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Merton 18 Rooms, 6 BR, 7 BA.

River Hills 11 Rooms, 4 BR,

4.5 BA. $849,000 #51439

6

Menomonee Falls 17 Rooms,

Shorewood 9 Rooms, 3 BR,

River Hills 8 Rooms, 4 BR,

$3,795,000 #59546

BR, 4.5 BA. $839,900

2.5

BA. $799,900 #69578

3 BA. $599,900 #66923

Kelly Seaman & Associates:

Pam Grant:

#67844 Gail Krajewski:

Deborah Gollin, ABR:

Wendy Crawford:

(414) 755-1660

(414) 559-5563

(414) 254-2133

(414) 755-1687

(414) 232-0663

Mequon 11 Rooms, 4 BR,

 

Richfield 11 Rooms, 4 BR,

2.5

BA. $595,000 #69628

2.5

BA. $550,000 #67651

Julie Alberts:

 

Gail Krajewski:

(262) 488-3313

(414) 254-2133

Delafield 10 Rooms, 5 BR,

Delafield 9 Rooms, 4 BR,

3.5

BA. $509,000 #69933

2.5

BA. $509,000 #66161

Marilee & Laura

 

Marilee & Laura

Baranowski:

Baranowski:

(414) 581-8518

(414) 581-8518

Whitefish Bay 8 Rooms, 4 BR,

Brookfield 13 Rooms, 4 BR,

1.5

BA. $489,000 #70405

2.5

BA. $439,000 #64955

Molly Abrohams & Sarah

 

Donna & Jim Zarek:

Pavlak: (414) 755-1621

(414) 791-4055

Delafield 8 Rooms, 4 BR,

Milwaukee 4 Rooms, 2 BR,

Brookfield 10 Rooms, 4 BR,

Mequon 8 Rooms, 4 BR,

Mequon 7 Rooms, 4 BR, 2 BA.

2.5

BA. $415,000 #69674

2

BA. $414,900 #65432

2.5 BA. $399,000 #61469

2.5

BA. $375,000 #70195

$372,500 #65148

Cindy Fleming:

Tom Riley:

Donna & Jim Zarek:

Wendy Crawford:

Tom Riley:

(262) 424-5711

(414) 755-1640

(414) 791-4055

(414) 232-0663

(414) 755-1640

Elkhart Lake 6 Rooms, 2 BR,

Brookfield 7 Rooms, 3 BR,

Milwaukee 6 Rooms, 3 BR,

Brookfield 9 Rooms, 4 BR,

Brookfield 8 Rooms, 4 BR,

3.5

BA. $359,000 #58625

3

BA. $355,000 #66625

3

BA. $329,900 #62124

2.5

BA. $299,900 #67650

2.5

BA. $224,900 #69507

Christine Krieg:

Susan Godfrey:

Molly Abrohams & Sarah

Leo Fitzgerald:

Cindy Fleming:

(414) 840-8486

(414) 807-3303

Pavlak: (414) 755-1621

(414) 350-9091

(262) 424-5711

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All Saints, Elmbrook Memorial, St. Francis, St. Joseph In Partnership with the Felician Sisters
All Saints, Elmbrook Memorial,
St. Francis, St. Joseph
In Partnership with the Felician Sisters
Milwaukee’s Lifestyle Magazine Publishers Gail Schulz Ostermann, Philip Paige editor Philip Paige, ppaige@conleynet.com
Milwaukee’s Lifestyle Magazine Publishers Gail Schulz Ostermann, Philip Paige editor Philip Paige, ppaige@conleynet.com

Milwaukee’s

Lifestyle Magazine

Publishers

Gail Schulz Ostermann, Philip Paige

editor

Philip Paige, ppaige@conleynet.com

Managing editors

Jordan Dechambre, jdechambre@conleynet.com Janet Raasch, jraasch@conleynet.com Amy Siewert, asiewert@conleynet.com

senior art director

Francine Demler-Gimla

grouP art director, conleY MagaZines

Chris Westin

graPhic designers

Gail Betla, Shailah Handy, Carol Reichelt

staff PhotograPher

Dan Bishop

advertising director

Gail Schulz Ostermann, gostermann@conleynet.com

account executives

Anne Altmann-White, Angela Mulberry-McGee, Pam Pozzi, Laura Schmidt

ProMotions director

Suzanne Fedie

contributing Writers

Laurie Arendt, Nan Bialek, Cathy Breitenbucher, Martin Hintz, Rebecca Konya, Brendan O’Brien, JoAnn Petaschnick, Pam Percy, Cari Taylor-Carlson, Lisa Jones Townsel, Anne Wangman

contributing PhotograPhers

Doug Edmunds, Tamara Conley Gogin, Moosie, Scott Paulus, AM Tapia, Daniel Wilson

circulation

Katie Kochelek

advertising dePartMent

Display Advertising

262-375-5100

(fax) 262-376-2904

Shops & Services Advertising

414-507-4154

Billing & Circulation

262-375-5100

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Mary Van Meter, (303) 575-9595

M (USPS: 018-986) is published monthly by Conley Media. Editorial, Advertising and Circulation offices are located at W61 N306 Washington Ave. Suite L1, Cedarburg, WI 53012; phone 262/375-5100. www.mmagazinemilwaukee.com. Peri- odicals postage paid at Cedarburg, WI and at additional mailing offices. Volume 15, Number 6, POSTMASTER: Send address changes to M, PO Box 47, Cedarburg, WI 53012. Subscription:

12 issues for $15. Please allow 4-6 weeks for subscription ful- fillment or change of address. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Copyright 2011, Conley Media.

permission is prohibited. Copyright 2011, Conley Media. James E. Conley Jr., President Circulation Audited by BPA

James E. Conley Jr., President

Copyright 2011, Conley Media. James E. Conley Jr., President Circulation Audited by BPA Worldwide Member of

Circulation Audited by BPA Worldwide

Member of City & Regional Magazine Association

April 2011 | Volume 15

|

No. 5

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April 2011 Contents 97 32 105 6 M | April 2011 Departments Columns 1 4

April 2011

Contents

97
97
32
32
105
105
April 2011 Contents 97 32 105 6 M | April 2011 Departments Columns 1 4 From

6 M | April 2011

Departments

Columns

14

From the Editors

16

From the Publisher

Cream City

20

Weather-Proofed Fun

10 things to do this month.

22

Urban Renewal

Project builds a stronger Latino community.

24

Against the Grain

Urban(wood) Encounter raises awareness.

26

Meet the Skipper

The Ron Roenicke era begins.

28

All Things Mommy

Event planner redirects focus.

32

Dynamic Diva

Cassandra McShepard is more than a talking head.

34

Hit the Road

Ride in style this season.

40

Datebook

56

Out & About

Health

46 Fatigue Fighters

Cancer patients encouraged to exercise.

Mode

62 What Lies Beneath

Sweet and sexy lingerie.

Special Section

66 High Style

Luxury properties offer the total package.

Dwellings

74

City Sophisticate

Downtown condo exudes glamour and elegance.

80

Dream Big

Tips for finding an interior designer.

83

Where Inspiration Blooms

Playful pieces create vacation atmosphere.

90

Dramatic Domain

Home combines nature and style.

97

Modern Love

Contemporary setting showcases art collection.

Taste

105 Dish: BelAir Cantina

106 Chef Speak: Peggy Magister, Crazy Water

107 Filter: Eat and Play

108 Restaurant Guide

Cover photography by Dan bishop

CorreCtion: It was incorrectly stated in the March issue that Big Bay Brewing Co. is under license with the Milwaukee Brewing Co. Big Bay has an alternating proprietorship with Milwaukee Brewing Co.

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From the Editors

The Power of Place

A t what point does a house become a home?

For many it’s the moment we fill it with personal possessions, claiming the space as our own. It’s all about the power of place, and how you define yourself

through your own sense of style. It’s more than placing furniture and adding accessories. The atmosphere is created through your daily ritu- als, and entertaining family and friends. And as editors we look forward to the Home and Garden Issue, when we are able to showcase some of our new favorite projects. There’s the newly built home in Mequon that capitalizes on its natural setting (page 90), an art collector’s loft in the Third Ward (page 97), and the high-rise sophistication of a downtown condo dripping with glamour (page 74). But part of home is also the land that encompasses it. Check out one couple’s interpretation of its rural landscape (page 83).

couple’s interpretation of its rural landscape (page 83). Thinking about decorating your home but the thought

Thinking about decorating your home but the thought makes you break out in a cold sweat? Take tips from the experts (page 80) for find- ing an interior designer that’s right for you. Although the anticipation of spring may be the first thing on our minds, Mother Nature can still be very unpredictable during this season. To that end, we share 10 ideas (page 20) on how to beat cabin fever — and stay warm and dry in the process. Maybe you’re looking for a little more outdoor adventure, and hit- ting the pavement on a bicycle is what you had in mind. Four local bike shops unveil the latest in bicycles, from cruisers to high-tech rides for the serious athlete (page 34). Whatever adventure awaits you, remember spring is a time of rebirth and fresh starts — whether it’s from the comforts of your home or out on the open road.

— Janet Raasch, Jordan Dechambre and Amy Siewert, managing editors

home or out on the open road. — Janet Raasch, Jordan Dechambre and Amy Siewert, managing
Phil in the Blank by PHIL PAIGE, PUBLISHER
Phil in the Blank
by PHIL PAIGE,
PUBLISHER

10 things to Appreciate in April

T.S. Elliot called April the cruelest month. Edna

St. Vincent Millay said it was for idiots. That Shelly

dude said something profound about showers and May flowers. Here’s something more to look forward to in April:

“This sport is designed to break your heart. The game begins in the spring, when everything is new again, and it blossoms in the summer, filling the afternoons and evenings, and then as soon as

the chill rains come, it stops, and leaves you to face the winter alone.” — Baseball’s late Commissioner

A. Bart Giamatti

There’s nothing wrong with April, the month — not the person who cuts my hair, but we don’t have time to get into that now either. That should probably be a separate column … Anyway, it’s all how you deal with it. You can

complain because roses have thorns, or you can rejoice because thorns have roses. For those of you who don’t get that, try substituting suds and beer. April can be a great month in this great city:

1. The Brewers are still in first place.

2. Bobby G. doesn’t come out of hibernation for

two more weeks.

3. It’s a particularly good month for romance in

Milwaukee, but then so are July, September, Octo- ber, November, May, March, June, December and August. That’s what I read in some magazine, any- way. It probably has something to do with our new website, the Fonzie statue, Jordan’s recent trip to Fashion Week in New York, Holi Parker’s mysteri- ous disappearance at the last meeting of the Man- ly Men’s/Girl Haters Club at Ernie’s, and the Dan Brown conspiracy theory connection between these seemingly random events.

4. A Men’s Health poll indicates we’re less “pissed off” than most other places in the country. It undoubtedly has something to do with Sprecher beer and Tomaso’s pizza. Scott Walker moving to

Madison didn’t hurt either. (Before you call, please be aware there are two ways to interpret that last statement.)

5. My friend Gonzo, who spends the winter in

Arizona, comes back this month. (Oh, wait. That

entry actually belongs on the “Great Things About Winter” list. It may also be a key component of No. 4.)

