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Berkan BALIK IMT3 121008008

THE DIFFICULTIES TRANSLATORS MAY HAVE IN TRANSLATING THE ACQUIS AND SUGGESTIONS TO OVERCOME SUCH DIFFICULTIES THROUGH CLOSE COOPERATION WITH TRANSLATION COORDINATION DIRECTORATE We have been making research about the EU and Turkey, thereby focusing on the translation process. Throughout our study, we have looked into the translation on a centrifugal basis taking into account such factors as the importance of language, the importance of translation and the simple question what to translate? For a few months, we have been dwelling on these relations , which has helped us to prepare a substructure, a basis in otherwords, to work on concrete examples in the light of what we have gathered for a couple of months. Now, I will be dealing with what we can do to contribute to the operations of Translation Coordination Directorate. I will be mentioning about Termturk, lawyer linguists, the qualifications the Directorate may be expecting to find in a translator and what can be done to make a translator acquire such qualifications. Today, the EU has 23 official languages and someday Turkish language may be one of them, which has impelled the authorities to devise projects and take some actions. Hence, Translation Coordination Directorate was founded and they published a glossary for the translators for standardization and consistence throughout the documents. Then, Termturk was coined. Termturk is a project conducted by Hacettepe University and funded by the European Union. The main objective of the project is to establish the foundations required for the determination of a national terminology policy and to form a body of human resources that is to work in this field. We should start from the point where the first terminology studies started and begin a journey thoughout the history till the foundation of Termturk. During the process, we should trace the history of making terms and glossaries and what it has to do with the EU Legislation thereby coming up with some projections as to our possible contributions to the Project. Once terminologists have gathered information from specialised corpora, they compile these data into respositories so that they are available in a concise and useful form for other users, such as translators, to consult. says Ingrid Meyer. However in Turkey, translators, themselves, are also terminologists, which is a term we are not so familiar with. We regard forming terminlolgy as solely translation.
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The need to translate the EU Legislation has made it a must for some to look for lawyer linguists. The head of the Directorate itself is a lawyer himself. So we can correspond with them and see what they think about it. We can question either to bring up lawyer linguists or linguists specialised in Law. We can even ask why we have so few opprtunities to educate students and faciliatate more departments founded to that end if we need such experts. There is so few efforts, I think. If it is easier to find lawyers who can speak English or French, what are we striving for by studying translation and interpretation? Also, we should examine the language employed in the Legislation and spot the defects and take some measures accordingly. By coining terms, can a brand-new legilastion language be possible? At this point, I would like to determine the criteria and the qualifications which are expected to be acquired by a translator who could participate in the Project. By its very nature, translation is an interdisciplinary field and throughout the Project, translators will be in cahoots with professionals from other fields, mostly lawyers. The translation process consists of 3 steps. The first one is the translation process itself, the second one is proofreading and editing process and at the last step, the translations are reviewed by the professionals in the specific fields. In real life, any manipulation or interference will be taken unkindly by the translators but here, there are so few translators specialised in law. Actually, there are also so few lawyers who are expert at legal language in English. The language education provided to the wouldbe lawyers at the faculty of law, professional English by name, is insufficient. By the same token, legal translation courses are also inadequate. What they are looking for is translators who are quick-wit, creative in terms of observing and evaluating the situations thereby expressing it in their own language with new form, that is to say, with a new term formation. To overcome the difficulty, here are my suggestions: Firstly, the universities should work hand in hand with Translation Coordination Directorate and produce new projects. Moreover, they should send professionals working as translators in the field or lawyer reviewers to universities and organise panels to clear up our minds as to what is going on with respect to acquis communautaire. Secondly, there should be sub-directorates at universities which have translation and interpreting departments so that both Translation Coordination Directorate and the wouldbe tranlsators educated at these universities will finger on the pulse and keep in touch with the latest developments as to the EU in terms of translation. Those students who are

Berkan BALIK IMT3 121008008

eager to participate in such projects and organizations must be motivated by assigning responsbilities such as translations or projects. Hence, they can also bring up the qualified translators, the terminolgues or ,whatever they would call which they seek to employ. Thirdly, they should define the qualifications which must be acquired by the translators whom they are seeking to cooperate with. It is known that the translation process of acquis communautaire consists of 3 steps: translation by a freelance translator, revision by a translator competent in legal language and also the EU terminology and revision by a lawyer expert at legal language. Translators should be aware of the three steps and the fact that the process requires a great cooperation. Of course, the possible translators should pass the tests prepared by the Directorate. The content must comprise all the elements and qualifications they are expecting to see in a translator. Kyo Kageura suggests that one should be aware of such factors as concept (the EU), conceptual structure (acquis communautaire), chracteristic, domain (area of knowledge), subject field. RESOURCES Lexicography, terminology, and translation: text-based studies in honour of Ingrid Meyer /Ingrid Meyer,Lynne Bowker The Dynamics of Terminology/ A descriptive theory of term formation and terminological growth /Kyo Kageura A practical course in terminology processing / Juan C. Sager. Modern Approaches to Terminological theories and applications / Heribert Picht Handbook of terminology management: Application-oriented terminology management /Sue Ellen Wright, Gerhard Budin Terminology and language planning: an alternative framework of practice and discourse /Bassey Edem Antia