Optimization (AMCS 212) Numerical Linear Algebra (AMCS 251) Numerical Analysis of Differential Equations (AMCS 252) Applied Partial Differential Equations I (AMCS 231) Probability and Random Processes (AMCS 241) The Immersion courses in each AMCS track are as follows: Partial Differential Equations Stochastic Differential Equations (AMCS 236) Applied Partial Differential Equations II (AMCS 331) Mathematical Modeling (AMCS 332) Hyperbolic Conservation Laws and Godunov-type Methods (AMCS 333) Mathematical Fluid Dynamics (AMCS 334) Geometric Modeling and Scientific Visualization: Scientific Visualization (AMCS 247) Computer Graphics (AMCS 248) Geometric Modeling (AMCS 272) GPU and GPGPU Programming (AMCS 380) Information Science: Machine Learning (AMCS 229) Information Networks (AMCS 337) Computational Methods in Data Mining (AMCS 340) Advanced Topics in Data Management (AMCS 341)

Modeling and Numerical Simulation: Stochastic Differential Equations (AMCS 236) Scientific Visualization (AMCS 247) Stochastic Methods in Engineering (AMCS 308) Computational Science and Engineering (AMCS 330) Mathematical Modeling (AMCS 332) Computational Methods in Data Mining (AMCS 340) Computational Geoscience CG track students must take 3 of the following ErSE courses: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics I (ErSE 201) Geophysical Continuum Mechanics (ErSE 203) Seismology I (ErSE 210) Global Geophysics (ErSE 211) Inverse Problems and Data Assimilation (ErSE 216) Data Analysis in Geosciences (ErSE 253) Seismic Imaging (ErSE 260) Multiphase Flows in Porous Media (ErSE 305) As well as 2 of the following AMCS courses: Stochastic Methods in Engineering (AMCS 308) High Performance Computing I (AMCS 311) Computational Science and Engineering (AMCS 330) Applied Partial Differential Equations II (AMCS 331)

Master of Science Degree


Each MS degree student will be assigned an academic advisor who will assist the student in planning his/her program of study. MS degree without thesis The MS without thesis is usually a one year program. Typically, this will involve 4 courses each in the fall and spring semesters, and 6 credits of summer research or coursework. The degree requirements for the MS without thesis are: 1. Complete the five core courses 2. Complete three immersion courses in a chosen track 3. Complete one cognate course from outside the AMCS program 4. Complete 3 additional credits (coursework or directed research), for a total of 30 credits (minimum). 5. Write a short technical report and give a scientific presentation. The last requirement may be fulfilled by, for instance, a course research project presentation and report. MS degree with thesis

The MS degree with thesis is typically a 3-4 semester program. The degree requirements for the MS with thesis are: 1. Complete the five core courses 2. Complete three immersion courses in a chosen track 3. Complete one cognate course from outside the AMCS program 4. Complete 9 additional credits (including at least 6 MS thesis credits), for a total of 36 credits minimum. 5. Complete 12 credits of AMCS 297 (MS Thesis), present the thesis at a public seminar followed by an examination, and obtain approval signatures of the thesis committee. The MS thesis must involve research under the supervision of a KAUST faculty member. Typically, students in this program will complete their coursework during the first year, although additional courses may be taken during the second year. By the end of the students first year at KAUST, the student must find an advisor. By the end of the third semester, the student is required to form a committee including the advisor and two other faculty, one outside of the AMCS program. This committee must read and approve the thesis.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree


Ph.D. students must first satisfy the coursework requirements for the M.S. program, take at least 6 additional credits of 300-level coursework, pass qualifying examinations, and conduct original research culminating in a doctoral dissertation. Ph.D. coursework in AMCS is designed to ensure that graduates are equipped to lead multidisciplinary research in which they are required to communicate in the language of and understand the intellectual culture of each contributing disciplinefrom formulation, to mathematical technique, to computational implementation, to analysis and interpretation of results. Completing the Ph.D. program generally takes 3 additional years beyond the completion of the M.S. program requirements. The Ph.D. requirements are described in greater detail below. A faculty advisor is either immediately designated (in the case of a student being recruited by a specific faculty member) or temporarily assigned (in the case of KAUST fellowship students); in the latter case, the student is expected to identify a research advisor by (at the latest) the end of the first year. There are two phases and associated milestones for PhD students: (i) a qualification phase with a candidacy milestone and (ii) a dissertation phase with a final defense milestone. The Ph.D. program consists of the following requirements: 1. Coursework and comprehensive exam. 2. Acceptance to candidacy. 3. Doctoral thesis and final examination. Coursework Requirements Students pursuing a Ph.D. must first satisfy the coursework requirements for the

M.S. program. For students admitted to the program after obtaining a Masters degree elsewhere, some or all of these requirements may be waived, at the discretion of the students advisor and with the approval of the dean. All Ph.D. students must complete at least an additional 6 credits of 300-level coursework. For most students admitted to the Ph.D. program, an advisor will already have been identified. If not, an interim advisor will be assigned. In any case, the student must identify a research advisor by the end of the first year. Comprehensive Exam The comprehensive exam covers material from the students Masters and PhD coursework. The student will be provided a list of examination topics in advance. The possible outcomes of the exam are: pass, fail, or fail with possibility of retake. In the case of a retake, the student must retake and pass the exam within 3 months of the date of the first exam. The exam is administered by an examination committee, which does not include the students advisor. The committee may waive the exam based on the students preparation and performance. Admission to Candidacy To be admitted to candidacy, the student must: 1. Complete the coursework requirements and pass the comprehensive exam (unless waived). 2. Identify an advisor and form a supervisory committee. 3. Present a doctoral research proposal and obtain approval of the supervisory committee. Supervisory Committee The supervisory committee is formed by the student under the guidance of the advisor. The committee is chaired by the advisor, and must include at least three other faculty, one of whom must be external to the program. The committee may additionally include one or more appropriate persons external to KAUST. The committee must meet at least once annually (as arranged by the student) with the student to discuss the students progress. The supervisor and two other committee members must be designated as readers. Doctoral Candidacy Exam The doctoral candidacy exam tests the student's preparedness to pursue thesis research. It is a public oral presentation of a research proposal, together with questioning by the advisory committee. The student must submit a written research proposal to the committee two weeks prior to the exam. The committee shall consist of a minimum of three KAUST faculty members, one of whom must be external to the degree program. The candidate must convince the committee that the chosen research area is suitable and demonstrate an appropriate breadth of knowledge in the chosen area. The committee should decide if there is a thesis topic in the area and whether the candidate is capable of completing such a thesis. There are four possible outcomes: pass, conditional pass, failure with retake permitted, and failure. Passing the

qualification phase is achieved by acceptance of all committee members of the written proposal and a positive vote of all but, at most, one member of the oral exam. If more than one member casts a negative vote, one retake of the oral defense is permitted if the entire committee agrees. A conditional pass involves conditions (e.g., another course in a perceived area of weakness) imposed by the committee, with the conditional status removed when the conditions have been met. Each student is expected to complete the candidacy exam by the end of the second year.

Thesis and Final Examination The student must schedule the final examination after completion of the doctoral research (including completion of 60 credits of AMCS 397) and writing of the thesis. This examination will be a defense of the doctoral thesis and a test of the candidates knowledge in the specialized field of research. The format of the examination will be a public seminar presented by the candidate, with an open question period, followed by a private examination by the final examination committee. The final examination committee shall consist of a minimum of four members, one of whom should be a KAUST faculty member external to the degree program and one of whom should be external to KAUST (holding a faculty position or equivalent position at another institution, with approval by both the faculty research advisor and division dean). The only requirement for commonality with the proposal examination committee is the research advisor, although it is expected that other members will carry forward to the dissertation committee. Passing the dissertation phase is achieved by acceptance of all committee members of the written dissertation, with a minimum of a positive vote of all but, at most, one member of the oral defense. If more than one member casts a negative vote, one retake of the oral defense is permitted if the entire committee agrees. A fifth non-voting KAUST faculty member, appointed by the division dean, shall serve as a faculty monitor to ensure that the established protocol is followed, and the required forms are completed. APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTATONAL SCIENCE (AMCS) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Note: Some AMCS courses listed below are cross-listed in the Computer Science (CS) program. AMCS 201. Applied Mathematics I (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Advanced and multivariate calculus and elementary complex variables. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. No degree credit for AMCS majors. AMCS 201 and 202 may be taken separately or in either order. Part of a fast-paced two-course sequence in graduate applied mathematics for engineers and scientists, with an emphasis on analytical technique. A review of practical aspects of linear operators (superposition, Greens functions, and eigenanalysis) in the context of ordinary differential equations, followed by extension to linear partial differential equations (PDEs) of parabolic, hyperbolic, and elliptic type through separation of variables and special functions. Integral transforms of Laplace and Fourier type. Self-similarity. Method of characteristics for first-order PDEs.

Introduction to perturbation methods for nonlinear PDEs, asymptotic analysis, and singular perturbations. AMCS 202. Applied Mathematics II (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Advanced and multivariate calculus and elementary complex variables. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. No degree credit for AMCS majors. AMCS 201 and 202 may be taken separately or in either order. Part of a fast-paced two-course sequence in graduate applied mathematics for engineers and scientists, with an emphasis on analytical technique. A review of linear spaces (basis, independence, null space and rank, condition number, inner product, norm, and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization) in the context of direct and iterative methods for the solution of linear systems of equations arising in engineering applications. Projections and least squares. Eigenanalysis, diagonalization, and functions of matrices. Complex analysis, Cauchy-Riemann conditions, Cauchy integral theorem, residue theorem, Taylor and Laurent series, contour integration, and conformal mapping. AMCS 206. Applied Numerical Methods (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Advanced and multivariate calculus. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. No degree credit for AMCS majors. A fast-paced one-semester survey of numerical methods for engineers and scientists, with an emphasis on technique and software. Computer representation of numbers and floating point errors. Numerical solution of systems of linear and nonlinear algebraic equations, interpolation, least squares, quadrature, optimization, nonlinear equations, approximation of solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations. Truncation error, numerical stability, stiffness, and operation and storage complexity of numerical algorithms. AMCS 207. Programming Methodology and Abstractions (3-0-3) (Same as CS 207.) Computer programming and the use of abstractions. Software-engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to basic time and space complexity analysis. The course teaches the mechanics of the C, C++ or Java language. This course is considered remedial training for students in the AMCS program and will not count toward any degree requirement. AMCS 210 Applied Probability and Biostatistics (3-0-3) (Same as CS 210.) Prerequisites: Advanced and multivariate calculus. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, nonparametric tests, regression and correlation analyses. Applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. AMCS 211. Numerical Optimization (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Advanced and multivariate calculus and elementary real analysis. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. Solution of nonlinear equations. Optimality conditions for smooth optimization problems. Theory and algorithms to solve unconstrained optimization; linear programming; quadratic programming; global optimization; general linearly and nonlinearly constrained optimization problems. AMCS 212. Linear and Nonlinear Optimization (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Advanced

and multivariate calculus. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. The role of duality, optimality conditions and algorithms in finding and recognizing solutions. Perspectives: problem formulation, analytical theory, computational methods and recent applications in engineering, finance and economics. Theories: finite dimensional derivatives, convexity, optimality, duality and sensitivity. Methods: simplex and interiorpoint, gradient, Newton and barrier. AMCS 221. Artificial Intelligence (3-0-3) (Same as CS 221.) Prerequisites: working knowledge of basic discrete mathematics (e.g., sets and functions) and proof techniques, programming ability (and exposure to probability. An introduction to the principles and practices of artificial intelligence. Topics include: search, constraint satisfaction, knowledge representation, probabilistic models, machine learning, neural networks, vision, robotics and natural-language understanding. AMCS 229. Machine Learning (3-0-3) (Same as CS 229.) Prerequisites: linear algebra and basic probability and statistics. Familiarity with artificial intelligence recommended. Topics: statistical pattern recognition, linear and non-linear regression, non-parametric methods, exponential family, GLIMs, support vector machines, kernel methods, model/ feature selection, learning theory, VC dimension, clustering, density estimation, EM, dimensionality reduction, ICA, PCA, reinforcement learning and adaptive control, Markov decision processes, approximate dynamic programming and policy search. AMCS 231. Applied Partial Differential Equations I (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Advanced and multivariate calculus and elementary complex variables. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. First part of a sequence of courses on partial differential equations (PDE) emphasizing theory and solution techniques for linear equations. Origin of PDE in science and engineering. Equations of diffusion, heat conduction, and wave propagation. The method of characteristics. Classification of PDE. Separation of variables, theory of the Fourier series and Fourier transform. The method of Greens functions. Sturm-Liouville problem, special functions, eigenfunction expansions. Higher dimensional PDE and their solution by separation of variables, transform methods, and Greens functions. Fractional PDE. Introduction to quasi-linear PDE and shock waves. AMCS 236. Introduction to Stochastic Differential Equations (3-0-3) Prerequisites: knowledge of basic probability, numerical analysis, and programming. Brownian motion, stochastic integrals and diffusions as solutions of stochastic differential equations. Functionals of diffusions and their connection with partial differential equations. Weak and strong approximation, efficient numerical methods and error estimates. Jump diffusions. AMCS 241. Probability and Random Processes (3-0-3) (Same as CS 241 and EE 241.) Prerequisites: Advanced and multivariate calculus. Introduction to probability and random processes. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. Topics include probability axioms, sigma algebras, random vectors, expectation, probability distributions and densities, Poisson and Wiener processes, stationary processes, autocorrelation, spectral density, effects of filtering, linear least-squares estimation and convergence of random sequences. AMCS 247. Scientific Visualization (3-0-3) (Same as CS 247.) Prerequisites: Advanced and multivariate calculus, and linear algebra, computer graphics, and programming experience. Techniques for generating images of various types of experimentally measured, computer generated, or gathered data. Grid structures.

Scalar field visualization. Vector field visualization. Particle visualization. Graph visualization. Animation. Applications in science, engineering, and medicine. AMCS 248. Computer Graphics (3-0-3) (Same as CS 248.) Prerequisites: solid programming skills and linear algebra. Input and display devices, scan conversion of geometric primitives, 2D and 3D geometric transformations, clipping and windowing, scene modeling and animation, algorithms for visible surface determination, local and global shading models, color and real-time rendering methods. AMCS 251. Numerical Linear Algebra (3-0-3) (Same as CS 251.) Prerequisites: Programming skills (MATLAB preferred) and linear algebra. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. Linear algebra from a numerical solution perspective. Singular Value Decomposition, matrix factorizations, linear least squares, GramSchmidt orthogonalization, conditioning and stability, eigenanalysis, Krylov subspace methods and preconditioning, and optimization and conjugate gradient methods. AMCS 252. Numerical Analysis of Differential Equations (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Analysis of PDEs and numerical analysis. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. Theory and technique for the numerical analysis of ODEs and of PDEs of parabolic, hyperbolic, and elliptic type: accuracy, stability, convergence and qualitative properties. Runge-Kutta and linear multistep methods, zero-stability, absolute stability, stiffness, and order conditions. Finite difference methods, multigrid, dimensional and operator splitting, and the CFL condition. AMCS 260 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3-0-3) (Same as CS 260) Prerequisite: computer programming skills, probability, basic data structures, basic discrete mathematics. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. Review of algorithm analysis (search in ordered array, binary insertion sort, merge sort, 2-3 trees, asymptotic notation). Divide and conquer algorithms (master theorem, integer multiplication, matrix multiplication, fast Fourier transform). Graphs (breadth-first search, connected components, topological ordering, depth-first search). Dynamic programming (chain matrix multiplication, shortest paths, edit distance, sequence alignment). Greedy algorithms (binary heaps, Dijkstra's algorithm, minimum spanning tree, Huffman codes). Randomized algorithms (selection, quick sort, global minimum cut, hushing). P and NP (Cook's theorem, examples of NP-complete problems). Approximate algorithms for NPhard problems (set cover, vertex cover, maximum independent set). Partial recursive functions (theorem of Post, Diophantine equations). Computations and undecidable problems (undecidability of halting problem, theorem of Rice, semantic and syntactical properties of programs). AMCS 261 Algorithmic Paradigms (3-0-3) (Same as CS 261.) Prerequisite: Familiarity with discrete algorithms at the level of AMCS 260. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. Topics: algorithms for optimization problems such as matching, maxflow, min-cut and load balancing. Using linear programming, emphasis is on LP duality for design and analysis of approximation algorithms. Approximation algorithms for NP-complete problems such as Steiner trees, traveling salesman and scheduling problems. Randomized algorithms. AMCS 271. Applied Geometry (3-0-3) Differential Geometry: selected topics from the classical theory of curves and surfaces, geometric variational problems, robust computation of differential invariants, discrete differential geometry. Projective Geometry: computing with homogeneous coordinates, projective maps, quadrics and

polarity. Algebraic Geometry: algebraic curves and surfaces, rational parametrizations, basic elimination theory. Kinematical Geometry: geometry of motions, kinematic mappings. The practical use of these topics is illustrated at hand of sample problems from Geometric Modeling, Computer Vision, Robotics and related areas of Geometric Computing. AMCS 272 Geometric Modeling (3-0-3) (Same as CS 272.) Prerequisites: Advanced and multivariate calculus, and linear algebra, computer graphics, and programming experience. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. Terminology, coordinate systems, and implicit forms. Parametric and spline representations of curves and surfaces and their uses. Basic differential geometry of curves and surfaces. Subdivision surfaces. Solid modeling paradigms and operations. Robustness and accuracy in geometric computations. Applications. AMCS 291 Scientific Software Engineering (3-0-3) (Same as CS 291.) Prerequisites: Programming experience and familiarity with basic discrete and numerical algorithms. Practical aspects of application development for high performance computing. Programming language choice; compilers; compiler usage. Build management using make and other tools. Library development and usage. Portability and the GNU autoconf system. Correctness and performance debugging, performance analysis. Group development practices and version control. Use of third-party libraries and software licensing. AMCS 292. Parallel Programming Paradigms (3-0-3) (Same as CS 292) Prerequisites: Programming experience and familiarity with basic discrete and numerical algorithms. Distributed and shared memory programming models and frameworks. Thread programming and OpenMP. Message passing and MPI. Parallel Global Address Space (PGAS) languages. Emerging languages for many-core programming. Elements to be covered will include syntax and semantics, performance issues, thread safety and hybrid programming paradigms. AMCS 297. MS Thesis (variable credit) AMCS 298. Graduate Seminar (variable credit) Master-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. AMCS 299. Directed Research (variable credit) Prerequisite: Sponsorship of advisor and approved prospectus. Master-level supervised research. AMCS 308. Stochastic Methods in Engineering (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Basic probability, numerical analysis, and programming. Review of basic probability; Monte Carlo simulation; state space models and time series; parameter estimation, prediction and filtering; Markov chains and processes; stochastic control; Markov chain Monte Carlo. Examples from various engineering disciplines. AMCS 311 High Performance Computing I (3-0-3) (Same as CS 311.) Prerequisites: Programming experience and familiarity with basic discrete and numerical algorithms. Part one of a two-course sequence in high performance computing technology, with an emphasis on using KAUSTs research computing systems, focusing primarily on hardware architectures. History of high performance computing. Hardware architectures. CMOS processor design. Cache architectures. Memory architectures. Hardware counters. Processing benchmarks. Power. Single-node performance of real applications. AMCS 312 High Performance Computing II (3-0-3) (Same as CS 312.)

Prerequisites: Programming experience and familiarity with basic discrete and numerical algorithms and AMCS 311. Part one of a two-course sequence in high performance computing technology, with an emphasis on using KAUSTs research computing systems, focusing primarily on hardware architectures. I/O systems and communication networks. Communication benchmarks. Theoretical and achievable performance for processor, memory system, network, and I/O. Future architecture directions and limitations. The course is intended to develop a deep understanding of the underlying high performance computing architectures on which the student will develop and deploy applications. AMCS 330. Computational Science and Engineering (3-0-3) (Same as CS 330.) Programming experience and familiarity with basic discrete and numerical algorithms and experience with one or more computational applications. Case studies of representative and prototype applications in partial differential equations and meshbased methods, particle methods, ray-tracing methods, transactional methods. AMCS 331. Applied Partial Differential Equations II (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Multivariate calculus, elementary complex variables, ordinary differential equations. Recommended: AMCS 231 or AMCS 201. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. Second part of a sequence of courses on partial differential equations (PDE) emphasizing theory and solution techniques for nonlinear equations. Quasi-linear and nonlinear PDE in applications. Conservation laws, first-order equations, the method of characteristics. Burgers equation and wave breaking. Weak solutions, shocks, jump conditions, and entropy conditions. Hyperbolic systems of gas dynamics, shallow-water flow, traffic flow, and bio-fluid flow. Variational principles, dispersive waves, solitons. Nonlinear diffusion and reaction-diffusion equations in combustion and biology. Traveling waves and their stability. Dimensional analysis and similarity solutions. Perturbation methods. Turing instability and pattern formation. Eigenvalue problems. Stability and bifurcation. AMCS 332. Introduction to Mathematical Modeling (3-0-3) An introduction to mathematical modeling through a combination of practical problemsolving experience and applied mathematics techniques, including dimensional analysis, non-dimensionalisation, asymptotic expansions, perturbation analysis, boundary layers, computing and other topics. AMCS 333. Hyperbolic Conservation Laws and Godunov-type Methods (3-0-3) Theory of linear and nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs, with applications including fluid dynamics, elasticity, acoustics, electromagnetics, shallow water waves, and traffic modeling. Theory of shock and rarefaction waves. Finite volume methods for numerical approximation of solutions; Godunov's method, TVD methods, and high order methods. Stability, convergence, and entropy conditions. Numerical solution of multidimensional problems. AMCS 334. Mathematical Fluid Dynamics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: AMCS 231 or AMCS 201. Recommended: AMCS 331. Equations of fluid dynamics; inviscid flow and Euler equations; vorticity dynamics; viscous incompressible flow and Navier-Stokes equations; existence, uniqueness, and regularity of solutions of Navier-Stokes equations; Stokes flow; free-surface flows; linear and nonlinear instability and transition to turbulence; rotating flows; compressible flow and shock dynamics; detonation waves.

AMCS 337. Information Networks (3-0-3) (Same as CS 337.) Prerequisite: probability. Network structure of the Internet and the Web. Modeling, scale-free graphs, smallworld phenomenon. Algorithmic implications in searching and interdomain routing, the effect of structure on performance. Game theoretic issues, routing games and network creation games. Security issues, vulnerability and robustness. AMCS 340. Computational Methods in Data Mining (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Probability and scientific computing. Focus is on very-large-scale data mining. Topics include computational methods in supervised and unsupervised learning, association mining and collaborative filtering. Individual or group applications-oriented programming project. 1 unit without project; 3 units requires final project. AMCS 361 Combinatorial Machine Learning (3-0-3) Prerequisites: AMCS/CS 260. Lower and upper bounds on complexity and algorithms for construction (optimization) of decision trees, decision rules and tests. Decision tables with one-valued decisions and decision tables with many-valued decisions. Approximate decision trees, rules and tests. Global and local approaches to the study of problems over infinite sets of attributes. Applications to discrete optimization, fault diagnosis, pattern recognition, analysis of acyclic programs, data mining and knowledge discovery. Current results of research. AMCS 380. GPU and GPGPU Programming (3-0-3) Prerequisite: CS 280. Recommended optional prerequisites: CS 248, CS 292. Architecture and programming of GPUs (Graphics Processing Units). Covers both the traditional use of GPUs for graphics and visualization, as well as their use for general purpose computations (GPGPU). GPU many-core hardware architecture, shading and computer programming languages and APIs, programming vertex, geometry, and fragment shaders, programming with CUDA, Brook, OpenCL, stream computing, approaches to massively parallel computations, memory subsystems and caches, rasterization, texture mapping, linear algebra computations, alternative and future architectures. AMCS 397. Doctoral Dissertation (variable credit) AMCS 398. Graduate Seminar (variable credit) Graduate Seminar (variable credit) Doctoral-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. AMCS 399. Directed Research (variable credit) Prerequisite: Sponsorship of advisor and approved prospectus. Doctoral-level supervised research.

5. BIOSCIENCE PROGRAM
MS Degree Program The curriculum provides a strong introduction with courses on the biochemistry and biophysics of living matter. The program comprises a single track of courses consisting of lectures, seminars and laboratory classes. Each course is a self-contained module providing a complete review of the subject concerned. For students to graduate with an MS degree in Bioscience, they are required to complete 30 credit hours (with the average course worth three credit hours) of coursework and maintain an average GPA of 3.0 (B grade). Students must take two of the three core courses in their first semester. If a grade of B- or less is achieved in a core course, the course must be repeated. One course (3 credit hours) is required in the general areas of mathematics or statistics. One cognate course is required in addition to the mathematics or statistics course, and can be satisfied by any course outside of Bioscience or Chemical and Biological Engineering. The remaining course requirements are technical electives, directed research, and/or thesis. At least 24 units of formal coursework, exclusive of directed research or thesis, are required. Graduate seminars do not carry an award of credit hours and are not evaluated. Core Courses:

Students are required to select two of the following three courses. Due to the limitation of space in laboratories, students may not get his/her first choice. If students can provide evidence that a subject has been studied and assessed at a high enough level, they are invited to apply for and may be awarded academic credit for a course. B 201 Biophysics B 208 Biochemistry B 224 Fundamentals of Cell Biology Electives: B 202 B 204 B 205 B 206 B 207 B 209 B 239 B 297 B 298 B 299 Plant Biology Genomics Protein Structure and Function Synthetic Biology and Biotechnology Physiology and Metabolic Engineering Molecular Genetics Stem Cells Thesis Graduate Seminar Directed Research

Coursework or thesis options: There are two general MS degree options: (i) coursework only or (ii) coursework and thesis option. The coursework-only is set up for completion in 12 months with full-time course loads (12 credit hours per semester or, with advisor approval, a maximum of 15 credit hours) in the Fall and Spring semesters plus up to six units in the Summer. Both options require 24 credit hours of formal coursework (exclusive of directed research). Coursework-only students may take up to six credit hours of directed research or may focus exclusively on formal coursework. Thesis-option students typically spend their Summer and a second Fall semester working on a research topic. A formal written thesis must be submitted and an oral defense is required, with a committee comprised of the faculty supervisor, plus two other KAUST faculty members. A total of six thesis credit hours must be earned, with the grade assigned being Pass/Fail. In most cases, the research period is an intense final six months (late Summer/Fall semester) without coursework, although the research can potentially be spread over a longer period. PhD Degree Program There are three possible entry points into the Bioscience PhD degree program: (i) students possessing a MS degree in Bioscience or related field (the normal entry point);

(ii) KAUST students pursuing a seamless Bioscience MS/PhD; (iii) and students possessing a BSc degree (a more rare entry point). The seamless MS/PhD option is intended for MS students who decide, after their arrival at KAUST, to pursue a PhD. This option simply allows a student to begin to satisfy PhD requirements while completing their MS requirements. The only difference between the seamless MS option and the BSc entry is that the latter does not acquire an MS degree on the way to a PhD degree. PhD students apply for and enter the Bioscience degree program. A Bioscience faculty advisor is either immediately designated (in the case of a student being recruited by a specific faculty member) or temporarily assigned (in the case of KAUST fellowship students); in the latter case, the student is expected to identify a research advisor by (at the latest) the end of the first year. There are two phases and associated milestones for PhD students: (i) a qualification phase with a candidacy milestone and (ii) a dissertation phase with a final defense milestone. Qualification and advancement to candidacy are contingent upon: (i) successfully passing PhD coursework, (ii) designating a research advisor, and (iii) preparing a written research proposal and orally defending it. The maximum time for advancement to candidacy for a student entering with an MS degree is two years, three years for the BSc-degree entry option. A minimum of six credit hours of actual PhD coursework (300 level) is required beyond the MS degree. For students who enter with a BSc degree, 24 additional units are required, equivalent to MS degree coursework, excluding a thesis. In the case of the MS degree being from another major/degree program, there may be additional deficiency courses specified by the advisor. Courses designated should be relevant to the dissertation topic, if defined, and/or proposed general area of research. A minimum GPA of 3.0 must be achieved in two 300-level courses to fulfill doctoral coursework requirements. Besides actual coursework (six or more credit hours), 60 units of dissertation research (B 397 Thesis) credit must be earned during the first and second phases. A full-time workload for PhD students is considered to be 12 credit hours per semester (courses and B 397) and six credit hours in Summer (B 397). There is a minimum residency requirement (enrollment period at KAUST) of 2.5 years for students entering with an MS degree, 3.5 years for a BSc degree. The maximum enrollment period is five years, extendable upon approval of both the faculty research supervisor and division dean. Achieving candidacy is contingent upon successfully meeting the following requirements. First, the research supervisor must assess and approve of the research proposal. Second, the student must pass an oral examination of the research proposal successfully. The research proposal committee shall consist of a minimum of three KAUST faculty members, one of whom must be external to the Bioscience degree program. There are

four possible outcomes: pass, conditional pass, failure with retake permitted, and failure. The student will have passed if all committee members accept the written research proposal and if the student receives no more than one negative vote from the proposal examination committee. If more than one member casts a negative vote, one retake of the oral defense is permitted if the entire committee agrees. A conditional pass involves conditions (e.g., another course in a perceived area of weakness) imposed by the committee, with the conditional status removed when the conditions have been met. Once constituted, the composition of the proposal examination committee can only be changed upon approval by both the faculty research advisor and the division dean. The final (dissertation) phase involves acceptance of the written dissertation and an oral defense thereof. The dissertation defense committee shall consist of a minimum of four members, one of whom should be a KAUST faculty member external to the Bioscience degree program and one of whom should be external to KAUST (holding a faculty position or equivalent position at another institution, with approval by both the faculty research advisor and division dean). Passing the dissertation phase is achieved by acceptance of all committee members of the written dissertation, with the student receiving no more than one negative vote from any member of the committee. If more than one member casts a negative vote, one retake of the oral defense is permitted if the entire committee agrees. A fifth non-voting KAUST faculty member, appointed by the division dean, shall serve as a faculty monitor to ensure that the established protocol is followed, and the required forms are completed. Students transferring from other PhD programs may receive some dissertation research and coursework credit, on a case-by-case basis, for related work performed at their original institution. However, such students must still satisfy the written and oral requirements for a research proposal (if this phase was passed at the original institute, the proposal may be the same, if approved by the research advisor). The minimum residency requirement for enrollment of such students at KAUST is two years. Courses: B 303 B 304 B 305 B 306 B 397 B 398 B 399 Advanced Topics in Plant Development Advanced Topics in Sequencing Technology Advanced Topics in Evolution Pathogen Biology Thesis Graduate Seminar Directed Research

BIOSCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS B 201.Biophysics (3-0-3) Conservation of mass and momentum, physiological mass transport, membrane structure, carrier proteins and active membrane transport, ion

channels, intracellular vesicular transport, diffusion in reacting systems, heat and mass transfer in bioreactors, culture aeration. Lectures and laboratory. B 202.Plant Biology (3-0-3) Review of cellular structure function, diffusion and active transport limitations and benefits on plant cell systems. Membrane structures translocation and transport. Energy and primary metabolism, secondary metabolism in microbes and plants. B 204. Genomics (3-0-3) Prokaryotic versus eukaryotic genome structure, conservation (gene order/sequence/structure, regulatory sequences), approaches to mapping/sequencing genomes, DNA sequencing, DNA sequencing technologies, approaches to genome annotation, SNPs, microarray technology, gene expression microarrays, antibodies, chromatin immuno-purification, high throughput perturbation studies. Problem-solving/data-handling/critical thinking/journal-club sessions. Possible interactions with Genomics Research Core facility. B 205. Protein Structure and Function (3-0-3) Introduction to protein structure and technologies used to study protein structure, X-ray crystallography, protein NMR. Protein folding, post translational modification, protein sorting. Enzyme structure and function. Study of differential protein expression, proteomics. Protein interactions, methods to study the interactome. Problem-solving/data handling/criticalthinking/journal-club sessions. Possible interactions with Genomics Research Core facility. B 206. Synthetic Biology and Biotechnology (3-0-3) Introduction to genetic circuits in natural systems; engineering principles in biology; BioBricks and standardization of biological components; numerical methods for systems analysis and design; fabrication of genetic systems in theory and practice; transformation and characterization; examples of engineered systems; hands-on experiments. B 207. Physiology and Metabolic Engineering (3-0-3) Introduction to regulation of metabolism and physiology of microbes and plants; hands-on analytical techniques for measuring metabolite and ion levels; mechanisms for homeostasis; influence of environmental changes, including nutrition, salt stress, temperature and drought; genetic pathways for stress response and adaptation in plant and microbial systems, crop improvement and biotechnology. Gene expression and cell-based expression systems for protein and small molecules; gene cloning and expression laboratory; gene over-expression strategies. Biocatalysis and metabolic engineering. B 208.Biochemistry (3-0-3) Origin of life on earth, cellular plans and advantages/limitations imposed by cell designs. Membranes and transport, specialized transport protein structures. Protein structure. Central metabolism, amino acid synthesis. Energy metabolism ATP, ATP hydrolase. DNA, proteins and the genetic code. Transcription and translation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. B 209.Molecular Genetics (3-0-3) Essentials of Mendelian and molecular genetics as the basis for current models of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetic exchange and gene expression. Introduction to molecular biology. Chromosome organization; mechanisms and consequences of recombination; gene organization, operons/regulons, control of transcription, translation and epigenetics. Data handling and problem solving; critical essays and discussion of literature. B 224.Fundamentals of Cell Biology (3-0-3) Types of microorganisms (e.g., viruses, microbes, yeast, mammalian and stem cells); cell physiology, structure and function;

gene expression and protein synthesis; protein folding; post-translational modification; cell cycle; molecular biology techniques. Lectures and laboratory. B 239.Stem Cells (3-0-3) This course covers stem cell biology and therapeutics. It is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of current understanding of embryonic and adult stem cells, including their basic properties and interactions within organisms. Stem cell isolation methods, experimental models and potential biomedical therapeutic applications will be encountered through research of literature. It is a graduate level course that requires a basic background in biology. B 297. Thesis (variable credit) MS Thesis (6 units total) Master-level research leading to a formal written thesis and oral defense thereof. B 298. Graduate Seminar (variable credit) Master-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. B 299. Directed Research (variable credit) Master-level supervised research. B 303.Advanced Topics in Plant Development (3-0-3) TBC B 304.Advanced Topics in Sequencing Technology (3-0-3) Next generation sequencing technology has emerged as a major transformative tool in the field of genomics. This course consists of advanced topics, focusing on detailed description of the current and future sequencing technologies and several sequencers (for example, Roche 454, Life Technologies SOLiD, Illumina Solexa, and PacBios newly launched machine) as well as their data quality and processing tools. It also provides examples for various applications in genomics, transcriptomics, and epigenomics. B 305.Advanced Topics in Evolution (3-0-3) Given that the principle of evolution is a key to understanding modern biology, and in particular genomics, we will briefly cover some of the fundamentals as well as current research methods. The course will be centred around the study and discussion of the classical works by Darwin, Wallace and Lamarck as well as the contemporary literature. Each student will have to do a research project using literature studies and computational methods to critically discuss a biological argument in evolutionary biology. B 306 Pathogen Biology (3-0-3) Prerequisite: A degree in biological sciences or consent of instructor. Knowledge in basic molecular biology is essential. Overview of global impact of pathogens on human, animal and plant health, basic concepts in microbial pathogenesis, overview of pathogen genome analysis and visualization tools, comparative genomics, hands-on training in pathogen genome analysis using popular tools such as Artemis and Artemis Comparison Tool (ACT), application of second-generation sequencing technologies in pathogen genomics, overview of web-based genomic resources for pathogen research. B 397 Thesis PhD Dissertation (increments of 3 units): PhD-level research leading to a formal written dissertation and oral defense thereof. B 398 Graduate Seminar (variable credit) Doctoral-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. B 399 Directed Research (variable credit) Doctoral-level supervised research.

6. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


The Chemical and Biological Engineering (CBE) degree program in KAUST offers students MS and PhD degree in Chemical and Biological Engineering. The program has the following two major tracks: Advanced Chemical Engineering, including specializations in membrane technologies, process engineering, energy engineering, product engineering and advanced process technology. Advanced Biological Engineering, including specializations in bioenergy, biotherapeutics and the environment. The two tracks together cover a broad range of modern advanced chemical and biological engineering and should equip a student for a successful and productive career in these fields. The following courses are elaborately designed to systematically cover not only the basic fundamentals, but also the science and technologies that reflect the modern trends in these fields. Core courses for both tracks are as follows: Applied Engineering Thermodynamics (CBE 201) Fundamentals of Cell Biology (CBE 224) Applied Partial Differential Equations (AMCS 231) Advanced Chemical Engineering Specialization Courses CBE 202, CBE 203, CBE 204, CBE 336 Advanced Chemical Engineering Electives CBE 210, CBE 211, CBE 212, CBE 213, CBE 214, CBE 215, CBE 216 CBE 218, CBE 219, CBE 230, CBE 226, CBE 231, CBE 237, CBE 311 CBE 312, CBE 313, CBE 314, CBE 315, CBE 317, CBE 334 Advanced Biological Engineering Specialization Courses CBE 221, CBE 222, CBE 223, CBE 336 Advanced Biological Engineering Electives CBE 205, CBE 206, CBE 207, CBE 208, CBE 209, CBE 219, CBE 226 CBE 231, CBE 232, CBE 233, CBE 234, CBE 235, CBE 237, CBE 239 CBE 304, CBE 317, CBE 331, CBE 332, CBE 333, CBE 334 A student seeking a degree in chemical and biological engineering must specify one track. The MS Students must complete 2 core courses, 2 specialization courses and minimum of 3 elective courses that are designated in that track, and one cognate course. For Ph.D students, 2 courses in 300-level are required. All courses (including core modules) on a track are available as electives for students taking the other track. Master Degree requirements CBE provides two options for Masters program: Master with non-thesis and master with thesis. Students must indicate their choice to the program coordinator within 6 months

after enrolled in CBE program. Students who take the thesis option must find a thesis supervisor from a KAUST faculty member within 6 months after enrolling in CBE program. If the thesis supervisor is not a CBE faculty, a co-supervisor from CBE degree program is highly recommended. Normally, students must fulfill all the requirements for master degree within 12 months for non-thesis option, and 18 months for the thesis option. Extension of the studying period must be approved by the degree program coordinator case-by-case. Graduation with a MS degree in Chemical and Biological Engineering (CBE) requires completion of a minimum of 30 credit units with a cumulative GPA of 3.0. A minimum of 24 units of course work credits are required including 2 core courses, 2 specialization courses, minimum of 3 elective courses designated in one track, and a cognate course. The cognate course is a course offered by another degree program in KAUST, normally refers to a Math/Stats course. However, students who take AMCS 231 as one of their core courses will not need to take another cognate course. Students must achieve a grade of B- or above in any of their courses, otherwise the course must be repeated. For non-thesis option, a minimum of 3 credits of directed research (CBE 299) is required. For thesis option, the student must complete a thesis under the supervision of a KAUST faculty member in CBE or a co-supervisor in CBE and minimum 12 credits of thesis research (CBE 297) are required. The thesis must be evaluated and approved by a thesis committee which is consists of the thesis advisor(s) and at least two other KAUST faculty members. The thesis advisor will be the coordinator of the committee. Seminar requirement: Registration in the CBE seminar course (CBE 298, 1 credit) is compulsive in each residence semester. At least 80% of attendance to all seminar series is required to fulfill the course requirement. However, the credit earned for the seminar course will not be counted toward the total credit requirement. PhD degree requirements Students in the PhD degree program must find a KAUST faculty member as their academic supervisor within 12 months after enrolling in the CBE program. If the academic supervisor is not a CBE faculty, a co-supervisor from the CBE degree program is highly recommended. There are three possible entry points into the CBE PhD degree program: (i) students possessing a MS degree in CBE or a related engineering or science field; (ii) KAUST students pursuing a seamless CBE MS/PhD; (iii) and students possessing a BSc degree. The seamless MS/PhD option is intended for MS students who decide, within 12 months after joining KAUST, to pursue a PhD; this option allows a student to begin to satisfy PhD requirements (e.g., coursework) while completing their MS requirements. The only difference between the seamless MS option and the BSc entry is that the latter does not acquire a MS degree on the way to a PhD degree.

A minimum of 6 units of PhD coursework (300-level) is required beyond the MS degree. For students who enter with a BSc degree, 30 additional units are required, equivalent to MS degree coursework excluding a thesis. In the case of the MS degree being from another major/degree program, there may be additional deficiency courses specified by the advisor. Courses designated should be relevant to the dissertation topic, if defined, and/or proposed general area of research. A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 must be achieved. Passing grade for each course is B; otherwise the course must be re-taken. Besides the coursework (6 or more units), 60 units of dissertation research (CBE 397) credit must be earned. A full-time workload for PhD students is considered to be 12 credit units per semester (courses and CBE 397) and 6 credit units in summer (CBE 397). There is a minimum residency requirement (enrollment period at KAUST) of 2.5 years for students entering with a MS degree, 3.5 years for a BSc degree. The maximum enrollment period is 5.0 years, extendable upon approval of both the faculty research advisor and degree program coordinator. Two milestones must be reached in time before a student successfully obtains a PhD degree from Chemical and Biological Engineering: (i) successful pass of the research proposal examination and (ii) successful pass of the dissertation examination. The maximum time to achieve the first milestone for a student entering with an MS degree is 18 months, and 24 months for the BSc-degree entry option. The maximum time to achieve the second milestone for all students is 5 years. Extension of the studying period must be approved case-by-case by both the faculty research advisor and the degree program coordinator. To reach the first milestone, the student must meet the following requirements: (1) successfully pass of all the required PhD coursework (2) designate a research advisor The research proposal examination is an oral exam administered by the students research proposal examination committee which includes the students academic supervisor(s) and at least three other KAUST faculty members, one of whom must be external to the CBE degree program. Students must contact each committee member and arrange for a suitable time and place for the exam, and inform the graduate program coordinator at least 2 weeks prior to the date chosen for the exam. The student must submit the research proposal to the committee at least two weeks prior to the examination. The examination may begin with a 30 ~ 45 min presentation by the student; followed by a 15 min question session to answer any questions that might be raised from the committee. The result of the exam will be made based on the recommendation of the examination committee. There are four possible outcomes: Pass: the student passes the exam and may proceed to independent study and research for the doctoral degree.

Conditional pass: the students may be required to provide additional information. If approved by the proposal exam committee, the exam can be passed without another oral exam. Failure with retake: The student must prepare a new research proposal and be orally examined again within the next six weeks. Failure: The student is not qualified for further PhD studies. To reach the final dissertation milestone, the student must meet the following requirement: (1) The student must have completed all the course work requirement (2) The student must have completed 60 dissertation credits. (3) The student must have passed the research proposal examination at least one year before. The dissertation examination committee shall consist of a minimum of four members, one of whom should be a KAUST faculty member external to the CBE degree program. Passing the dissertation examination is achieved by acceptance of a written dissertation and an open oral defense thereof. The student must contact each committee member to arrange for a suitable time and place for the examination, and inform the degree program coordinator at least 4 weeks prior to the date chosen for the exam. The student must submit the written dissertation to the committee at least two weeks prior to the final exam. The examination begins with 45-min presentation followed a 10~15 min open question session for the student to answer any questions which may arise from audience, and followed by another 15~20 min close question session, where the student should clarify or defend any questions related to the dissertation or other academic related matters. The result of the exam will be made based on the recommendation of the committee. There are four possible outcomes: Pass: the student passes the exam, and the dissertation is accepted as submitted. Pass with revisions: the student passes the exam, but the dissertation need to be revised based on the suggestions raised from the committee. Failure with retake: The student must do more research to fulfill the research topic. The student must revise the dissertation, and take another oral examination within six months. Failure: the student is not qualified to obtain a PhD degree from KAUST. Transfer Students Students transferring from other PhD programs may receive some dissertation research and coursework credit units, on a case by case basis, for related work performed at their original institution. However, such students must still satisfy the written and oral requirements for a research proposal (if this phase was passed at the original institute, the proposal may be the same, if approved by the research advisor). The minimum residency requirement for enrollment of such students at KAUST is 2 years. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CBE201. Applied Engineering Thermodynamics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Undergraduate thermodynamic course. Main objective of this course is the application of thermodynamics and molecular theory in chemical engineering. Topics include thermodynamics of phase equilibria, Gibbs phase rule, solutions of non-electrolytes and strong electrolytes (activity and osmotic coefficients), entropy and information. Part of the course will deal with applications like systems for power production, heating and cooling and pumps and compressors.
CBE 202. Advanced Transport Phenomena (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of fluid mechanics, heat & mass transfer, vector analysis, and differential equations.

The aim of this course is to enable students to i) derive appropriate differential balances for specific material properties, including momentum, thermal energy, and mass species, accounting appropriately for property flux by convective and diffusive (molecular-scale) processes, along with property generation or loss in the material continua; ii) write the Thermal Energy Equation, the Species Continuity Equation, and the Navier-Stokes Equations and pose (simplify) them appropriately for specific transport problems; iii) know appropriate boundary conditions that can be applied to specific transport problems; iv) conduct scale or dimensional analyses of transport problems, using the analyses to help simplify or enhance understanding of underlying transport processes; v) solve and physically interpret one-dimensional steady state conduction and species diffusion problems in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical geometries, with and without zero-order and first-order generation/loss; vi) use separation of variables technique to solve and physically interpret two-dimensional steady-state conduction and species diffusion problems; vii) use similarity methods to solve and physically interpret unsteady state conduction and diffusion problems in unbounded material regions; viii) use the finite Fourier transform method to solve and interpret unsteady state conduction and diffusion problems in bounded material regions; ix) solve and physically interpret unidirectional steady and unsteady viscous flows in unbounded regions and in bounded regions (i.e. flow conduits or ducts); and x) solve and physically interpret simultaneous convection and diffusion (conduction) problems involving the interaction of thermal or concentration boundary layers with developing or developed velocity profiles.
CBE 203. Advanced Reaction Engineering (3-0-3) Prerequisite: undergraduate reaction engineering course or consent of instructor. The objective of this course is to impart and to continue the rigorous study of reaction engineering. In this course, particular emphasis will be given to chemical kinetics and transport phenomena, review of elements of reaction kinetics, rate processes in heterogeneous reacting systems, design of fluid-fluid and fluid-solid reactors, scale-up and stability of chemical reactors and residence time analysis of heterogeneous chemical reactors

CBE 204. Engineering Mathematics and Numerical Methods (3-0-3) Numerical linear algebra, the solution of linear and nonlinear algebraic systems of equations, the integration of nonlinear dynamic systems, the solution of partial differential equations, the use and solution of population balances, foundation of numerical methods in statistics, foundation of numerical methods in molecular simulation and computational fluid dynamics. CBE 205. Protein Structure and Function (2-1-3) Prerequisite: degree in biological sciences or engineering or consent of instructor. Introduction to protein structure and

technologies used to study protein structure, X-ray crystallography, protein NMR. Protein folding, post translational modification, protein sorting. Enzyme structure and function. Study of differential protein expression, proteomics. Protein interactions, methods to study the interactome. Problem-solving, data handling, critical-thinking, journal-club sessions. Possible interactions with Genomics Research Core facility. CBE 206. Synthetic Biology and Biotechnology (2-1-3) Prerequisite: degree in biological sciences or engineering or consent of instructor. Introduction to genetic circuits in natural systems; engineering principles in biology; BioBricks and standardization of biological components; numerical methods for systems analysis and design; fabrication of genetic systems in theory and practice; transformation and characterization; examples of engineered systems; hands-on experiments. CBE 207. Physiology and Metabolic Engineering (2-1-3) The course will provide a growth and development explanation of plant physiology that includes physical, chemical and biochemical functions of higher seed plants (angiosperms). Topics will focus on mechanisms and processes that are fundamental for cell, tissue and organ composition, differentiation and development. How plant growth and development are regulated and modulated by genetic, chemical and environmental cues will be emphasized. Basic physical, chemical and biochemical mechanisms and processes will be presented in the context of the plant growth and development beginning with seed germination, then vegetative growth and development, and followed by reproduction (flowering and fruit maturation). Mechanisms and processes will be dissected at the molecular genetics, physical, and biochemical levels. Basic plant metabolism such as photosynthesis (primary metabolism) and secondary products (secondary metabolism), signaling and signal responses to chemical (hormonal) and environmental metabolic stimuli, water and nutrient transport and utilization and plant defense will be discussed. Distinguished experts will present lectures that translate plant physiology into agriculture and other anthropogenic uses.
CBE 208. Plant Biology (2-1-3) Prerequisite: degree in biological sciences or engineering or consent of instructor. Review of cellular structure function, diffusion and active transport limitations and benefits on plant cell systems. Membrane structures translocation and transport. Energy and primary metabolism, secondary metabolism in microbes and plants. CBE 209: Genomics (2-1-3) Prerequisite: degree in biological sciences or engineering or consent of instructor. Prokaryotic versus eukaryotic genome structure, conservation (gene order/sequence/structure, regulatory sequences), approaches to mapping/sequencing genomes, DNA sequencing, DNA sequencing technologies, approaches to genome annotation, SNPs, microarray technology, gene expression microarrays, antibodies, chromatin immunopurification, high throughput perturbation studies. Problem-solving/data-handling/critical thinking/journal-club sessions. Possible interactions with Genomics Research Core facility. CBE 210. Materials Chemistry (3-0-3) This course will present fundamental concepts in materials chemistry. The main topics to be covered include structure and characterization, macroscopic properties and synthesis and processing

CBE 211. Dynamic Behavior of Process Systems (3-0-3) Dynamic behavior of complex batch and continuous process engineering systems: modeling as lumped and distributed systems, estimation and validation of such models, the formulation and solution of dynamic process optimization problems for typical engineering problems. CBE 212. Advanced Process Control (3-0-3) Advanced control applications: the role of signals and measurements; the design of plant-wide control systems; the use,

selection and evaluation of advanced control schemes; the use of data-driven approaches to analyze and control process behavior. CBE 213. Interface Science, Engineering and Technology (3-0-3). Surface tension and surface free energy (theory and measurement methods); Surface films on liquid substrates (surface potential, monomolecular films, Langmuir-Blodgett layers); Electrical aspects of surface chemistry (electrical double layer, zeta potential, DLVO theory); Solid-liquid interface, stability of dispersions, stabilization of suspensions; Contact angle (theory and measurement methods); Emulsions, foams and aerosols; Wetting of surfaces by liquids, Lotus effect; Flotation, aggregation and flocculation; Detergency, surfactants, self-assembly, micelles and vesicles; Friction, lubrication and adhesion; Adsorption; Characterization of colloidal particles; Applications of colloid and surface science in petroleum recovery, coating and painting, food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry CBE 214. Electrochemical Engineering and Technology (3-0-3) Principles, design and operation of electrochemical reactors and processes, fuel cells and batteries. Electrode potentials and redox reactions; potential-pH and activity-pH diagrams for element-water systems; transport rates in electrochemical systems; kinetics of electrochemical reactions; functions and selection of electrode materials; catholyte/anolyte separators and ion-permeable membranes; design and modeling of electrochemical reactors; performance of reactors/processes, fuel cells and batteries. CBE 215. Polymers and Polymerization Processes (3-0-3) Cornerstones of polymer science: synthesis, characterization, processing and properties. Monomer synthesis, polymerization chemistry, reactors and scale-up, polymer structure (solution and solid state), morphology and processability." CBE 216. Engineering of Sustainable Processes (3-0-3) Environmental impacts of human activities, how to quantify such impacts; application of chemical engineering unit operations to emission abatement; concepts of sustainability, waste minimization, clean technology and green chemistry; factors which determine how emission legislation is approached and formulated; process safety and loss prevention. CBE 218. Urban Energy Systems (3-0-3) Urbanization and growth in energy demand; cities as dynamic systems; characterizing city infrastructures, complex systems and networks; energy supply, conversion and demand in cities; resource flows and city sustainability; modeling, analysis and optimization of cities from an energy systems perspective; transport modeling; land-use interactions and energy demand; case studies. CBE 219. Bioinorganic Chemistry (3-0-3) Prerequisite is a basic understanding of chemistry and inorganic Chemistry as it is provided by any undergraduate chemistry, biochemistry, biotechnology or chemical engineering education. The more advanced chemical and biochemical aspects and methods are all developed during the course. The course will provide students with a general overview of the many very fundamental tasks performed by inorganic elements in living organisms as well as the related methods and theories with particular emphasis on enzymatic conversions and electron transfer. This goes along with the elucidation of model systems and technical applications of both, concepts learned from nature as well as biological systems. CBE 221. Biophysics (3-0-3) (Same as B 201.) Conservation of mass and momentum, physiological mass transport, membrane structure, carrier proteins and active

membrane transport, ion channels, intracellular vesicular transport, diffusion in reacting systems, heat and mass transfer in bioreactors, culture aeration. Lectures and laboratory. CBE 222. Bioprocess Fundamentals (3-0-3) Genetic recombination, expression systems, principles of fermentation processes, bioreactor types and operation modes, process scale-up, separation and recovery of biological products. Industrially relevant applications, such as microbial systems, mammalian systems, stem cell systems. Lectures, case studies and laboratory CBE 223. Introduction to Statistics and Bio-Statistics (3-0-3) Analyze and formulate bio-engineering problems in mathematical form, solve them and analyze the results. Numerical linear algebra, linear and nonlinear algebraic systems of equations, integration of nonlinear dynamic systems, partial differential equations, population balances, foundation of numerical methods in statistics, foundation of numerical methods in molecular simulation and computational fluid dynamics. Lectures and laboratory. CBE 224. Fundamentals of Cell Biology (3-0-3). Types of microorganisms (e.g., viruses, microbes, yeast, mammalian and stem cells); cell physiology, structure and function; gene expression and protein synthesis; protein folding; post-translational modification; cell cycle; molecular biology techniques. CBE 230. Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules (3-0-3) Conformation and configuration; Solution Thermodynamics; Phase separation (theory and experimental aspects), polymer fractionation; Mechanisms and kinetics of phase separation; Miscibility of polymer blends and compatibilization; Microphase separation and selfassembly; Rheology of polymer solutions; Viscosity of diluted and concentrated solutions, polymer gels; Rheology of polymer melts and composites, relevance for polymer processing; Amorphous state, glass-rubber transition, plasticizers; Elasticity and Viscoelasticity; Thermal analysis, dynamic mechanical analysis; Crystalline state, liquid-crystalline state; Mechanical properties. CBE 231. Biological Separations (3-0-3) Basic cell separation techniques such as filtration and centrifugation, cell rupture; purification techniques such as adsorption (affinity and ligand), chromatography, solvent extraction, precipitation and crystallization; process flowsheeting in downstream separation. The laboratory course will focus on analytical techniques and downstream unit operations in biotechnology. Lectures and laboratory. CBE 232. Metabolic Engineering (3-0-3) Fundamentals of redox reactions, catalysis and the use of energy by cells, enzyme-catalyzed reaction kinetics, glucose metabolism, regulation of metabolic pathways, respiration, anaerobic metabolism, autotrophic metabolism, principles of metabolic flux analysis. CBE 233. Modeling of Biological Systems (3-0-3) Homeostasis and physiology of healthy and disease states; modeling of feedback control mechanisms; cell signaling, including molecules, receptors and pathways; modeling of reaction networks; signal transduction modeling; cell cycle regulation; population modeling; gene expression control and regulation; metabolic flux analysis. CBE 234. Biomechanics (3-0-3) Tissue and cell mechanics; physiological fluid mechanics; stress, strain and deformation; mechanical properties and molecular structure; analysis of musculoskeletal systems.

CBE 235. Environmental Biotechnology (3-0-3) Microbial and thermodynamic concepts and quantitative tools: stoichiometry and bacterial energetics; microbial kinetics; biofilm kinetics and reactors; application design: activated sludge and aerobic biofilm processes, nitrification, denitrification, phosphorus removal, anaerobic treatment and detoxification of hazardous chemicals. Lectures and laboratory. CBE 237. Pharmaceutical Process Development (3-0-3) Methodology for the development of pharmaceutical and related processes and associated equipment design, main challenges in pharmaceutical process development, conceptual designs from process chemistry, design calculations for separation and isolation processes, experimental design, elucidation of reaction kinetics from experiments. CBE 239. Stem Cells (3-0-3). (Same as B 239) This course covers stem cell biology and therapeutics. It is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of current understanding of embryonic and adult stem cells, including their basic properties and interactions within organisms. Stem cell isolation methods, experimental models and potential biomedical therapeutic applications will be encountered through research of literature. It is a graduate level course that requires a basic background in biology. CBE 297. Master Thesis Research (3 credits) CBE 298. Graduate Seminar (1 credit) Master-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. CBE 299. Directed Research (3 credits) Master-level supervised research. Formulating and solution of problems in process synthesis, design and operations using advanced optimization methods. Mathematical modeling via mixed integer and continuous optimization formulations, principles of continuous optimization, principles of modeling with integer variables, principles of mixed-integer linear and nonlinear optimization, principles of optimization under uncertainty, applications to interactions of design and control and model-based control. CBE 304. Advanced Topics in Sequencing Technology (3-0-3) Next generation sequencing technology has emerged as a major transformative tool in the field of genomics. This course consists of advanced topics, focusing on detailed description of the current and future sequencing technologies and several sequencers (for example, Roche 454, Life Technologies SOLiD, Illumina Solexa, and PacBios newly launched machine) as well as their data quality and processing tools. It also provides examples for various applications in genomics, transcriptomics, and epigenomics. CBE 311. Advanced Process Optimization (3-0-3) Prerequisite: CBE 204. Formulating and solution of problems in process synthesis, design and operations using advanced optimization methods. Mathematical modeling via mixed integer and continuous optimization formulations, principles of continuous optimization, principles of modeling with integer variables, principles of mixed-integer linear and nonlinear optimization, principles of optimization under uncertainty, applications to interactions of design and control and model-based control. CBE 312. Advanced Transport Phenomena (3-0-3) Prerequisite: CBE 202. Exact approximate and semi-analytical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. Heat and mass transfer in natural and forced convection. Hydrodynamic instabilities: capillary and gravity waves, Rayleigh instability, Rayleigh-Benard and Benard- Marangoni convection. Turbulence: dimensional analysis, transitional and fully developed turbulent flows; Reynolds averaging and models for Reynolds stresses; CFD.