6. My younger friend Jerry likes to depart from

our health club some mornings by telling me he

has to get off to work to pay for my impending Social Security. April 15 is your day, buddy. Keep my retirement fund growing. Next month we’ll see

if you can take a half-day off on a Sunday. No

promises! But, maybe, just maybe …

7. I store my Porsche for the winter. I could take

it for a drive if the battery wasn’t dead, and I move

six garbage cans, a snow blower, all the lawn fur-

niture that goes on the deck and patio, two bikes,

a large bucket of balls, bats, skates and rodents,

three bags of lawn fertilizer, some kind of soc- cer net and my daughter’s Volvo, which also has a

dead battery and is parked behind it. Maybe next month …

8. I won’t have to hear, “Is it cold enough for ya?”

until at least October.

9. More terrifying than Stephen King’s latest

1,000-pager, this is our Home and Garden Issue. While zombies, werewolves and things that go bump in the night may leave you scared spitless, it’s landscaping, gardening, fertilizing, pruning and lawn mowing that give me nightmares, also known as “the willies” if you live in Cedarburg. Luckily, it’s too cold this month to worry about

those lost episodes of “True Blood”-type chores. Instead, we can focus on the NCAA tournament, baseball and the couch. 10. Fran, our art director, is telling me my column

is too long, and I need to cut it. Anyway, the abso-

lutely very best thing about April in Milwaukee is

an InSIdeR’S guIde To MeTRo MIlWaukee

Cream City

People

|

Culture

|

Trends

Get Rollin’ Hop on the seat and hit the road this spring for a little

Get Rollin’

Hop on the seat and hit the road this spring for a little outdoor recre- ation. There are miles of paved and unpaved trails throughout the Metro Milwaukee area. If you need a little extra oompf for getting up that big hill, try Trek’s Ride + electric assist bike, available at Wheel and Sprocket’s Mil- waukee area locations for $2,529.99. It comes with its own battery and an adjustable power system that kicks in when you need a little push. For more cutting-edge bikes, turn to page 34.

Cream City » Short Take

 
 

The red-shirted Rushin’ Rollettes battle the Crazy Eights recently at the U.S. Cellular Arena. Brew City Bruisers roller girls teams are in action at the Cell this month.

Weather-Proofed Fun

by Rebecca Konya | photography by Moosie

 

April showers mAy bring mAy flowers, but Milwaukee area residents are well aware how fickle spring weather can be here. With temperatures known to swing from balmy to subzero in less time than it takes to say “cold front,” we’ve compiled a list of indoor activities that are sure to please no matter what the elements.

1.

Reach New Heights

interns take over Stiemke Studio.

Milwaukee Turners Climbing Alliance

Night owls are treated to a range of

performance pieces presented by The Rep’s Artistic Intern Ensemble.

Test your athletic prowess at this unique urban indoor climbing facility.

 

N. 4th St., Milwaukee

Milwaukee Repertory Theater,

 

1034

5-10 p.m. Tue-Thu, noon-5 p.m. Sat-Sun. Learn to climb rate: $25 per one-hour class; day pass: $8; gear rental: $3 per item.

108

Midnight, April 1-4, for ticket information,

E. Wells St., Milwaukee

call (414) 224-9490 or e-mail tickets@milwaukeerep.com.

 

2.

Find Your Inner Artist

 

5. Hit the Museums

 

Friday Night Life Drawing

“Frank Lloyd Wright: Organic Architecture for the 21st Century”

Aspiring artists are invited to draw the nude male or female figure from a variety of poses.

Architecture buff or not, check out this

UW-Milwaukee Peck School of the Arts,

ground-breaking exhibition, featuring more than

 

2400

E. Kenwood Blvd., Milwaukee

100

rare drawings, photos and video footage.

7-10 p.m. Fridays; $7 per session, $30 for five sessions, $50 for 10 sessions, $80

Milwaukee Art Museum,

for 20 sessions.

700

Through May 15, free to members and children (12 and under); $12 adults; $10 seniors and teens.

“Mummies of the World”

N. Art Museum Drive, Milwaukee

3.

Cheer for Harry

“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows — Part 1: The IMAX Experience”

Watch Harry Potter come to life on the

Don’t miss the largest exhibition of mummies

and related artifacts ever assembled. Relics on display date back 6,500 years.

IMAX screen as he struggles to defeat the Dark Lord.

IMAX theater, 800 W. Wells St., Milwaukee. March 4-April 24, $9 adults, $8 seniors and teens, $7 children ages 3-12 and museum members.

Milwaukee Public Museum,

 

800

Through May 30; nonmembers: $22.50 adults, $19 seniors and teens, $15.50 children ages 3-12; members: $10 adults, $8 seniors and teens, $6.50 children.

W. Wells St., Milwaukee

4.

Check Out REP LAB

Anything can happen when the

6. Take in Gallery Night

Milwaukee’s premier art event for gallery hopping and art viewing, featuring 50 venues throughout the downtown area.

Downtown Milwaukee and Historic Third Ward April 15-16; free.

7. See a Broadway Musical

“Rock of Ages”

Witness a small-town girl and a big-city rocker fall in love while rocking out to iconic ’80s hits.

Milwaukee Theater,

500 W. Kilbourn Ave., Milwaukee

April 29-May 1; visit milwaukeetheatre.com for show times and ticket prices.

“Beauty and the Beast”

A tale as old as time, true as it can be, the musical version of Disney’s award-winning animated feature film is sure to win your heart.

Milwaukee Theater,

500 W. Kilbourn Ave., Milwaukee

April 15-17; visit milwaukeetheatre.com

for show times and ticket prices.

“Les Miserables”

Catch the 25th anniversary production of this legendary musical, complete with new staging and spectacular scenery inspired by artist Victor Hugo.

Marcus Center for the Performing Arts,

929 N. Water St., Milwaukee

April 19-24; visit marcuscenter.org for show times and ticket prices.

8. See Hell on Wheels

Brew City Bruisers Semi-final Action

See the Brew City Bruisers teams kick some serious butt during the roller derby semi-finals. Featured in the new Wii game, Jam City Rollergirls, Milwaukee’s roller derby league is pure entertainment on wheels.

U.S. Cellular Arena,

400 W. Kilbourn Ave., Milwaukee

7 p.m., April 17; $15 adults, $12 seniors and children 12 and younger.

9. Feel the Beat

MSO Pops – A tribute to Cole Porter

Anything goes when conductor Marvin Hamlisch and the Milwaukee Symphony Pops pay tribute to composer Cole Porter.

Marcus Center for the Performing Arts,

929 N. Water St., Milwaukee

April 8-10; $25-$95, visit mso.org for show times and ticket information.

10. Dust Off Your Compound Bow

Take aim at Wisconsin’s only public indoor archery range, which boasts a 40-yard 3D range and 20-yard dart video range.

Buck Rub Outfitters, W28400 Silvernail Road, Pewaukee 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Mon -Thu, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Fri, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat-Sun; call (262) 547-0535 for pricing.

Cream City » Short Take

David Shields, a Marquette University priest, created the Casa Romero Renewal Center, which offers outreach
David Shields, a Marquette University
priest, created the Casa Romero
Renewal Center, which offers
outreach programs for the
Latino community.
Urban Renewal

by brendan o’brien | photography by dan bishop

The Rev. David Shields believes he has experienced a bit of divine intervention. Without a debilitating disease that struck him about two decades ago, the Jesuit priest might never have come to Milwaukee and created Casa Romero Renewal Center, a bilingual retreat on Bruce Street that offers spiritual programs to the Latino community. “We say our mission statement is to form and renew individuals, and to strengthen the family and build the community,” Shields says during an interview at the center. “That is the real goal. How can we build a stronger civic community, a stronger faith community and a stronger com- munity in Milwaukee? Our goal is a better Milwaukee and a better society.” The center is home to more than a dozen inventive faith-based programs that focus on the Latino family and the journey of life. The La Quinceañera — Dreaming a Future of Hope pro- gram is a day-long bilingual retreat for teenage girls and their mothers to connect and build a stronger relationship. Another program — Canasta Liena — is a four-session retreat intended to strengthen the spiritual and communication bonds throughout the family. “Between the first-generation and second-generation Latino, there is a real disconnect be- cause the parents, when they think about what it means to be a teenager, think about life in the past (in their homeland) and the kids have never been there, and can’t go there because

Jane Dawson teaches

of the immigration system,” he says.

women how to feel safe.

Shields suffers from macular degeneration, a condition that has left him legally blind. He was stricken with the disease when he was working in western South Dakota with the Pine Ridge Reservation in the early 1990s. “So it became more and more problematic for me to exist out there with declining vi- sion,” Shields says. “I couldn’t drive.” After spending three months of sabbati- cal time studying Spanish in Guatemala in 1996, his superiors brought him to Milwau- kee, where he worked at St. Patrick Parish at 7th and Washington streets. In the course of working with the Latino community on the South Side, it became clear to Shields they lacked a place to gather for workshops, retreats or conferences. It was then that Shields had a vision for an abandoned, vandalized building, now home to the center. Although the 115-year- old building was a wreck, it still had strong bones, he says. “I would take people around and I would say, ‘We can do this here, that there,’” he says. “I had more than one per- son say they couldn’t believe they were looking at the same building I was. It was one of those things — some people saw this broken down, horrible building, and I saw the Princess of Aragon.” During the last decade, Shields and a group of volunteers have slowly created the center — a cozy, welcoming, three-story home featuring Latino decor, original cabi- netry and decorative ceilings. The center features several large meeting rooms, a din- ing area in the basement and an enclosed courtyard area outside, where programs and gatherings can be held informally. “I would really like to say that I had a comprehensive idea. I didn’t,” Shields says. “I’m Irish and a Greek major, and those are two mitigating factors right there for comprehensive ideas. I was just convinced the place needed to exist for the people to come. It’s now a casa.”

Event: A Taste Of Latin America When: Saturday, April 30 Time: 7-11:30 p.m. Where: Tripoli Shrine Center 3000 W. Wisconsin Ave., Milwaukee Tickets:

$30 in advance; $40 at the door Website:

www.casaromerocenter.org

Cream City » Short Take

Furniture maker Dwayne Sperber says this stack of ash lumber stored in a barn at
Furniture maker Dwayne Sperber
says this stack of ash lumber stored
in a barn at Riveredge Nature Center
is the starting point for turning
urban wood into a usable product.

