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XX.

LOCKOUT / TAGOUT PROGRAM

20. LOCKOUT/TAGOUT PROGRAM


Lockout / tagout is a safety procedure requirement to prevent deaths and injuries caused by the activation of machinery through the sudden unexpected release of energy. This procedure applies to all forms of energy including electrical, steam, pneumatic, hydraulic, thermal, chemical, pressurized liquids and gases, mechanical, gravity loads, etc. Lockout / tagout who needs it? YOU DO, if you work with or near such energy sources and value your life. OSHA estimates that lockout / tagout compliance could prevent some 120 deaths, 28,000 serious injuries, and 32,000 minor injuries annually. If your state, city, employer, or place of work has an approved lockout / tagout procedure in place, follow it carefully, because one small mistake can have very serious results. Your lockout / tag out program should include a written procedure, employee training, all necessary equipment, and provisions for proper documentation. Make certain that you have located all energy sources, feeds and shut-off locations. Multiple switch, valve, or other activation points are common, and all require the same lockout / tagout attention. The lock must be secured to prevent anyone else from activating that control. The tag informs others of the outage, identifies the contractor, employee, and the time and date of the installation. Only the person who installed the lock and tag has authorization to remove it, except under emergency conditions while following specific procedures. After all energy sources are shut off, proceed with caution deactivated equipment may still function due to stored energy always test for movement by trying the operating controls, the follow then follow the equipment manufacturer's guidelines for special de-energizing procedures. SAFETY THREE OUT OF FOUR ACCIDENTS INVOLVING UNEXPECTED MACHINERY REMINDERS ACTIVATION OCCUR ON JOBS OF 15 MINUTES OR LESS. NO JOB IS TOO SMALL OR SHORT FOR LOCKOUT/TAGOUT.

20A. SAMPLE LOCKOUT/TAGOUT POLICY


HOW TO LOCKOUT/TAGOUT Below are guidelines for lockout / tagout by authorized employees. These are the basic step-bystep rules that should be followed to prevent the unexpected energization, start-up, or release of stored energy that could cause injury to anyone working on, electrical systems equipment, or machinery. 1. TURN OFF THE EQUIPMENT AND DISCONNECT THE ENERGY SOURCE. IMPORTANT: Notify all affected employees that a lockout procedure is beginning and why. Locate and identify all switches, valves, and other devices that will have to be locked and/or tagged. More than one energy source may be involved. Shut the electrical system or equipment down by the normal procedure. Pull the plug, flip the power switch, break the circuit, pull a fuse, close a valve, or otherwise neutralize stored energy do whatever is necessary to turn "off" the equipment and disconnect the energy source. Then test the "on" switch and turn it back to "off". While working on circuits where the breaker controlling the circuit is in a large panel board and there is no physical way to lock the breaker/switch, to be certain the circuit will not be energized, remove the conductors from the breaker/switch. If you're not authorized to turn off main power controls, find out who is. Record this person's name and phone number. KNOW THE SYSTEM AND THEIR POWER SOURCES SOME MAY HAVE MORE THAN ONE SOURCE OF POWER. BE SURE TO DISCONNECT ALL SOURCES OF POWER BEFORE YOU CONTINUE. 2. LOCKOUT ENERGY SOURCES. Use a lock to prevent the flow of energy from being restored. Snap a lock on the control lever or on the multiple-lock adapter. Test the disconnect to be sure it can't be moved to the "on" position. In other words, make it impossible for the flow of energy to be re-established without your knowledge. PULLING A FUSE OR FLIPPING A CIRCUIT BREAKER IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR LOCKING OUT. If more than one person is going to be working on the equipment, use a multiple lockout device. If you come across a closed valve or a switch that has been turned off but doesn't have a lock, assume that someone has turned it off for a reason. Find out why the source of energy has been turned off before you restore power. 3. TAG AT THE DISCONNECT POINT. Even though you're using a lock, you must place a tag at the disconnect point. A tag provides vital information and extra protection. It tells everyone who you are and what you're doing, as well as instructing them not to restore energy. When it's physically impossible to use a lock, a tag is absolutely essential.

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WHAT INFORMATION IS REQUIRED ON THE TAG? EMPLOYEE NAME TIME AND DATE WORK BEGAN TYPE OF WORK BEING DONE DANGER-DO NOT START DANGER-DO NOT OPEN DANGER-DO NOT ENERGIZE IMPORTANT: Always use a company lock. Never borrow someone's personal lock to establish a Lockout/Tagout System.