CBE 313. Dynamical Systems in Chemical Engineering (3-0-3) Prerequisite: CBE 204. Development and application of modern techniques in nonlinear dynamics, pattern formation and bifurcation theory. Analytical and numerical tools required for complex nonlinear dissipative dynamical systems. Multiple coexisting states and hysteresis, onset of oscillations, aperiodic and chaotic behavior, spontaneous breaking of spatial symmetry and pattern formation, nonlinear waves and turbulence. CBE 314. Particle Engineering (3-0-3) Fundamentals: particle characterization, particle mechanics, population balances. Unit operations: particle formation, particlefluid separation, size reduction, size enlargement, mixing and de-mixing, storage and transport. CBE 315. Modeling of Phase Equilibria (3-0-3) Prerequisite: CBE 201. Predicting the phase behavior of fluids in the context of process design: theoretical fundamentals and modern computational methods including advanced thermodynamic models and molecular simulation techniques. Lectures and case studies. CBE 317. Clean Fossil Fuels and Biofuels (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Undergraduate chemical engineering and chemistry courses. The different types of biofuels will be presented and discussed in this course. Topics include biomass feedstocks, first, second and third generation of biofuels, fuel from cellulose, catalytic conversion of biomass to liquid, energy balance of biofuels, biological production of hydrogen, biodiesel, microbial fuel cells. The Clean Fossil Fuel part of this course deals with gasification processes including ICCG power plants, Fischer Tropsch synthesis, clean coal technologies, desulfurization and carbon dioxide capture and storage. CBE 326. Biocatalysis (3-0-3) Application of Biocatalysis has a long tradition. Starting out from basic food-processing fermentations e.g. related to bread baking or cheese making, today the result emerging from this discipline influence all areas of modern daily life. Developments in Pharmacy, medicine, nutrition, analytics, environmental technology, fine chemical synthesis and others are based on the progress in Biocatalysis research. Enzymes as natures catalysts set the benchmarks for artificial systems in terms of activity and selectivity. Correspondingly, Biocatalysis has evolved into one of the pillars of biotechnology and chemical industry. This course aims to provide an understanding of fundamental aspects of biocatalysis, while the general focus is set on current applications of biocatalytic systems. CBE 331. Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells (3-0-3) Prerequisite: CBE 224. Principles of regenerative medicine, cellular engineering, mesenchymal and embryonic stem cells, pluripotency, controlled differentiation, growth factors, cell encapsulation, scaffolds, techniques for product characterization, principles of stem cell bioprocesses, examples of applications (e.g., cartilage, bone, cardiomyocytes). Lectures and laboratory. CBE 332. Materials for Bio-Applications (3-0-3) Selection, fabrication/processing and testing of biomaterials; scaffolds for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine; examples of applications in lung, bone and soft-tissue engineering; biodegradable polymers; injectable scaffolds; surface modification. CBE 333. Biomass and Bio-Refineries (3-0-3) Common types and chemical composition of biomass; processes to convert biomass to added-value chemicals, materials, fuel, power and other products; examples of gasification, fermentation, digestion and pyrolysis methods; treatment of extracted material.

CBE 334. Formulation Engineering and Technology (3-0-3) Scientific fundamentals and engineering practice of liquid and solid products formulation; selection of ingredients and processing routes for formulated products in the pharmaceutical, consumer goods, cosmetics, foods and specialty chemicals sectors. Lectures and laboratory. CBE 336. Membrane Science and Membrane Separation Processes (3-0-3) Formulation and solution of engineering problems involving design of membrane systems for gas separation, reverse osmosis, filtration, dialysis, pervaporation and gas absorption/stripping processes. Membrane selection, fabrication and preparation. Membrane transport: gas permeation and reverse osmosis. Polarization and fouling, membrane module design. Lectures and laboratory. CBE 397. Dissertation research (variable credit). CBE 398. Graduate Seminar (1 credit) Doctoral-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. CBE 399: Directed Research (3 credit) Doctoral-level supervised research.

7. CHEMICAL SCIENCE PROGRAM


The Chemical Science program at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology offers programs of study leading to the Masters in Science (thesis and non-thesis) and Ph.D. degrees. Each degree program has specific requirements in terms of coursework, student seminars, qualifying examinations (Ph.D. only), and a thesis (MS) or dissertation (Ph.D.) that presents the results of an original research project. It is possible (and most common) to earn a Ph.D. degree without earning an MS degree on the way. It is also possible to earn only an MS degree, as well as (and sometimes required, upon committees discretion) to first earn an MS degree and then a Ph.D. degree. The programs leading to the M.S. or Ph.D. degree in Chemical Science emphasize the attainment of a high level of competency in one of the specialized areas of applied and theoretical chemistry. By completing the M.S. degree, the student will have acquired a

sound foundation for a career in chemical research or for continuing advanced graduate studies. The major emphasis for the Ph.D. degree is on research. The program leading to the Ph.D. degree requires the development of a broad knowledge through additional coursework beyond the M.S. requirement and through supervised research. Upon completion of the Ph.D. degree, the student is expected to be capable of designing and executing independent research projects.

Master of Science (M.S.) in Chemical Science


There are two M.S. degree programs in Chemical Science, one with a thesis and one without. The program without the thesis is expected to be completed in one year. The program with the thesis is expected to be completed in 1.5 years. The coursework requirements for the two M.S. programs are listed below. M.S. degree without thesis Students are required to take at least 3 out of the 6 offered core courses (9 credits). Students are required to take at least 3 elective courses in the chemical science program (9 credits). Students are required to take at least 2 elective courses out of the chemical science program and not cross listed with it (6 credits). Students are not required to take any math requirements. Students are required to successfully complete six credits of directed research (6 credits) Total credits required: 30 Typically, a student will enroll in four courses (12 credits) in the Fall semester, four courses (12 credits) in the Spring semester, and six credits of directed research or coursework during the Summer session. M.S. degree with thesis Students are required to take at least 3 out of the 6 offered core courses (9 credits). Students are required to take at least 3 elective courses in the chemical science program (9 credits). Students are required to take at least 2 elective courses out of the chemical science program and not cross listed with it (6 credits). Students are not required to take any math requirements. Students are required to successfully complete twelve credits of directed research (12 credits). The research conducted will be presented in the students thesis and presentation. Total credits required: 36

The M.S. thesis reports on research conducted under the supervision a Chemical Science faculty member. Typically, students in this program complete their coursework during the first two semesters of study, although additional courses may be taken during the second year. By the end of the first year of study, an M.S. with thesis student must select a faculty supervisor. During the third semester of the program, the student must form a committee that includes the faculty supervisor and two other faculty members, including one from outside of the Chemical Science program. This committee must read and approve the thesis.

Doctor of Philosophy in Chemical Science


Students studying for a Ph.D. must first satisfy the coursework requirements for the M.S. program. Some or all of the M.S. coursework requirements may be waived, at the discretion of the students advisor and with the approval of the dean, when a student is admitted to the program after obtaining a Masters degree from a university other than KAUST. The Ph.D. degree requires (in addition to the M.S. coursework requirements) a minimum of 6 credit hours of course work and 60 hours of dissertation research. In special cases, these minimum requirements may be reduced with the approval of the dean. Ph.D. students must enroll in a minimum of two courses at the 300 level or above as a part of their degree work. If a student admitted to the Ph.D. program does not have a research advisor, an interim advisor will be assigned. The student must identify a permanent research advisor by the end of the first year in the program. Typically, completing the Ph.D. program takes a minimum 2.5 years beyond the completion of the M.S. program requirements. In accordance with KAUST regulations, the Ph.D. program includes the following requirements: Successfully completing Ph.D. coursework, designating a research advisor, and passing a subject-comprehensive examination. Obtaining candidacy status. Preparing a doctoral dissertation and successfully defending it. Subject-comprehensive Exam The subject-comprehensive exam tests the students knowledge of materials covered in the core and track courses. The exam includes both oral and written components. The student is provided a list of examination topics in advance. The possible outcomes of the exam are: pass, conditional pass, failure with retake, and failure. In the case of a retake, the student must retake and pass the exam within three months of the date of the first exam. The exam is administered by an examination committee (with a minimum three faculty members) that is selected by the advisor and the student. Students admitted with a Masters degree should complete the subject-comprehensive exam within one year from the start of the program; students admitted without a Masters degree should complete the subject-comprehensive exam within two years from the start of the program.

Admission to Ph.D. Candidacy To be admitted to Ph.D. candidacy, the student must: Successfully complete all coursework requirements and pass the subjectcomprehensive exam. Identify an advisor and form a dissertation committee. Present a doctoral research proposal and obtain approval from the dissertation committee. Dissertation Committee The dissertation committee is formed by the student under the guidance of the advisor. The committee is chaired by the advisor, and it must include at least three other faculty members, one of whom must be external to the program. The committee may additionally include one or more appropriate persons external to KAUST. The committee members must interact with the student to discuss the students progress. The student must submit an annual written progress report to the dissertation committee. All committee members must be designated as dissertation readers. Research Proposal Defense A Ph.D. student must submit a written research proposal to the dissertation committee two weeks prior to an oral defense of the proposal. The oral defense consists of an oral presentation by the student followed by a question and answer session. The oral defense must be attended by a minimum of three members of the dissertation committee. The committee will determine if the proposal qualifies as a dissertation topic in the area and if the candidate is capable of completing the research project as proposed. The committees decision can take the form of pass, conditional pass, fail with retake, or fail. In the case of fail with retake, the committee will provide feedback to the student, who must prepare and pass a repeat examination within one semester. Each student is expected to defend the research proposal by the end of the second year from the start of the program. Dissertation Defense The student must schedule a dissertation defense after the doctoral research project and dissertation are completed. The dissertation defense will include a defense of the doctoral dissertation and a test of the candidates knowledge in the specialized field of research. The format of the dissertation defense will be a public seminar presented by the candidate, with an open question period, followed by a private examination by the dissertation committee. The possible outcomes of the exam are pass, conditional pass, or fail. After a successful defense, the final written dissertation approved by the committee must be submitted within two months and must be signed by the supervisor and all dissertation committee members.

ChemS Program Courses


Core Courses (choose at least 3):

ChemS ChemS ChemS ChemS ChemS ChemS

320 340 330 350 360 370

Advanced Organic Chemistry I Advanced Organic Chemistry II Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II Theoretical Chemistry Thermodynamics and Kinetics

Elective Courses (choose at least 3):


ChemS 210 / CBE 210 ChemS 250 ChemS 215 / CBE 215 ChemS 226 / CBE 226 ChemS 220 ChemS 230 / CBE 230 ChemS 212 ChemS 218 ChemS 219 / CBE 219 ChemS 213 / CBE 213 Material Chemistry I Material Chemistry II Polymers and Polymerization Proceses Biocatalysis Organometallic Chemistry Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules Spectroscopy Analysis Photo and Electro Catalysis Bioinorganic Chemistry Interface Science, Engineering, & Technology

Directed Research and Seminar Courses:


ChemS 298 ChemS 299 ChemS 398 ChemS 399 Special Seminar MS Thesis Research Graduate Seminar Directed Research for PhD Students

CHEMICAL SCIENCE PROGRAM COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ChemS 210. Material Chemistry I (3-0-3) (Same as CBE 210) Prerequisite: An understanding of the material covered in basic inorganic and organic chemistry. The course is designed to present students with a descriptive overview of Materials Chemistry with particular emphasis on the correlation between materials structure and their properties. This course will cover the following topics: molecular symmetry; basic crystallography; band theory; porous materials; nano-structured materials and some material characterization techniques including powder X-ray diffraction and physical adsorption. ChemS 212. Spectroscopy Analysis (3-0-3) The course introduces the student to the principles and techniques of modern analytical chemistry. Atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and chromatographic separation techniques are stressed. Some discussion of contemporary electrochemistry is included. The principles

of data collection and the processing and representation of analytical signals are introduced. ChemS 213. Interface Science, Engineering, and Technology (3-0-3) (Same as CBE 213) This course covers surface tension and surface free energy (theory and measurement methods), surface films on liquid substrates (surface potential, monomolecular films, Langmuir-Blodgett layers), electrical aspects of surface chemistry (electrical double layer, zeta potential, DLVO theory), solid-liquid interface, stability of dispersions, stabilization of suspensions, Contact angle (theory and measurement methods) Emulsions, foams and aerosols, wetting of surfaces by liquids, Lotus effect, Flotation, aggregation and flocculation, Detergency, surfactants, self-assembly, micelles and Vesicles, Friction, lubrication, and Characterization of colloidal particles Applications of colloid and surface science in petroleum recovery, coating and painting, food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry ChemS 215. Polymers and Polymerization Processes (3-0-3) (Same as CBE 215) The preparation, reactions and properties of high-molecular-weight polymeric materials of both natural and synthetic origin. Physical and organic chemistry of polymers for persons with a basic training in chemistry, physics, or engineering. The course is a survey of preparative methods of polymers; step growth polymerization, radical polymerization, ionic polymerization, ring-opening polymerization, polymerization by transition metal catalysts; and methods of characterization (nuclear magnetic resonance, Raman, infrared, intrinsic viscosity, differential scanning, calorimetry, gel permeation chromatography) and scattering (light, x-rays). ChemS 218. Photo and Electro Catalysis (3-0-3) Fundamentals of Photo and Electro catalysis presented with a novel approach for industrial applications ChemS 219. Bioinorganic Chemistry (3-0-3) This course will introduce the principles of bioinorganic chemistry and its vast applications in industry and catalytical processes. ChemS 220. Organometallic Chemistry (3-0-3) Systematic consideration of modern aspects of organometallic chemistry including main group and transition metal complexes. The structure and binding in organometallic compounds is covered.Particular emphasis is placed on applications of homogenous organometallic catalysis in polymer synthesis, industrial processes and synthetic organic chemistry. ChemS 230. Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules (3-0-3) Same as CBE 230 Prerequisite: ChemS 215 or consent of instructor. Physical chemistry of macromolecules, including the theory for the experimental methods used for the study of macromolecular solutions. ChemS 250. Material Chemistry lI (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ChemS 210 or consent of instructor. This course will introduce electron microscopy based techniques: Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Electron diffraction (ED), Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), Energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM), Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). On-site demonstration of the electron microscope will be given. ChemS 298. Graduate Seminar (1credit) Master-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. ChemS 299. Directed Research (variable credit) Prerequisite: Approval of Advisor. Master-level Thesis Research.

ChemS 320. Advanced Organic Chemistry I (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Adequate Knowledge in general chemistry rules and concepts. Reactivity and reactions of organic moieties including enolates, carbenes, radicals, carbonyl compounds, and transition metal organometallics; mechanisms of named reactions; multistep total synthesis techniques and reactions; advanced NMR and mass spectrometric techniques as applied to research efforts in organic chemistry and related fields, such as pharmaceuticals, materials science, supramolecular synthesis, and crystal engineering. ChemS 326. Biocatalysis (3-0-3) (Same as CBE 226) Prerequisite: ChemS 219 or consent of instructor. This course aims to provide an understanding of fundamental aspects of biocatalysis, while the general focus is set on current applications of biocatalytic systems. It targets Students enrolled in chemical sciences, chemical engineering and biological engineering. ChemS 330. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Adequate Knowledge in general chemistry rules and concepts. Generalizations of the periodic table and their relationship to classical and modern concepts of atomic and molecular structure. Inorganic stereochemistry including concepts of crystal chemistry, silicate chemistry, coordination theory, ligand field theory, catalysis, acid-base theory, reaction mechanisms, organometallic chemistry and a detailed consideration of selected groups of the periodic table. ChemS 340. Advanced Organic Chemistry II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ChemS 320 or consent of instructor. This course will focus on a deeper understanding of the structure and reactivity of organic molecules with an emphasis on reaction mechanisms. It is a review of aspects of physical organic chemistry, covering structure and bonding, stereochemistry, and kinetics and thermodynamics, as well as molecular orbital theory with an introduction to the use of computational tools, such as Gaussian 09. ChemS 350. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ChemS 330 or consent of instructor. Emphasis on concepts and applications of homogenous and heterogeneous catalysis and the impact of such processes on the advancement of different industries. ChemS 360. Theoretical Chemistry (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Adequate Knowledge in general chemistry rules and concepts. Review of quantum mechanics from a postulational viewpoint; variational and matrix methods; time independent and timedependent perturbation theory; applications to molecular systems including potential energy surfaces and reaction pathways. ChemS 370. Thermodynamics and Kinetics (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ChemS 360 or consent of instructor. A discussion of chemical phase equilibria, the treatment of solutions and chemical reactions by classical thermodynamics, the applications of electrochemical cells in studying chemical reactivities, utilization of molecular and atomic spectra in statistical-mechanical calculations. ChemS 398. Graduate Seminar (1 credit) Doctoral-level ChemS program seminar. ChemS 399 Directed Research (variable credit) Prerequisite: Approval of Advisor. Doctoral-level supervised research.

8. COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM

1. Overview of the Program


Computer Science at KAUST offers Master and PhD degrees. Both graduate degrees require course work. Each student has a faculty member as advisor/supervisor, who can provide advice on course selection and directions for research. Computer Science offers five tracks, each of which leads to a frontier of computing: 1. Theoretical Computer Science 2. Computer Systems 3. Artificial Intelligence 4. High Performance Computing 5. Visual Computing For the Master degree, a student can chose one of the following directions: 1. Master degree without thesis option: minimum of 30 credit hours of courses, or 2. Master degree with thesis option: minimum of 30 credit hours of courses and a thesis. Thesis credit-hours range from 6 to 12. A student must choose between the options before starting the second term of study. For the PhD degree, a student must: 1. Complete a minimum of 6 credit hours 300-level courses (after a Masters degree), or additional 30 credit hours of course work for students bypassing the Master program.

2. Complete the PhD qualification and candidacy phases. 3. Present two seminars or lectures. 4. Submit an annual progress report. 5. Submit a thesis, which contains the candidates scholarly work. Thesis work must be publishable in well recognized journals and conferences. 6. Complete a thesis defense oral examination. These basic requirements are explained in 4. 1.1 Advisors/Supervisors Each Master student is assigned to a faculty member who is responsible for advising the student on the selection of courses and the options available. The advisor also signs the students forms. After the first term of registration, the student may select the same or a different faculty member (with the agreement of the faculty member) as research supervisor for the thesis option only. A PhD student must have a research supervisor assigned prior the admission to the program. The research supervisor also serves as the advisor. Every student has the right to select co-supervisors from within the division. A maximum of 2 co-supervisors is permitted to supervise a graduate student. Each supervisor or co-supervisors must have an academic faculty-level appointment. 1.2 Program length For the Master degree without thesis, a minimum of one year of full-time registration (4 courses, 12 credit hours) is normally required. Master degree with thesis option requires up-to four semesters. The minimum period of registration for the PhD degree is five semesters after a Masters degree (or seven semesters after a Bachelors). The actual length of the PhD program depends on the students preparation and choice of research topic. 1.3 Progress Reports Progress reports are required of Master students under the thesis option and of PhD students. They are intended to assist the student to focus on making timely progress through the program requirements. Students are required to submit annual progress report to the supervisor. The student progress can be discussed among the student advisory committee. 1.4 Courses Graduate courses are classified into two levels: 200-level courses which are basic graduate courses, 300level courses which are research-oriented courses. The program offers the following course classified as Core, Track, and Doctoral and Master level research courses.

Core courses: 1. (CS 221) Artificial Intelligence 2. (CS 240) Operating Systems and Systems Programming 3. (CS 242) Programming Languages 4. (CS 260) Design and Analysis of Algorithms 5. (CS 282) Computer Architecture and Organization Immersion courses in each track: Theoretical Computer Science 1. (CS 212) Linear and Nonlinear Optimization 2. (CS 229) Machine Learning 3. (CS 248) Computer Graphics 4. (CS 260) Design and Analysis of Algorithms 5. (CS 261) Algorithmic Paradigms 6. (CS 361) Combinatorial Machine Learning Computer Systems 1. (CS 244) Computer Networks 2. (CS 245) Databases 3. (CS 248) Computer Graphics 4. (CS 282) Computer Architecture and Organization 5. (CS 341) Advanced Topics in Data Management 6. (CS 344) Advanced Topics in Computer Networks 7. (CS 346) Advanced Topics in Operating Systems 8. (CS 380) GPU and GPGPU Programming Visual Computing 1. (CS 248) Computer Graphics 2. (CS 247) Scientific Visualization 3. (CS 272) Geometric Modeling 4. (CS 271) Applied Geometry 5. (CS 380) GPU and GPGPU Programming Artificial Intelligence 1. (CS 212) Linear and Nonlinear Optimization 2. (CS 229) Machine Learning 3. (CS 245) Databases 4. (CS 340) Computational Methods in Data Mining 5. (CS 324) Advance Topics in Data Management 6. (CS 361) Combinatorial Machine Learning High Performance Computing 1. (CS 282) Computer Architecture and Organization 2. (CS 291) Scientific Software Engineering 3. (CS 292) Parallel Programming Paradigms 4. (CS 311) High Performance Computing I 5. (CS 312) High Performance Computing II 6. (CS 380) GPU and GPGPU Programming Master-level Research 1. (CS 298) Master Graduate Seminar 2. (CS 299) Master Directed Research

3. (CS 297) Master Dissertation Research Doctoral-level Research 1. (CS 398) Doctoral Graduate Seminar 2. (CS 399) Doctoral Directed Research 3. (CS 397) Doctoral Dissertation Research 4. (CS 341) Advanced Topics in Data Management 5. (CS 344) Advanced Topics in Computer Networks 6. (CS 346) Advanced Topics in Operating Systems 7. (CS 380) GPU and GPGPU Programming 8. (CS 361) Combinatorial Machine Learning

2 Master Degree without Thesis Requirements


For the Master degree without thesis option, course requirements include four Core courses, minimum of three Immersion courses, one course from the student field of research, one mathematics course, and one elective course. Detailed description of courses is available in Section 5.

3 Master Degree with Thesis Requirements


For the Master degree thesis option, course requirements include four Core courses, minimum of three Immersion courses, one course from the student field of research, one mathematics course, and one elective course. An additional six to twelve thesis credit hours (CS 297 Dissertation Research) are required. By the end of the second semester, a student must have arranged a research supervisor and agreed on the general area of the proposed research. Before the end of the third semester, the student must have defined a thesis topic in consultation with the supervisor. Two readers for the thesis, in addition to the supervisor, must also be chosen. The mutual agreement of the student, supervisor, and readers must be reported in writing and kept at the division. The agreement must explicitly state the topic of the thesis, and the expected completion date of the thesis. The Master thesis student must present the results of the thesis research at an announced division-based seminar. The thesis must be approved by the supervisor and two readers.

4 PhD Degree Requirements


A research supervisor is assigned for each admitted PhD student. 4.1 PhD Course Work PhD students are required to complete a minimum of 6 credit hours from 300- level courses (after a Masters degree). Courses are determined according to the research supervisor. An additional 30 credit hours of course work are required for students bypassing the Master program. They must satisfy similar degree requirements for Master degree without thesis program presented above. 4.2 PhD Qualification PhD student must pass the qualification exam. The qualification exam consists of two phases. Phase one is the breadth requirements. Each student must demonstrate broad knowledge in the three main areas of

Computer Science: systems, theory, and applications. Each of these areas is further subdivided into areas that represent Computer Science fields. Systems include software engineering, operating systems, programming languages, hardware, and software systems. Theory includes algorithms and complexity. Applications include databases, networks, artificial intelligence, and graphics. A PhD student should have already taken a number of advanced courses during graduate and senior undergraduate levels in the above mentioned broad range of categories with a minimum grade of B+ (or equivalent). The student supervisor can determine the breadth course coverage. Based on results of the student transcript and presented course syllabus, each PhD student is given a list of courses to satisfy. The table bellow summarizes the breadth requirement according to the categories and area of courses. High Performance Computing 282, 291, 292, 311, 312, 380 Systems Hardware and Software Systems 240, 340, 242, 244, 241, 248, 341, 344, 346, 380 Theory Algorithms and Complexity 212, 229, 248, 260, 261, 361 Artificial Intelligence 212, 229, 245, 340, 361, 324 Database 245, 341, 340 Network and Distributed Systems Applications 244, 344, 311, 312 Graphics and User Interfaces 248, 247, 380, 272, 271 The second phase is the qualifying exam. A seminar is required to examine the student knowledge and research skills in a selected topic. PhD student must complete the breadth requirements by the end of the first semester. Once completed, the student should be ready to start working on the PhD qualifying seminar by the end of the first year. 4.3 PhD Candidacy The PhD Candidacy exam tests the students preparedness to pursue thesis research. It is an oral presentation of a research proposal together with questioning by the advisory committee. The student

submits a written research proposal to the advisory committee two weeks prior to the exam. The advisory committee consists of a minimum of two faculty-appointed personnel from within the division and the supervisor. The candidate must convince the committee that the chosen research area is suitable and demonstrate an appropriate breadth of knowledge in the chosen area. The committee should decide if there is a thesis topic in the area and whether the candidate is capable of completing such a thesis. The committee decision can be: Pass: Student passed and can proceed with the final thesis Conditional Pass: Student collects the committee feedback and attempt to complete the deficiencies. The committee can request another informal/individual oral exam. A Pass must be obtained by the end of the following semester. Fail: Student demonstrated unsatisfactory research abilities and is not capable of completing the degree. The committee reports the results to the student and to the division in writing. Each PhD student must complete the candidacy exam by the end of their forth semester (i.e., second year). PhD students bypassing the Master degree, must complete the candidacy exam by the end of the sixed semester (i.e., third year). 4.4 PhD Seminar Requirement Each PhD candidate must present at least two publicly announced seminars (or lectures, possibly in 200 level-courses) during the program. The purpose of this requirement is ensures that each student participates in the academic life of the university and to enhance their presentational skills. Each seminar must be attended by the supervisor and one faculty. 4.5 PhD Thesis The PhD thesis which contains the candidates scholarly work. The work of the thesis must be publishable in well recognized journals and conferences. 4.6 PhD Oral Defense Each student must arrange a two-hour oral defense. The supervisor, advisory committee, external to the division (computer science) examiner, external to the university examiner, and session moderator must be present. The student presents his or her results and answers questions from the examiners. The PhD oral defense result is either Pass or Fail.

Computer Science Program Course Descriptions

CS 207. Programming Methodology and Abstractions (3-0-3) Computer programming and the use of abstractions. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to basic time and space complexity analysis. The course teaches the mechanics of the C, C++ or Java language. This course is considered remedial training for students in the CS program and will not count toward any degree requirement. CS 209. Digital Systems (3-0-3) Prerequisites: facility with at least one programming language (at least at the level of CS 207) and logic. The design of processor-based digital systems. Instruction sets, addressing modes, data types. Assembly language programming, low-level data structures, introduction to operating systems and compilers. Processor micro architecture, microprogramming, pipelining. Memory systems and caches. Input/output, interrupts, buses and DMA. System design implementation alternatives, software/hardware tradeos. Labs involve the design of processor subsystems and processor-based embedded systems. CS 210. Applied Probability and Biostatistics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Advanced and multivariate calculus. Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, nonparametric tests, regression and correlation analyses. Applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. CS 211. Numerical Optimization (3-0-3) Recommended prerequisite: AMCS 171. Solution of nonlinear equations. Optimality conditions for smooth optimization problems. Theory and algorithms to solve unconstrained optimization, linear programming, quadratic programming, global optimization, general linearly and nonlinearly constrained optimization problems. Programming project. CS 212. Linear and Nonlinear Optimization (3-0-3) Optimization theory and modeling. The role of prices, duality, optimality conditions and algorithms in finding and recognizing solutions. Perspectives: problem formulation, analytical theory, computational methods and recent applications in engineering, finance and economics. Theories: finite dimensional derivatives, convexity, optimality, duality and sensitivity. Methods: simplex and interior-point, gradient, Newton and barrier. CS 221. Artificial Intelligence (3-0-3) Prerequisites: working knowledge of basic discrete mathematics (e.g., sets and functions) and proof techniques, programming ability (at least at the level of CS 207) and exposure to probability. An introduction to the principles and practices of artificial intelligence. Topics include: search, constraint satisfaction, knowledge representation, probabilistic models, machine learning, neural networks, vision, robotics and natural language understanding. CS 229. Machine Learning (3-0-3) Prerequisites: linear algebra and basic probability and statistics. Familiarity with artificial intelligence recommended. Topics: statistical pattern recognition, linear and non-linear regression, nonparametric methods, exponential family, GLIMs, support vector machines, kernel methods, model/ feature selection, learning theory, VC dimension, clustering, density estimation, EM,

dimensionality reduction, ICA, PCA, reinforcement learning and adaptive control, Markov decision processes, approximate dynamic programming and policy search. CS 240. Operating Systems and Systems Programming (3-0-3) Prerequisite: solid computer programming skills (at least at the level of CS 207). Operating systems design and implementation. Basic structure; synchronization and communication mechanisms; implementation of processes, process management, scheduling and protection; memory organization and management, including virtual memory; I/O device management, secondary storage and file systems. CS 241. Probability and Random Process (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Advanced and multivariate calculus. Introduction to probability and random processes. Topics include probability axioms, sigma algebras, random vectors, expectation, probability distributions and densities, Poisson and Wiener processes, stationary processes, autocorrelation, spectral density, effects of filtering, linear least squares estimation and convergence of random sequences. CS 242. Programming Languages (3-0-3) Prerequisites: programming experience with Lisp, C and an object-oriented programming language. Central concepts in modern programming languages, impact on software development, language design trade-o s and implementation considerations. Functional, imperative and object oriented paradigms. Formal semantic methods and program analysis. Modern type systems, higher-order functions and closures, exceptions and continuations. Modularity, objectoriented languages, and concurrency. Runtime support for language features, interoperability and security issues. CS 243. Compilers (3-0-3) Prerequisites: solid computer programming skills (at least at the level of CS 207), familiarity with formal languages (regular expressions and grammars). Principles and practices for design and implementation of compilers and interpreters. Topics: lexical analysis, parsing theory, symbol tables, type systems, scope, semantic analysis, intermediate representations, run-time environments, co de generation and basic program analysis and optimization. Students construct a compiler for a simple object-oriented language during course programming projects. CS 244. Computer Networks (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Operating systems and systems programming. Packet switching, Internet architecture, routing, router architecture, control algorithms, retransmission algorithms, congestion control, TCP/IP, detecting and recovering from errors, switching, Ethernet (wired and wireless) and local area networks, physical layers. clocking and synchronization. Assignments intro duce network programming, including sockets, designing a router and implementing a transport layer. CS 245. Databases (3-0-3) Prerequisites: working knowledge of basic discrete mathematics (e.g., sets, functions and relations) and programming skills. Database design and use of database management systems for applications. The relational model, relational algebra and SQL, the standard language for creating, querying and modifying relational and object-relational databases. XML data including the query languages XPath and XQuery. UML database design and relational design principles based on functional dependencies and normal forms. Other topics include indexes, views, transactions, authorization, integrity constraints and triggers. Advanced topics from data warehousing, data mining, Web data management, Datalog, data integration, data streams and continuous queries and data-intensive Web services.