Going Against the Grain

BY REBECCA KONYA | PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAN BISHOP

When Dwayne Sperber, a Delafield furniture maker, first became acquainted with the farm-to-the-table initiative, which seeks to bring more locally grown food to area grocery stores, restaurants and consumers, his first thought was “that table needs to be made from local wood.” “We need to make smart use of local resources,” says Sperber, who is an advocate of turn- ing urban wood (trees in cities or suburban areas typically cut down because of disease or injury) into usable hardwood lumber. Although the urban wood movement has been around since the 1970s, Sperber says the general public remains largely unaware about the opportunities to harvest such a regionally abundant natural resource for constructive uses. Right now, most urban timber is destined to become firewood or mulch. Enter Urban(wood)Encounter, an exhibition that will showcase original furniture made from reclaimed urban trees. The exhibition, presented by Town & Country RC&D, will be held at the Design Within Reach Milwaukee Studio, 167 N. Broadway, on April 15 and 16, in conjunction with Gallery Night. Urban(wood)Encounter challenges furniture makers and designers to create a functional piece of furniture using urban wood obtained from a source within a 150-mile radius of

Milwaukee. The inaugural event will feature 17 participants, ranging from well-known furniture makers like Celia Greiner to nov-

ice designers like Natalya Neis, a 16-year- old high school student from Brookfield. “It’s really a platform to educate, promote and inspire people to use this abundant re- source,” Sperber says of the exhibition. According to sustainable forestry studies,

if urban timber were fully utilized, it could

provide up to 30 percent of the United States’ timber needs. “Every tree should have a lo- cal destination,” says Sperber. “Urban trees can live on as sustainable building products

that help conserve resources and support local jobs.” Bruce Horigan, owner of Horigan Ur- ban Forest Products, a hardwood sawmill in Skokie, Ill., says the modern day urban wood movement seeks to revive the use of local lumber, a practice that was common during the pioneer days. “The urban wood movement is a funny thing — I liken it to ‘Back to the Future,’” says Horigan, whose company is sponsoring the Urban(wood)Encounter. Horigan says the one-of-a-kind exhibition is a chance to show the public there are better uses for urban wood than relegating it to the wood chipper. “It’s an opportunity to showcase pieces made from a resource that might otherwise be wasted,” he explains. Most urban lumber is considered “charac-

ter wood” as a result of its unique aesthetic qualities like knots, gnarls and wormwood holes, which does little to raise its market value or desirability. “It’s true that urban wood has more char- acter, but we want people to understand that those unique qualities add to the beauty of

a piece of furniture or flooring, not detract from it,” Horigan says. But where the use of urban timber can have a real impact is the environment, ad- vocates say. Turning urban wood into us- able hardwood lumber would reduce the number of trees removed from living for- ests; reduce the amount of fuel consumed

for transportation; and reduce the amount of carbon released into the atmosphere. “Regularly using urban wood could have

a huge impact,” Horigan says. “If we took down 30 percent fewer trees every year, it wouldn’t be long before future generations would see old growth forests again.” If Urban(wood)Encounter is successful, Sperber says exhibition organizers would like to see the event return next year on

a larger scale. “We want people to see the

beauty of a resource that is literally right outside our doors.”

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Cream City » Short Take

Crew’s New Skipper on Board

by Cathy Breiten B u C her | photography by SCott PauluS, Milwaukee BrewerS PhotoS

Ron Roenicke played in the 1984 WoRld SeRieS and won a championship ring as a coach with the 2002 Los Angeles Angels. Can he bring a title to Milwaukee as the Brewers’ new manager? Before heading to spring training, Roenicke talked with M writer Cathy Breitenbucher.

How does the addition of starting pitchers Zack Greinke and Shaun Marcum affect the team chemistry?

It doesn’t change the way we go about doing things, but it changes the attitude of the fans, the attitude of some of the players. It excites them, because if we have the same kind of offensive year (as in 2010) and now we have this great starting staff, we’ve got a really good chance to win.

Attendance was almost 2.8 million last year. How do you personally plan to connect with the fans, to keep their interest strong and positive?

I want the focus to be on the guys. I’m going to get criticized for some things I do. That’s fine, that’s part of the job. Say we succeed as a team — I don’t want this to be because of me. It’s because of the guys.

You’re the fan in the stands. What’s more fun to watch: a walk-off home run, a no-hitter by a pitcher or a double steal?

The walk-off homers and no-hitters are huge — don’t happen all that often. The double steals or just the plain stolen base, hopefully that’s going to happen a lot.

It’s been said you have good people skills. How do you “coach” fun in the clubhouse?

There are little things a manager can do, but I think most of it is trying to get the personality out of the players. If you can just get the players to relax … to laugh, to have fun and to play their game, if you have a good team and good quality players, they’ll come out of a slump quicker than being uptight about things.

Describe yourself as far as someone with a passion for the game.

I’m pretty consistent in my personality. There’s not a lot of real highs and not lows. I try to stay positive. I need to care about what’s going on off the field and make sure everything’s fine there. If I can help with anything, fine. It may be just picking up a guy, just walking by and picking him up a little bit.

Do you have a favorite sports movie or a sports movie moment?

“Brian’s Song” is one of my favorites, with the adversity that some people go through, and keep coming back. “Hoosiers” is just a great movie. It talked about the mental part of it a lot, and how people struggle with different things, and sticking with people.

Do you have special memories of some of the old stadiums that don’t exist anymore?

The first time in Detroit, our first baseman, Pat Putnam, hit three home runs in one game. The third one, the right fielder would have caught the ball but it hit the upper deck — it hit that thing that protruded out. Yankee Stadium, going out to the monuments and looking at those things was pretty impressive. Candlestick, how cold that place was. The elements were so tough, the wind and the cold.

You have a sense of the history of baseball, and that’s one of those things that connects with fans, the continuity of the game over the years.

I think so. Free agency has changed some of

that, because players move around so much. The Angels in 2002, fans got really attached to those guys. When Scott Spezio came back, after he’d left the Angels, there was a big ovation for him and what he had done for the Angels. Those things are pretty neat when they happen.

Are you planning to move to Wisconsin?

I still live in southern California. I do like the

warm weather. When we have off days, I’m looking forward to (being in Wisconsin). I love the

outdoors, I love to fish and hunt and I do play golf. All three of those things really fit.

You’ll have to get Uecker to take you out on the lake.

Does he fish a lot?

get Uecker to take you out on the lake. Does he fish a lot? Ron Roenicke

Ron Roenicke (left) surveys the field during spring training.

the View from the Dugout

Roenicke played for six teams in the majors from 1981-88. That’s a lot of teammates and opponents. Among those he most enjoyed watching:

» Tony Gwynn: “Just watching how much

time he put in the batting cage and hitting and studying it.”

» Mike Schmitt: “Very serious, just nobody

prepared harder than he did.”

» Fernando Valenzuela: “A fun personality, you

know, he just had this great sense of humor.”

the Making of a Manager

Ron Roenicke explains how some of his former bosses influenced him:

» Del Crandall, minor leagues, Seattle

Mariners: “Del is a very intelligent guy, a very intelligent baseball mind, but he could make

things really simple so we were able to execute what it was he was trying to get us to do.”

» Tommy Lasorda, LA Dodgers: “A really fun

manager to play for. He could motivate you, you enjoyed playing, you had excitement. I don’t have that same personality, so I have to kind of create what I can with the personality that I have.”

» Mike Scoscia, LA Angels: “Watching him

over the years, the way he handled the press, the way he handled players … whether a guy was slumping or when he’s in that great groove.”

the way he handled players … whether a guy was slumping or when he’s in that

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Cream City » Short Take

Using her skills as an event planner and marketing manager, Shannon Schultz launched a blog
Using her skills as an event planner and marketing manager,
Shannon Schultz launched a blog for parents and a family-
oriented event planning business.

All Things Mommy

by NaN Bialek | photography by DaN Bishop

As a full-time, home-schooling mom, Shannon Schultz of Cedarburg knows how to keep her three children — August, 7, Martha, 4, and Hazel, 2 — calm and carrying on. On her Ugga Mugga blog, she shares her family friendly tips on everything from new products to fashion, fascinating field trips and crafts that manage to be cute, but not sappy. Armed with a degree in organizational communication and public relations, Schultz plunged right into challenging jobs soon after graduating from Mequon’s Concordia University Wisconsin. She worked as marketing manager at the Betty Brinn Children’s Museum and as an event planner at Northwestern Mutual Life and Quarles & Brady. She also organized Firstar Eve and Firstar Fireworks celebrations. “But I always knew I wanted to be a stay-at-home mom,” she says. So she left the corporate world behind, with faith that new opportunities would present themselves. She took the same energy that propelled her business career and invested it in researching “every aspect of being a mother,” she says. Soon friends began calling her for advice, and Schultz found herself fielding questions about the safest car seats, best diaper bags and keeping little ones entertained on snow days.

When her husband, Aaron, suggested that she write a blog, Schultz didn’t hesitate. She borrowed one of August’s favorite phrases from “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” and launched Ugga Mugga. Schultz writes about children’s products she can highly recommend from experience. Although she often receives samples from manufacturers, she says she does not get paid to feature the items and writes only about the products she loves. It’s no coincidence that her 4-year-old is named Martha. Schultz is a devoted Martha Stewart fan. She has always had Stewart- like tendencies. Her mother recalls Schultz’s kindergarten teacher asking her to name colors. Even at that tender age, Schultz’s answers were “robin’s egg blue” and “moss green.” The crafts featured on Ugga Mugga have that same artistic sensibility, such as charming do-it-yourself snow globes made from plastic cups, white glitter and tiny penguin figurines. Now, Schultz says, she is combining all of her interests into a new venture, Ugga Mugga Events. “It’s another way to try to reach more families,” she says. “So now, instead of hiring a magician or clown to come to a birthday party for an hour, they can hire me to come and do a nice craft.” Families can hire Schultz to plan and stage the entire party, or simply handle one or two aspects of the event, such as creating custom invitations or inventing a one-of-a- kind cake. The idea came from the “crazy” birthday parties requested by her own kids, like Hazel’s “cow party.” Schultz offered Hazel’s guests an array of flavored milk, and they played “pin the tail on the cow.” At the Schultz’s fortune cookie party, homemade dragons hung from the ceiling and each guest had their personalized fortunes baked into their cookies. Five years ago, when she decided to stay home to raise her children, Schultz never dreamed that she would be a go-to resource for families. “I just try to make things easier for parents, especially those who work, so they can enjoy their kids more,” she says.

For more information, visit www.UggaMugga.com and www.UggaMuggaEvents.com.

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Cream City » Short Take

Jewelry designer Brenda Schweder recently released her third book, “Steel Wire Jewelry.”
Jewelry designer Brenda Schweder recently
released her third book, “Steel Wire Jewelry.”

Express Yourself

by Laurie arendt | photography by dan Bishop

There’s always been a segment of people who want to fit in. And then there’s that other group of people, who not only embrace individuality, they thrive on it. That’s an idea that resonates with Waukesha jewelry designer and author Brenda Schweder.

“Humans have always enjoyed embellish- ing themselves, but I think more and more there’s a movement to express individual- ity and our personalities in our jewelry,” Schweder says. The Mount Mary College graduate’s jour- ney into the one-of-a-kind jewelry world started after she traded her corporate mar- keting career for motherhood. “It was actu- ally a great segue for me because it gave me the opportunity to try all different forms of art, and I initially thought jewelry was a cop- out,” she laughs. “Jewelry? Everyone does jewelry!” But she was hooked, and there were a number of things about jewelry making that she enjoyed from the start. “I think beaders have hoarding tenden- cies, and I also tend to be that way about found objects,” she says. “But I liked the process of connecting with things.” While she finds something to enjoy in ev- ery piece she’s created, her choice of mate- rials and approach to the craft consistently produce two elements that she enjoys:

patina and history to the piece. “But they also tend to have a bit of whim- sy to them, which appeals to me,” she says. “I like little jokes and quips in my work.” In addition to creating her own pieces, Schweder is a longtime contributor to Bead- Style Magazine and has just released her third book, “Steel Wire Jewelry.” She also shares her craft through teaching others how to make their own jewelry. “It’s very different than my first two books,” she says, noting the first two re- volved around repurposing found and vin- tage items. “But it did follow from it. I’ve found that steel wire is a great venue for capturing those found objects without drill- ing them.” There’s also something about the use of steel wire, a utilitarian medium that can be found in any hardware store, that appeals to her. “It’s a non-precious material in its value to society,” she explains. “So when you make a piece of jewelry, the value is not in the wire as it would be in silver or gold. It’s in the creation of the jewelry itself.”