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RELEASE RESIDUAL ENERGY. Do you know what Zero Mechanical State (ZMS) is and how to achieve it on every machine and piece of equipment? (ZERO MECHANICAL STATE MEANS THE MACHINE HAS BEEN PUT IN A STATE IN WHICH THE POSSIBILITY OF AN UNEXPECTED MECHANICAL MOVEMENT HAS BEEN REDUCED TO A MINIMUM.) REMEMBER: Some equipment doesn't run by electricity alone. Hydraulic and pneumatic devices may also be involved. Air under pressure in a hose, and unsecured machine parts are also examples of potentially dangerous energy that is often stored in a shut down machines or equipment. That is why releasing residual energy by discharging capacitors, grounding circuits, or releasing built-up pressure is a step that can't be overlooked.

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TEST EQUIPMENT. It's necessary to test equipment to make sure it won't energize before working on it. A disconnect switch would be defective, or the wrong switch thrown, leaving the circuit energized. So after you've completed the first four steps, turn on the switch or push the start button to make sure you've successfully blocked out all energy sources. Then return it to the "off" position. Be aware of hidden energy sources. For example, if there's more than one energy source, make sure you lockout and tag the other sources following the steps above.

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RESTORE ENERGY SAFELY. When you've finished working, check to make sure all tools and grounding protection have been removed, all lines have been reconnected or unblocked, all guards have been replaced, and other workers are safely out of the way before removing lock and tag. Be sure you're not exposing another person to danger by removing your lock. BEWARE OF MULTIPLE-LOCKOUT SITUATIONS: If the lock placed is the last one remaining on the lockout device, it's a good idea to check and to notify your supervisor before restoring energy. Just to be safe! Remember, it is extremely important that everyone develop a respect for what can happen when we energize circuits, turn switches, start and stop equipment, turn valves and engage clutches without knowing for sure what those devices control. We should all practice work

habits that require a thorough inspection of electrical equipment and machinery before turning the switch.

20B. LOCKOUT/ TAGOUT PROGRAM GUIDELINES


Each Electrical Contractor should have a strong commitment to provide a safe work place and to establish policies promoting high standards of employee health and safety. In keeping with this commitment, it is the company's intent to maintain a Lockout/Tagout Policy. LOCKOUT/TAGOUT YOUR KEY TO SAFETY Protect yourself and your co-workers by following these lockout / tagout procedures any time you repair, service, or inspect, electrical systems equipment or machinery. Notify others that you're beginning a lockout / tagout procedure and why. Turn off equipment and disconnect the energy source (electric, steam, pneumatic, hydraulic), and keep in mind residual energy. Test the "on" switch; return it to the "off" position. Release residual or stored energy in capacitors, springs and unsecured machine parts. Lockout / tagout the energy sources, using a lock and tag. Re-test the "on" switch and return switch to "off" position. Make sure others are safe; machine guards are in place; tools, lock, grounding protection and tags are removed before restoring energy.

LOCKOUT/TAGOUT RULES AFFECT EVERYONE EVEN THOSE WORKERS WHO DON'T ACTUALLY SERVICE OR REPAIR ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS, MACHINERY, AND EQUIPMENT. Every employee must understand what a LOCK and TAG means on an Electrical System or a piece of machinery or equipment, otherwise, accidents can and will happen. Learning about Lockout/Tagout procedures is important, especially if you're responsible for cleaning, repairing, servicing or inspecting equipment. This policy covers the information you'll need to know. Know the procedures and follow them before working on any mechanical, hydraulic, electrical, or pneumatic equipment. MAKING ANY EXCEPTION TO THE RULES WOULD RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH.

WHAT IS TAGOUT? Means placing a tag on the power source to warn co-workers and others not to turn the power on. Tags don't provide the physical restraint that locks provide, but they're just as important. You will also find one of the following written statements on a Tag. DANGER DANGER DANGER DANGER DANGER DO NOT START DO NOT OPEN DO NOT CLOSE DO NOT ENERGIZE DO NOT OPERATE