CS 247. Scientific Visualization (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Advanced and multivariate calculus, and linear algebra, computer graphics, and programming experience. Techniques for generating images of various types of experimentally measured, computer generated, or gathered data. Grid structures. Scalar field visualization. Vector field visualization. Particle visualization. Graph visualization. Animation. Applications in science, engineering, and medicine. CS 248. Computer Graphics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: solid programming skills and linear algebra. Input and display devices, scan conversion of geometric primitives, 2D and 3D geometric transformations, clipping and windowing, scene modeling and animation, algorithms for visible surface determination, local and global shading models, color and realtime rendering methods. CS 251. Numerical Linear Algebra (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Programming skills and linear algebra. Linear algebra in the presence of floating point rounding error, with applications to large scale scientific computing. Matrix factorizations. Linear least squares. Accuracy and stability. Eigen analysis. Singular Value Decomposition. Krylov subspace methods and preconditioning. Optimization and saddle point systems. CS 260. Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3-0-3) Prerequisites: computer programming skills, knowledge of probability, understanding of basic data structures, basic knowledge in discrete mathematics. Fulfills University Mathematics Requirement. Review of algorithm analysis (search in ordered array, binary insertion sort, merge sort, 2-3 trees, asymptotic notation). Divide and conquer algorithms (master theorem, integer multiplication, matrix multiplication, fast Fourier transform). Graphs (breadth-first search, connected components, topological ordering, depth-first search). Dynamic programming (chain matrix multiplication, shortest paths, edit distance, sequence alignment). Greedy algorithms (binary heaps, Dijkstra's algorithm, minimum spanning tree, Huffman codes). Randomized algorithms (selection, quick sort, global minimum cut, hushing). P and NP (Cook's theorem, examples of NP-complete problems). Approximate algorithms for NP-hard problems (set cover, vertex cover, maximum independent set). Partial recursive functions (theorem of Post, Diophantine equations). Computations and undecidable problems (undecidability of halting problem, theorem of Rice, semantic and syntactical properties of programs). CS 261. Algorithmic Paradigms (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Familiarity with discrete algorithms at the level of AMCS 260. Topics: algorithms for optimization problems such as matching, max flow, min-cut and load balancing. Using linear programming, emphasis is on LP duality for design and analysis of approximation algorithms. Approximation algorithms for NP-complete problems such as Steiner trees, traveling salesman and scheduling problems. Randomized algorithms. CS 271. Applied Geometry (3-0-3) Differential Geometry: selected topics from the classical theory of curves and surfaces, geometric variational problems, robust computation of differential invariants, discrete differential geometry. Projective Geometry: computing with homogeneous coordinates, projective maps, quadrics and polarity. Algebraic Geometry: algebraic curves and surfaces, rational parametrizations, basic elimination theory. Kinematical Geometry: geometry of motions, kinematic mappings. The practical use of these topics is illustrated at hand of sample problems from Geometric Modeling, Computer Vision, Robotics and related areas of Geometric Computing.

CS 272 Geometric Modeling (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Advanced and multivariate calculus, and linear algebra, computer graphics, and programming experience. Terminology, coordinate systems, and implicit forms. Parametric and spline representations of curves and surfaces and their uses. Basic differential geometry of curves and surfaces. Subdivision surfaces. Solid modeling paradigms and operations. Robustness and accuracy in geometric computations. Applications. CS 282. Computer Architecture and Organization (3-0-3) Prerequisite: CS 209. Advanced topics in cache hierarchies, memory systems, storage and IO systems, interconnection networks and message passing multi-processor systems (clusters). Issues such as locality, coarse grain parallelism, synchronization, overlapping communication with computation, hardware/software interfaces, performance/power trade-o s and reliability. Characteristics of modern processors that affect system architecture. CS 291 Scientific Software Engineering (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Programming experience and familiarity with basic discrete and numerical algorithms. Practical aspects of application development for high performance computing. Programming language choice; compilers; compiler usage. Build management using make and other tools. Library development and usage. Portability and the GNU auto-configure system. Correctness and performance debugging, performance analysis. Group development practices and version control. Use of third-party libraries and software licensing. CS 292 Parallel Programming Paradigms (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Programming experience and familiarity with basic discrete and numerical algorithms. Distributed and shared memory programming models and frameworks. Thread programming and OpenMP. Message passing and MPI. Parallel Global Address Space (PGAS) languages. Emerging languages for many core programming. Elements to be covered will include syntax and semantics, performance issues, thread safety and hybrid programming paradigms. CS 308. Stochastic Methods in Engineering (3-0-3) Prerequisite: CS 241. Review of basic probability; Monte Carlo simulation; statespace models and time series; parameter estimation, prediction and filtering; Markov chains and processes; stochastic control and stochastic differential equations. Examples from various engineering disciplines. CS 311 High Performance Computing I (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Programming experience and familiarity with basic discrete and numerical algorithms. Part one of a two-course sequence in high performance computing technology, with an emphasis on using KAUSTs research computing systems, focusing primarily on hardware architectures. History of high performance computing. Hardware architectures. CMOS processor design. Cache architectures. Memory architectures. Hardware counters. Processing benchmarks. Power. Single-node performance of real applications. CS 312 High Performance Computing II (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Programming experience and familiarity with basic discrete and numerical algorithms and AMCS 311. Part two of a two-course sequence in high performance computing technology, with an emphasis on using KAUSTs research computing systems, focusing primarily on hardware architectures. I/O systems and communication networks. Communication benchmarks. Theoretical and achievable performance for processor, memory system, network, and I/O. Future architecture directions and limitations. The course is intended

to develop a deep understanding of the underlying high performance computing architectures on which the student will develop and deploy applications. CS 330. Computational Science and Engineering (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Programming experience and familiarity with basic discrete and numerical algorithms and experience with one or more computational applications. Case studies of representative and prototype applications in partial differential equations and mesh-based methods, particle methods, ray-tracing methods, transactional methods. CS 337. Information Networks (3-0-3) Prerequisite: probability. Network structure of the Internet and the Web. Modeling, scale-free graphs, small-world phenomenon. Algorithmic implications in searching and inter-domain routing, the effect of structure on performance. Game theoretic issues, routing games and network creation games. Security issues, vulnerability and robustness. CS 340. Computational Methods in Data Mining (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Probability and scientific computing. Focus is on very large-scale data mining. Topics include computational methods in supervised and unsupervised learning, association mining and collaborative filtering. Individual or group applications oriented programming project. 1 unit without project; 3 units requires final project. CS 341 Advanced Topics in Data Management (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CS 245 Topics in Data Management will be analyzed and discussed. Students will engage in research and project presentations. Topics will vary by semester. CS 344 Advanced Topics in Computer Networks (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CS 244. Solid computer networks background, excellent skills in C/C++ and TCL, suing network simulators such as NS-2, working with Linux systems. Topics in Computer Networks will be analyzed and discussed. Topics will vary by semester. CS 346. Advanced Topics in Operating Systems (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Solid computer programming skills (at least at the level of CS 207) and solid background in at least one operating systems (CS 240) or computer architecture (at least at the level of CS 209 or CS 282), or permission of instructor. Topics in Operating Systems will be analyzed and discussed. Topics will vary by semester. CS 380 GPU and GPGPU Programming (3-0-3) Prerequisite: CS 280. Recommended optional prerequisites: CS 248, CS 292. Architecture and programming of GPUs (Graphics Processing Units). Covers both the traditional use of GPUs for graphics and visualization, as well as their use for general purpose computations (GPGPU). GPU many-core hardware architecture, shading and computer programming languages and APIs, programming vertex, geometry, and fragment shaders, programming with CUDA, Brook, OpenCL, stream computing, approaches to massively parallel computations, memory subsystems and caches, rasterization, texture mapping, linear algebra computations, alternative and future architectures. CS 361 Combinatorial Machine Learning (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CS 260. Lower and upper bounds on complexity and algorithms for construction (optimization) of decision trees, decision rules and tests. Decision tables with one-valued decisions and decision tables with many-valued decisions. Approximate decision trees, rules and tests. Global and local approaches to the study of problems over infinite sets of attributes. Applications to discrete optimization, fault diagnosis, pattern recognition, analysis of acyclic programs, data mining and knowledge discovery. Current results of research.

CS 297. Master Dissertation Research (variable credit) Master-level supervised research. CS 298. Master Graduate Seminar (variable credit) Master-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. CS 299. Master Directed Research (variable credit) Master-level supervised research. CS 397. Doctoral Dissertation Research (variable credit) Doctoral-level supervised research. CS 398. Doctoral Graduate Seminar (variable credit) Doctoral-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. CS 399. Doctoral Directed Research (variable credit) Doctoral-level supervised research.

9. EARTH SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PROGRAM


The Earth Science and Engineering (ErSE) Program focuses on applications of modern computational methods to study geophysical problems associated with the atmosphere and/or ocean circulation, earthquakes, oil exploration, reservoir modeling, and subsurface phenomena. Students in this program receive broad training in numerical methods, mathematical modeling, and geophysics, with an option for M.S. students to participate in scientific research activities that include computational, mathematical modeling, and field-study projects. Ph.D. candidates in the program conduct original research on a topic related to earth science and engineering. The program is divided into two tracks that focus on computational analysis of (1) fluid earth systems and (2) solid earth systems. ErSE students must specify one of the two tracks as their major. Students in the fluid earth systems track study flow and transport processes both beneath and above the earths surface, including subsurface, surface and atmospheric flows. Students in the solid earth systems track focus on seismology, geophysics, geodynamics and geomechanics.

Master of Science (M.S.) in Earth Science and Engineering


There are two M.S. degree programs in ErSE, one with a thesis and one without. The program without the thesis is expected to be completed in one year. The program with the thesis is expected to be completed in 1.5 years. The coursework requirements for the two M.S. programs are listed below. M.S. degree without thesis Three core courses (nine credits) successfully completed Three courses (nine credits) in the chosen track (fluid earth systems or solid earth systems) successfully completed Two elective courses (including at least one non-ErSE course; six credits) successfully completed Six additional credits (coursework or directed research) successfully completed

Total credits required: 30 Typically, a student will enroll in four courses (12 credits) in the Fall semester, four courses (12 credits) in the Spring semester, and six credits of directed research or coursework during the Summer session. M.S. degree with thesis The degree requirements for the M.S. with thesis are: Three core courses (nine credits) successfully completed Three courses (nine credits) in the chosen track (fluid earth systems or solid earth systems) successfully completed Two elective courses (including at least one non-ErSE course; six credits) successfully completed Twelve additional credits (including at least six M.S. thesis credits and a thesis presentation) Total credits required: 36

The M.S. thesis reports on research conducted under the supervision an ErSE faculty member. Typically, students in this program complete their coursework during the first two semesters of study, although additional courses may be taken during the second year. By the end of the first year of study, an M.S. with thesis student must select a faculty supervisor. During the third semester of the program, the student must form a committee that includes the faculty supervisor and two other faculty members, including one from outside of the ErSE program. This committee must read and approve the thesis.

Doctor of Philosophy in Earth Science and Engineering


Students studying for a Ph.D. must first satisfy the coursework requirements for the M.S. program. Some or all of the M.S. coursework requirements may be waived, at the discretion of the students advisor and with the approval of the dean, when a student is admitted to the program after obtaining a Masters degree from a university other than KAUST. The Ph.D. degree requires (in addition to the M.S. coursework requirements) a minimum of 12 credit hours of course work and 60 hours of dissertation research. In special cases, these minimum requirements may be reduced with the approval of the dean. Ph.D. students must enroll in a minimum of two courses at the 300 level or above as a part of their degree work. If a student admitted to the Ph.D. program does not have a research advisor, an interim advisor will be assigned. The student must identify a permanent research advisor by the end of the first year in the program. Typically, completing the Ph.D. program takes a minimum 2.5 years beyond the completion of the M.S. program requirements. In accordance with KAUST regulations, the Ph.D. program includes the following requirements:

Successfully completing Ph.D. coursework, designating a research advisor, and passing a subject-comprehensive examination. Obtaining candidacy status. Preparing a doctoral dissertation and successfully defending it. Subject-comprehensive Exam The subject-comprehensive exam tests the students knowledge of materials covered in the core and track courses. The exam includes both oral and written components. The student is provided a list of examination topics in advance. The possible outcomes of the exam are: pass, conditional pass, failure with retake, and failure. In the case of a retake, the student must retake and pass the exam within three months of the date of the first exam. The exam is administered by an examination committee (with a minimum three faculty members) that is selected by the advisor and the student. Students admitted with a Masters degree should complete the subject-comprehensive exam within one year from the start of the program; students admitted without a Masters degree should complete the subject-comprehensive exam within two years from the start of the program. Admission to Ph.D. Candidacy To be admitted to Ph.D. candidacy, the student must: Successfully complete all coursework requirements and pass the subjectcomprehensive exam. Identify an advisor and form a dissertation committee. Present a doctoral research proposal and obtain approval from the dissertation committee.

Dissertation Committee The dissertation committee is formed by the student under the guidance of the advisor. The committee is chaired by the advisor, and it must include at least three other faculty members, one of whom must be external to the program. The committee may additionally include one or more appropriate persons external to KAUST. The committee members must interact with the student to discuss the students progress. The student must submit an annual written progress report to the dissertation committee. All committee members must be designated as dissertation readers. Research Proposal Defense A Ph.D. student must submit a written research proposal to the dissertation committee two weeks prior to an oral defense of the proposal. The oral defense consists of an oral presentation by the student followed by a question and answer session. The oral defense must be attended by a minimum of three members of the dissertation committee. The committee will determine if the proposal qualifies as a dissertation topic in the area and if the candidate is capable of completing the research project as proposed. The committees decision can take the form of pass, conditional pass, fail with retake, or fail. In the case of fail with retake, the committee will provide feedback to

the student, who must prepare and pass a repeat examination within one semester. Each student is expected to defend the research proposal by the end of the second year from the start of the program. Dissertation Defense The student must schedule a dissertation defense after the doctoral research project and dissertation are completed. The dissertation defense will include a defense of the doctoral dissertation and a test of the candidates knowledge in the specialized field of research. The format of the dissertation defense will be a public seminar presented by the candidate, with an open question period, followed by a private examination by the dissertation committee. The possible outcomes of the exam are pass, conditional pass, or fail. After a successful defense, the final written dissertation approved by the committee must be submitted within two months and must be signed by the supervisor and all dissertation committee members. EARTH SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PROGRAM COURSE REQUIREMENTS Core Courses (choose at least 3, one AMCS course is mandatory): ErSE 203 ErSE 211 ErSE 213 ErSE 253 AMCS 206 or AMCS 231 or AMCS 306 Geophysical Continuum Mechanics Global Geophysics Inverse Problems and Data Assimilation Data Analysis in Geosciences Applied Numerical Methods Applied Partial Differential Equations I Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations

Fluid Earth Systems Courses (at least 3 from the list) ErSE 201 ErSE 202 ErSE 301 ErSE 303 ErSE 305 ErSE 306 ErSE 307 ErSE 308 ErSE 324 ErSE 395 ME 250 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics I Computational Groundwater Hydrology Geophysical Fluid Dynamics II Numerical Methods of Geophysics Multiphase Flows in Porous Media Ocean Physics and Modeling Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Atmospheric Physics and Modeling Parallel Scientific Computing in Earth Sciences Special Topics in Earth Science Introduction to Viscous Flow

Solid Earth Systems Courses (at least 3 from the list) ErSE 210 ErSE 212 ErSE 214 ErSE 215 ErSE 217 Seismology I Geophysical Geodesy and Geodynamics Seismic Exploration Geomechanics I Seismotectonics

ErSE 225 ErSE 260 ErSE 310 ErSE 315 ErSE 324 ErSE 325 ErSE 328 ErSE 329 ErSE 345 ErSE 395

Physical Fields Methods in Geophysics l Seismic Imaging Seismology II Geomechanics II Parallel Scientific Computing in Earth Sciences Physical Fields Methods in Geophysics ll Advanced Seismic Inversion I Advanced Seismic Inversion II Seismic Interferometry Special Topics in Earth Science

In addition to the above, a number of courses from other programs (MarSE, ME, EE, AMCS) may serve as appropriate electives for students in ErSE. Those courses could be taken upon approval by graduate advisor. EARTH SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ErSE 201. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics I (3-0-3) (Same as MarSE 212) Prerequisite: ME 250 and ErSE 203 or consent of instructor. Topics include governing equations of mass and momentum conservation; wave kinematics, dispersion, group velocity; surface and internal gravity waves, shallow water theory; stratified fluids and normal mode analysis; waves in rotating fluids: Kelvin, Poincare and Rossby waves; the Rossby adjustment problem and conservation of potential vorticity; the quasigeostrophic approximation. ErSE 202. Computational Groundwater Hydrology (3-0-3) (Same as EnSE 224) Prerequisite:Basic programming skill in MATLAB or consent of instructor. Co-requisites: ErSE 203. Derivation of mathematical models for porous media flow. Development and application of massconservative simulator models of single phase, miscible fluids in porous media. Solution of the pressure equation. Numerical methods for convection diffusion equations. ErSE 203. Geophysical Continuum Mechanics (3-0-3) Prerequisite: AMCS 231 or consent of Instructor. The course provides physical background foundation and overview of mathematical continuum models of geophysics. The goal of the course is to allow students to learn modeling ideas and utilize them in simulation. The course will include a basic introduction to finite difference and finite element methods and their application to continuum modeling and simulation. Topics discussed include: brief introduction to Cartesian tensors, their calculus and algebra; deformations and strain measures; balance laws and equations of motion; thermodynamical relations and constraints; mixture theory and phase change. ErSE 210. Seismology I (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ErSE 203 or consent of instructor. Introductory and advanced concepts of seismic wave propagation. Vectors and tensors, Hookes law, elastic coefficient tensors, Christoffel equation, group and phase velocities, and Green's theorem. The following concepts will also be covered: reflection and transmission coefficient formulas for a layered medium, attenuation, Snell's law, Hooke's law, Fermat's principles, Fresnel zone, finite-difference solutions to the wave equation and eikonal equation, transport equation, and traveltime tomography.

ErSE 211. Global Geophysics (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ErSE 203 or consent of instructor.The course provides introductory descriptions of the Earth solid and fluid natural systems and their interaction. It discusses Earth early geological history, plate motions, magnetism and sea floor spreading, earthquakes and earth structure, gravity, geochronology, heat flow, mantle convection and earths magnetic field; history of earth climate, formation of oceans and atmosphere, biological history, energy balance climate model, general circulation of ocean and atmosphere, climate change, coupled oceanatmosphere-biosphere climate models. ErSE 212. Geophysical Geodesy and Geodynamics (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ErSE 211 or consent of instructor. Satellite geodesy, gravimetry, GPS, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), radar altimetry. Plate tectonics and paleomagnetism, plate motions, plate-boundary deformation, seismic cycle, heat flow, basin subsidence, plateflexure, post-glacial rebound, geoid determination, gravity anomalies, sea-level measurements, tides, earth rotational variations, volcano geodesy. ErSE 213. Inverse Problems and Data Assimilation (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Background in linear algebra, multivariable calculus (gradients, hessians, ...), probability theory, and programming in Matlab. This course will introduce the principles of Inverse theory and data assimilation with applications to geophysics and other sciences. Both deterministic and stochastic viewpoints will be covered. Subjects studied will include topics such as least squares, generalized inverses, regularization, Kalman filter, adjoint method, etc. Techniques for solving nonlinear inverse and data assimilation problems will be also covered. ErSE 214. Seismic Exploration (2-1-3) An introductory course on Seismic exploration covering the basics of seismic waves, seismic data, seismic acquisition, data processing, filters, seismic velocities, and stacking. The course includes an introduction to seismic imaging. ErSE 215. Geomechanics I (3-0-3) Concepts of linear elastic fracture mechanics as applied to the classification, origin and evolution of all types of rock fractures; continuum theory in rock mechanics; rock strength and failure criteria; rock mechanics testing; stress tensors; elastic theory; poroelasticity and thermoelasticity; inelastic behaviour; stress regimes; geological applications. ErSE 217. Seismotectonics (3-0-3) Stress and strain, tensor analysis, rheology, brittle vs. ductile deformation, fracture, fault mechanics, friction, stable and unstable sliding, double-couple representation of earthquake sources, moment tensors, coulomb failure stress changes, earthquake triggering, stress drop, Kostrov's summation, comparative seismotectonics. ErSE 225. Physical Fields Methods in Geophysics l (2-1-3) Prerequisite: PDEs and course in basic EM physics. Measurement and theory of gravity and magnetic fields of the earth; small- to large-scale gravity and magnetic anomalies in exploration and global geophysics; reduction of gravity and magnetic data and forward modeling; applications to exploration, tectonics, and environmental problems. Thermal properties, temperatures, and heat transfer within the context of global geological and geophysical processes, such as plate tectonics and sedimentary basin evolution. ErSE 253. Data Analysis in Geosciences (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Background in linear algebra, probability theory, statistics, and programming in Matlab. Time Series (filtering, correlation, deconvolution, spectral analysis, regression), processing of

multidimensional data, spatial statistics including variogram, covariance analysis and modeling, multipoint estimation, spatial interpolation including statistical methods (kriging) and dynamical methods (Kalman filter), uncertainty assessment, cross validation, multivariate analysis including principal component analysis and canonical analysis. ErSE 260. Seismic Imaging (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ErSE 210 or ErSE 214 or consent of instructor. Seismic migration methods are developed. Green's theorem is used to derive Lippmann-Schwinger equation and the following migration methods: phase-shift migration, split-step and PSPI migrations, Fourier Finite Difference migration, phaseencoded multi-source migration, Kirchhoff migration, beam migration, diffraction stack migration, reverse time migration, and migration velocity analysis. ErSE 296. Special Seminar (1 credit) Master-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. ErSE 297. MS Thesis Research (variable credit) Prerequisite: Approval of Advisor. Master-level Thesis Research. ErSE 298. Graduate Seminar (1 credit) Master-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. ErSE 299. Directed Research (variable credit) Prerequisite: Approval of Advisor Master-level supervised research. ErSE 301. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ErSE 201 or consent of instructor. Climate and climate change, large-scale atmospheric and oceanic motions, fine-scale processes. Quasigeostrophic motion of a stratified fluid on a sphere, the equations of motions in spherical coordinates, scaling and asymptotic analysis, potential-vorticity equation. Rossby waves in a stratified fluid. Theory of instability, baroclinic instability, barotropic instability, instability of flows with horizontal and vertical shear. Energy and enstrophy. Numerical models of general circulation of atmosphere, pressure vertical coordinate, linear and nonlinear numerical instabilities. ErSE 303. Numerical Models of Geophysics (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ErSE 203 or consent of instructor. Built on the modeling and simulation foundation developed in ErSE203, this specialized course will discuss advanced ideas of multi-scale modeling, linear and non-linear finite element methods, investigate modern approaches to numerical simulations of hydrodynamic and geophysical turbulence, problems of theoretical glaciology and material science of ice for the prediction of ice sheet evolution, and wave propagation in linear and non-linear media. ErSE 305. Multiphase Flows in Porous Media (3-0-3) Prerequisite: AMCS 252 or consent of instructor. Thermodynamics of pressure, volume, temperature and composition relationships in water, oil or nonaqueous phase liquids and gas mixtures. Modeling compositional and thermal fluids, including streamline flow, fractional flow and both immiscible and miscible flow. ErSE 306. Ocean Physics and Modeling (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ErSE 201, ErSE 203, AMCS 252 or consent of instructor. This course will introduce the theory and numerical modeling of ocean circulation. This includes the theory of steady and time-dependent large-scale circulation, effects of earth's curvature, wind-driven Sverdrup circulation, western boundary currents, eastern boundary upwelling, effects of buoyancy forcing, wind- and buoyancy-forced circulation in the thermocline. The course will also review the theoretical models of ocean circulation, including shallow water, barotropic,

quasigeostrophic, and primitive equation models; adjustment times, internal length and time scales; the role of advection, bathymetry and coastlines; global models, basin models, regional models. ErSE 307. Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ErSE 203, AMCS 252 or consent of instructor. The course provides an introduction in atmospheric chemical processes and their role in climate system. It covers fundamentals of reactions kinetics, photochemical processes, chemistry of troposphere and stratosphere, tropospheric ozone and air-pollution, stratospheric ozone and ozone hole, atmospheric aerosols, chemistry of clouds, atmospheric transport, chemistry transport models, chemistry climate models. ErSE 308. Atmospheric Physics and Modeling (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ErSE 203, AMCS 252 or consent of instructor. The course discusses main physical processes in the Earth's atmosphere and their role in the formation of weather and climate including atmospheric dynamics and general circulation, sub-grid fine-scale processes and their parameterizations, atmospheric convection, cloud and precipitation formation, atmospheric turbulence and the planetary boundary layer, air-sea interaction, energy balance, radiative-convective equilibrium, general circulation models, coupled oceanatmosphere models. ErSE 310. Seismology II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ErSE 253 and any of ErSE 210, ErSE 211, ErSE 216. Part I: Whole Earth wave propagation (body waves, surface waves, normal modes); imaging Earth 3D structure with ray-based methods; introduction to methods beyond ray-theory; attenuation and scattering of seismic waves. Part II: Earthquake source mechanics; earthquake kinematics and scaling laws; earthquake dynamics, fracture modes and crack propagation; introduction to probabilistic seismic hazard assessment. ErSE 315. Geomechanics ll (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ErSE 215, ErSE 203 or consent of instructor. Application of Geomechanics I to reservoir characterization; borehole imaging and borehole stresses; borehole failure analysis; pore pressure prediction and effective stress concepts; sand production and sand failure modeling; effects of water on sand production; wellbore stability; drilling practice. ErSE 324. Parallel Scientific Computing in Earth Sciences (3-0-3) (Same as AMCS 292) Prerequisite: AMCS 252, ErSE 203 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the basics of modern parallel computing: parallel architectures, message passing, data and domain decomposition, parallel libraries, programming languages, data management and visualization and parallel numerical algorithms. Applications to scientific computing problems in earth sciences and engineering. ErSE 325. Physical Fields Methods in Geophysics ll (3-0-3) Prerequisite: PDEs and course in basic EM physics. General concepts of electromagnetic field behavior. Electromagnetic properties of rocks. Direct current methods, natural-field electromagnetic methods, magnetotelluric field, numerical modeling, magnetotelluric survey methods. Controlled source electromagnetic methods, electromagnetic sounding and profiling. Computer simulation and interpretation of electromagnetic geophysical data. ErSE 328. Advanced Seismic Inversion I (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Include courses in linear algebra and partial differential equations. Knowledge of linear inversion and exploration seismology is helpful. Consent of instructor is required. Overview of non-

linear seismic inversion methods that invert for earth parameters from seismic data. The inversion procedure is a multiscale iterative method (typically, non-linear conjugate gradient) that employs preconditioning and regularization. Solution sensitivity is analyzed by model covariance matrices, the slice-projection theorem, and the generalized Radon transform. Methods for waveform inversion, wave path traveltime tomography, and least squares migration are presented. ErSE 329. Advanced Seismic Inversion II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ErSE 328. Codes for waveform tomography, wavepath traveltime tomography, traveltime tomography, least squares migration, and skeletalized inversion are used to help student evaluate limits and benefits of these methods, and extend the frontier of seismic inversion. A term project is required that will be written as a paper, and possibly submitted to a relevant scientific journal. ErSE 345. Seismic Interferometry (3-0-3) Main objective is to present the key ideas of seismic interferometry and illustrate them with seismic examples from marine data, land data, and synthetic data. MATLAB exercises will be presented that educate the user about the benefits and pitfalls of interferometric imaging. Examples will be presented that use interferometry for 2D deconvolution, data extrapolation, data interpolation, super-stacking, passive seismology, surface-wave interferometry, and superillumination. ErSE 395. Special Topics in Earth Science (3-0-3) Computational Science and Engineering Programming experience and familiarity with basic discrete and numerical algorithms and experience with one or more computational applications. Case studies of representative and prototype applications in partial differential equations and meshbased methods, particle methods, ray-tracing methods, transactional methods. ErSE 396. Special Seminar (1 credit) Doctoral-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. ErSE 397. Ph.D. Dissertation Research (variable credit) Prerequisite: Approval of Advisor. ErSE 398. Graduate Seminar (1 credit) Doctoral-level ErSE program seminar. ErSE 399. Directed Research (variable credit) Prerequisite: Approval of Advisor. Doctoral-level supervised research.

10. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


The Electrical Engineering program has three major tracks, each consisting of six or more courses in each of two closely related areas. The three tracks together cover the most important areas in modern-day electrical engineering, and should equip a student for a successful and productive career in these fields. The three tracks are: Solid-State Electronics: o Circuits and Microsystems o Solid-State Devices Electromagnetics and Photonics o Electromagnetics o Photonics Communications and Signal Processing: o Communications o Signal Processing MASTER DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Non-Thesis Option: Credit Requirements: Total of 30 credits Minimum 24 credits of letter-graded course work Maximum 6 credits of Directed Research (EE 299) can be counted towards the degree

Minimum 15 credits of letter-graded course work in EE degree program Minimum 9 credits of letter-graded course work in a single EE track (see above) Minimum 3 credits of letter-graded course work in Applied Mathematics degree program GPA Requirement: Minimum average GPA must be 3.0 Seminar Requirement: The student must register for EE 298 (1 credit) in at least one semester of his/her residence Thesis Option Credit Requirements: Total of 30 credits Maximum 6 credits of Thesis Research (EE 297) can be counted towards the degree Minimum 21 credits of letter-graded course work Maximum 3 credits of Directed Research (EE 299) can be counted towards the degree Minimum 15 credits of letter-graded course work in EE degree program Minimum 9 credits of letter-graded course work in a single EE track (see above) Minimum 3 credits of letter-graded course work in Applied Mathematics degree program GPA Requirement: Minimum average GPA must be 3.0 Thesis Requirement: The student must complete a thesis and be advised by a KAUST faculty member. If the advisor is not from the EE degree program, the student must have a coadvisor within the EE degree program The thesis must be evaluated and approved by the advisor (and co-advisor if the advisor is not from the EE degree program) Seminar Requirement: The student must register for EE 298 (1 credit) at least in one semester of his/her residence PHD DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Credit Requirements: Minimum 6 credits of letter-graded course work in EE degree program (300 level or above) Minimum 60 credits of Thesis Research (EE 397) GPA Requirement: Minimum average GPA must be 3.0 Seminar Requirement: The student must register for EE 398 (1 credit) at least in one semester of his/her residence Exam Requirement: Subject-Comprehensive Exam Research Proposal Examination

Final Examination Subject-Comprehensive Exam The subject-comprehensive exam is offered the first week of the semester (Fall, spring and summer on demand). The examination is administrated (separately) by two faculty members from the course track the student is following (including the students research/thesis advisor) and one faculty member external to that track (including degree programs external to Electrical Engineering). Requirements: The student must have a research advisor Students entering with Bachelors degrees must pass the exam no later than the fourth semester in residence Students entering with Masters degrees must pass the exam no later than the second semester in residence The student must indicate in writing his/her intention to take the exam at least eight weeks prior to the exam (Form 1, available from the Electrical Engineering Department, should be used for this purpose). The student must submit the names of the examiners (Form 1 should be used for this purpose). The names of the examiners must be approved by the Graduate Degree Coordinator. The purpose of the examination is to evaluate the students understanding in fundamental topics of the course track he/she is following ability to analyze problems and construct solutions The evaluation is performed by the examiners by asking quantitative and qualitative questions related to the topics covered in the courses taken by the student in the form of a written and/or an oral exam. The recommended length of the examination is 30-45 minutes. Decision Process: Each examiner grades the student based on the above two criteria and reports it to the Graduate Program Coordinator. The Graduate Program Coordinator includes the reports in the students data sheet together with the students doctoral qualification coursework, GRE scores, and the overall academic record as measured by the students GPA. The Degree Coordinator calls for an Electrical Engineering faculty meeting. Results: One of the following three outcomes is possible Pass: The student is qualified for the doctoral program. Pass decision is achieved by the majority vote. Failure with retake permitted: The student is not qualified for the doctoral program but allowed to retake the examination one more time. Failure: The student is not qualified for the doctoral program and not allowed to retake the examination exam (See the second note below). The Graduate Degree and Program Coordinators are responsible for informing the students about the outcome of the faculty meeting. Notes: Under exceptional conditions if a student fails the exam twice, he might still be qualified for the doctoral program. But for this to be accepted:

o Research advisor of the student must provide solid evidence of the students progress in research (such as published/submitted papers). o Qualification decision should be accepted by all of the Electrical Engineering faculty members. Research Proposal Examination The research proposal examination is an oral exam administered by the students research proposal examination committee. Requirements: The student must have passed the subject-comprehensive exam. Students entering with Bachelors degrees must take the exam no later than the sixth semester in residence Students entering with Masters degrees must take the exam no later than the fourth semester in residence Student must contact each committee member and make arrangements for a suitable time and place for the exam. The student must submit the information regarding the time and place for the examination to the Graduate Program Coordinator at least six weeks prior to the date chosen for the exam. The student must submit the research proposal to the committee at least one week prior to the examination. The examination begins with the presentation by the student. Then the committee questions the student regarding the problem, the preliminary results, and the proposed work. The committee may suggest alternative methods of attacking the problem or suggest different aspects of the problem as suitable areas for exploration. The committee also may ask questions of a more general nature in order to test the adequacy of the student's preparation for the proposed research. Result: One of following four outcomes is possible: Pass: The student passed the exam and may proceed to independent study and research for the doctoral degree. Pass decision is achieved by the consensus of the committee with a maximum of one negative vote. Failure with retake permitted: If more than one member casts a negative vote, one retake of the examination is permitted if the entire committee agrees. The student must prepare a new research proposal and be examined again within the next six months. Failure: If more than one member casts a negative vote and retake of the examination is not permitted, the student is failed. Final Examination The final examination for the doctoral degree is an oral examination administered by the students final examination committee. Requirements: The student must have passed the research proposal examination The student must have completed sixty dissertation credits The final examination must take place at least one year (but no later than three years) after the research proposal examination. The student must contact each committee member and make arrangements for a suitable time and place for the examination. The student must submit the information

regarding time and place for the examination to the Graduate Program Coordinator at least eight weeks prior to the date chosen for the exam. The student must submit the thesis to the committee at least two weeks prior to the final exam. The examination begins with a presentation by the student outlining the problem chosen, the procedures and methods used, and the results obtained. The committee then questions the student regarding the thesis work. The student may be asked to clarify matters in the thesis and to defend various aspects of the work. Errors and ambiguities in the thesis may be brought to the students attention. Result: One of the following four outcomes is possible: Pass: The student passed the exam and the thesis is accepted as submitted. Pass decision is achieved by the consensus of the committee with a maximum of one negative vote. Pass with revisions: The student passed the exam but the thesis will be accepted after specified corrections and revisions are made. Pass with revisions decision is achieved by the consensus of the committee with a maximum of one negative vote. Failure with retake permitted: If more than one member casts a negative vote, one retake of the examination is permitted if the entire committee agrees. The student must revise the thesis and be examined again within the next six months. Failure: If more than one member casts a negative vote and retake of the examination is not permitted, the student is failed. Research Proposal and Final Examination Committees Before the research proposal examination, the student consults with the research advisor regarding the members of the research proposal and final examination committees. These committees must satisfy the following conditions: Both committees must include at least three KAUST faculty members, one of whom should be external to Electrical Engineering Program. In both committees, one of the members must have primary research interests in an area different from that of the student. The student must submit the names of the research proposal examination committee members to the Graduate Program Coordinator at least six weeks prior the research proposal examination (Form 3a should be used for this purpose). It is expected that all members of the research proposal examination committee will carry forward to the final examination committee. Additionally, the final examination committee should include a member external to KAUST. This member should hold a faculty (or equivalent) position at another institution. The student must submit the names of the final examination committee members to the Graduate Program Coordinator at least eight weeks prior the final examination (Form 3b should be used for this purpose). The names of the committee members must be approved by the Graduate Degree Coordinator and the division dean. Once constituted, the composition of the committees can only be changed upon approval by both the Graduate Degree Coordinator and the division dean.

In the final examination, a non-voting KAUST faculty member, appointed by the division dean, serves as a monitor to ensure that the established protocol is followed, and the required forms are completed. It is the students responsibility to contact each potential committee member and ask them to serve on the committees in a timely manner. Courses in Tracks Solid-State Electronics Circuits and Microsystems: EE 201, EE 202, EE 203, EE 204, EE 205, EE 223 EE 302, EE 303, EE 304, EE305 Solid-State Devices: EE 203, EE 204, EE 206, EE 208 EE 306, EE 308 Electromagnetics and Photonics Electromagnetics: EE 221, EE 222, EE 223 EE 321, EE 322 Photonics: EE 208, EE 231, EE 232, EE 233 EE 331, EE 332, EE 333, EE 334 Communications and Signal Processing Communications: EE 241, EE 242, EE 243, EE244 EE 341, EE 342, EE 343 Signal Processing: EE 241, EE 251, EE 252, EE 253 EE 351, EE 352, EE 353

Electrical Engineering Course Descriptions


EE 201. VLSI Design (3-0-3) Design techniques for rapid implementations of very large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits, MOS technology and logic. Structured design. Design rules, layout procedures. Design aids: layout, design rule checking, logic and circuit simulation. Timing. Testability. Architectures for VLSI. Projects to develop and lay out circuits. EE 202. Monolithic Amplifier Circuits (3-0-3) Analysis and design of BJT and MOS multi-transistor amplifiers. Feedback theory and application to feedback amplifiers. Stability considerations, pole-zero cancellation, root locus techniques in feedback amplifiers. Detailed analysis and design of BJT and MOS integrated operational amplifiers. Lectures and laboratory. EE 203. Solid-State Device Laboratory (1-2-3) Semiconductor material and device fabrication and evaluation: diodes, bipolar and field-effect transistors, passive components. Semiconductor processing techniques: oxidation, diffusion, deposition, etching, photolithography. Lecture and laboratory. Projects to design and simulate device fabrication sequence.

EE 204. Integrated Microsystems Laboratory (1-2-3) Development of a complete integrated microsystem, from functional definition to final test. MEMS based transducer design and electrical, mechanical and thermal limits. Design of MOS interface circuits. MEMS and MOS chip fabrication. Mask making, pattern transfer, oxidation, ion implantation and metallization. Packaging and testing challenges. Students work in interdisciplinary teams. EE 205. Introduction to MEMS(1-2-3) (Same as ME 323) Micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS), devices and technologies. Micro-machining and microfabrication techniques, including planar thin-film processing, silicon etching, wafer bonding, photolithography, deposition and etching. Transduction mechanisms and modeling in different energy domains. Analysis of micromachined capacitive, piezoresistive and thermal sensors/actuators and applications. Computer-aided design for MEMS layout, fabrication and analysis. EE 206. Physical Principles Underlying Smart Devices (3-0-3) Structural properties of materials. Basic quantum mechanics of electrons in solids. Band theory and trap states. Charge transport, band conduction and hopping conduction. Optical properties of materials. Piezoelectric and ferro-electric phenomena. Magnetic effects in materials. Physical phenomena will be related transistors, light emitters, sensor and memory devices. EE 208. Semiconductor Optoelectronic Devices (3-0-3) Materials for optoelectronics, optical processes in semiconductors, absorption and radiation, transition rates and carrier lifetime. Principles of LEDs, lasers, photodetectors, modulators and solar cells. Optoelectronic integrated circuits. Designs, demonstrations and projects related to optoelectronic device phenomena. EE 221. Electromagnetic Theory (3-0-3) Review of vector algebra and calculus, coordinate transformations. Fundamental electromagnetic concepts: Maxwells equations, Lorentz force relation, electric and magnetic polarizations, constitutive relations, boundary conditions, Poynting theorem in real and complex forms, energy relations. Solution of the Helmholtz equation: plane, cylindrical, and spherical waves, potentials. Electromagnetic theorems: uniqueness, duality, reciprocity, equivalence and induction theorems, Huygens and Babinets principles. Guided fields: waveguides, dispersion, phase and group velocities, attenuation, inhomogeneous waveguides, resonant cavities. Antennas: elementary antennas, radiation patterns. EE 222. Antenna Theory and Design (3-0-3) Fundamental antenna system parameters: gain, directivity, efficiency, input impedance. Theory of transmitting and receiving antennas: reciprocity, equivalence, and induction theorems, Huygens principle. Elementary antennas: dipoles, loops, traveling-wave antennas. Antenna arrays: analysis and synthesis of linear arrays, mutual impedance, phased arrays. Aperture antennas: Fourier transform, Babinets principle. Antenna noise temperature. Special topics: log-periodic antennas, microstrip antennas, corrugated waveguides and horns, reflector and lens antennas. EE 223. Microwave Circuits (3-0-3) Fundamental microwave concepts: Transmissionline theory, guided wave propagation, S-parameters, ABCD matrix, signal-flow graphs, impedance and admittance transformation, matching networks, Smith chart. Microwave components: microstrip and coplanar lines, directional couplers, power dividers, lowpass and band-pass filters, diode detectors, microwave integrated circuits.

EE 231. Principles of Optics (3-0-3) (Same as MSE 231) Basic principles of optics: light sources and propagation of light; geometrical optics, lenses and imaging; ray tracing and lens aberrations; interference of light waves, coherent and incoherent light beams; Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction. Overview of modern optics with laboratory demonstrations. EE 232. Applied Quantum Mechanics (3-0-3) (Same as MSE 232) Introduction to nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. Summary of classical mechanics, postulates of quantum mechanics and operator formalism, stationary state problems (including quantum wells, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum theory and spin, atoms and molecules, band theory in solids), time evolution, approximation methods for time independent and time-dependent interactions including electromagnetic interactions, scattering. EE 233. Photonics (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EE 231. Introduction to photonics, lasers and fiber optics. Topics include mirrors, interferometers, modulators and propagation in waveguides and fibers; photons in semiconductors, including semiconductor laser, detectors and noise effects, with applications to fiber lightwave systems, high-power lasers and display technologies. EE 241. Probability and Random Processes (3-0-3) (Same as AMCS 241 and CS241) Introduction to probability and random processes. Topics include probability axioms, sigma algebras, random vectors, expectation, probability distributions and densities, Poisson and Wiener processes, stationary processes, autocorrelation, spectral density, effects of filtering, linear least-squares estimation and convergence of random sequences. EE 242. Digital Communication and Coding (3-0-3) Digital transmission of information across discrete and analog channels. Sampling; quantization; noiseless source codes for data compression: Huffmans algorithm and entropy; block and convolutional channel codes for error correction; channel capacity; digital modulation methods: PSK, MSK, FSK, QAM; matched filter receivers. Performance analysis:power, bandwidth, data rate and error probability. EE 243. Communication Networks (3-0-3) Prerequisite: preceded or accompanied by EE 241. System architectures. Data link control: error correction, protocol analysis, framing. Message delay: Markov processes, queuing, delays in statistical multiplexing, multiple users with reservations, limited service, priorities. Network delay: Kleinrock independence, reversibility, traffic flows, throughput analysis, Jackson networks, Multiple access networks: ALOHA and splitting protocols, carrier sensing, multi-access reservations. EE 244. Wireless Communications (3-0-3) Prerequisite: preceded or accompanied by EE 241, EE 242. This course introduces fundamental technologies for wireless communications. It addresses the following topics: review of modulation techniques, wireless channel modeling, multiple access schemes, cellular communications, diversity techniques, equalization, channel coding, selected advanced topics such as CDMA, OFDM, Multiuser detection, space time coding, smart antenna, software radio. EE 251. Digital Signal Processing and Analysis (3-0-3) Introduction to digital signal processing of continuous and discrete signals. The family of Fourier transforms including the discrete Fourier transform (DFT). Development of the fast Fourier

transform (FFT). Signal sampling and reconstruction. Design and analysis of digital filters. Correlation and spectral estimation. EE 252. Estimation, Filtering and Detection (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EE 241. Principles of estimation, linear filtering and detection. Estimation: linear and nonlinear minimum mean squared error estimation and other strategies. Linear filtering: Wiener and Kalman filtering. Detection: simple, composite, binary and multiple hypotheses.Neyman-Pearson and Bayesian approaches. EE 253. Wavelets and Time-Frequency Distribution (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EE 251. Review of DTFT and digital filtering. Multirate filtering. Filter banks and subband decomposition of signals. Multiresolution subspaces. Wavelet scaling and basis functions and their design: Haar, Littlewood-Paley, Daubechies, Battle-Lemarie. Denoising and compression applications. Spectrogram, Wigner-Ville, Cohens class of time-frequency distributions and their applications. EE 297. Thesis Research (variable credit) Master-level supervised thesis research. EE 298. Graduate Seminar (1 credit) Master-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. EE 299. Directed Research (variable credit) Master-level supervised research. EE 302. Integrated Analog/Digital Interface Circuits (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EE 202. This course covers most of the well-known analog-to-digital conversion schemes.These include the flash, folding, multi-step and pipeline Nyquist rate, architectures. Oversampling converters are also discussed. Practical design work is a significant part of this course. Students design and model complete converters. EE 303. Integrated Circuits (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EE 202. Integrated circuit fabrication overview, relationships between processing choices and device performance characteristics. Long-channel device I-V review, short-channel MOSFET I-V characteristics including velocity saturation, mobility degradation, hot carriers, gate depletion. MOS device scaling strategies, silicon-on-insulator, lightly doped drain structures, on-chip interconnect parasitics and performance. Major CMOS scaling challenges. Process and circuit simulation. EE 305. Advanced MEMS Devices and Technologies (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EE 205. Advanced micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) devices and technologies. Transduction techniques, including piezoelectric, electrothermal and resonant techniques. Chemical, gas and biological sensors; microfluidic and biomedical devices. Micromachining technologies such as laser machining and microdrilling, EDM, materials such as SiC and diamond. Sensor and actuator analysis and design through CAD. EE 304. Integrated Microsystems (3-0-3) Prerequisites: EE 204, EE 205. Review of interface electronics for sense and drive and their influence on device performance, interface standards, MEMS and circuit noise sources, packaging and assembly techniques, testing and calibration approaches and communication in integrated microsystems.Applications, including RF MEMS, optical MEMS, bioMEMS and microfluidics. Design project using CAD and report preparation. EE 306. Electronic and Optical Properties of Semiconductors (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EE 206. The course discusses in detail the theory behind important semiconductorbased experiments such as Hall effect and Hall mobility measurement, velocity-field measurement, photoluminescence, gain, pump-probe studies, pressure and straindependent studies. Theory will cover: Band structure in quantum wells; effect

of strainon band structure; transport theory; Monte Carlo methods for high field transport;excitons, optical absorption, luminescence and gain. EE 307. High-Speed Transistors (3-0-3) Detailed theory of high-speed digital and high-frequency analog transistors. Carrier injection and control mechanisms. Limits to miniaturization of conventional transistor concepts. Novel submicron transistors including MESFET, heterojunction and quasi-ballistic transistor concepts. EE 308. Semiconductor Lasers and LEDs (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EE 208. Optical processes in semiconductors, spontaneous emission, absorption gain, stimulated emission. Principles of light-emitting diodes, including transient effects, spectral and spatial radiation fields. Principles of semiconducting lasers, gain-current relationships, radiation fields, optical confinement and transient effects. EE 321. Numerical Methods in Electromagnetics (3-0-3) Review of vector algebra, calculus, and electromagnetic theory. Introduction to computational electromagnetics. Finite difference time domain method (FDTD): fundamentals, absorbing boundary conditions, perfectly matched layers. Integral equations: fundamentals, method of moments (MOM), Galerkins technique, conjugate gradient FFT. Finite element method (FEM): fundamentals, vector and higher-order elements. Hybridization of FEM and boundary integral methods. Application of the above methods to the solution of practical problems in electromagnetics involving wave propagation on transmission lines, interference of antennas, scattering, and characterization of cavity resonances. EE 322. Active Remote Sensing (3-0-3) Prerequisites: EE 221, EE 222. Radar equation, noise statistics, resolution techniques, calibration. Space and ground propagation, synthetic aperture radar, scatterometers, scattering models, surface and volume scattering. Land and oceanographic applications. EE 323. Microwave Measurements Laboratory (1-2-3) Prerequisites: EE 221, EE 223. Advanced topics in microwave measurements: power spectrum and noise measurement, introduction to state-of-the-art microwave test equipment, methods for measuring the dielectric constant of materials, polarimetric radar cross section measurements, near-field antenna pattern measurements, electromagnetic emission measurement (EM compatibility). Followed by a project that will include design, analysis, and construction of a microwave subsystem. EE 331. Classical Optics (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EE 231. Theory of electromagnetic, physical and geometrical optics. Classical theory of dispersion. Linear response, Kramers-Kronig relations and pulse propagation. Light scattering. Geometrical optics and propagation in inhomogeneous media. Dielectric waveguides. Interferometry and theory of coherence. Diffraction, Fresnel and Fraunhofer. Gaussian beams and the ABCD law. EE 332. Lasers (3-0-3) Prerequisites: EE 331, EE 333. Complete study of laser operation: the atom-field interaction; homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening mechanisms; atomic rate equations; gain and saturation; laser oscillation; laser resonators, modes and cavity equations; cavity modes; laser dynamics, Q-switching and mode-locking. Special topics such as femto-seconds lasers and ultra-high-power lasers. EE 333. Optical Waves in Crystals (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EE 233. Propagation of laser beams: Gaussian wave optics and the ABCD law. Manipulation of light by electrical, acoustical waves; crystal properties and the dielectric tensor; electrooptic, acoustooptic

effects and devices. Introduction to nonlinear optics; harmonic generation, optical rectification, four-wave mixing, self-focusing and self-phase modulation. EE 334. Nonlinear Optics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: EE 331, EE 333. Formalism of wave propagation in nonlinear media, susceptibility tensor, second harmonic generation and three-wave mixing, phase matching, third-order nonlinearities and fourwave mixing processes, stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering. Special topics: nonlinear optics in fibers, including solitons and self-phase modulation. EE 341. Information Theory (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EE 241. The concepts of source, channel, rate of transmission of information. Entropy and mutual information. The noiseless coding theorem. Noisy channels, the coding theorem for finite state zero memory channels. Channel capacity. Error bounds. Parity check codes. Source encoding. EE 342. Channel Coding Theory (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EE 241. The theory of channel coding for reliable communication and computer memories. Error correcting codes; linear, cyclic and convolutional codes; encoding and decoding algorithms; performance evaluation of codes on a variety of channels. EE 343. Digital Communication Theory (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EE 241, EE 242. Theory of digital modulation and coding. Optimum receivers in Gaussian noise. Signal space and decision theory. Signal design. Bandwidth and dimensionality. Fundamental limits in coding and modulation. Capacity and cutoff rate. Block, convolutional and trellis coding. Continuous phase modulation. Filtered channels and intersymbol interference. Equalization. Spread-spectrum. Fading channels. Current topics. EE 351. Advanced Signal Processing (3-0-3) Prerequisites: EE 241, EE 251. Estimators of second-order properties of random processes: nonparametric and modelbased techniques of spectral estimation, characterization of output statistics for nonlinear systems, time-frequency representations. Performance evaluation using asymptotic techniques and Monte Carlo simulation. Applications include speech processing, signal extrapolation, multidimensional spectral estimation and beam forming. EE 352. Image Processing (3-0-3) Prerequisites: EE 241, EE 251. Theory and application of digital image processing. Random field models of images. Sampling, quantization, image compression, enhancement, restoration, segmentation, shape description, reconstruction of pictures from their projections, pattern recognition. Applications include biomedical images, time-varying imagery, robotics and optics. EE 353. Adaptive Signal Processing (3-0-3) Prerequisites: EE 241, EE 251. Theory and applications of adaptive filtering in systems and signal processing. Iterative methods of optimization and their convergence properties: transversal filters; LMS (gradient) algorithms. Adaptive Kalman filtering and least-squares algorithms. Specialized structures for implementation (e.g., least-squares lattice filters, systolic arrays). Applications to detection, noise canceling, speech processing and beam forming. EE 391. Advanced Topics in Circuits and Microsystems (3-0-3) Doctoral-level lectures focusing on state of the art within the field. EE 392. Advanced Topics in Solid State Devices (3-0-3) Doctoral-level lectures focusing on state of the art within the field.

EE 393. Advanced Topics in Electromagnetics (3-0-3) Doctoral-level lectures focusing on state of the art within the field. EE 394. Advanced Topics in Photonics (3-0-3) Doctoral-level lectures focusing on state of the art within the field. EE 395. Advanced Topics in Communications (3-0-3) Doctoral-level lectures focusing on state of the art within the field. EE 396. Advanced Topics in Signal Processing (3-0-3) Doctoral-level lectures focusing on state of the art within the field. EE 397. Thesis Research (variable credit) Doctoral-level supervised thesis research. EE 398. Graduate Seminar (1 credit) Doctoral-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. EE 399. Directed Research (variable credit) Doctoral-level supervised research.

11. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PROGRAM


MS Degree Program Students entering the Environmental Science and Engineering (EnSE) MS program take a set of core courses and then take specialty courses from one of four major tracks. The remaining courses are technical electives, including a math or statistics course, and possibly directed research or a thesis. At least one cognate course from another degree program is required. The four tracks together cover the most important areas in modern-day Environmental Science and Engineering, and the core plus specialty courses and electives will equip a student for a successful and productive career in the EnSE field. The four EnSE tracks are: Water Quality, Chemistry, and Treatment Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology Air Quality and Pollution Control (not offered during academic year 2010-2011) Gradation with a MS degree in Environmental Science and Engineering (EnSE) requires completion of a minimum of 30 units with a cumulative GPA of 3.0. A student must first take (in the first semester) a series of three of four designated EnSE core courses (9 units); unless a grade of B- is achieved, the course must be repeated. In addition, a specific track must be identified with an additional three courses (9 units) required, of which at least one course must be at the 300-level and no more than one course may be outside of EnSE. One course (3 units) is required in the general areas of mathematics or statistics. The remaining course requirements are technical electives, directed research, and/or thesis. At least 24 units of formal coursework, exclusive of directed research or thesis, are required. The courses in the core are as follows: Core Courses EnSE 201, (Air) and Water Quality EnSE 202, Environmental Chemistry EnSE 203, Environmental Microbiology EnSE 204, Environmental Transport Processes (cross-listed with CBE 202) The courses in each track are as follows: Water Quality, Chemistry, and Treatment Track EnSE 213, Environmental Organic Chemistry EnSE 221, Environmental Fluid Mechanics EnSE 312, Advanced Aquatic and Soil Chemistry EnSE 342, Physical/Chemical Treatment Processes EnSE 350, Hazardous Waste Management

CBE 236, Membrane Science and Membrane Separation Processes ChemS 240, Organic Principles ChemS 260, Chemical Kinetics ErSE 220, Geochemistry Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology Track EnSE 311, Molecular Biology and Microbial Ecology EnSE 341, Processes in Environmental Biotechnology EnSE 350, Hazardous Waste Management CBE 238, Biofuels B204, Genomics B208, Biochemistry Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology Track EnSE 221, Environmental Fluid Mechanics EnSE 222, Surface Hydrology EnSE 223, Groundwater Hydrology (cross-listed with ErSE 202) EnSE 304, Water Resources Engineering EnSE 321 Numerical Modeling of Environmental Flows ErSE 301, Multiphase Flows in Porous Media MarSE 311, Coastal and Estuarine Oceanography MarSE 314, Advanced Environmental Data Analysis Air Quality and Pollution Control Track Not Active During Academic Year 2010-2011 Beyond the core courses (9 units) and track courses (9 units), the remaining 12 units correspond to technical electives (from the entire pool of track courses), a mathematics or statistics course, directed research (EnSE 299), and/or thesis (EnSE 297). The required course in mathematics or statistics can be satisfied from among the following: AMCS 206, Applied Numerical Methods AMSC 210, Applied Probability and Biostatistics CBE 204, Engineering Mathematics and Numerical Methods CBE 223, Introduction to Statistics and Biostatics The cognate course is in addition to the mathematics or statistics course, and can be satisfied by any track or technical elective course. No credit is offered for graduate seminar (EnSE 298) but attendance is required during each semester of enrollment. There are two general MS degree options: (i) coursework only or (ii) thesis option. The former is set up for completion in 12 months with full-time course loads (12 units or, with advisor approval, 15 units) in the Fall and Spring semesters plus up to 6 units in the summer. Both options require 24 units of formal coursework (exclusive of directed research or thesis). Coursework-only students may take up to 6 units of directed research or focus exclusively on formal coursework.