For more information, visit www.brendaschweder.com.

Cream City » On Tap

Cream City » On Tap Ultimate Oprah Yoga instructor Julie Lemerond hung with the koalas last

Ultimate Oprah

Yoga instructor Julie Lemerond hung with the

koalas last December, thanks to Oprah Winfrey. Lemerond, a Wauwatosa native, was in the audience for “The Oprah Winfrey Show” final season premiere last September, when the TV queen announced she was taking the entire audience to Australia.

A longtime Winfrey admirer who now resides

in Scottsdale, Ariz., Lemerond completed an

application on Oprah’s website to become an ultimate viewer.

“I don’t even remember what I said, but it

was about why I love Oprah,” she says. “I also

Photoshopped a picture of myself into a picture of Oprah.”

A month later, she received a call from one of

the producers. Eventually, she was told she’d be in the audience for the premiere.

Audience members knew nothing of the trip. “It was so exciting,” she says. “People were

screaming and yelling. Confetti fell out of the ceiling. We couldn’t believe it.” Lemerond, her mom and 300 other ultimate viewers visited Australia along with Winfrey Dec. 5 to 15. Once there, the fans were divided into smaller groups, depending on their interests. “We spent a few days in Sydney, then my group went to Byron Bay, a beautiful beachside town,” she says. “We rejoined everyone for three more days in Sydney, watched a U2 concert and met Olivia Newton-John.” As an extra thrill, Lemerond was chosen to accompany Oprah on the red carpet for a “Welcome to Sydney” event.

“It was a life-changing experience that took us

out of the box of our everyday experiences,” she says. “It was an amazing time.” — JoAnn Petaschnick

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Cream City » Short Take

Cream City » Short Take Dynamic Diva by Lisa Jones TownseL | photography by Dan Bishop

Dynamic Diva

by Lisa Jones TownseL | photography by Dan Bishop

There’s something about meeting Cassandra McShepard that makes you feel like you can do it all. Maybe it’s because she has. When she walks into a room, it fills with optimism, groundedness and a “you-can-do-it, girl” spirit. Today, she looks amazing, wearing a draped black coat that floats as she walks, leaving one to wonder where she got it. (She made it, as she does most of her clothes.) And her sassy crop on top, albeit a wig — she speaks often of her collec- tion — completes her polished persona.

McShepard is one of four morning television personalities who ex- ude boundless energy on the chatty morning show Real Milwaukee

on Fox 6. Many are just happy she resurfaced after her six-year stint as an enchanting radio personality with WMCS-AM (1290) ended in

2009.

But what some may not know is that McShepard spent decades sharpening her skills, honing her talents and, as she says, “designing her life.” It’s a befitting analogy for this woman, whose life dream was to become a fashion designer. “I wanted to design clothes and be famous,” says McShepard, in her hypnotic tone. Her early design laurels include making uniforms for The Pfister Hotel and running a boutique of her own. But a chance meeting catapulted her career to the next level when she landed an in-person visit with the late R&B singer Phyllis Hy- man. McShepard would go on to dress Hyman for 14 years. She also designed ensembles for Nancy Wilson, the Manhattans, The Whis- perers, Maze and others. Life with Hyman changed her, and so did Hyman’s suicidal death. It led McShepard to re-examine her life. “By 35, I was fried, burnt out,” she says, somberly. “I was tired of making gowns for divas to make enough money to make gowns for divas.” Ready to look forward, she moved back to Milwaukee, expect- ing great things, but having no clue where to find them. When a long-lost friend saw her at a wedding and suggested they pitch a program idea to radio station WMCS, McShepard listened. The first attempt failed, but McShepard’s cohort tried again and the two “split one check” as guest hosts of their own show. Eventually, the friend grew weary but McShepard continued, taking on more responsibili- ties and soon becoming host of the afternoon program, “That’s What I’m Talkin’ About.” “If it’s in your mind, it’s yours to do,” McShepard insists. In between her public successes, McShepard experienced person- al disappointments. In addition to Hyman’s death and a divorce in her early 20s, one of her younger brothers died of cancer, and her parents passed away. Through it all, she still rises. Her brother’s death at age 38 inspired her to do what she’s always wanted to do – sing – and now she performs a jazzy monologue at various venues. “But I don’t kick my shoes off like Phyllis used to do,” she quips. Forever impacted by her mother’s struggle with Alzheimer’s disease, McShepard now serves as the spokesperson for the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute. If there was ever anyone who could make lemonade out of lem- ons, it has to be McShepard. Just 15 months after exiting the doors of the radio station, she was contacted by Fox 6 personnel about co-hosting a new local TV show with Katrina Cravy, Rob Haswell and Nicole Koglin. In her spare time, McShepard is a motivational speaker, personal trainer and video blogger (“This Is What I Know So Far,” http:// cassandrasbread.blogspot.com/). She also finds time to play video games, watch a bit of reality TV (“The Real Housewives of Atlanta”) and build furniture (“I love the smell of sawdust!”) “My entire life doesn’t make any sense,” she insists, gesturing with her hands. “But it’s my reality. I don’t ask how. I just focus on doing the thing.”

Cream City » On Tap

Cream City » On Tap Truth Meets Fiction When Rob Grede stumbled upon historic family heirlooms

Truth Meets Fiction

When Rob Grede stumbled upon historic family heirlooms while helping his parents pack up the family homestead in the late 1990s, he knew instantly there was a story waiting to be told. “My father’s account of the spur and sash held our rapt attention,” says Grede, who spent the next 11 years meticulously researching and writing the Civil War-era novel. The artifacts, which date back to the 1860s, belonged to Grede’s great-great-grandfather, George Van Norman, a prominent Milwaukee businessman who helped found the city of South Milwaukee. In 1865, though, Van Norman was a young Union soldier who was wounded in battle and sent to Tennessee to convalesce. While Grede has authored best-selling nonfiction marketing books, “The Spur & The Sash” is his first fictional effort. Despite the Civil War backdrop, Grede likened the story to

a classic Romeo and

Juliet tale. “It’s really

a timeless love story,”

explains Grede, who wasn’t particularly interested in historical fiction before penning “The Spur & The Sash.” Although he grew up in Elm Grove hearing stories about his great-great-grandfather, researching the novel allowed Grede to become intimately acquainted with his famous ancestor. “I gained real insight into his personality,” Grede says. Grede’s promotional book tour includes several Wisconsin appearances in April. For a complete schedule, visit thespurandthesash.com. — Rebecca Konya

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Cream City » Short Take

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Cannondale SuperSix

Is this the season you’re ready to commit to the sport of cycling? The Cannondale SuperSix is light, fast and race-ready for cyclists who are looking for a little more road action. $1,999.99, Local Motion Outfitters.

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Hit the Road

Seven ways to ride in style this season

BY LAURIE ARENDT

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Specialized Live 3

For those daily urban cyclists whose preferred mode of transportation relies on two instead of four wheels, turn to a hybrid. This bike includes an integrated rack system, a durable enclosed drive system and a carbon fiber belt to power those wheels. $1,550, Crank Daddy’s, Milwaukee.

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Electra Townie 3i

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“Easy access to downtown and a beautiful lake setting, plus the feel of a small- town village drew us to Shorewood. We’ve raised three children here in a terrific school system with very high academic standards. Our schools offer a variety of athletic teams, an unsurpassed music and theatre program, and the arts remain important in the curriculum. “We can walk or bike anywhere in the village with everything close by. Shorewood’s amenities are by far the very best in the area. What a great place to live and raise a family – we wouldn’t live anywhere else.”

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Cream City » Short Take

Wauwatosa native Grace Weber has shared her talents on “Showtime at the Apollo,” “The Today
Wauwatosa native Grace Weber has
shared her talents on “Showtime at the
Apollo,” “The Today Show,” and “The
Oprah Winfrey Show,” as well as at the
Kennedy Center and the Ella Awards.
Photo Submitted

Grace’s Gospel

BY LISA JONES TOWNSEL

Grace Weber’s voice is like the “Sparrows” she sings about on the title cut of her most recent EP: feathery soft, lilting and full of soul.

Yet it may have never been realized had she not joined the Inner City Youth Gospel Choir in Milwaukee when she was 12. The Wauwatosa native and 2006 Pius XI High School grad says ever since she could remember, she’s wanted to sing, and she did – in the family basement, kitchen and car. In fact, she was particularly drawn to the voices of Whitney Houston, Celine Dion, Mariah Carey, Eva Cassidy and India.Arie. But it was her time with the Milwaukee-based gospel chorus that sharpened her chops and deepened her appreciation for soulful music. “It was a huge dream of mine to join a gospel choir. Growing up in Wauwatosa, I didn’t know if choirs like the ones in the ‘Sister Act’ movies were in Milwaukee. “Then one day on a retreat in sixth grade, my teacher announced that our special guest would be this choir. They entered the room and sang. I knew that this was what I wanted to be a part of,” Weber says during a phone interview from New York City. “I went up to the choir director and said, ‘Could I sing for you guys?’ Then I sang ‘Amazing Grace’ in the most soulful voice that I could drum up. It took two months to convince my mother to drive me to the rehearsals in the city, but I told her this was something I had to do.” Four years of soulful tutelage took Weber to churches and revivals about the city and helped produce the mature sound that won her honors. By age 16 she performed on

“Showtime at the Apollo” at Harlem’s Apollo Theater. At 18, she sang at the Kennedy Cen- ter and was named a Presidential Scholar by the National Foundation for the Advance- ment in the Arts. At 20, she was touring and recording as part of the Grace Weber Band. At 21, in November 2009, she appeared on Oprah Winfrey’s Karaoke Challenge, where Winfrey handpicked Weber from among thousands to appear on the show. And last year, at 22, Weber graduated from New York University (bachelor’s degree in music per- formance and music marketing), became a Billboard “Spotlight Artist to Watch,” and worked on her debut solo album (due for release in June) with Grammy Award-win- ning producer Mike Mangini. Although most of her time is now spent in the Big Apple, Weber is always happy to return home. “I miss my family a lot. I have three siblings. My mom and dad are there … And my sister just had a baby,” says Weber, who now has a manager, a website and a calendar full of gigs. “I love New York, but I feel lucky to get to go home to Milwaukee, to calm down a bit.”

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Cream City » Energy

After being stricken with ulcerative colitis when she was in high school, Megan Starshak is
After being stricken
with ulcerative colitis
when she was in
high school, Megan
Starshak is now an
advocate for the
Crohn’s and Colitis
Foundation.