The information on the tag will include the name of the worker who put it there, the date and time the work began, and the type of work being performed. A tag can only be used alone when it is not possible to lock out the energy source. It is also required to use a tag along with a lock for double protection and to provide co-workers with more detailed information about the lockout / tagout procedures. Tags should be treated like locks. They're not to be removed without authorization TAGS ARE NEVER TO BE BYPASSED OR IGNORED. WHEN TO LOCKOUT/TAGOUT This procedure establishes the requirements for our Lockout/Tagout plan to ensure that all equipment and machinery are isolated from all potentially hazardous energy sources before employees are allowed to perform repairs, service, maintenance, or inspection assignments. RESPONSIBILITY 1. Job site superintendent and supervisors are responsible for the training of the employees assigned to their site. They are also responsible to ensure that the Lockout/Tagout policy is utilized whenever operational electrical systems, equipment, or machinery are de-energized for inspection, service, repairs or routine maintenance. 2. All employees are required to be properly trained in the company's Lockout/ Tagout policy. Additional job site training is required for those special requirements or each job site. All employees transferred to the job site should be properly trained at the time of transfer. 3. The company will provide, at each job/work site location, a Lockout System of locks with one key under the control of the site superintendent, multi-lockout devices, and Tagout tags, with the proper language and a space to list employee name, date, work location and effected systems. WHAT IS LOCKOUT? When you're blocking the flow of energy from the power source to the equipment -and keeping it blocked out that's LOCKOUT. A lockout device is usually a key or combination lock arrangement that secures a disconnect switch breaker, valve or lever in the "off" position.

20C. LOCKOUT/ TAGOUT COMPLIANCE CHECKLIST


1. Has employer established a program with procedures for utilizing lockout / tagout devices? (1910.147 (a)(3)(i)) Are "affected" as well as "authorized" employees covered by the program ((a)(3)(ii)(b)) Does program include an "energy control procedure" and employee training to ensure that machinery is isolated and rendered inoperative? ((c)(i)) If item cannot be locked out, is a tagout system utilized? ((c)(2)(i)) If tagouts are used, can the employer demonstrate that utilization of the tagout will provide full employee protection? ((c)(2)(ii)) Are the tagouts attached at the same locations that the lockouts would have been located? ((c)(3)(i)) Have specific procedures been developed, documented and utilized for each particular piece of equipment unless the 8 requirements for exception are met? ((c)(4)(i)) Do written procedures include: A. statement of intended use B. specific steps for shutting down, isolating, blocking and securing C. specific steps for placement, removal and transfer of lockout / tagout devices and responsibilities D. specific requirements for testing the machine to verify effectiveness of lockout? ((c)(4)(ii)) 9. Are lockout and tagout devices singularly identified to user and not used for other purposes? Are they standardized within the facility in color, shape and size and, in case of tagouts, in print and format? ((c)(5)(ii)) 10. Does the program include a periodic inspection procedure at least annually? Does the inspection program include: A. inspection by authorized employee B. a review with each authorized employee of that employee's responsibility C. documentation that the periodic inspections were performed? ((c)(6)(ii)) _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

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Does the employer provide training? Does the training include: A. recognition of hazardous energy sources (authorized employees) B. purpose and use of energy control procedures (affected employees) C. procedure and prohibition to restart equipment which has been locked or tagged out (all other employees) D. when tagout systems are used, the limitations of tags? ((c)(7)(ii))

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Is employee re-training provided for authorized and affected employees, A. whenever there is a change in job assignments B. change in machines C. change in energy control procedures? ((c)(7)(iii)(A)) _____ _____ _____

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Does the employer have documentation of the employee training, including names and dates? ((c)(7)(iv)) Are affected employees notified when lockouts, tagouts are applied or removed? ((c)(9)) Does the established procedure for application of energy control include: A. preparation for shutdown B. shutdown procedure C. machine/equipment isolation D. lockout / tagout application E. removal of stored energy F. verification of isolation? ((c)(9))

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Are the following procedures taken before energy is restored: A. work area inspected to ensure removal of non-essential items and guards intact _____ B. work area checked to ensure employees have been removed and that affected employees have been notified C. lockout / tagout devices have been removed? ((d)(6)) _____ _____

17. If the authorized employee who applied the lockout / tagout device is not available to remove it, are the following procedures utilized: A. verification that employee is not at the facility B. a reasonable effort has been made to contact the employee C. employee whose lockout / tagout was removed is notified before he or she resumes work D. other procedures are followed before re-start: 1. clear mechanism of tools and materials 2. employees are removed from the machine and area 3. lockout / tagout devices are removed 4. machinery is de-energized and energy control procedures are re-applied? ((e)(1-3)) 18. If outside personnel are to engage in activities, do the on-site employer and outside employer inform each other of their respective lockout / tagout procedures? ((f)(2)) Are there specific procedures to utilize during shift or personnel changes, including a provision for orderly transfer of lockout / tagout devices? ((f)(4))

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