Thesis-option students typically spend their summer and a second Fall semester on an experimental and/or computational research topic. A formal written thesis and oral defense is required with a committee comprised of a faculty supervisor plus two other KAUST faculty members. A total of 12 units of thesis credit must be earned, with the grade assigned being satisfactory/unsatisfactory. In most cases, the research period is an intense final 6-month (late summer/fall semester, e.g., July December) without coursework, although the research can potentially be spread over a longer period including the second semester. PhD Degree Program There are three possible entry points into the EnSE PhD degree program: (i) students possessing a MS degree in EnSE or a related engineering (e.g., chemical engineering) or science (e.g., chemistry) field (the normal entry point); (ii) KAUST students pursuing a seamless EnSE MS/PhD; (iii) and students possessing a BSc degree (a more rare entry point). The seamless MS/PhD option is intended for MS students who decide, after their arrival at KAUST, to pursue a PhD; this option simply allows a student to begin to satisfy PhD requirements (e.g., coursework) while completing their MS requirements. The only difference between the seamless MS option and the BSc entry is that the latter does not acquire a MS degree on the way to a PhD degree. PhD students apply for and enter the EnSE degree program. An EnSE faculty advisor is either immediately designated (in the case of a student being recruited by a specific faculty member) or temporarily assigned (in the case of KAUST fellowship students); in the latter case, the student is expected to identify a research advisor by (at the latest) the end of the first year. There are two phases and associated milestones for PhD students: (i) a qualification phase with a candidacy milestone and (ii) a dissertation phase with a final defense milestone. Qualification and advancement to candidacy are contingent upon: (i) successfully passing PhD coursework, (ii) designating a research advisor, and (iii) preparing a written research proposal and orally defending it. The maximum time for advancement to candidacy for a student entering with an MS degree is two years, three years for the BSc-degree entry option. A minimum of 6 units of actual PhD coursework (300 level) is required beyond the MS degree. For students who enter with a BSc degree, 24 additional units are required, equivalent to MS degree coursework excluding a thesis. In the case of the MS degree being from another major/degree program, there may be additional deficiency courses specified by the advisor. Courses designated should be relevant to the dissertation topic, if defined, and/or proposed general area of research. A minimum GPA of 3.0 must be achieved on all doctoral coursework. Besides actual coursework (6 or more units), 60 units of dissertation research (EnSE 397) credit must be earned during the first and second phases. A full-time workload for PhD students is considered to be 12 units per semester (courses and EnSE 397) and 6

units in summer (EnSE 397). There is a minimum residency requirement (enrollment period at KAUST) of 2.5 years for students entering with a MS degree, 3.5 years for a BSc degree. The maximum enrollment period is 5.0 years, extendable upon approval of both the faculty research advisor and division dean. Achieving candidacy is contingent upon successfully passing both parts of a two-part qualification examination consisting of acceptance by the research advisor of a written research proposal and successfully passing an oral examination thereof. The proposal examination committee shall consist of a minimum of three KAUST faculty members, one of whom must be external to the EnSE degree program. There are four possible outcomes: pass, conditional pass, failure with retake permitted, and failure. Passing the qualification phase is achieved by acceptance of all committee members of the written proposal and a positive vote of all but, at most, one member of the oral exam. If more than one member casts a negative vote, one retake of the oral defense is permitted if the entire committee agrees. A conditional pass involves conditions (e.g., another course in a perceived area of weakness) imposed by the committee, with the conditional status removed when the conditions have been met. Once constituted, the composition of the qualification phase committee can only be changed upon approval by both the faculty research advisor and the division dean. The final (dissertation) phase involves acceptance of the written dissertation and an oral defense thereof. The final examination committee shall consist of a minimum of four members, one of whom should be a KAUST faculty member external to the EnSE degree program and one of whom should be external to KAUST (holding a faculty position or equivalent position at another institution, with approval by both the faculty research advisor and division dean). Passing the dissertation phase is achieved by acceptance of all committee members of the written dissertation, with a minimum of a positive vote of all but, at most, one member of the oral defense. If more than one member casts a negative vote, one retake of the oral defense is permitted if the entire committee agrees. A fifth non-voting KAUST faculty member, appointed by the division dean, shall serve as a faculty monitor to ensure that the established protocol is followed, and the required forms are completed. Students transferring from other PhD programs may receive some dissertation research and coursework credit, on a case by case basis, for related work performed at their original institution. However, such students must still satisfy the written and oral requirements for a research proposal (if this phase was passed at the original institute, the proposal may be the same, if approved by the research advisor). The minimum residency requirement for enrollment of such students at KAUST is 2.0 years.

Environmental Science and Engineering Course Descriptions


EnSE 201. Air and Water Quality (3-0-3) Introduction to outdoor and indoor air quality, measurement systems, fate of contaminants, air pollution control systems, gas and particle transport on multiple scales. Introduction to water quality, effluent, chemical elements, salinity. Physical, chemical and biological treatment processes for drinking,

industrial and waste water. EnSE 202. Environmental Chemistry (2-1-3) Chemistry of processes and behavior in air and aquatic systems. Acid-base and redox chemistry, carbonate system, precipitation. Chemical thermodynamics including quantitative assessment of chemical composition and fate of contaminants using equilibrium calculations. EnSE 203. Environmental Microbiology (2-1-3) Fundamentals of microbiology for the environment, physiology, microbial metabolism, basics of genetics, microbial growth processes, introduction to molecular biology. Illustrations from microbiology and pollutants, microbiology and disease, microbiology of bioremediation, wastewater treatment, microbial fuel cells. EnSE 204. Environmental Transport Processes (3-0-3) Movement and fate of chemicals and contaminants in air, water and soil. Mass balance and transfer, hydrodynamic transport, environmental sources and sinks. EnSE 205. Principles of Environmental Sustainability (3-0-3) Fundamental aspects of sustainability, energy cycles and accounting. Carbon cycle, emissions and sequestration. Concepts of green design. Life-cycle analysis. EnSE 211. Atmospheric Chemistry (3-0-3) Chemistry of atmospheric constituents, photochemistry and oxidation, chemistry of airborne pollutants. EnSE 213. Environmental Organic Chemistry (3-0-3) Behavior and fate of organic compounds in the environment. Chemical properties, mechanisms, kinetics and reaction products in air, water and soils; photochemical and biochemical transformation reactions. EnSE 221. Environmental Fluid Mechanics (3-0-3) Principles of fluid flow in natural systems including the atmosphere, rivers, lakes and oceans, and engineered systems such as in wastewater treatment. Roles of density variation and stratification, diffusion and turbulence. EnSE 222. Surface Hydrology (3-0-3) Fundamentals of surface hydrology, the hydrologic cycle, hydrologic processes. EnSE 223. Groundwater Hydrology (3-0-3) Groundwater hydrology, subsurface flow, geological considerations, aquifers and wells. EnSE 225 Water Desalination (3-0-3) Theoretical and practical aspects of seawater/brackish water desalination technologies, including thermal-based (MSF, MED, VC) and membrane-based (RO, NF, ED/EDR) desalination processes; process design and system performance; fouling, scaling (including bio-fouling) and cleaning; product water quality and post-treatment. EnSE 297. MS Thesis (6 units total) Master-level research leading to a formal written thesis and oral defense thereof. EnSE 298. Graduate Seminar (variable credit) Master-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. EnsE 299. Directed Research (variable credit) Master-level supervised research. EnSE 302. Atmospheric Transport (3-0-3) Prerequisites: EnSE 201, EnSE 204. Contaminant transport in the atmosphere, mathematical models of pollutant dispersal, plumes, meteorology and climate change. EnSE 303. Climate Change (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EnSE 204. Fundamentals of global climate change, inputs and assumptions in climate change models, modeling and simulation of the carbon cycle and CO2 sequestration.

EnSE 304. Water Resource Engineering (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EnSE 201. Planning and management of water resources. Water supply, flood control, irrigation, mathematical modeling and optimization techniques. EnSE 305. Air Quality Control Processes (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EnSE 201. Indoor and outdoor air quality control processes. Theory and practice of air pollution control. Sources, transport, fate, impacts, characteristics and control of air contaminants; design of control technologies for particulate, gaseous and VOC emissions. EnSE 311. Molecular Biology and Microbial Ecology (2-1-3) Prerequisites: EnSE 202, EnSE 203. Principles of molecular biology in environmental science and engineering. Research methods, engineering tools. Principles of microbiological systems, genomics, microbial evolution, microbial diversity, the biogeochemical cycle. EnSE 312. Advanced Aquatic and Soil Chemistry (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EnSE 202. Biogeochemistry, colloids, soil and gas or liquid interfaces, oxidationreductionreactions and adsorption processes. Chemistry and properties of soil and soil processes. EnSE 321. Numerical Modeling of Environmental Flows (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EnSE 204. Advanced numerical methods for environmental transport processes, multi-scale and multi-physics issues. EnSE 331. Advanced Topics in Sustainability (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EnSE 205. Topic 1: Assessment of Energy and Resource Needs. Topic 2: Materials, Environment and Sustainability. Topic 3: Sustainable Engineering Systems. EnSE 341. Processes in Environmental Biotechnology (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EnSE 311. Principles of molecular biology and microbiology applied to the design and operation of engineered environmental systems: treatment of wastewater, bioremediation, energy conversion. EnSE 342. Physical/Chemical Treatment Processes (3-0-3) Prerequisite: EnSE 201. Water-treatment processes, membranes, advanced oxidation, principles and techniques of water desalination. EnSE 343. Wasteland Reclamation and Reuse (3-0-3) This course will introduce the design, implementation, and operation of water reuse applications. Topics that will be covered include: introduction to wastewater reclamation and reuse; reuse regulations and guidelines; public health protection and risk assessment; water reclamation technologies, disinfection for reuse applications, non-potable reuse applications; potable reuse via ground water recharge and surface water augmentation; direct potable reuse; managed aquifer recharge; hybrid systems to manage risks from pathogens and chemicals; public participation and public acceptance; and economic and financial analysis. EnSE 350. Hazardous Waste Management (3-0-3) Prerequisites: EnSE 201, EnSE 204. Legal and technological approaches to control and management of hazardous wastes and contaminated sites to protect human health and the environment: fate and transport of contaminants; physical, chemical and biological treatment; environmental monitoring systems; medical waste and treatment options; toxicology; storage tanks; landfills. EnSE 397. PhD Dissertation (increments of 3 units) PhD-level research leading to a formal written dissertation and oral defense thereof. EnSE 398. Graduate Seminar (variable credit) Doctoral-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. EnsE 399. Directed Research (variable credit) Doctoral-level supervised research.

12. MARINE SCIENCE PROGRAM


MS Degree Program The curriculum provides a strong introduction with courses on the fundamental of marine science and oceanography. The program comprises two tracks - Marine Biology & Conservation and Ocean Physics & Modeling. Each track consists of lectures, seminars, laboratory classes and fieldwork. Each track includes introductory courses as well as courses with increasing level of specialization. For students to graduate with an MS degree in Marine Science, they are required to complete 30 credit hours (with the average course worth three credit hours) of coursework and maintain an average GPA of 3.0 (B grade). MarSE students must take two of the core courses in their first semester. If a grade of B- or less is achieved in a core course, the course must be repeated. One course (3 credit hours) is required in the general areas of mathematics or statistics. One cognate course is required in addition to the mathematics or statistics course, and can be satisfied by any course outside of Marine Science. The remaining course requirements are technical electives, directed research, and/or thesis. At least 24 units of formal coursework, exclusive of directed research or thesis, are required.

A multi-disciplinary Marine Science Seminar Series will run continuously, featuring seminars offered by MarSE faculty, staff, students, and visitors. Credit is not awarded, but satisfactory participation is mandatory to complete the MarSE degree. Participation in KAUSTs Winter Enrichment Period (WEP) is mandatory. WEP courses do not earn credit towards the degree. Marine Biology and Conservation Track (MS) Core Courses: Students are required to the take the three core courses below. If students can provide evidence that a subject has been studied and assessed at the graduate level, they are invited to apply for and may be awarded academic credit for a course. MarSE 221 Marine Life MarSE 228 Structure and Function of Marine Ecosystems MarSE 235 Introduction to Physical Oceanography Three additional MarSE courses from: MarSE 213 Environmental Chemistry MarSE 218 Environmental Microbiology MarSE 229 Marine Microbial Ecology MarSE 203 Environmental Microbiology MarSE 226 Coral Reef Ecology MarSE 230 Ecological Genomics Other MarSE courses (TBA, e.g., see MarSE 243 below) Math requirement: Students must take one of the following Math courses: AMCS 210 Introduction to Statistics and Biostatistics AMCS 206 Applied Numerical Methods AMCS 231 Applied Partial Differential Equations Suggested electives: At least one non-MarSE course must be taken in addition to the Math requirement. Suggested electives are listed below, but students may choose another elective with approval of their advisor. B 201 Biophysics B 202 Plant Biology B 204 Genomics B 205 Protein Structure and Function B 206 Synthetic Biology and Biotechnology B 207 Physiology and Metabolic Engineering B 208 Biochemistry B 209 Molecular Genetics B 224 Fundamental of Cell Biology ENSE 201 Air & Water Quality ENSE 203 Environmental Biochemistry

ENSE 213 Environmental Organic Chemistry Thesis requirement: All students in the Marine Life and Conservation Track are required to complete a thesis based on original research under the direction of a MarSE faculty member. This requires registration in the following two courses to complete the degree: MarSE 297 Thesis (3 credits minimum, a maximum of 12) MarSE 299 Directed Research (3 credits minimum, a maximum of 6) Both courses are evaluated as Pass/Fail. A formal thesis must be written and will be evaluated by a committee comprised of at least two MarSE faculty members and may include one other KAUST faculty member as deemed appropriate by the supervising faculty member. The thesis must be presented at an oral defense with the same committee. Ocean Physics and Modeling Track (MS) Core Courses: Students are required to select two of the following three courses. If students can provide evidence that a subject has been studied and assessed at the graduate level, they are invited to apply for and may be awarded academic credit for a course. MarSE 221 Marine Life MarSE 228 Structure and Function of Marine Ecosystems MarSE 235 Introduction to Physical Oceanography Students are required to take four of the following six courses. If students can provide evidence that a subject has been studied and assessed at the graduate level, they are invited to apply for and may be awarded academic credit for a course. MarSE 212 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics I ErSE 301 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics II MarSE 235 Introduction to Physical Oceanography ERSE 253 Data analysis in Geosciences ERSE 306 Ocean Physics and Modeling ERSE 203 Geophysical Continuum Mechanics Electives (two of the below): ERSE 213 Inverse Problems and Data Assimilation ERSE 307 Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport ERSE 324 Parallel Scientific Computing in Earth Science ENSE 213 Environmental Organic Chemistry ENSE 201 Air & Water Quality Math requirement: Students must take two of the following Math courses: AMCS 206 Applied Numerical Methods AMCS 231 Applied Partial Differential Equations

AMCS 306

Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations

Thesis requirement: All students in the Ocean Physics and Modeling Track are required to complete a thesis based on original research under the direction of a MarSE faculty member. This requires registration in the following two courses to complete the degree: MarSE 297 Thesis (3 credits minimum, a maximum of 12) MarSE 299 Directed Research (3 credits minimum, a maximum of 6) Both courses are evaluated as Pass/Fail. A formal thesis must be written and will be evaluated by a committee comprised of at least two MarSE faculty members and may include one other KAUST faculty member as deemed appropriate by the supervising faculty member. The thesis must be presented at an oral defense with the same committee. PhD Degree Program There are three possible entry points into the Marine Science PhD degree program: (i) students possessing a MS degree in Marine Science or related field (the normal entry point); (ii) KAUST students pursuing a seamless Marine Science MS/PhD; (iii) and students possessing a BSc degree (a more rare entry point). The seamless MS/PhD option is intended for MS students who decide, after their arrival at KAUST, to pursue a PhD. This option simply allows a student to begin to enter the PhD program before completing the full MS requirements. PhD students apply for and enter the Marine Science degree program. A Marine Science faculty advisor is either immediately designated (in the case of a student being recruited by a specific faculty member) or temporarily assigned (in the case of KAUST fellowship students); in the latter case, the student is expected to identify a research advisor by (at the latest) the end of the first year. There are two phases and associated milestones for PhD students: (i) a qualification phase with a candidacy milestone and (ii) a dissertation phase with a final defense milestone. Qualification and advancement to candidacy are contingent upon: (a) successfully passing PhD coursework, (b) designating a research advisor, and (c) preparing a written research proposal and orally defending it. The maximum time for advancement to candidacy for a student entering with an MS degree is one year. For students entering the PhD in the seamless MS/PhD option, students must advance to candidacy not more than two years after beginning the MS program. Students entering in the BSc-degree entry option must advance to candidacy within two years. A multi-disciplinary Marine Science Seminar Series will run continuously, featuring seminars offered by MarSE faculty, staff, students, and visitors. Credit is not awarded, but satisfactory participation is mandatory to complete the MarSE PhD. A) For students entering with an MS: i) Coursework: A minimum of six credit hours of PhD coursework (300 level, excluding Thesis and Directed Research) is required beyond the MS degree. In the case where the MS degree is from a major or degree program other than Marine Science, there may be additional deficiency courses specified by the advisor. In all cases, courses designated should be relevant to the dissertation topic, if defined,

and/or proposed general area of research. A minimum GPA of 3.0 must be achieved on all doctoral coursework. Students transferring from other PhD programs may receive some dissertation research and coursework credit, on a case-by-case basis, for related work performed at their original institution. However, such students must still satisfy the written and oral requirements for a research proposal as described below (if this phase was passed at the original institute, the proposal may be the same, if approved by the research advisor). The minimum residency requirement for enrollment of such students at KAUST is two years. ii) Research Proposal: Within six months of enrollment, the student must submit a formal research proposal. This proposal must be 5000-7000 words and include the following sections: -Literature Review -Background -Methods -Objectives -Expected Outcomes -Timeline The research proposal is reviewed by the students thesis committee, which shall consist of: -the thesis advisor -an additional MarSE faculty member -one additional non-MarSE KAUST faculty member -one external (non-KAUST) member holding a faculty position or equivalent position at another institution, with approval by both the faculty research advisor and division dean iii) Confirmation Seminar: The research proposal must be presented in a public seminar and will be assessed by the thesis committee. There are four possible outcomes of the assessment: pass, conditional pass, failure with retake permitted, and failure. The student will have passed if all committee members accept the written research proposal and if the student receives no more than one negative vote from the proposal examination committee. If more than one member casts a negative vote, one retake of the oral defense is permitted if the entire committee agrees. A conditional pass involves conditions (e.g., another course in a perceived area of weakness) imposed by the committee, with the conditional status removed when the conditions have been met. Once constituted, the composition of the proposal examination committee can only be changed upon approval by both the faculty research advisor and the division dean. iv) Annual Progress Report: The student will be required to submit an annual progress report to the committee, in particular commenting on the relevant timelines and any deviations from the approved research proposal. v) Thesis submission: The student must submit a thesis, which contains the candidates scholarly work. Thesis work must be published or deemed publishable in well-recognized journals. In order to proceed to the oral examination stage, three of the four committee members must approve the submitted thesis.

vi) Oral defense: The oral examination of the candidate consists of a public thesis defense followed by a closed-door session with the candidate, thesis committee, and a non-MarSE KAUST faculty member (appointed by the Division Dean) to serve as a procedural (non-voting) monitor of protocol. This is concluded with a final session without the candidate present. In order to pass the oral examination stage, three of the four committee members must approve. The student cannot receive more than one negative vote from any member of the committee. If more than one member casts a negative vote, one retake of the oral defense is permitted if the entire committee agrees. vii) Total enrollment requirement: In addition to the required six or more credit hours (see Coursework above), at least 60 units of dissertation research (MarSE 397 Thesis) credit must be earned during the degree. A full-time workload for PhD students is considered to be 12 credit hours per semester (courses and MarSE 397/399) and six credit hours in the summer term (MarSE 397/399). There is a minimum residency requirement (enrollment period at KAUST) of 2.5 years for students entering with an MS degree, 3.5 years for a BSc degree. The maximum enrollment period is five years, extendable upon approval of both the faculty research supervisor and division dean. B) For students electing the seamless MS/PhD option, the student must complete at least 6 hours of coursework at the 300 level (excluding Thesis and Directed Research) after being admitted to the PhD portion of the program. In order to complete the program the student must earn a total of at least 36 credit hours (including Directed Research). In all cases, courses designated should be relevant to the dissertation topic, if defined, and/or proposed general area of research. From the point that the student is enrolled in the PhD program, the student has 6 months to submit a thesis proposal as above. All other aspects of the PhD program are the same as for the MS entry option. The minimum residency requirement at KAUST for students in the seamless MS/PhD option is 3.5 years. C) For students who enter with a BSc degree, coursework requirement is the same as for the MS degree described above in the first two semesters, excluding a thesis. During the second year, the student must complete at least two courses at the 300 level (excluding Thesis and Directed Research). From the point that the student is enrolled in the PhD program via the direct BSc entry option, the student has 12 months to submit a thesis proposal as above. All other aspects of the PhD program are the same as for the MS entry option. The minimum residency requirement at KAUST for students in the direct BSc to PhD entry option is 3.5 years. Courses: MarSE 397 Thesis MarSE 399 Directed Research MarSE 329 Advanced Marine Microbial Ecology MarSE 326 Advanced Coral Reef Ecology MarSE 330 Advanced Ecological Genomics MarSE 343 Advanced Ecology and Management of Marine Fisheries Other MarSE PhD level courses (TBA)

MARINE SCIENCE AND OTHER RELEVANT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


MarSE 213. Environmental Chemistry (3-0-3) Chemistry of processes and behavior in air and aquatic systems. Acid-base and redox chemistry, carbonate system, precipitation. Chemical thermodynamics including quantitative assessment of chemical composition and fate of contaminants using equilibrium calculations. MarSE 218. Environmental Microbiology (3-0-3) Fundamentals of microbiology for the environment, physiology, microbial metabolism, basics of genetics, microbial growth processes, introduction to molecular biology. Illustrations from microbiology and pollutants, microbiology and disease, microbiology of bioremediation, wastewater treatment, microbial fuel cells. MarSE 221. Marine Life (3-0-3) An overview of marine biology that surveys the diversity of marine habitats, major groups of taxa inhabiting those habitats and the general biology of the various taxa. Topics include the production and consumption of organic material in the ocean, as well as factors controlling those processes. Species diversity, structure of marine food webs and the flow of energy within different marine habitats will be detailed and contrasted. MarSE 226. Coral Reef Ecology (3-0-3) Prerequisite: MarSE 221. This course will cover coral reef distributions, biogeography, and ecological processes important to reefs. Basic coral anatomy and physiology will be discussed. Reef fishes and their interaction with coral communities will be highlighted, along with coral reef fisheries. Modern threats to coral reefs, including thermal bleaching, ocean acidification, and diseases of corals will be examined with particular emphasis on processes affecting the future status of reef communities. MarSE 228. Structure and Function of Marine Ecosystems (3-0-3) This course gives an overview of marine ecology. It addresses the global production and distribution of plankton and fish, the vertical distribution of both pelagic and benthic organisms as well as predator-prey interactions among organisms in different habitats. It describes ecosystems from the intertidal zone to the deep sea and outlines ecological principles governing the distributions of organisms and their adaptations to be successful in the different environments. MarSE 229. Marine Microbial Ecology (3-0-3) Prerequisite: MarSE 203. This course covers recent developments in the field of marine microbial ecology and will give an overview on structure and function of microbial communities in the oceans including discussions on novel methods, results and hypotheses. Among the topics covered are: Photoheterotrophic bacteria, Marine Bacteria and the Carbon Cycle, UV radiation effects on Microbes and Microbial Processes, Uptake and Regeneration of Inorganic Nutrients by Marine Heterotrophic Bacteria, Bacterivory: Interactions between Bacteria and their Grazers, Symbiosis and Mixotrophy Among Pelagic Microorganisms, Marine Viruses and their ecological impact, Global Ocean Survey of Marine Metagenomics, Single cell activity. MarSE 230. Ecological Genomics: (3-0-3) Ecological genomics describes the application of genomic tools (high throughput sequencing, microarrays, quantitative PCR etc.) to solve questions of ecology. Its purpose is to increase understanding of the responses and interactions of organisms to the environment and to one another by analyzing genomic sequences, gene expressions and genome evolution. This course

will give an overview over the methods utilized and the questions asked by ecological genomics with a particular emphasis on marine ecological genomics. MarSE 235. Introduction to Physical Oceanography (3-0-3) This course provides an introduction to Oceanography and includes the following topics: Ocean basins, major currents and water property distributions; Properties of seawater: equation of state, T/S analysis; Basic dynamical ideas: hydrostatic balance, Coriolis force, geostrophy, turbulence; Forcing of the ocean: solar radiation, winds, heat and freshwater fluxes. Ekman transport; The observed ocean: major currents, gyres, meridional overturning, eddies, sill flows, upwelling, monsoons, equatorial motions, El Nio, Marginal Seas. Time dependence: inertial oscillations, long gravity waves, Rossby waves; Tides: astronomical forcing, basin modes, local resonances, tidal mixing. MarSE 243. Ecology and Management of Marine Fisheries (3-0-3) Reviews basic ecological principles applied to fisheries management with the aim of promoting sustainable fisheries and marine conservation. Topics include fish life history and population dynamics and the community and ecosystem-level responses to fishing and natural variability, with special emphasis on coral reef fisheries. MarSE 212. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics I (3-0-3) ME 250 and ErSE 203 are prerequisites, or consent of instructor. Topics include governing equations of mass and momentum conservation; wave kinematics, dispersion, group velocity; surface and internal gravity waves, shallow water theory; stratified fluids and normal mode analysis; waves in rotating fluids: Kelvin, Poincare and Rossby waves; the Rossby adjustment problem and conservation of potential vorticity; the quasigeostrophic approximation. MarSE 217. Marine Genomics (3-0-3) Genome science is the study of the structure, content, and evolution of genomes. This course deals with organization of genomes, genome sequencing, genomic variation, gene expression and functional genomics with a particular emphasis on marine organisms and how to apply this field to study marine science. ErSE 301. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics II (3-0-3) ErSE 201 is prerequisite, or consent of instructor. Climate and climate change, large-scale atmospheric and oceanic motions, fine-scale processes. Quasigeostrophic motion of a stratified fluid on a sphere, the equations of motions in spherical coordinates, scaling and asymptotic analysis, potential-vorticity equation. Rossby waves in a stratified fluid. Theory of instability, baroclinic instability, barotropic instability, instability of flows with horizontal and vertical shear. Energy and enstrophy. Numerical models of general circulation of atmosphere, pressure vertical coordinate, linear and nonlinear numerical instabilities. ERSE 253. Data analysis in Geosciences (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Background in linear algebra, probability theory, statistics, and programming in Matlab. Time Series (filtering, correlation, deconvolution, spectral analysis, regression), processing of multidimensional data, spatial statistics including variogram, covariance analysis and modeling, multipoint estimation, spatial interpolation including statistical methods (kriging) and dynamical methods (Kalman filter), uncertainty assessment, cross validation, multivariate analysis including principal component analysis and canonical analysis. ERSE 306. Ocean Physics and Modeling (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ErSE 201, ErSE 203, AMCS 252 or consent of instructor. This course will introduce the theory and numerical modeling of ocean circulation. This includes the theory of steady and time-dependent

large-scale circulation, effects of earth's curvature, wind-driven Sverdrup circulation, western boundary currents, eastern boundary upwelling, effects of buoyancy forcing, wind- and buoyancy-forced circulation in the thermocline. The course will also review the theoretical models of ocean circulation, including shallow water, barotropic, quasigeostrophic, and primitive equation models; adjustment times, internal length and time scales; the role of advection, bathymetry and coastlines; global models, basin models, regional models. ERSE 203. Geophysical Continuum Mechanics (3-0-3) Prerequisite: AMCS 231 or consent of Instructor. The course provides physical background foundation and overview of mathematical continuum models of geophysics. The goal of the course is to allow students to learn modeling ideas and utilize them in simulation. The course will include a basic introduction to finite difference and finite element methods and their application to continuum modeling and simulation. Topics discussed include: brief introduction to Cartesian tensors, their calculus and algebra; deformations and strain measures; balance laws and equations of motion; thermodynamical relations and constraints; mixture theory and phase change. ERSE 324. Parallel Scientific Computing in Earth Science (3-0-3) Prerequisite: AMCS 252, ErSE 203 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the basics of modern parallel computing: parallel architectures, message passing, data and domain decomposition, parallel libraries, programming languages, data management and visualization and parallel numerical algorithms. Applications to scientific computing problems in earth sciences and engineering. MarSE 297. Thesis (3 credits) MS Dissertation (increments of 3 units): Masters-level research leading to a formal written dissertation and oral defense thereof. MarSE 298. Graduate Seminar (variable credit) Masters-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. MarSE 299. Directed Research (variable credit) Masters-level supervised research. MarSE 323. Advanced Topics in Pelagic Ecology (3-0-3) The course will address one or a few central topics in pelagic ecology in depth. It will mainly be based on seminars where the students will present and discuss scientific papers. The aims are to acquire knowledge of the state-of-the-art of current research questions, as well as to train communication skills and the ability of critically reading research papers. There will be a final, oral exam. MarSE 326. Advanced Coral Reef Ecology (3-0-3) This course will cover coral reef distributions, biogeography, and ecological processes important to reefs. Basic coral anatomy and physiology will be discussed. Reef fishes and their interaction with coral communities will be highlighted, along with coral reef fisheries. Modern threats to coral reefs, including thermal bleaching, ocean acidification, and diseases of corals will be examined with particular emphasis on processes affecting the future status of reef communities. As a PhD level course, assessment of students and participation expectations will be commensurate with the level of student experience. As a PhD level course, assessment of students and participation expectations will be commensurate with the level of student experience. MarSE 329. Advanced Marine Microbial Ecology (3-0-3) This course covers recent developments in the field of marine microbial ecology and will give an overview on structure and function of microbial communities in the oceans including discussions on

novel methods, results and hypotheses. Among the topics covered are: Photoheterotrophic bacteria, Marine Bacteria and the Carbon Cycle, UV radiation effects on Microbes and Microbial Processes, Uptake and Regeneration of Inorganic Nutrients by Marine Heterotrophic Bacteria, Bacterivory: Interactions between Bacteria and their Grazers, Symbiosis and Mixotrophy Among Pelagic Microorganisms, Marine Viruses and their ecological impact, Global Ocean Survey of Marine Metagenomics, Single cell activity in marine bacterioplankton. As a PhD level course, assessment of students and participation expectations will be commensurate with the level of student experience. Environmental Microbiology (EnSE 203) is a prerequisite for this course. MarSE 330. Advanced Ecological Genomics (3-0-3) Ecological genomics describes the application of genomic tools (high throughput sequencing, microarrays, quantitative PCR etc.) to solve questions of ecology. Its purpose is to increase understanding of the responses and interactions of organisms to the environment and to one another by analyzing genomic sequences, gene expressions and genome evolution. This course will give an overview over the methods utilized and the questions asked by ecological genomics with a particular emphasis on marine ecological genomics. As a PhD level course, assessment of students and participation expectations will be commensurate with the level of student experience. MarSE 343. Advanced Ecology and Management of Marine Fisheries (3-0-3) Reviews basic ecological principles applied to fisheries management with the aim of promoting sustainable fisheries and marine conservation. Topics include fish life history and population dynamics and the community and ecosystem-level responses to fishing and natural variability, with special emphasis on coral reef fisheries. MarSE 397. Thesis PhD Dissertation (increments of 3 units): PhD-level research leading to a formal written dissertation and oral defense thereof. MarSE 399. Directed Research (variable credit) Doctoral-level supervised research.

13. MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PROGRAM


The Material Science and Engineering program offers students pursuing a Master of Science (MS) or a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree two types of courses: Core and Elective courses. Each of the courses will consist of 3 credits hours (42 hours of lectures) and will be evaluated by written exams, coursework, and where necessary by an individual oral presentation. The Core and Elective Courses along with titles are defined in the following: CORE COURSES

MSE 216 Crystallography & Diffraction Fall (1st) MSE 219 Electronic, Optical, Magn., Thermal Properties Fall (1st) MSE 224 Statistical Thermodynamics & Equilibrium Processes Fall (1st) MSE 205 Materials Modeling Fall (3rd) MSE 210 Functional Ceramics Fall (3rd) MSE 232 Applied Quantum Mechanics Spring (2nd) MSE 217 Kinetics & Phase Transformations Spring (2nd) MSE 202 Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials Spring (2nd) MSE 222 Solar Cell Materials and Devices Spring (2nd) MSE 204 Electrochemistry & Corrosion Spring (2nd) ELECTIVE COURSES MSE 200 Advanced Engineering Mathematics (Fall 1st) MSE 201 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering Fall MSE 203 Materials Characterization Fall MSE 218 Thin Film Science & Engineering Fall MSE 206 Structural Ceramics Fall MSE 209 Polymeric Materials Fall MSE 223 Soft Materials Fall MSE 208 Nanomaterials Spring MSE 213 Materials for Energy Spring MSE 212 Mechanical Behavior of Composite Materials Spring MSE 207 Biomaterials Spring MSE 221 Defects in Solids Spring MSE 211 Engineering Alloys Spring MSE 299 Directed Research- MS Fall, Spring MSE 399 Directed Research- PhD MSE 392 Advanced Topics in Materials Science 1 Fall, Spring MSE 393 Advanced Topics in Materials Science 2 Fall, Spring MSE 394 Advanced Topics in Materials Science 3 Fall, Spring MSE 398 Graduate Seminar (visitors present 1 credit) Fall, Spring MSE 297 MS Thesis Research Fall, Spring MSE 397 PhD Thesis Research Fall, Spring

MASTERS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


Students can choose to enroll in MS program or apply directly to the PhD program. Direct enrollment in PhD program will undergo an approval process through the Admission Committee. There are two options for the masters program. Thesis Option: The MS degree requirements are 36 credit hours. This includes 5 MSE Core courses

(MSE 216, 217, 219, 224, 232), 2 MSE Elective courses or interdisciplinary courses (upon approval of advisor), one course of Mathematical Methods, and 6 credits of Thesis. The time needed to finish the thesis option MS degree is up to two years. Student in the MS thesis program must take 6 direct research credits during the summer. The directed research credits count toward the 36 credits required for graduation. The students in this option must pass a thesis defense in order to graduate. The thesis defense shall be done publicly in the presence of a committee consisting of the students thesis advisor and two committee members, one from the MSE program, and the other can be from any program at KAUST, including MSE. The student is responsible for scheduling the defense date with his/her advisor and committee members. It is advisable that the student gives her/his thesis at least six weeks prior the defense date. Course Option: Although the program strongly encourages students to pursue the Thesis Option for their MS degree, an option for a course-based MS degree is also offered. In this case, the student must take 30 credits consisting of the following: 5 MSE Core courses chosen by the student, one course of Mathematical Methods, and 3 courses of approved elective courses. The elective courses can be selected from the list of approved MSE courses. However, students can choose to broaden their educational experience by taking interdisciplinary courses from other KAUST programs. These will count as electives. Students in the non-thesis option shall successfully complete 2 courses of directed research (6 credit hours) during the summer. The directed research credits count toward the 30 credits required for graduation. The expected duration of this option is one calendar year. Passing Grade for Masters Students The passing grade for any course during the Masters program is B. A student scoring below B is allowed to repeat the class once. If the grade upon repeating the class falls below B, the student will be terminated from the program.

PhD DEGREE REQUIREMNTS

The requirements for the PhD degree depend on the stage at which the student enters the PhD program at KAUST. BS to PhD Students entering the PhD program with a BS degree will be awarded the PhD degree upon the successful completion of 102 credit hours, of which 60 credits are for thesis research, distributed as follows: 1) 8 Core courses (5 of which are obligatory: MSE 216, 217, 219, 224, 232) 2) 3 Elective courses from MSE or other interdisciplinary programs 3) 1 Course of Mathematical Methods 4) 60 credits of research thesis 5) 6 seminar credits Seminar credits can be earned by attending MSE offered seminars or seminars offered in other programs whose focus compliments the students thesis research or directed research activities. Up to six directed research credits can replace two classes if approved by the students advisor. MS to PhD Students entering the PhD program with a masters degree either from KAUST or elsewhere are expected to take a minimum of 4 MSE courses. The total number of credit hours such student is expected to complete is 78 hours, of which 60 credits are for thesis research distributed as follows: 1) A minimum of four approved MSE courses (12 credits) 2) 60 credits of research thesis 3) 6 seminar credits Up to six directed research credits can replace two classes if approved by the students advisor. Seminar credits can be earned by attending MSE offered seminars or seminars offered in other programs whose focus compliments the students thesis research or directed research activities. Passing Grade

PhD candidates must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in order to remain in the program. The passing grade in any class is B. Getting a grade below B will result in the termination the student from the PhD program. PhD Examinations Upon completion of core course requirements, the student must complete the required PhD examinations. These include a written test, henceforth referred to as the written subject examination, and an oral test, henceforth referred to oral thesis proposal examination. Students entering the PhD program with an MS degree must pass the written subject examination in their first year of attendance at KAUST. Students entering the PhD program with a BS degree must pass the written subject examination during the first four semesters at KAUST. The written subject examination is governed by the following rules and procedures: . The written examination will cover the content of the five required Core Courses (MSE 216, 217, 219, 224, 232). . The written exam will be held on two separate days within one week. Three core course exams will be held on the first day and two additional core course exams on the subsequent day. . The maximum length of the examination on one of the two days cannot exceed 3 hours. . The written examination will be offered twice per year (May and December) and on as needed basis as determined by MSE faculty. . Students must declare their intent to take the exam 3 months before the actual date. The oral thesis proposal examination is governed by the following rules . The oral thesis proposal must be presented in the presence of the students thesis committee . The content of the oral proposal are based on the students planned thesis research project . This part of the exam can be attended by other students and faculty . Students are responsible for scheduling the oral proposal examination with their advisor and faculty members . The thesis proposal examination can only be taken after passing the written subject examination There are three possible outcomes for students who take the written subject exam or thesis proposal exam:

(1) Pass (2) Fail with option to retake (3) Fail without option to retake The decision to allow (or deny) a student to re-take an exam shall be decide by the faculty on a case-by-case basis. Students allowed to retake the PhD examinations (written or Oral) a second time do not have to retake the entire exam. For example, if the student passes the written subject exam but fails the oral exam, only the oral exam must be retaken. Students who twice fail either exam will be terminated from the program. The student allowed to retake the written qualifying exam a second time is expected to only retake the subject that he or she failed. PhD Candidacy A PhD student is officially considered a PhD Candidate after he or she passes both the written subject examination and the oral thesis proposal examination. The oral thesis proposal examination can only be taken after the student passes the written subject examination. Students entering KAUST with a B.Sc. degree are expected to complete the requirements of PhD candidacy no later than 4 semesters after joining the PhD program at KAUST. Students entering KAUST with a MS degree are expected to become PhD candidates within 1 year of starting at KAUST. PhD Thesis The student must write in English his/her thesis which should be an original work. The Thesis Defense is the final exam and must be done publicly. The Thesis defense consists of an oral presentation followed by questions. As a general rule, the research advisor (thesis supervisor) is appointed to chair the defense committee which consists of a total of five faculty members, three of which must be MSE faculty members. One of the non-MSE members should be from another program at KAUST and should be in charge of conducting the defense proceedings to make sure they are run in an unbiased fashion and in accordance with KAUST university requirements. The fifth member of the thesis committee should preferably be from outside KAUST. It is the responsibility of the student to keep the thesis committee informed of his/her progress, deadlines for submitting graduation forms, defense date, etc. It is advisable that the student gives her/his thesis six weeks prior the defense date in order to receive feedback from the committee members in a timely manner. The public defense of the thesis may last up to a

maximum of three hours. The student must receive a passing grade (PASS) by unanimous agreement. Transferring Credits The student can petition to transfer graduate credits from another university. The curriculum committee in consultation with the admission committee has the final authority to approve or deny the petition. The following rules apply: MS Student Transfers (students who have not yet graduated from Masters program) . Courses with grade below B+ will not be transferred. . Two courses not to exceed six credits for MS program will be considered for transfer, after evaluation on a case by case basis. . Transfer of a given course will not be accepted if the latter was taken more than two years prior to admission to KAUST. PhD Student Transfer . Courses with grade below B+ will NOT be transferred. . Each students application will be reviewed by the curriculum committee and dealt with on a case by case basis. . Up to six courses not to exceed a total of 18 credits may be transferred for Ph.D. program. . These courses should be relevant to the MSE program, as approved by the program. . Transfer of a given course will not be accepted if the particular course was taken more than two years prior to admission into KAUST. A transfer student has the option of challenging the five core courses for the written qualifying exam. If the student passes this exam, he/she receives credit for the five courses. For a transfer student, the written subject examination has to be completed during the students first year at KAUST. MS and PhD advisor The Ph.D. thesis advisor can be any MSE faculty member of the MSE program. The student may also elect an advisor who is a faculty in another program at KAUST. In this case, the student must seek the approval of the MSE Program prior to commencing research. Students Program Planning It is the sole responsibility of the student to plan her/his graduate program in consultation

with their advisor. All forms and deadlines must be met. Most core courses are offered once a year. Required Training Sessions Every student in MSE must pass required training session in: 1) Laboratory safety and practices 2) Ethical conduct in academia and research 3) Cultural differences and acceptance MATERIAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PROGRAM COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MSE 200 Advanced Engineering Mathematics (3-0-3) This course presents basic mathematical methods for engineers including: differentiation and integration, Taylors expansion, linear systems resolution and matrix formalism, partial differential equations, Laplace, Fourier and Legendre transforms, statistics and probability MSE 201. Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering (3-0-3) This course is intended for students who do not have a materials science & engineering background. The course will cover four major topics including: (1) fundamental concepts (2) microstructure development & phase equilibria (3) material properties and (3) fabrication methods and applications. The course will cover atomic structure, atomic bonding, crystal structures, defects, and diffusion in materials. It also will cover phase transformations and phase equilibria and how they impact microstructure development. The electrical, magnetic, optical, thermal, and mechanical properties of materials will also be reviewed. The course will also highlight modern fabrication technologies and applications of metals, ceramics, semiconductors, and polymers. MSE 202. Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials (3-0-3) This course explores the phenomenology of mechanical behavior of materials at the macroscopic level and the relationship of mechanical behavior to material structure and mechanisms of deformation and failure. Topics covered include elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, creep, fracture, and fatigue, elementary theory of statics and dynamics of dislocations, fundamentals of thermal behavior: heat capacity, thermal expansion and conductivity; effects of thermal stress. MSE 203. Materials Characterization (3-0-3) This course will introduce the basic principles of materials characterization and the common characterization techniques available at KAUST. It will cover the following topics: Diffraction methods: basic principles, interaction of radiation and particle beams with matter, XRD, scattering techniques; Spectroscopic methods; Imaging: optical including confocal microscopy, scanning, transmission electron, scanning tunneling and field ion microscopy; Microanalysis and Tomography: energy dispersive, wavelength dispersive, Auger Processes, Electron, Ion and Atom Probe Tomograhy, SIMS, photoelectron spectroscopy; thermal analysis: DTA, DSC. Lab visits and demonstrations will be scheduled to the class to discuss some case studies. MSE 204. Electrochemistry & Corrosion (3-0-3) This course offers, in a first part, an overview of the fundamentals of electrochemistry including thermodynamics, non-

equilibrium systems and Electrode/Electrolyte interfaces followed by an Introduction to modern applications of electrochemistry such as synthesis of nanoparticles, nanowires and thin films; as well as electrochemical means of energy conversion and storage. The second part deals with Corrosion phenomena: types of corrosion cells and damages, thermodynamics and kinetics, uniform corrosion, passivity, localized corrosion, atmospheric and high temperature corrosion, environmentally induced cracking. Prevention of corrosion using electrochemical and surface engineering means. Corrosion mechanisms and protection of materials of practical interest. MSE 205. Materials Modeling (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Applied Quantum Mechanics MSE 232. Introduction to the theory and application of materials modeling techniques. Advantages of modeling to the engineer. Data requirements and structuring. Analytical and numerical methods. Basic numerical algorithms. Modeling for different length scales from atomistic to continuum. Band structure approaches for crystalline solids. Density functional theory. Classical and quantum molecular dynamics. Application and use of commercial and freeware computer packages. MSE 206. Structural Ceramics (3-0-3) Powder preparation and characterization: production of powders, with emphasis on chemical routes for nano-grained oxide and non-oxide materials. Powder characterization: particle shape, particle size and size distribution, specific surface area. Consolidation and forming: inter-particle forces and colloid stability. Binders and dispersants. Shaping methods: die pressing, isostatic pressing, extrusion, tape casting, screen printing, spin coating, deep coating, ink jet printing. Sintering: driving force and material transport mechanisms, role of grain boundaries and pores, grain growth and pore stability, liquid phase sintering. Nanosintering (grain growth control techniques): pressure-assisted sintering, spark plasma sintering, microwave sintering. Production of flat glass by the float process. Controlled crystallization of glass for glass ceramics. MSE 207. Biomaterials (3-0-3) This course offers a basic understanding of the concepts underlying the design and selection of materials for use in biological applications. It focuses on both hard and soft tissue materials. The class addresses modern topics including biosensors, surface and interface functionalization. Further topics include: A brief introduction to relevant tissue types: anatomy, biochemistry and physiology; concepts of biocompatibility, host response, material degradation, testing and selection criteria; an overview of current research on biomechanics and its relevance to prosthesis design and tissue engineering; basic concepts of drug delivery and molecular biomechanics. MSE 208.Nanomaterials (3-0-3) This course describes the most recent advances in the synthesis, fabrication and characterization of nanomaterials. Topics to be covered: Zero-dimensional nanomaterials, including nanoparticles, quantum dots and nanocrystals; one dimensional materials including nanowires and nanotubes; twodimensional materials: including self-assembled monolayers, patterned surfaces and quantum well; three-dimensional nanomaterials: including nanoporosity, nanocomposites, block copolymers, and supra-crystals. Emphasis on the fundamental surface and size-related physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials; and their applications in biosensing, nanomedicine, catalysis, photonics, and nanoelectronics.

MSE 209. Polymeric Materials (3-0-3) This course describes polymerization processes; polymer solutions (Flory-Huggins model and application to polymer blends); polymer chain conformations; calculation of end-to-end distribution function W(r) for short range interacting chains; rotational isomeric state scheme and temperature dependence; chain with long range interactions (excluded volume effect); radius of gyration; the crystalline and amorphous states of polymers; the glass transition (configurational entropy model); mechanical, electrical and optical properties and characterization of polymers. MSE 210. Functional Ceramics (3-0-3) Fundamental concepts relevant to functional ceramics will be reviewed, including defect chemistry and reactions, Brouwer diagrams, Ellingham diagrams, Heckman diagrams, ionic and electronic transport, and tensor notation. The physics, materials, and applications for the following classes of functional ceramics will be covered: linear dielectrics, ferroelectrics & multiferroics, piezoelectrics, pyroelectrics, electrooptics, thermoelectrics, and semiconducting oxides. Selected technological applications will be reviewed including varistors, sensors, MEMs, capacitors, memories, transistors, night vision systems, positive temperature coefficient resistors, and electro-optic devices. MSE 211.Engineering Alloys (3-0-3) This course offers a basic understanding of materials requirements of alloys for various applications. Topics covered include: the trade-off between properties (e.g., strength and toughness) and micro-structure; the impact of alloy composition on the micro-structure; property differences and design philosophy in steels, nickel-, titanium- and aluminum- based alloys, focusing on construction, aerospace and automotive applications; alloy evolution and Production routes. MSE 212. Mechanical Behavior of Composite Materials (3-0-3) (Same as ME 343) Response of composite materials (fiber and particulatere inforced materials) to static, cyclic, creep and thermomechanical loading. Manufacturing process-induced variability and residual stresses. Fatigue behavior, fracture mechanics and damage development. Role of the reinforcement-matrix interface in mechanical behavior. Environmental effects. Dimensional stability and thermal fatigue. Application to polymer, metal, ceramic and carbon matrix composites. MSE 213. Materials for Energy (3-0-3) Emphasizes materials engineering aspects and the role they play in important energy related technologies such as energy harvesting approaches, supercapacitors and energy storage media, batteries, fuel cells, bioenergy, nuclear energy, solar and wind based power generation, thermoelectricity, and Hydrogen generation. MSE 216. Crystallography & Diffraction (3-0-3) The objective of this course is to present the basic concepts needed to understand the crystal structure of materials. Fundamental concepts including lattices, symmetries, point groups, and space groups will be discussed and the relationship between crystal symmetries and physical properties will be addressed. The theory of X-ray diffraction by crystalline matter along with the experimental x-ray methods used to determine the crystal structure of materials will be covered. Application of X-ray diffraction to proteins, electron diffraction and neutron diffraction will be briefly discussed. MSE 217. Kinetics and Phase Transformations (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MSE224.

The course offers a modern and fundamental understanding to the main concepts and practical applications of Kinetics and Phase Transformations in materials science. The following major topics are discussed within the frame of this course: kinetics of homogenous chemical reactions, thermodynamics of irreversible processes including an introduction to the Onsager postulates, mathematical description of Diffusion in Materials (Ficks Laws and an atomistic description via random-walk process). Basic concepts of phase transformation theories, including homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation and growth, spinodal decomposition and Landau theory of phase transformation MSE 218.Thin Film Science & Engineering (3-0-3) Thin films and coatings are the material building blocks of many modern and pervasive technologies ranging from electronics to optics and photovoltaics, and from anticounterfeiting to glazings and hard coatings. The fundamentals and atomistics of thin film growth are discussed in detail. Deposition techniques for thin films and coatings are presented, including physical and chemical vapor depositions, molecular beam epitaxy, atomic layer deposition, and lowpressure plasma processes. Organic thin film deposition. Solution-processing and printing of inorganic, and hybrid organic-inorganic thin films. Artificially structured and chemically modulated layered and nanocomposite materials. Ex situ/in situ characterization of thin films and coatings. MSE 219. Electronic, Optical, Magnetic, and Thermal Properties of Materials (3-03) This course offers an overview of the electronic, optical, magnetic and thermal properties of materials, not limited to solid state. It covers the fundamental concepts of band structure and bonding of materials, electrical and thermal conduction in metals, semiconductors and dielectric. The interaction between light and matter will be addressed and important concepts such as excitons will be introduced. Finally magnetism and superconductivity will be introduced. Although a significant part will be devoted to the study of solid state, the physical properties of non-crystalline and liquid materials will be mentioned. MSE 221. Defects in Solids (3-0-3) The course will cover the various types of defects that occur in solids including point, linear, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional defects. Non-stoichiometry in materials, defect equilibria, reactions, Kroger-Vink formalism, Brouwer and Ellingham diagrams will be discussed. The physics and thermodynamic aspects of defect formation, mobility, and interaction will be discussed. Defects common in metals, ceramics, and polymers will be reviewed and differences highlighted. The impact of each defect type on the mechanical, electrical, optical, magnetic, and thermal properties of materials will be discussed. MSE 222. Solar Cell Materials and Devices (3-0-3) This course will provide the students with an up-to-date basic knowledge of the physical and chemical principles of materials used in solar cells of various kinds including but not limited to technologies such as: 1) silicon based solar cells, 2) CIGS, CIS and other inorganic thin film solar cells, 3) multijunction solar cells, 4) nanoparticles and quantum dots solar cells, 5) organic and hybrid solar cells and 6) thermal and concentrator solar power generation. MSE 223. Soft Materials (3-0-3) This course covers chemical and physical aspects of soft materials such as gels, polymers, lipids, surfactants and colloids; physical chemistry

of soft materials; phase transformations and self-assembly; the role of intermolecular and surface forces in determining morphology and hierarchy. Membranes, catalysis, drug delivery, flexible and stretchable materials and devices MSE 224. Statistical Thermodynamics & Equilibrium Processes (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Advanced Engineering Mathematics MSE 200 (Students might attend this course as co-requisite). The course offers a modern fundamental understanding to the main concepts and practical applications of thermodynamics in materials science. The following major topics are discussed within the frame of this course: review of basic laws of classical thermodynamics, an introduction to phase equilibria including the theory of solutions, chemical reaction and surface and interfacial phenomena. Additionally, an introduction to statistical thermodynamics of gases and condensed matter is provided. MSE 232. Applied Quantum Mechanics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Advanced Engineering Mathematics MSE200. Introduction to non-relativistic quantum mechanics. Summary of classical mechanics and electrodynamics. Postulates of quantum mechanics, wave functions, and operator formalism. Stationary state problems, including quantum wells. Harmonic oscillator. Angular momentum and spin. Atoms, molecules, and band theory of solids. Time evolution. Approximation methods for time-independent as well as time-dependent interactions, including electromagnetism. Scattering theory. Modern applications. MSE 298. Graduate Seminar (variable credit) Master-level seminar focusing on special topics within the field MSE 299. Directed Research (variable credit) Master-level supervised research. MSE 392. Advanced Topics in Material Science I (variable credit) Lecture-based class. MSE 393. Advanced Topics in Material Science II (variable credit) Lecture based class. MSE 397. Dissertation Advisement (variable credit) MSE 398. Graduate Seminar (variable credit) Doctoral level seminar focusing on special topics within the field. MSE 399. Directed Research (variable credit) Doctoral-level supervised research.

14. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


Master of Science Degree
A minimum of 33 units of courses numbered 200 or above, that meet the distribution requirements listed below, must be completed with a grade of at least B-while maintaining a minimum GPA of 3.00 to earn the masters degree in mechanical engineering. The M.Sc. degree in mechanical engineering at KAUST is offered without a thesis option. All units must be taken for grades, except for courses offered only on a pass/fail basis. Each students program must be approved by his or her advisor in mechanical engineering. Admitted students are expected to complete the Masters degree program in mechanical engineering in one year of graduate residence at KAUST, which includes the Fall Semester, Winter Enrichment Program, Spring Semester and Summer Session. Program Requirements Graduate Mechanical Engineering core12 units These units should provide a solid base for the students engineering interest. The courses may be selected from the following list: ME 200 ab ME 211 ab, ME 212 ab, ME 221 ab, ME 232 ab, ME 234 ab, ME 241, and ME 242. Mathematics, Engineering, and Research electives12 units, (6 in mathematics) Students who have not taken the equivalent of AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 are required to take these two courses for 6 units. Mechanical engineering students are urged to consider taking 6 units of courses in automation, robotics and mechatronics (ME 222 ab, ME 224, ME 234 ab); engineering design (ME 256); experimental methods (ME 214); or any additional courses listed in the Graduate Mechanical Engineering courses. Courses in other disciplines may also be taken. Students who are considering study beyond the masters degree are encouraged to take directed research units, ME 299, up to a maximum of 6.

Free Electives6 units These units may be selected from any course with a number of 200 or greater. Research units may not be included. Engineering Seminar, ME 290 3 units (1 unit in Fall, WEP and Spring) May be substituted for a WEP class with the student advisor approval. Any course taken from the aforementioned areas that is not listed as a Mechanical Engineering course, including mathematics, will satisfy the cognate course requirement in the KAUST catalog. Students admitted for study toward a Masters degree but interested in pursuing subsequent study toward a Ph.D. degree should also read the section below relating to this degree.

Degree of Doctor of Philosophy


Approximately two years of course work are required, and two or more additional years are usually needed for preparation of the dissertation. Advising and Thesis Supervision An interim adviser is appointed for each student upon admission to a graduate degree in mechanical engineering. The interim adviser will serve as the primary mentor until the student finds a research adviser. It is the responsibility of the student to find an academic and research adviser within two terms of graduate residence at KAUST as a Masters student if the student wishes to continue to the Ph.D. program. In consultation with the adviser, the student must form a Ph.D. dissertation supervision committee within one year of graduate residence at KAUST. This committee shall consist of at least three members of the KAUST professorial faculty, with two members from the faculty in mechanical engineering and one from outside the degree program. The adviser shall serve as chair of this committee. This committee shall meet as requested by the student. Further, this committee shall meet annually to review progress and to approve the registration of the student beyond the fifth year of graduate residence at KAUST. The adviser and the thesis supervision committee provide the majority of mentoring to the student. In addition, the degree program coordinator and other members of the faculty are always available to provide advice and mentoring on any aspect of research, progress toward the Ph.D., future careers, and other aspects of life in graduate school and as a professional scientist. Acceptance to Candidacy

To be accepted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering, the student must, in addition to meeting the general KAUST requirements, do the following: Obtain the agreement of a KAUST professorial faculty member to serve as his or her academic and research adviser and form a three-member dissertation supervision committee with the adviser as the chair. Successfully complete at least 12 units of research and demonstrate satisfactory research progress. Pass with a grade of at least B-a minimum of 12 units of course work in any two core mechanical engineering subjects spanning at least two broad areas listed below. This may be waived, or part thereof, for students who already hold a Masters degree. Examples of suitable courses are given in parentheses. Area 1: Fluid Mechanics (ME 200ab), Area 2: Mechanics of Structures and Solids (ME 211ab), Continuum Mechanics of Solids and Fluids (ME 212ab) Area 3: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (ME 241, ME 242), Combustion (ME 244) Area 4: Controls and Dynamical Systems (ME 221 ab, ME 231 ab), Dynamics (ME 232ab), Design (ME 256), The student may petition the mechanical engineering degree program coordinator to accept alternate subjects or areas. These changes should retain core mechanical engineering knowledge and represent sufficient breadth. The petition must be submitted to the degree program coordinator and approved before the student registers for the course. These 12 units may also be used in the students program for the masters degree. Students must also do the following: Pass with a grade of at least B-an additional 6 units (with a course number 300 or above) and 6 units of advanced courses in applied mathematics other than AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 that pertain to the students specialty and are approved by the students adviser. An overall GPA of 3.30 must be maintained in the courses taken in this category. The requirement in

mathematics is in addition to the requirements above for the Masters degree program. Pass both the comprehensive subject and research components of the oral candidacy examination by the end of two full semesters as a Ph.D. student at KAUST (or the end of four full semesters as a Ph.D. student if admitted directly to the Ph.D. degree program with only a Bachelors degree). The oral candidacy examination must be taken before the end of the second year of graduate academic residence at KAUST for students who obtained their MS degree at KAUST and must be taken before the end of the first year of academic residence at KAUST if the student was admitted to KAUST directly to the PhD. degree program. The comprehensive subject component examination will be given at the end of WEP and allowed re-takes will be given at the end of the Spring Semester. The subject component will include one oral examination in mathematics and two oral examinations in any two areas mentioned above. Each oral examination will last one hour and will be closed book and closed notes. The student will be given a list of the examination topics in each area in advance. The research component examination will be given at the end of the Spring Semester and will include the following: Presentation by the student to the examining committee about the thesis topic proposal. Submission of a 10 page thesis proposal to the examining committee at least 14 days prior to the scheduled presentation. The requirement of a minimum grade of Bwill be waived for a 300 level course which (i) lists one of the courses in Areas 1, 2, and 3 as a prerequisite, and (ii) is offered only pass/fail. The faculty will evaluate the students research progress, class performance, advisers input, and oral candidacy exam results to determine whether the student will be accepted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. Registration beyond Fifth Year of Graduate Residence. The annual approval of the Ph.D. dissertation supervision committee and the Dean is necessary for registration beyond the fifth year of graduate residence at KAUST. Thesis and Final Examination. The thesis examination will be given after the student has completed at least 60 units of Ph.D.