Conquering Colitis

By NaN Bialek i PhotograPhy By DaN Bishop

For Megan Starshak of Milwaukee, the symptoms of ulcerative colitis began when she was a junior in high school. The disease, an inflammation of the colon, often causes frequent and urgent trips to the bathroom and severe abdominal pain. “At first, I thought maybe I had a virus,” says Starshak, 26. “I was doing high school track at the time and thought I was overworking.” But Starshak’s pain and cramping got worse over time, and her body was becoming unable to absorb nutrients and water. Family and friends were concerned, and she often had to assure friends that she was not anorexic or bulimic. She went to several doctors, but did not get a definitive diagnosis of ulcerative colitis until the summer after she graduated from high school and was looking forward to her freshman year in college. “It’s a huge transitional time,” Starshak says, and not only was she away from her parents and making her own decisions, she was also trying to define her own identity. She was meeting new people and trying to get involved in sports. Starshak realized that everything she did was going to be affected by her condition. She wasn’t sure how much to tell people about her symptoms and knew that some just would not understand. “It makes you grow up a little bit faster,” she says. “In college, you have all the freedom in the world and none of the responsibility. If I go out for a night of drinking, I could be sick for a month.”

The course of treatment called for Starshak to take 12 anti-inflammatory pills per day, including a steroid, which tamed the symptoms, but did not completely stop them. When a new intravenous therapy called Remicade became available, Starshak decided to give it a try. Remicade works with the immune system to combat the disease. Starshak says she noticed a difference three days after her first treatment. “After six years of being sick and dealing with symptoms, and being mentally exhausted, it was like waking up a new person,” she says. Every eight weeks, Starshak spends three hours at Froedtert Hospital undergoing Remicade therapy. She says she looks forward to that time, and uses it to relax and recharge. She recently completed her MBA at UW-Milwaukee and landed a position in marketing for a local manufacturer. She is an avid cyclist and would eventually like to race competitively. Every year, Starshak cycles in a charity ride for the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation, and her mother volunteers on the sidelines. “Basically, I’ve been in remission for two years. I can eat salad, drink Pepsi and run again without issues,” she says. Starshak says Voices of UC, an educational and awareness program, has helped her understand ulcerative colitis by providing information and resources for patients and their families. “Their website is a really great place if you’re newly diagnosed and kind of just learning,” she says. “You’re arming yourself with information.” She was one of 1,000 people with ulcerative colitis who participated in a recent survey sponsored by Voices of UC. The survey was intended to identify gaps in the way patients and physicians discuss treatment, and it also gave patients an opportunity to share their insights about dealing with the disease. Starshak says an important way to cope with ulcerative colitis, which has no cure as of yet, is to talk with others who are experiencing the same issues. “I think it’s important also to remember that even though it’s a terrible disease with awful side effects, sometimes it changes you for the better,” she says. “Through colitis I’ve also realized that I’m so strong and I can handle more things than I’ve ever imagined.”

Wednesday - Saturday: 10:00 am - 4:30 pm Sunday: 1:00 - 4:30 pm

Wednesday - Saturday: 10:00 am - 4:30 pm Sunday: 1:00 - 4:30 pm

COLLECT CONSERVE DOCUMENT EDUCATE EXHIBIT

The Yin and the Yang: Schomer Lichtner & Ruth Grotenrath, A Retrospective

APRIL 27 – JULY 10

SNEAK PEEK FRIDAY:

SNEAK PEEK FRIDAY:

SNEAK PEEK FRIDAY:

Friday, April 29, 10:30 a.m.

Casual gallery talk with curator and coffee.

OPENING RECEPTION:

Sunday, May 1, 1:30 - 4:00 p.m.

THE MOMENT:

Thursday, May 26, 5:00 - 8:00 p.m.

An evening program with hospitality, featuring dialogue to further explore the exhibition.

Media Sponsor:

Quite possibly Wisconsin’s most celebrated artistic couple, Schomer Lichtner and Ruth Grotenrath worked together for over 60 years. Each chapter of their monumental careers will be covered in this in-depth retrospective, with a debut and author book signing of their biographies at the listed events.

Bring in this ad and receive 2-for-1 adult admission

Bring in this ad and receive 2-for-1 adult admission   300 S. 6th Ave., West Bend,
 
 

300 S. 6th Ave., West Bend, Wisconsin 53095

262.334.9638

 

www.wisconsinart.org

  300 S. 6th Ave., West Bend, Wisconsin 53095 262.334.9638   www.wisconsinart.org April 2011 | M

WHAT TO SEE, HEAR & ExPERIENCE THIS MONTH

Datebook

Arts | Events | Music

Arts | Events

| Music

Rock of Ages 4/29-5/1 American Idol finalist Constantine Maroulis reprises his acclaimed performance in the
Rock of Ages 4/29-5/1
American Idol finalist Constantine Maroulis reprises his
acclaimed performance in the First National Tour of the
five-time Tony Award nominated musical, an arena-rock
love story told through the hits of Journey, Night Ranger,
Styx, REO Speedwagon and more. Milwaukee Theatre,
500 W. Kilbourn Ave., Milwaukee. (414) 908-6001 or
www.milwauketheatre.org.

Art

Alumni Exhibition 4/1 Northwestern Mutual Art Gallery, Cardinal Stritch University, 6801 N. Yates Road, Milwaukee. (414) 410-4105 or www.stritch.edu.

Lake Boats: The Photography of Jim Brozek and Christopher Winters 4/1-3 Grohmann Museum, MSOE, 1000 N. Broadway. 4/15-8/21, Milwaukee Mills: A Visual History. (414) 277-7135 or www.msoe.edu/museum.

INWARD VISIONS 4/1-9 The Fine Art Gallery, 207 E. Buffalo St., Suite 210, Milwaukee. 4/1-9, Lightscapes; 4/15-7/16, ARTISSIMA. (414) 688-2787 or www.thefineartgallery.org.

Prints & Drawings from Rembrandt to the Present 4/1-9 David Barnett Gallery, 1024 E. State St., Milwaukee. (414) 271-5058 or www.davidbarnettgallery.com.

Tom Uttech — New Work 4/1-14 Tory Folliard Gallery, 233 N. Milwaukee St., Milwaukee. 4/15-5/14, Mark Mulhern. (414) 273-7311 or www.toryfolliard.com.

Layers and Sediment: Steve Wellman Retrospective 4/1-16 Kunzelmann-Esser Lofts Gallery, 710 W. Historic Mitchell St., Milwaukee. (414) 647-8770.

Rodger Bechtold 4/1-22 Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts, 19805 W. Capitol Drive, Brookfield. (262) 781-9470 or www.wilson-center.com.

William Lemke: Flora in Shades of Grey 4/1-5/1 Anaba Tea Room, Garden Room, 2107 E. Capitol Drive, Shorewood. (414) 963-9510 or www.gardenroomonline.com.

Frank Lloyd Wright: Organic Architecture for the 21st Century 4/1-5/15 Milwaukee Art Museum, 700 N. Art Museum Drive, Milwaukee. 4/1-3, Framing a Decade: Acquisitions of Prints and Drawings, 2001–2011; 4/1-3, Art in Bloom. (414) 224-3200 or www.mam.org.

Hollywood Icons, Local Demons 4/1-5/22 Haggerty Museum of Art, 13th and Clybourn streets, Milwaukee. 4/1-5/22, The Truth is Not in the Mirror. Free admission. (414) 288-1669 or Marquette.edu/haggerty.

Items for this column may be submitted by April 15 for the June issue to datebook@conleynet.com or faxed to (262) 376-2904. No phone calls please.

The Children of Israel Journeyed: Music Selections from the Chagall Bible Series 4/1-6/6 Jewish Museum
The Children of Israel Journeyed:
Music
Selections from the Chagall Bible
Series 4/1-6/6
Jewish Museum Milwaukee,
1360 N. Prospect Ave., Milwaukee.
www.jewishmuseummilwaukee.org.
Bright Eyes 4/3
Riverside Theater, 116 E. Wisconsin
Ave., Milwaukee. 8 p.m. 4/11, Robert
Plant & The Band of Joy; 4/15, Gary
Allan. (414) 286-3663 or
www.pabsttheater.org.
Tasting Cultures: The Arts of
Latino Foodways 4/1-7/21
Latino Arts Inc., 1028 S. 9th St.,
Milwaukee. (414) 384-3100 or
www.latinoartsinc.org.
Paul Cebar 4/1
Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the
Arts, 19805 W. Capitol Drive, Brook-
field. 4/9, Mark Morris Dance Group
with the MMDG Music Ensemble;
4/17, Saeunn Thorsteinsdottir;
4/28, MSO Stars of Tomorrow.
(262) 781-9470 or
www.wilson-center.com.
Café Sopra Mare 4/3
Tangos with Stas & Friends. Villa Ter-
race Decorative Arts Museum, 2220
N. Terrace Ave., Milwaukee. 10:30
a.m.-12:30 p.m. (414) 271-3656 or
www.villaterracemuseum.org.
The Charles Allis:
100 YEARS 4/1-11/13
Charles Allis Art Museum, 1801 N.
Prospect Ave., Milwaukee. 4/1-5/15,
FORMED: Karen Gunderman and
Linda Vitamvas; 4/27, John Gurda,
Made in Milwaukee: The Allis Family
and the Rise of Manufacturing.
(414) 278-8295 or
www.cavtmuseums.org.
The English Beat 4/1
Turner Hall Ballroom, 1032 N. 4th
St., Milwaukee. $25. 8 p.m. 4/2,
Railroad Earth; 4/7, Over The Rhine;
4/9, Maritime; 4/13, Ra Ra Riot;
4/17, 2011 WAMI Awards; 4/20, The
Budos Band; 4/21, The Black Angels;
4/22, Trampled By Turtles; 4/25,
Foals; 4/26, The Pains Of Being Pure
At Heart; 4/30, Dead Man’s Carnival.
(414) 286-3663 or
www.pabsttheater.org.
Festival Concert: Ooo, La, La 4/3
Schwan Hall, Wisconsin Lutheran
College, 8815 W. Wisconsin Ave.,
Milwaukee. 3 p.m. www.mfbrass.org.
Schubert | Schwanengesang
Song Cycle 4/3
Wisconsin Conservatory of Music,
1584 N. Prospect Ave., Milwaukee.
4/7, Jamie Breiwick & Choir Fight;
4/11, Philomusica Quartet; 4/25-26,
Prometheus Trio. (414) 276-5760 or
www.wcmusic.org.
Robert Plant & The Band of Joy
Riverside Theater 4/11
ARPIK WEITZER 4/8-5/6
DeLind Gallery of Fine Art, 450 E. Mason
St., Milwaukee. (414) 271-8525 or
www.delindgallery.com.
Milwaukee. 4/15-16, Beethoven, Plus
Pictures At An Exhibition; 4/29-30,
Cirque de la Symphonie.
(414) 291-7605 or www.mso.org.
Tami Zwicke and Danceworks
Art Gallery 4/15-6/18
Danceworks Art Gallery, 1661 N.
Water Street, Milwaukee.
(414) 277-8480, ext. 6025, or
www.danceworksmke.org.
Dennis DeYoung: The Music of
Styx Unplugged 4/1
Pabst Theater, 144 E. Wells St.,
Milwaukee. 4/15, Ralph Stanley & The
Clinch Mountain Boys; 4/16, Peter
Yarrow; 4/17, Festival City Symphony
Season Finale; 4/21, George
Winston; 4/23, Chris Cornell.
(414) 286-3663 or
www.pabsttheater.org.
Bottom Line Duo 4/8
Cedarburg Performing Arts Center,
W68 N611 Evergreen Blvd., Cedar-
burg. (262) 376-6161
or www.cedarburgpac.com.
Tribute to Cole Porter 4/8-10
Performed by the Milwaukee Sym-
phony Orchestra. Marcus Center for
the Performing Arts, 929 N. Water St.,
Legends of Hip Hop with Salt n
Pepa, Naughty by Nature, Kool
Moe Dee, Doug E. Fresh & Slick
Rick 4/9
Milwaukee Theatre, 500 W. Kilbourn
Ave., Milwaukee. 8 p.m. 4/27, CELTIC
WOMAN: Songs From The Heart.
(414) 908-6001 or
www.milwaukeetheatre.org.
Relax Relate Release May 12-15, 2011  food EGGscape Package $69 per person  shopping
Relax
Relate
Release
May 12-15, 2011
 food
EGGscape Package
$69 per person
 shopping
Includes plenty of food, fun and free time,
 live music
as well as wine tasting, fashion show,
 wine tasting
belly dancing, Zumba, bonfire, pub
crawl, and a plethora of optional
 fashion show
activities! Lodging starts as low as
 art & wine crawl
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 fitness classes
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Landmark Resort. For more
 door prizes
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call Sonja at
 pub crawl
920-868-5164.
 karaoke
 dance
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MAY 20 - JUNE 12

Already a hit in New York and Chicago, Milwaukee native Josh Schmidt wrote this award-winning, darkly comic and heartbreakingly beautiful musical with Skylight in mind. We are thrilled to be performing this Wisconsin premiere.

Original Music by: JOSH SCHMIDT Libretto by: JASON LOEWITH & JOSH SCHMIDT

Box O ce 414-291-7800 skylightopera.com

supported by

by: JOSH SCHMIDT Libretto by: JASON LOEWITH & JOSH SCHMIDT Box O ce 414-291-7800 skylightopera.com supported
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Barrage 4/10 Schauer Arts and Activities Center, 147 Rural St., Hartford. 4/15, Golden Days – The Florentine Opera Studio Artists. (262) 670-0560 or www.SchauerCenter.org.

Women of Paris featuring Claudia Hommel 4/12 Cedarburg Cultural Center, W62 N546 Washington Ave., Cedarburg. 4/17, UWM Faculty Chamber Music. (262) 375-3676 or www.CedarburgCulturalCenter.org.

The Vivaldi Project: The Composer’s Affinity to the Natural World 4/16-17 Performed by Ensemble Musical Offering. Ca- thedral Church of All Saints, 818 E. Juneau Ave., Milwaukee. (414) 258-6133 or www.musicalofferingltd.org.

Adam Carolla Pabst Theater 4/29
Adam Carolla
Pabst Theater 4/29

Performing Arts

Say Goodnight Gracie 4/1-2 Schauer Arts and Activities Center, 147 Rural St., Hartford. 4/15, The Wizard of Oz; 4/29, Buckets & Tap Shoes. (262) 670-0560 or www.SchauerCenter.org.

Cosi Fan Tutte 4/1-3 Performed by the Skylight Opera Theater. Broad- way Theatre Center, 158 N. Broadway, Milwaukee. (414) 291-7800 or www.skylightopera.com.

Three 4/1-3

Performed by the Milwaukee Ballet. Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, 929 N. Water St., Milwau- kee. (414) 902-2103 or www.milwaukeeballet.org.

Tuesdays with Morrie 4/1-3 Sunset Playhouse, 800 Elm Grove Road, Elm Grove. 4/1-3, From the Diary of Virginia Woolf & Meditations on Arion; 4/28-5/22, Love, Sex and the I.R.S. (262) 782-4430 or www.sunsetplayhouse.com.

The Hundred Dresses 4/1-16 Performed by First Stage Children’s Theatre. Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, 929 N. Water St., Milwaukee. 4/29-6-5, Miss Nelson Missing. (414) 267-2929 or www.firststage.org.

In Acting Shakespeare 4/1-17 Performed by Renaissance Theaterworks. Studio Theatre, Broadway Theatre Center, 158 N. Broadway, Milwaukee. (414) 291-7800 or www.r-t-w.com.

The Bomb-Itty of Errors 4/1-5/8 Performed by the Milwaukee Repertory Theater. Stackner Cabaret, 108 E. Wells St., Milwaukee. (414) 224-9490 or www.milwaukeerep.com.

Sharon Van Etten 4/7 Pabst Theater, 144 E. Wells St., Milwaukee. 8 p.m. 4/22, Bill Burr; 4/29, Adam Carolla. (414) 286-3663 or www.pabsttheater.org.

Kramp & Adler Comedy Festival 4/8 Turner Hall Ballroom, 1032 N. 4th St., Milwaukee. $25. 8 p.m. (414) 286-3663 or www.pabsttheater.org.

Death of a Salesman 4/12-5/15 Performed by the Milwaukee Repertory Theater, Quadracci Powerhouse, 108 E. Wells St., Milwau- kee. (414) 224-9490 or www.milwaukeerep.com.

The Lion in Winter 4/14-5/1 Milwaukee Chamber Theatre, 158 N. Broadway, Milwaukee. (414) 291-7800 or www.chamber-theatre.com.

Disney’s Beauty and The Beast 4/15-17 Milwaukee Theatre, 500 W. Kilbourn Ave., Milwau- kee. 4/29-5/1, Rock of Ages. (414) 908-6001 or www.milwaukeetheatre.org.

Spring Departures 2011 4/15-17 Danceworks Studio Theatre, 1661 N. Water Street, Milwaukee. 4/28-5.1, Stone Soup. (414) 277-8480, ext. 6025, or www.danceworksmke.org.

Tomato Dodgeball 4/16 Cedarburg Cultural Center, W62 N546 Washing- ton Ave., Cedarburg. 8 p.m. (262) 375-3676 or www.CedarburgCulturalCenter.org.

Les Misérables 4/19-24 Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, 929 N. Water St., Milwaukee. (414) 273-7206 or www.MarcusCenter.org.

Thrill Me: The Leopold & Loeb Story

4/29-5/15

Performed by In Tandem Theatre. Tenth Street The- atre, 628 N. 10th St., Milwaukee. (414) 271-1371 or www.intandemtheatre.org.

Miscellaneous

Smokey Bear & Woodsy Owl:

Home Sweet Home 4/1-5/22 Betty Brinn Children’s Museum, 929 E. Wisconsin Ave., Milwaukee. (414) 390-KIDS (5437) or www.bbcmkids.org.

Mummies of the World 4/1-5/30 Milwaukee Public Museum, 800 W. Wells St., Milwaukee. 4/1, Captivating Characters in World Mythology; 4/1-6/1, It’s All in the Details: The Legacy of the Fifield Collection. (414) 278-2728 or www.mpm.edu.

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Feb 12–May 15, 2011

Explore the relevance of Frank Lloyd Wright’s principles to contemporary times. See scale models, furniture, newly discovered video footage, and more than 100 drawings (including thirty on view for the first time) from the celebrated architect’s seven-decade career. Wright liked to say of his homes, “you can’t tell where the house ends and nature begins.”

Sponsored by

The Figge Foundation and Thomas K. Figge

The exhibition is organized by the Milwaukee Art Museum and Phoenix Art Museum in conjunction with the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottsdale, AZ. Photos courtesy the Library of Congress. “Fallingwater” photo by Carol M. Highsmith. “Tree of Life” Window for the Martin House (Buffalo, NY), ca. 1904. Drawings © 2011 Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottsdale, AZ.

The Grand Slam Charity Jam 4/2 Benefit concert for more than 50 local charities. Performances by Sugar Ray, Kimberley Locke, Paris Bennett, Jamecia of Sounds of Blackness and more. Hosted by Kristin Bauer of HBO’s “True Blood” and appearance by Leroy Butler. Red carpet walk, live and silent auctions, VIP dinner party and after party. Potawatomi Wood- lands Dream Ballroom and Northern Lights Theater, 1721 N. Canal St., Milwaukee. $60-$500. (262) 377-6500, ext. 215, or visit www.grandslamcharityjam.

2011 Spayghetti and No Balls Bash 4/8 Silent auction/raffle, music by Siren, casino-style game tables, caricature drawings and more. Benefitting the Milwaukee Animal Rescue Center’s Spay/Neuter Efforts. The Italian Community Center, 631 E. Chicago St., Milwaukee. $40. 6 p.m. www.milwaukeearc.org.

The Women’s Center

Anniversary Luncheon 4/8

A raffle, silent auction, lunch and

presentation, with keynote speaker photographer Ann Jones. Proceeds benefit The Women’s Center. Italian

Community Center, 631 E. Chicago

St., Milwaukee. $60. (262) 522-3805

or www.twcwaukesha.org.

Dennis DeYoung: The Music of Styx Unplugged Pabst Theater 4/1

MSOE Health and Wellness Fair

4/14

Free community event including more than 70 booths with free or low-cost health screening tests, give-aways, healthy snacks, live demos, mini massages and information on natural medicine, exercise, holistic health, women’s cardiac awareness and much more. Kern Center, 1245 N. Broadway, Milwaukee. www.msoe.edu/healthfair.

Vendor Fair 4/16 The Community League’s third annual Vendor Fair features 40 party vendors, baked goods, raffles, pictures with the Easter Bunny, free chair massages, beverages, a light lunch and live music. Proceeds benefit local chari- ties. Menomonee Falls High School, N8101 Merrimac Drive, Menomonee Falls. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. www.communityleague.com.

Ozaukee Family Services Spring Brunch 4/27 Dramatist, book reviewer and sto- ryteller Barbara Rinella returns with

academic entertainment. Proceeds benefit child abuse prevention pro- grams. Shully’s Garden Tent, 146 N. Green Bay Road, Thiensville. 10 a.m.- noon. $40. (262) 376-7774 or www.OzaukeeFamilyServices.org. M

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Health » Living with Cancer

Kevin Crowley combated fatigue from cancer treatment by continuing to ride his bike.

Cancer patients encouraged to exercise in order to maintain muscle mass, stamina

Fatigue

Fighter

BY CATHY BREITENBUCHER I PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAN BISHOP

A three-sport athlete in high school, Kevin Crowley, 25, was eager to stay active during

cancer treatments that lasted nearly all of 2010.

Thanks to physical therapy and miles of indoor cycling workouts on a trainer, Crowley

is back at work and wrapping up graduate school at UW-Milwaukee. He’s also hoping

to hit the roads and resume a 50-miles-per-week biking regimen. Crowley was diagnosed with sarcoma, a cancer of the cells that form muscle and connective tissue, in his left leg. He underwent chemotherapy, surgery to replace his femur and hip, more chemo and then radiation. “By being active during chemo, the fatigue wasn’t so bad,” says Crowley, an accounting student who lives in Brookfield. “The last few rounds of chemo, when I could get on the bike again, it defi- nitely, definitely helped.”

Experts say therapy and exercise can restore range of motion and build muscle mass — important components of both daily activities and fitness. According to Crowley’s physical therapist, Chris Walczak of Froedtert & Medical College of Wisconsin Cancer Center, aerobic exercise is documented to reduce cancer-related fatigue. Besides, she adds, “It gives them some con- trol over their disease. They’re actively doing something to make themselves feel better.” Fitness organizations and health clubs are offering specialized workouts, too. The YMCA and the Lance Armstrong Foundation co-sponsor “LiveStrong at the Y,” a 12-week program held locally at the Tri-County branch in Menomonee Falls and the Feith Ozaukee branch in Port Washington. The focus is on small classes and individu- alized plans for patients, some of whom may still be involved in their hospital-based PT. Workouts can include zumba, pilates, yoga, weights or cardiovascular training. “People get familiar with the machines and how to do different routines,” explains Stephanie Navarro, area director of healthy lifestyles for the YMCA of Metro Milwaukee. “If they haven’t been exercisers, it’s getting them to make it part of their lifestyle routine.” As for Crowley, he sees cycling, swimming and softball in his future, and he encourages other cancer patients to pursue exercise. “Try to be as active as possible,” he says. “Sitting around isn’t the best way to pass the time — it can just drag on.”