Dissertation credits (ME 397) and the thesis has been formally completed. This examination will be a defense of the doctoral thesis and a test of the candidates knowledge in the specialized field of research. The format of the examination will be a public seminar presented by the candidate, with an open question period, followed by a private examination by the examining committee. The examining committee shall consist of five members with the following structure: Two KAUST faculty members from Mechanical Engineering. One KAUST faculty member not from Mechanical Engineering. One member external to KAUST and must hold a doctoral degree. The external member would review the written thesis and his/her attendance of the thesis defense is not mandatory. One KAUST faculty member not from Mechanical Engineering who would act only as an observer and will not have voting rights. The committee must be chaired by one of the aforementioned members other than the students advisor. The Ph.D. degree is awarded once the written thesis is formally accepted and the thesis defense examination is passed with a minimum of three votes. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ME 200a. Fluid Mechanics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Undergraduate fluid mechanics, AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently). Fundamentals of fluid mechanics. Microscopic and macroscopic properties of liquids and gases; the continuum hypothesis; review of thermodynamics; general equations of motion; kinematics; stresses; constitutive relations; vorticity, circulation; Bernoullis equation; potential flow; thin-airfoil theory; surface gravity waves; buoyancy-driven flows; rotating flows; viscous creeping flow; viscous boundary layers; introduction to stability and turbulence; quasi one-dimensional compressible flow; shock waves; unsteady compressible flow; acoustics. ME 200b. Fluid Mechanics (3-0-3) Continuation of ME 200a. ME 211a. Mechanics of Structures and Solids (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Undergraduate strength of materials and stress analysis, AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently). Static and dynamic stress analysis. Two-and three-dimensional theory of stressed elastic solids. Analysis of structural elements with applications in a variety of fields. Variational theorems and approximate solutions, introduction to finite elements. A variety of special topics will be

discussed in the second term such as, but not limited to, elastic stability, wave propagation, and introductory fracture mechanics. ME 211b. Mechanics of Structures and Solids (3-0-3) Continuation of ME 211a. ME 212a. Continuum Mechanics (3-0-3) Elements of Cartesian tensors. Configurations and motions of a body. Kinematicsstudy of deformations, rotations and stretches, polar decomposition. Lagrangian and Eulerian strain velocity and spin tensor fields. Irrotational motions, rigid motions. Kineticsbalance laws. Linear and angular momentum, force, traction stress. Cauchys theorem, properties of Cauchys stress. Equations of motion, equilibrium equations. Power theorem, nominal (Piola-Kirchoff) stress. Thermodynamics of bodies. Internal energy, heat flux, heat supply. Laws of thermodynamics, notions of entropy, absolute temperature. Entropy inequality (Clausius-Duhem). Examples of special classes of constitutive laws for materials without memory. Objective rates, corotational, convected rates. Principles of materials frame indifference. Examples: the isotropic Navier-Stokes fluid, the isotropic thermoelastic solid. Basics of finite differences, finite elements, and boundary integral methods, and their applications to continuum mechanics problems illustrating a variety of classes of constitutive laws. ME 212b. Continuum Mechanics (3-0-3) Continuation of ME 212a. ME 214. Experimental Methods (2-2-4) Prerequisites: AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently), ME 200a and b or ME 211a and b or equivalent (may be taken concurrently). Lectures on experiment design and implementation. Measurement methods, transducer fundamentals, instrumentation, optical systems, signal processing, noise theory, analog and digital electronic fundamentals, with data acquisition and processing systems. ME 221a. Control Theory (2-2-4) Prerequisites: Undergraduate Calculus of One and Several Variables, Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, Probability and Statistics or equivalents; AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 or equivalent may be taken concurrently. An introduction to analysis and design of feedback control systems, including classical control theory in the time and frequency domain. Modeling of physical, biological, and information systems using linear and nonlinear differential equations. linear vs. nonlinear models, and local vs. global behavior, Input/output response, modeling and model reduction, Stability and performance of interconnected systems, including use of block diagrams, Bode plots, the Nyquist criterion, and Lyapunov functions. Robustness and uncertainty management in feedback systems through stochastic and deterministic Basic principles of feedback and its use as a tool for altering the dynamics of systems and managing uncertainty methods. Introductory random processes, Kalman filtering, and norms of signals and systems. ME 221b. Control Theory (2-2-4) Continuation of ME 221a. ME 222a. Mechatronics and Intelligent Systems (2-2-4) Prerequisite: ME 23a and b. Principles, modeling, interfacing and signal conditioning of motion sensors and actuators; acquire and analyze data and interact with operators. Basic electronic devices, embedded microprocessor systems and control, power transfer components and mechanism design. hardware-inthe-loop simulation and rapid prototyping of realtime closed-loop computer control of electromechanical systems; modeling, analysis

and identification of discrete-time or samples-data dynamic systems; commonly used digital controller design methods; introduction to nonlinear effects and their compensation in mechatronic systems; robotic manipulation and sensing; obstacle avoidance and motion planning algorithms; mobile robots, use of vision in navigation systems. The lectures will be divided between a review of the appropriate analytical techniques and a survey of the current research literature. Course work will focus on an independent research project chosen by the student. ME 222b. Mechatronics and Intelligent Systems (2-2-4) Continuation of ME 222a. ME 224. System Identification and Estimation (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ME 221a and b (ME 221 b can be taken concurrently). Deterministic state estimation, recursive observers, estimation for uncertain process dynamics; SISO and MIMO least-squares parameter estimation, linear system subspace identification. Random variables and random processes: linear systems forced by random processes, power-spectral density. Bayesian filtering including Kalman filter. Jump-Markov estimation and fault diagnosis. Nonlinear estimation, particle filters, unscented Kalman filter. Introduction to estimation for hybrid systems. ME 226. Fuzzy Sets in Engineering (3-0-3) Prerequisites: AMCS 201 and AMCS 202, working knowledge of the C computer programming language. The relatively new mathematics of fuzzy sets has recently been used to represent and manipulate vague and imprecise information in engineering. This course will present the basics of fuzzy sets and fuzzy mathematics and explore applications in the areas of data representation; function representation; filters and triggers; engineering design and optimization, including (fuzzy) set-based concurrent engineering. ME 231. Introductory Concepts for Dynamical Systems (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Undergraduate Calculus of One and Several Variables, Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, Probability and Statistics or equivalents. Nonlinear system dynamics. Initialand boundary-value problems, ordinary and partial differential equations. Hybrid system models; modeling/simulation environments such as Dymola, Modelica, Ptolemy, Simulink and StateFlow. Networked system models. System analysis: elementary discretization methods, initial value, ordinary differential equation theory; linearization; convolution, state-space and frequency domain representations; stability, input/output operator norms, least squares and inverse problems; model reduction. ME 232a. Advanced Dynamics (3-0-3) Prerequisite: AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 or equivalents (may be taken concurrently). Basics in topics in dynamics in Euclidean space, including equilibria, stability, Lyapunov functions, periodic solutions, PoincarBendixon theory, Poincar maps. Attractors and structural stability. The Euler-Lagrange equations, mechanical systems, small oscillations, dissipation, energy as a Lyapunov function, conservation laws. Introduction to imple bifurcations and eigenvalue crossing conditions. Discussion of bifurcations in applications, invariant manifolds, the method of averaging, Melnikovs method, and the Smale horseshoe. ME 232b. Advanced Dynamics (3-0-3) Continuation of ME 232a. ME 234a. Introduction to Kinematics and Robotics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently).Introduction to the study of planar, rotational, and spatial motions with applications to robotics, computers, computer graphics, and mechanics. Topics in kinematic analysis will include screw

theory, rotational representations, matrix groups, and Lie algebras. Applications include robot kinematics, mobility in mechanisms, and kinematics of open and closed chain mechanisms. Additional topics in robotics include path planning for robot manipulators, dynamics and control, and assembly. Course work will include laboratory demonstrations using simple robot manipulators. ME 234b. Introduction to Kinematics and Robotics (3-0-3) Continuation of ME 234a. ME 241. Thermodynamics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Undergraduate thermodynamics, AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent. Fundamentals of classical and statistical thermodynamics. Basic postulates, thermodynamic potentials, chemical and phase equilibrium, phase transitions, and thermodynamic properties of solids, liquids, and gases. ME 242. Heat and Mass Transfer (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Undergraduate thermodynamics, AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 (may be taken concurrently). Transport properties, conservation equations, conduction heat transfer, convective heat and mass transport in laminar and turbulent flows, phase change processes, thermal radiation. ME 244. Combustion (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ME 241 or equivalent. Basic principles including chemical equilibrium, Arrhenius law, and Rankine-Hugoniot relations will be first discussed. Multi-component conservation equations with chemical reaction will be introduced. Various characteristics of premixed and diffusion flames will be studied which covers flame structure, flame stability, flame stabilization, flammability limit, quenching distance, and thermal explosion. Combustion phenomena in gas turbines, gasoline engines, diesel engines and power plants will be discussed. A matched asymptotic expansion technique will be introduced and applied in analyzing flame structures. ME 246. Laser Diagnostics for Thermal Engineering (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ME 241 or equivalent. Non-intrusive measurement techniques using lasers in thermo-fluid fields to probe temperature, species concentration and velocity. Principles of lasers. Geometrical and physical optics. Quantum mechanical nature of diatomic molecules, including rotational vibrational, and electronic transition frequencies. Mie and Rayleigh scattering. Raman scattering. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique for minor species. Coherent anti-Stokes-Raman spectroscopy (CARS) for temperature and major species. Laser induced incandescence (LII) for soot volume fraction. Velocity measurement techniques including laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). ME 250. Energy (3-0-3) Review of first and second laws of thermodynamics. Principles of energy conversion: vapor power cycles, combustion, combined cycle, and fuel cells. Modeling and forecasting. Heating, transportation, and electricity demand. Fossil-fuel supplies: oil, natural gas, coal, oil sands, and oil shale. Alternative energy sources: hydroelectric, nuclear fission and fusion, wind, biomass, geothermal, biofuels, waves, ocean thermal, solar photovoltaic, and solar thermal. Transportation systems: internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and electric vehicles. Energy systems: pipelines, rail and water transport, shipping, carbon capture and sequestration, transmission lines and electricity distribution networks. Energy policy: efficiency regulations, biofuels vs food, water impacts, air pollution, and climate.

ME 252. Sustainable Energy Engineering (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Undergraduate Thermodynamics, AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 (may be taken concurrently), ME 250. An in-depth examination of engineering systems to convert, store, transport, and use energy, with emphasis on technologies that reduce or eliminate dependence on fossil fuels and/or emission of greenhouse gases. Topics include thermodynamics of energy conversion, energy resources, stationary power generation (vapor power cycles, combined cycles, solar thermal systems, nuclear fission and fusion, solar photovoltaics, fuel cells, wind, geothermal), carbon sequestration, alternative fuels (hydrogen, biofuels), and transportation systems (internal combustion engines, gas turbines, fuel cell and electric vehicles). The course will emphasize using quantitative methods to assess and compare different technologies. ME 254. Theory and Methods in Product Design (2-2-4) Prerequisite: graduate standing in mechanical engineering or consent of instructor. The engineering design process and conceptual design of products. This course provides an experience in preliminary project planning of complex and realistic mechanical engineering systems. Design concepts and techniques are introduced, and the students design ability is developed in a design or feasibility study chosen to emphasize innovation and ingenuity and provide wide coverage of engineering topics. Design optimization and social, economic and political implications are included. Emphasis on hands-on creative components, teamwork and effective communication. Special emphasis on management of innovation processes for sustainable products, from product definition to sustainable manufacturing and financial models. The patent process. Both individual and group oral presentations are made, and participation in conferences is required. ME 256. Computer-Aided Engineering Design (1-2-3) Prerequisites: AMCS 201 and AMCS 202, working knowledge of the C computer programming language. Methods and algorithms for design of engineering systems using computer techniques. Topics include the design process; interactive computer graphics; curves and surfaces (including cubic and B-splines); solid modeling (including constructive solid geometry and boundary models); kinematic and dynamic mechanism simulation; single and multivariable optimization; optimal design, and symbolic manipulation. Assessment of CAD as an aid to the design process. ME 290. Mechanical Engineering Seminar (1 credit) All candidates for the M.S. degree in mechanical engineering are required to attend one graduate seminar in any division each week of the Fall and Spring Semesters and 3 graduate seminars each week of the Winter Enrichment Program. Graded pass/fail. ME 299. Individual Study or Research (variable credit) Prerequisites: M.S. status and consent of instructor. Course may be repeated for credit. Maximum number of units is 3 per semester (6 in the Summer). Must be taken on a pass/fail basis. Individual investigation on topics of relevance to mechanical engineering. ME 300. Advanced Fluid Mechanics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 200a and b or equivalent; AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 (may be taken concurrently). A more rigorous mathematical introduction to fluid mechanics. Derivation of Navier-Stokes; physical properties of real gases; the equations of motion of viscous and inviscid dynamics; the dynamical significance of vorticity; vortex dynamics; Kelvin circulation theorem and consequences; Biot-Savart Law, exact solutions in vortex dynamics; motion at high

Reynolds numbers; hydrodynamic stability; boundary layers; flow past bodies; compressible flow; subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow; Lax theory of shock waves. ME 302. Multi-Phase Flows (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 241, AMCS 201 and AMCS 202, ME 200a and b, ME 211a and b or equivalents. Selected topics in engineering twophase flows with emphasis on practical problems in modern hydro-systems. Fundamental fluid mechanics and heat, mass, and energy transport in multiphase flows. Liquid/vapor/gas (LVG) flows, nucleation, bubble dynamics, cavitating and boiling flows, models of LVG flows; instabilities, dynamics, and wave propagation; fluid/structure interactions. Discussion of two-phase flow problems in conventional, nuclear, and geothermal power plants, marine hydrofoils, and other hydraulic systems. ME 304. Experimental Methods in Fluid Mechanics (2-2-4) Prerequisites: ME 200a and b or equivalent; AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 (may be taken concurrently). Basic sampling theory. Spectral decomposition, aliasing, Nyquist criterion and dynamic range. Basic optics, lasers, diffraction limit. Particle tracking and streak photography. Point measurements of velocity, pitot static tube, hot wires, laser-doppler velocimetry. Measurements of velocity fields in planes and volumes, using particle image velocimetry. Micro-PIV. Measurement of scalar fields. Holographic PIV. High-speed video technology. This course has a significant laboratory component. ME 305a. Computational Fluid Dynamics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 200a and b or equivalent; AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 or equivalent. Introduction to floating point arithmetic. Introduction to numerical methods for Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with emphasis on error analysis, consistency, accuracy and stability. Modified equation analysis (dispersion vs. dissipation) and Von Neumann stability analysis. Finite difference methods, finite volume and spectral element methods. Explicit vs. implicit time stepping methods. Solution of systems of linear algebraic systems. Higher-order vs. higher resolution methods. Computation of turbulent flows. Compressible flows with high-resolution shock-capturing methods (e.g. PPM, MUSCL, WENO). Theory of Riemann problems and weak solutions for hyperbolic equations. ME 305b. Computational Fluid Dynamics (3-0-3) Continuation of ME 305a. ME 306. Hydrodynamic Stability (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ME 200a and b or equivalent; AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 (may be taken concurrently). Laminar-stability theory as a guide to laminar-turbulent transition. Rayleigh equation, instability criteria, and response to small inviscid disturbances. Discussion of Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and other instabilities, for example, in geophysical flows. The OrrSommerfeld equation, the dual role of viscosity, and boundary-layer stability. Modern concepts such as pseudomomentum conservation laws and nonlinear stability theorems for 2-D and geophysical flows. ME 307. Turbulence (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 200a and b; AMCS 201 and AMCS 202. Introduction to turbulence. Fundamental equations of turbulent flow. Statistical description of turbulence. Experimental methods for turbulence. Reynolds equations. Kolmogorovs theory. Scales of turbulence. Homogeneous turbulence. Free-shear flows. Bounded flows. Boundary

layers. Simulating turbulent flows. Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes approach. Introduction to Large Eddy Simulation. ME 308. Introduction to Plasma Physics and Magneto-hydrodynamics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 200a and b; AMCS 201 and AMCS 202. Motion of charged particles; Statistical behavior of plasmas. Vlasov and Fokker-Planck equations and derivation of fluid models for plasmasclosure problem and models. Dispersive waves in plasmas. Ideal and non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamics. Exact solutions. Alfvn and shock waves in MHD. MHD instabilities. ME 310. Mechanics and Materials Aspects of Fracture (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 211a and b (concurrently) or equivalent and instructors permission. Analytical and experimental techniques in the study of fracture in metallic and nonmetallic solids. Mechanics of brittle and ductile fracture; connections between the continuum descriptions of fracture and micromechanisms. Discussion of elastic-plastic fracture analysis and fracture criteria. Special topics include fracture by cleavage, void growth, rate sensitivity, crack deflection and toughening mechanisms, as well as fracture of nontraditional materials. Fatigue crack growth and life prediction techniques will also be discussed. In addition, dynamic stress wave dominated, failure initiation growth and arrest phenomena will be covered. This will include traditional dynamic fracture considerations as well as discussions of failure by adiabatic shear localization. ME 319a. Computational Solid Mechanics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 or equivalent; ME 211a and b or equivalent; ME 212a and b or taken concurrently. Variational principles in linear elasticity. Finite element analysis. Error estimation. Convergence. Singularities. Adaptive strategies. Constrained problems. Mixed methods. Stability and convergence. Variational problems in nonlinear elasticity. Consistent linearization. The NewtonRahpson method. Bifurcation analysis. Adaptive strategies in nonlinear elasticity. Constrained finite deformation problems. Contact and friction. Time integration. Algorithm analysis. Accuracy, stability, and convergence. Operator splitting and product formulas. Coupled problems. Impact and friction. Space-time methods. Inelastic solids. Constitutive updates. Stability and convergence. Consistent linearization. Applications to finite deformation viscoplasticity, viscoelasticity, and Lagrangian modeling of solids. ME 319b. Computational Solid Mechanics (3-0-3) Continuation of ME 319a. ME 312. Dynamic Behavior of Material (3-0-3) Prerequisites: AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 or equivalent; ME 211a and b. Fundamentals of theory of wave propagation; plane waves, wave guides, dispersion relations; dynamic plasticity, adiabatic shear banding; dynamic fracture; shock waves, equation of state. ME 313a. Theory of Structures (3-0-3) Geometry of spatial curves; finite 3-D rotations; finite deformations of curved rods; dynamics of rods; strings and cables; theory of plastic rods; statistical mechanics of chains; applications including frames and cable structures, polymers, open-cell foams, DNA mechanics, cell mechanics; small strain and von Karman theory of plates; applications to thin films, layered structures, functionally graded thin films, delamination, plastic collapse; surface geometry; finite deformations of shells; dynamics of plates and shells; membranes; theory of plastic plates and shells;

fracture of plates and shells; elastic and plastic stability; wrinkling and relaxation; applications including solar sails, space structures, closedcell foams, biological membranes; numerical methods for structural analysis; discrete geometry; finite elements for rods, plates and shells; time-integration methods; thermal analysis. ME 313b. Theory of Structures (3-0-3) Continuation of ME 313a. ME 314. Plasticity (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ME 211a and b or instructors permission. Theory of dislocations in crystalline media. Characteristics of dislocations and their influence on the mechanical behavior in various crystal structures. Application of dislocation theory to single and polycrystal plasticity. Theory of the inelastic behavior of materials with negligible time effects. Experimental background for metals and fundamental postulates for plastic stress-strain relations. Variational principles for incremental elasticplastic problems, uniqueness. Upper and lower bound theorems of limit analysis and shakedown. Slip line theory and applications. Additional topics may include soils, creep and rate-sensitive effects in metals, the thermodynamics of plastic deformation, and experimental methods in plasticity. ME 315. Computational Mechanics Using Particle Methods (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 319 or equivalent. Particle simulations of continuum and discrete systems. Advances in molecular, mesoscopic, and macroscale simulations using particles, identification of common computing paradigms and challenges across disciplines, discretizations and representations using particles, fast summation algorithms, time integrators, constraints, and multiresolution. Exercises will draw on problems simulated using particles from diverse areas such as fluid and solid mechanics, computer graphics, and nanotechnology. ME 316. Micromechanics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 or equivalent, ME 211a and b and ME 212a and b or instructors permission. The course gives a broad overview of micromechanics, emphasizing the microstructure of materials, its connection to Mechanical Engineering. Courses molecular structure, and its consequences on macroscopic properties. Topics include phase transformations in crystalline solids, including martensitic, ferroelectric, and diffusional phase transformations, twinning and domain patterns, active materials; effective properties of composites and polycrystals, linear and nonlinear homogenization; defects, including dislocations, surface steps, and domain walls; thin films, asymptotic methods, morphological instabilities, self-organization; selected applications to microactuation, thin-film processing, composite materials, mechanical properties, and materials design. ME 317a. Mechanics of Composite Materials and Structures (3-03) Prerequisite: ME 211a and b or instructors permission; AMCS 201 and AMCS 202. Introduction and fabrication technologies. Elastic response of composite materials (especially fiber and particulate reinforced materials) from the fabrication to the in-service structure. Up scaling strategies from the microstructure to the single ply: kinematic and static bounds, asymptotic expansion and periodical homogenization. Up scaling strategies from the single ply to the structural scale: elastic deformation of multidirectional laminates (lamination theory, ABD matrix). Mechanics of degradation in composite materials: fibermatrix debonding, plasticity, microcracking and induced delamination. Tools for description of non-linear effects: damage mechanics for

laminates, applications of fracture mechanics. Aging and fatigue. Basic criteria-based theories will also be reviewed, including first ply failure, splitting and delamination. Basic experimental illustration will include: hand lay up of a simple laminate, characterization using full field measurement of its material properties. ME 317b. Mechanics of Composite Materials and Structures (3-03) Continuation of ME 317a. ME 318. Dynamic Fracture and Frictional Faulting (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ME 211a and b or ME 212a and b or instructors permission. Introduction to elastodynamics and waves in solids. Dynamic fracture theory, energy concepts, cohesive zone models. Friction laws, nucleation of frictional instabilities, dynamic rupture of frictional interfaces. Radiation from moving cracks. Thermal effects during dynamic fracture and faulting. Crack branching and faulting along nonplanar interfaces. Related dynamic phenomena, such as adiabatic shear localization. Applications to engineering phenomena and physics and mechanics of earthquakes. ME 320. Geometry of Nonlinear Systems (3-0-3) Prerequisite: AMCS 202. Basic differential geometry, oriented toward applications in control and dynamical systems. Topics include smooth manifolds and mappings, tangent and normal bundles. Vector fields and flows. Distributions and Frobeniuss theorem. Matrix Control and Dynamical Systems. Lie groups and Lie algebras. Exterior differential forms, Stokes theorem. ME 324. Advanced Control Systems (3-0-3) Prerequisites: AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 or equivalent; ME 221a and b or equivalent. Introduction to modern control systems with emphasis on the role of control in overall system analysis and design. Input-output directions in multivariable systems: eigenvalues and singular value decomposition. System norms and introduction to MIMO robustness. Controller design for multivariable plants: linear quadratic regulator, linear quadratic Gaussian optimal control, H-infinity and H-2 control, sampled-data, model predictive control. Convex design methods: Youla parameterization, linear matrix inequalities; adaptive control, neural networks, fuzzy logic systems; introduction to neuro-fuzzy systems and soft computing. Multivariable control design examples drawn from throughout engineering and science in the field of aerospace, automotive, chemical-and energy-efficient buildings. ME 326. Robust Control (3-0-3) Prerequisites: AMCS 201 and AMCS 202 or equivalents; ME 221a and b or equivalent. Linear systems, realization theory, time and frequency response, norms and performance, stochastic noise models, robust stability and performance, linear fractional transformations, structured uncertainty, optimal control, model reduction, m analysis and synthesis, real parametric uncertainty, Kharitonovs theorem, uncertainty modeling. ME 332. Geometric Mechanics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 232. The geometry and dynamics of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems, including symplectic and Poisson manifolds, variational principles, Lie groups, momentum maps, rigid-body dynamics, Euler-Poincar equations, stability, and an introduction to reduction theory. More advanced topics (taught in a course the following year) will include reduction theory, fluid dynamics, the energy momentum method, geometric phases, bifurcation theory for mechanical systems, and nonholonomic systems. ME 340. Advanced Combustion Theory (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 244 or equivalent classes.

Review of fundamental concept of and phenomenology of combustion. Singularities in nonlinear problems. Matched asymptotic expansion technique. Large activation energy, Dankhler number and rate ratio asymptotics. Ignition/extinction. Laminar burning velocity. Diffusion flame. Aerodynamic effect. Preferential diffusion, differential diffusion, and heat loss effects. Hydrodynamic and acoustic instabilities. Reduced mechanisms. ME 342. Combustion Kinetics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 244 or equivalent. Nonequilibrium processes in chemically reacting gases. Example applications to combustion, atmospheric chemistry, plasmas, chemical and materials processing, rocket nozzles, and gaseous lasers. Bimolecular reaction theory (collision theory); transition state theory; unimolecular and association reactions; complex reactions; straight chain reactions; explosions and branched chain reactions; photochemistry, photophysics; energy transfer in fuel tracers; vibrational relaxation; experimental techniques. ME 344. Gasdynamics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 241. Concepts and techniques for description of high-temperature and chemically reacting gases from a molecular point of view. Introductory kinetic theory; chemical thermodynamics; statistical mechanics as applied to properties of gases and gas mixtures; transport and thermodynamic properties; law of mass action; equilibrium chemical composition; Maxwellian and Boltzmann distributions of velocity and molecular energy; examples and applications from areas of current interest such as combustion and materials processing. ME 346. Turbulent Combustion (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 244, ME 307 or equivalents. Governing equations of reactive fluid flow. Review of fundamental concepts in turbulence. Non-premixed turbulent combustion. Conserved scalar modeling approach and turbulent nonpremixed combustion models. Premixed turbulent combustion fundamentals and combustion regimes. Canonical models for premixed turbulent combustion. Partially premixed combustion. Scaling laws for lifted turbulent jet flames. ME 397. Ph.D. Dissertation Prerequisites: Ph.D. status and consent of instructor. Course may be repeated for credit. Maximum number of units is 12 per semester. Must be taken on a pass/fail basis. Individual investigation on topics of relevance to mechanical engineering. ME 400. Contemporary Topics in Fluid Mechanics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 200a and b and consent of the instructor. Lecture and/or seminar course on advanced topics in fluid mechanics. Topics are determined by the instructor and may vary from year to year. The course may be repeated for credit. ME 410. Contemporary Topics in Solid Mechanics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 211a and b, ME 212a and b and consent of the instructor. Lecture and/or seminar course on advanced topics in solid mechanics. Topics are determined by the instructor and may vary from year to year. The course may be repeated for credit.

ME 420. Contemporary Topics in Control Theory and Practice (3-03) Prerequisites: ME 221a and b and consent of the instructor. Lecture and/or seminar course on advanced topics in control theory and practice. Topics are determined by the instructor and may vary from year to year. The course may be repeated for credit. ME 430. Contemporary Topics in Dynamic (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 232a and b and consent of the instructor. Lecture and/or seminar course on advanced topics in dynamics. Topics are determined by the instructor and may vary from year to year. The course may be repeated for credit. Maximum number of units is 3 per semester. ME 440. Contemporary Topics in Thermal Science and Engineering (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ME 241 and ME 242 or ME 244 and consent of the instructor. Lecture and/or seminar course on advanced topics in thermal science and engineering. Topics are determined by the instructor and may vary from year to year. The course may be repeated for credit. ME 450. Contemporary Topics in Design Theory and Practice (3-03) Prerequisites: ME 254 and consent of the instructor. Lecture and/or seminar course on advanced topics in design theory and practice. Topics are determined by the instructor and may vary from year to year. The course may be repeated for credit.