Here are some exercise programs geared to cancer patients. Some have specific start dates, while others are ongoing. Be sure to ask if a referral from your physician or physical therapist is needed.

• YOGA, 4-5 p.m., Thursdays, Waukesha Memorial Hospital Professional Office Building, Suite 305, 725 American Ave., Waukesha. Free. Call Collette LaFrancis, (262) 928-7221.

• LOOK GOOD FEEL BETTER, 1-3 p.m., April 18, Oconomowoc Memorial Hospital; May 16, PHCMA Menomonee Falls; and June 20, Waukesha Memorial Hospital. These single-session classes are designed to help women who are undergoing cancer treat- ment develop skills to improve their appear- ance and self-image. Free (registration required). Call American Cancer Society, (800) 227-2345.

M: Is high-dose chemotherapy the best treatment?

Johnson: It depends on the specific type of cancer, even the specific sub-type of cancer, and the patient’s other medical conditions. Post-operative therapy for Stage 3 colon cancer or Stage 2 or Stage 3 breast cancer may often involve taking pills or undergoing intravenous therapy. By most traditional definitions, this would not be considered quote-unquote high- dose therapy.

Schulz: There is certainly data that would support what we call dose-dense (treatment) — meaning (chemo) doses given rapidly, together or close together. They have a survival benefit in patients with breast cancer. There are also high-dose treatments with chemotherapy for lymphomas, leukemias and myelomas (for patients) in preparation for transplants.

• BREATH, BODY & STRETCH, 6-7:30 p.m., Tuesdays starting April 19, The Pavlic Center at Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare- Elmbrook Memorial, 19333 W. North Ave., Brookfield. Six-week sessions include activities designed to calm the mind and lengthen the body. $65 (registration required). Call (262) 785-2254.

• GRACEFUL YOGA, 7-8 p.m., April 28, Westwood Health and Fitness, 2900 Golf Road, Pewaukee. Free (registration required). Go to www.westwoodfitness. org or call (262) 650-8000.

• MOVIN’ AND GROOVIN’ AFTER CANCER TREATMENT begins in September, Women’s Pavilion of Aurora West Allis Medical Center, 8901 W. Lincoln Ave., West Allis. Eight-week sessions will cover goal-setting, body mechanics and more. $45 (registration required). Call (414) 328-6640.

Myth Busters

BY CATHY BREITENBUCHER

Treating cancer is far different from a generation ago.

To separate fact from fiction, M writer Cathy Breitenbucher turned to two local experts — Dr. Peter H. Johnson, medical oncologist and medical direc- tor at ProHealth Care Regional Cancer Center; and Dr. Craig Schulz, radiation oncologist and medical director of oncology services at Columbia St. Mary’s Cancer Center.

M: Does a standard protocol based on chemo and radiation show better results than 30 or 40 years ago?

Johnson: Yes. The systemic therapy is not all chemo these days. Some of it is classic cytotoxic chemo that we may have been using for the last 30 years or more; some of those drugs are still quite useful. And yet, the broader term of system therapy encompasses not just those agents but other drugs (such as) oral therapy that may have few if any side effects.

Schulz: Radiation is very different than 30 to 40 years ago, at least in terms of how we deliver

it — how we can better analyze how the radiation dose is distributed to the tumor target area.

Clearly, by having better drugs and better ability to deliver targeted therapy with radiation, in

many cancers results have been very favorable.

M: Is there an accepted number of years for a patient in remission to be considered safe from recurrence?

Johnson: As long as you are living, your odds of a recurrence never go to zero but they approach that line over time.

Schulz: That “c” word — cured — always is a hard one to cough up. We tell our head and neck

cancer patients, if they make it beyond that two years after the completion of therapy, they have

a very good chance of being long-term survivors. Breast cancer, five years; prostate, seven to 10; and lung cancer, after three years they certainly may be long-term survivors.

M:

Are alternative treatments found outside the United States a realistic option to help a patient go into remission?

Johnson: The term ‘alternative therapy’ has a lot of meanings. It may mean something like herbal therapy taken orally, acupuncture or reiki. Being a U.S.-trained oncologist, we tend to employ medications and techniques we are familiar and comfortable with, and which have undergone pretty intense scrutiny by the FDA and other organizations.

Schulz: Certainly, there are some alternative treatments that are offered elsewhere or are in an experimental form right now, that are reasonable. There are some chemotherapy drugs that are approved for some disease sites overseas and are not approved here. It is a realistic option in some circumstances.

M: Any other myths about cancer treatment out there?

Johnson: We do bump up frequently into perceptions that the chemotherapy today is no bet- ter than or different than what was given 30 or 40 years ago where patients, as a matter of routine, were violently ill with nausea and vomiting, had profound weight loss, fatigue, hair loss, etc., and many of those instances required extensive and intensive hospitalizations for weeks on end. Fortunately, nowadays that’s the rare exception and not the rule. There is also the notion that cancer is driven by sugar, and if you can just cut out all the sugar in your diet you’ll cure your cancer. Unfortunately, that’s not true. It would be great if it were.

Schulz: The same goes with the bad effects of radiation. We have ways of pinpointing radia- tion beams or sculpting radiation treatments very precisely to treat what we want to treat and minimize the doses to the surrounding tissue, therefore keeping side effects very manageable. The other big myth is that cancer patients are contagious. I hear it all the time. M

PROMOTION

PROMOTION SPRING TOUR OF HOMES The Metropolitan Builders Association is hosting The Spring Tour of Homes,

SPRING TOUR OF HOMES

The Metropolitan Builders Association is hosting The Spring Tour of Homes, Condominiums & Land on April 2-17. This free tour runs Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4:00 p.m.

Whether you are searching for a roomy four bedroom home or a quaint condominium, your quest should begin at the Spring Tour of Homes. The 2011 Tour features more than 50 projects in a variety of communities, built or developed by MBA member companies. Open models are scattered through- out Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Washington, Racine and Waukesha counties.

The more models toured, the more chances to enter to win fantastic prizes. For more locations, floor plans, photos and descriptions of the projects, visit MBAonline.org.

and descriptions of the projects, visit MBAonline.org. SOFA SALE Shop Peabody’s Interiors in April and receive

SOFA SALE

Shop Peabody’s Interiors in April and receive 40 percent off all stock sofas and 30 percent off all custom ordered sofas.

Peabody’s Interiors 8655 N. Deerwood Drive, Brown Deer (414) 962-4550

UPCOMING

EVENTS | PROMOTIONS | PRODUCTS | SERVICES

UPCOMING EVENTS | PROMOTIONS | PRODUCTS | SERVICES MEET DONALD J. PLINER You’re invited on Saturday,
UPCOMING EVENTS | PROMOTIONS | PRODUCTS | SERVICES MEET DONALD J. PLINER You’re invited on Saturday,

MEET DONALD J. PLINER

You’re invited on Saturday, May 7, to view the latest styles in Donald J. Pliner’s fine footwear collection and shop with this renowned designer at Boston Store Bayshore.

Donald J. Pliner’s collection is renowned for innovative design, sophisticated style and exceptional comfort. Says Pliner, “When the feet are uncomfortable, so is the mind, so is the body, so is the soul.”

Call (414) 962-6006, ext. 3878, today to make your appointment. We’ll see you there!

Saturday, May 7, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Boston Store Bayshore Mall

UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE Discover the University School difference at the Spring Open House on
UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE
Discover the University School difference at the
Spring Open House on Sunday, April 10, from
2 to 4 p.m. Learn more about USM and how their
new state-of-the-art facilities enhance a 21st century
education.
University School of Milwaukee
2100 W. Fairy Chasm Road, Milwauke
www.usmk12.org
ALLEN EDMONDS GRAND REOPENING
Shop the Allen Edmonds Grand Reopening of their
store located next to Mark Berman & Son Clothiers
in Mequon. Freshen up your wardrobe with the new
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[ On ] Location

FESTIVITIES | CELEBRATIONS | REVELRIES | EVENTS

PROMOTION

| CELEBRATIONS | REVELRIES | EVENTS PROMOTION Mary Lee Hannan, Brookfield, and Brenda Cortez, Franklin

Mary Lee Hannan, Brookfield, and Brenda Cortez, Franklin

Mary Lee Hannan, Brookfield, and Brenda Cortez, Franklin Nick Blauat and Marianne Kohlmann, Milwaukee [ M

Nick Blauat and Marianne Kohlmann, Milwaukee

[M Magazine Best Home: Create Escape]

M Magazine hosted its third Best Home Seminar Series at the timothyj kitchen & bath showroom. M Magazine editor Amy Siewert moderated the panel that included David Frank of David J. Frank Landscape, Eric Slavin of Wade Weismann Architecture and Tony Enea of Ruvin Bros. Artisans & Trades. A networking lunch sponsored by Sazama’s Fine Catering followed.

Kent McKelvey of timothyj kitchen & bath studio introduces panelists Amy Siewert, M Magazine; Tony Enea, Ruvin Bros. Artisans & Trades; David Frank, David J. Frank Landscape; and Eric Slavin, Wade Weismann Architecture

Frank Landscape; and Eric Slavin, Wade Weismann Architecture Debbie Rahn and Paul Rasmussen, Cedarburg Photos by

Debbie Rahn and Paul Rasmussen, Cedarburg

Photos by Mark Bertieri
Photos by Mark Bertieri
Rahn and Paul Rasmussen, Cedarburg Photos by Mark Bertieri Michelle Bersell, Mequon, and Suzanne Monroe, Cedarburg

Michelle Bersell, Mequon, and Suzanne Monroe, Cedarburg

Michelle Bersell, Mequon, and Suzanne Monroe, Cedarburg Laurie Rasmussen, Mequon, and Michele Gaudes, Cedarburg

Laurie Rasmussen, Mequon, and Michele Gaudes, Cedarburg

Laurie Rasmussen, Mequon, and Michele Gaudes, Cedarburg Elizabeth Gilbert [ Eat, Pray, Love ] Eat, Pray,

Elizabeth Gilbert

[Eat, Pray, Love]

Eat, Pray, Love author Elizabeth Gilbert did a book reading and signing for a sold-out crowd at Elite Fitness in Mequon. Event proceeds benefit Gathering on the Green.

in Mequon. Event proceeds benefit Gathering on the Green. Linda Benna, Pewaukee, and Molly Marshall, Nashotah

Linda Benna, Pewaukee, and Molly Marshall, Nashotah

Green. Linda Benna, Pewaukee, and Molly Marshall, Nashotah Alycia Dobbs and Bianca Riley, Milwaukee [ Calvin

Alycia Dobbs and Bianca Riley, Milwaukee

[Calvin Klein Fragrance Event]

Boston Store Brookfield Square hosted a Calvin Klein fragrance event that included personalized engravings on fragrance purchases, complimentary gifts and delectable desserts.

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»

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PROMOTION

» SHOP LOCAL » » » » »

» » » PROMOTION » SHOP LOCAL » » » » » Perfect At Any Party
» » » PROMOTION » SHOP LOCAL » » » » » Perfect At Any Party
» » » PROMOTION » SHOP LOCAL » » » » » Perfect At Any Party

Perfect At Any Party

Larry’s Market in Brown Deer carries the finest selection of cut-to-order Wisconsin artisan cheeses.

Step-Up Your Organization

California Closets can organize so much more than just your closets. Visit its Brookfield showroom and prepare to be inspired.

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» »
ling
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iece

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your design vision, creating that

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design vision, creating that custom, perfect jewelry piece. » Stylish Server Papaver Orientale Square Trays from

»

Stylish Server

Papaver Orientale Square Trays from RockFlowerPaper are perfect for everyday living and entertaining. Styles available at Past Basket, Milwaukee.

A Well-Dressed Man

Shop men’s shoes and accessories at the Allen Edmonds retail store located next to Mark Berman & Son Clothiers in Mequon.

located next to Mark Berman & Son Clothiers in Mequon. » Dramatic Flare These stunning candleholders

»

Dramatic Flare

These stunning candleholders add drama to any space. This April, take 30 percent off all candleholders and candles, including Voluspa and Lafco. At Peabody’s Interiors, Brown Deer.

candleholders and candles, including Voluspa and Lafco. At Peabody’s Interiors , Brown Deer. 52 M |

GARDEN CLUB

Delight in exquisite floral arrangements throughout the Milwaukee Art Museum’s Collection galleries, by the area’s top floral designers. Take part in presentations, lectures, and more. Details at www.mam.org/bloom.

GARDEN CLUB

A 21ST CENTURY EDUCATION

At University School, we prepare your child

for the challenges and opportunities of the

21st century with an educational approach that

extends far beyond the classroom. We encourage

students to interact and connect with the world,

technology and each other, to build the foundation for

active and engaged learning, and to be creative thinkers and problem solvers.

Discover the University School difference at our Spring Open House Sunday, April 10 from 2:00-4:00 p.m. Information session at 2:15 p.m.

Learn more about USM and how our new, state-of-the-art

facilities enhance a 21st century education

by calling 414.540.3320 or emailing admissions@usmk12.org.

Arrange a personal tour today.

Prekindergarten (age 3) – Grade 12 l Independent l Coeducational 2100 West Fairy Chasm Road l Milwaukee, WI 53217 l www.usmk12.org

Photos by Mark Bertieri

Cream City » Charitable Events

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Snapshots

PROM The Ball 2011

More than 300 guests had the chance to redo their prom experience at the Milwaukee Ballet’s PROM The Ball 2011 gala. The event benefited the Milwaukee Ballet Company, Milwaukee Ballet School and its educational and community outreach programs.

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Allie Schuelke and Krisit Gorecki, Milwaukee 2. William & Melissa Daley, Milwaukee

3.

Ben Imhoff and Colleen Tierney, Milwaukee 4. Michelle & Jon Levine, Mequon

5.

Scott & Jennifer Peterson, Milwaukee

Giving

5. Scott & Jennifer Peterson, Milwaukee Giving Guests at Creative Fusion 2010 enjoyed interactive art

Guests at Creative Fusion 2010 enjoyed interactive art presentations.

Creative Fusion

Justin and Susanna Mortara are excited to “Party Outside the Lines” as they host this year’s Creative Fusion benefit on Saturday, May 7, at the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design. The event begins at 6:30 p.m. at the college’s Third Ward campus. According to the Mortaras, “Creative Fusion is a great event that showcases Milwaukee's creative edge. Guests will have the time of their lives amidst the very best of art and design, in the very studio spaces in which such creativity flourishes. We encour- age all to enjoy this wonderful opportunity.” Taking its cue from the talented MIAD students, Creative Fusion invites guests to step outside the lines and into the studios to experience the art and design process- es. Guests will also bid on specially created silent and live auction items. Delicious cui- sine will be provided by chef Scott Shully of Shully’s Catering. The event benefits the Creative Fusion Scholarship Fund, which helps support the 96 percent of MIAD students who receive financial aid.

6:30 p.m., Saturday, May 7, MIAD, 273 E. Erie St., Milwaukee. Tickets are $300 per person and available, with sponsorship information, through April 18 by calling Arlene Remsik at Exceptional Events, (414) 270-300, ext. 230. Auction images will be available at miad.edu/ creative fusion.

M: Milwaukee’s Lifestyle Magazine is a proud media sponsor of local charitable events. For sponsorship information, contact Suzanne Fedie at (414) 507-4154 or sfedie@conleynet.com.

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE LABEL Benjamin Moore colors can only be made with Benjamin Moore
IT’S ALL ABOUT
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Benjamin Moore colors
can only be made with
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Milwaukee | 420 S First St | 414-223-3219
Thiensville | 501 N Main St | 262-242-1050
see what we can do for you!
Whimsical Chic Our spring must have. THE SHOPS AT EAST TOWNE SQUARE 1515 WEST MEQUON
Whimsical Chic
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Hidden Jewel of the North Shore Indoor & Outdoor Tennis Courts | Easy Court Access
Hidden Jewel of the North Shore
Indoor & Outdoor Tennis Courts | Easy Court Access
Heated Outdoor Swimming Pool | Summer Snack Bar
Swim & Tennis Lessons | Children’s Swim & Tennis Teams
Tennis Programs led by
Manager/USPTA Pro Jackie Mueller Egelhoff,
United States Professional Tennis Association
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Photos by Dan Wilson

Cream City » Out & About

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Silver Soirée

The Cedarburg Cultural Center celebrated its 25th Anniversary with a festive gala. Guests enjoyed an eve- ning honoring the center’s past while looking forward to the future.

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1. Jane Musich, Grafton, and Cecil Hunt, Cedarburg 2. Tricia & Chuck Parshall, Cedarburg 3. Courtney & David Olson, Cedarburg 4. Carol Ross, Cedarburg; Lauren Rose Hofland,

Grafton; Barbara Hunt and John Katzka, Cedarburg 5. Trudi & Tom Roesch, Cedarburg 6. Eileen & Kevin Goniu, Mequon 7. Martha Sterline and Anne Maetzold, Cedarburg

8. Amy & John Cordio, Cedarburg 9. Bryan & Robin Dworak, Cedarburg 10. Liz Bryde and Vicky Schaefer, Cedarburg

If you would like a photographer to come to your event, please e-mail outandabout@conleynet.com. No phone calls please.

Love,

Barb

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Photos by Tamara Conley Gogin

Cream City » Out & About

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The Pink Tie Gala

The Delafield Chamber of Commerce and Wisconsin Breast Cancer Showhouse hosted a winter ball at The Delafield Hotel to benefit breast and prostate cancer research.

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1. Carol Williams, Menomonee Falls, and Rebecca Banks, St. Francis 2. Flora Cameron, Oconomowoc, and Daniel O’Hair, Milwaukee 3. Katie Zurn and Lindsey Mikulance, Pewaukee 4. Jeff & Debbie Krajacic and Amy & Kent Attwell, Delafield 5. Elizabeth & Charlie Haas and Kadie & Steve Jelenchick, Milwaukee 6. Keith & Beth Clemence, Hales Corners 7. Robert & Kathleen Schwade, Delafield 8. Bruce Wade, Milwaukee, and Jacqueline Johansson, Nashotah 9. Jim & Tanya Ropella, Oconomowoc 10. Gary Langenbach & Judy Derse, Oconomowoc

TODAY! us

Contact

“Put Some Spring in your Step”

For the Finest Footwear • Accessories • Apparel

SHOPS OF GiGi 1554 W. Mequon Rd.

62-241-5578

Mon.-Fri. 10-6, Sat. 10-5

GALLERIA WEST 18900 W. Bluemound Rd.

262-784-3434

Mon.-Fri. 10-6, Sat. 10-5

A new year brings a new partnership

Double your value with

ENTHUSIASTIC

EXCELLENT

EXPERIENCED

Real Estate Specialists

Gail Ganley

Barb Donner

414-906-1211

414-906-1238

Coldwell Banker North Shore Office

6000 N. Port Washington Rd. Glendale, WI 53217

a social, sporting and business venue Meet friends that turn into family

Cruising & Power Boat Fleets

No dining minimum | No jacket required

Pool, Spa & Bars

Worldwide reciprocal Club

benefit privileges

You don’t need a boat to join

Contact: Wendy Olsen, Membership Director

262.707.2811 • wendyolsen@milwaukeeyc.com

Photos by Mark Bertieri

700 A Genesee Street, Dela eld

262-646-3310

www.stevenpauldesigns.com

Diamond

the birthstone for April

414-963-1657

2107 East Capitol Dr., Shorewood

Hours: Tue10-5 • Wed– Sat 10-9 Sun 10-4 Closed on Mondays

Since 2000

Remodeling your outdoor room?

We have plenty of ideas for you!

Landscape Design & Installation

Hardscape Construction

Decks & Patios

Maintenance

Chris Oberndorfer Mequon | (262) 512-9509

oberndorferlandscape.com

fine home furnishings, decorating accessories & gifts

FRESHEN UP YOUR HOME THIS SPRING WITH NEW ACCENT LAMPS AND FURNITURE COMPLIMENTARY DECORATING CONSULATION AVAILABLE Located in Concord Court, 1380 W. Mequon Rd., Mequon

262.241.8787

Cream City » Out & About

Fantasy House

Drs. Faye and Sam Shammo of Brookfield hosted the American Cancer Society’s 2010 Loretta Thomson Christmas Fantasy House Preview Party. Guests enjoyed an evening of fine wines, hors d’oeuvres, silent auction and an intimate tour of the home.

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1. Faye & Sam Shammo, Brookfield

2. Pam LaFrance, Milwaukee, and Bill Mansour,

Brookfield 3. Craig & Danielle Husar, Brookfield

4. Laura & Alan Swan, Milwaukee

Photos by Matt Haas

Celebration of Diversity

The Nonprofit Center of Milwaukee held its 16th annual holiday event at the Italian Community Center featuring music, traditional foods, artists and displays showcasing the cultural diversity in Milwaukee.

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1. Adam Noe, Milwaukee, and Jason Noe, Brown Deer 2. Michael Drake,

Brookfield, and Larry Moore, Milwaukee 3. David & Janete Bradford, Menomonee Falls; and Monte Crumble, Milwaukee 4. Dalton Speller and Jeffrey Speller, Wauwatosa 5. Erin Gannon, Milwaukee, and Paula Penebaker, Glendale

6. Kosa Galic, Laura Galic, and Adela Marinesca, Cudahy

the

LIEN

team

#1 IN ALL COMPANY SALES

A Lifetime of Results

www.jefflienteam.com

Direct: 414-807-4800 • Email: jlien@firstweber.com

Brookfield 4BR/4BA

PIN #62201

$719,900

Delafield 5BR/3.5BA

PIN #68127

$599,900

Hartland 4BR/3.5BA

PIN #70154

$489,500

Pewaukee 3BR/2.5BA

PIN #67322

$649,900

Wales - Legend 5BR/4.5BA

PIN #70896

$897,500

Delafield 5BR/3.5BA

PIN #68027