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eSkwela Social Franchise Manual version 1.

Table of Contents Introduction...................................................................................................................................................3 Preface............................................................................................................................................................4 Acronyms........................................................................................................................................................6 What is eSkwela?...........................................................................................................................................7 Concept.....................................................................................................................................................7 The APEC Education Foundation Years (2006-2007)..........................................................................8 The Expansion years (2008-2011).........................................................................................................9 Awards.......................................................................................................................................................9 Preparing for turnover from CICT to DepEd (2010-11)...................................................................10 Phase Zero - Pre-setup...............................................................................................................................11 Question 1: Is an eSkwela Center needed in my community?........................................................11 Question 2: Is my community ready for an eSkwela Center?...............................................................12 Question 2: Is my community ready for an eSkwela Center?..........................................................12 Phase 1 Setup...........................................................................................................................................14 1a. Contact DepEd.................................................................................................................................14 1b. Application......................................................................................................................................14 Infrastructure Space / Room........................................................................................................14 Infrastructure Computers............................................................................................................15 Staff....................................................................................................................................................16 The eSkwela Application Form.......................................................................................................16 1c. Validation and Assessment............................................................................................................21 Assessment of Application Form...................................................................................................21 Site Inspection...................................................................................................................................22 1d. Memorandum of Agreement........................................................................................................23 Sample eSkwela Center MOA*.......................................................................................................24 MOA duties from CICT to DepEd...................................................................................................29 1e. Training.............................................................................................................................................31 Training for Learning Facilitators...................................................................................................31 Training for Network Administrators............................................................................................31 eSkwela LF and NA Trainings - Design......................................................................................32 Training for Center Managers.........................................................................................................33 eSkwela CM Training Design...................................................................................................34 1f. Installation of eSkwela learning package....................................................................................36 Inauguration / Launch...........................................................................................................................36 Phase 2 Operations.................................................................................................................................37 2a. Implementation of the eSkwela Instructional Model................................................................37 Components .....................................................................................................................................37 Learning sessions..............................................................................................................................39 Working through the modules.......................................................................................................39 Using the Learning Management System.....................................................................................40 Module Guide as a Learning Scaffold............................................................................................40 Best Practices....................................................................................................................................41 2b. Center Management.......................................................................................................................42 Getting Local Partner support........................................................................................................43 Add-on Programs and Activities.....................................................................................................44 Competencies: A Snapshot of the eSkwela Center Management Training.............................44 Service-oriented management..................................................................................................44 Social enterpreneurship.............................................................................................................45 Social Marketing and Networking.............................................................................................46 Phase 3 Monitoring and Evaluation......................................................................................................48 M&E Definition.......................................................................................................................................48 M&E at the program management level............................................................................................49 M&E at the Center level...................................................................................................................50 M&E with a purpose.........................................................................................................................52 Annexes........................................................................................................................................................54

Introduction The eSkwela Social Franchise Manual version 1.0 gathers everything essential there is to know in the set-up, implementation, management and sustainability of an eSkwela Center (community e-learning center for out-of-school youth and adults). From August 2006 to April 2011, the Commission on Information and Communications Technology (CICT) handled the management of the eSkwela Project. In the process of handholding, or providing personalized assistance and keeping communication lines open to each Center and its proponents, the CICT-eSkwela Project Team learned of the project's nuances and drew from this experience in the improvement of project design and execution. Similar improvements were made in site replication and the eSkwela instructional model; from an initial 4 pilot sites, a total of 105 eSkwela Centers currently make use of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) for non-formal education. Effective May 2011, the Department of Education Bureau of Alternative Learning System (DepEd-BALS) will assume program management of eSkwela. Version 1.0 of the eSkwela Franchise manual reflects this significant update and written in detail throughout the document. The eSkwela Social Franchise Manual is a written version of the handholding assistance provided to the eSkwela Centers during the project's time with CICT, and will serve as a guide for individuals and/or groups be it local DepEd Offices, local government units, NGOs, faithbased groups, civic groups, private sector - who want to take an active role in providing ICTenhanced education to the out-of-school population and add to the growing number of eSkwela Centers in the Philippines.

Preface As we approached the final year of eSkwela with CICT and its impending turnover to DepEd, we at the CICT-eSkwela Project Team felt the need to update and improve on the initial eSkwela Social Franchise Manual to aid in project expansion and a seamless transition process. We learned a lot from the experience of managing the eSkwela Project, and it was clear that the manual's working version, written way back in 2008, was due for an overhaul. We would have wanted to release this manual during the project's stint with CICT. However, there was never enough time to just sit down and write. There were too many training activities to prepare, local partners to meet, centers to monitor, e-learning materials to review. Not that we were complaining. Managing the project indeed kept us on our toes, yet in an odd way this assured us we were on to something good. True enough, eSkwela had a quite successful run during this period: alongside the multiple international awards the eSkwela Project has received, it has gained momentum to encourage more individuals and groups to take part in its expansion. More importantly, we have seen Information and Communications Technology for Education (ICT4E) in action - how eSkwela is making a positive impact in the Alternative Learning System and in Philippine education in general, through the support and appreciation it continues to get from its partners (DepEd, public and private sector), implementers (ALS implementers and teachers, Center staff) and beneficiaries (out-of-school youth and adult learners). We hope to have a made available a clear and useful guide for all future eSkwela partners and stakeholders through this manual. With the help of this Manual, we are confident that eSkwela will continue to grow beyond its years with CICT.

The CICT eSkwela Project Team (2010-2011) Mel Tan Liset Domingo Jops Josef Ave Mejia Jane Alvarez Dyan Corpuz Vanessa Dalma Aimee Emejas Daryl Roxas Mark Sinapilo

eSkwela Social Franchise Manual version 1.0

Free and Open Source software was used in making this Manual. (LibreOffice 3.3 on Ubuntu 10.04)

Acronyms
A&E BALS CeC CICT DepEd ICT ICT4BE ICT4E LCE LGU LMS LP/s OSYAs M&E PhilCeC RC RT TESDA tPCA Accreditation and Equivalency Bureau of Alternative Learning System Community eCenter Commission on Information and Communications Technology Department of Education Information and Communications Technology Information and Communications Technology for Basic Education Information and Communications Technology for Education Local Chief Executive Local Government Unit Learning Management System Local partner/s Out-of-school youth and adults Monitoring and Evaluation Philippine Community eCenter Program eSkwela Regional Coordinator eSkwela Regional Team Technical Education and Skills Development Authority telecentre.org-PhilCeC Academy

eSkwela Social Franchise Manual version 1.0

What is eSkwela?
Once a flagship project of the Commission of Information and Communications Technology (CICT), eSkwela (sounds like eeskwela, pronounced with a long e) is a program of the Department of Education Bureau of Alternative Learning System (DepEd-BALS) that uses Information and Communications Technology (ICT) to enhance educational opportunities for the countrys out-of-school youth and adults, thus doing its share of bridging the widening digital divide and social chasms between those who are educated and those who are not. At eSkwela, ICT becomes the delivery mode for DepEd's Alternative Learning System (ALS): an ICT-equipped learning center, or an eSkwela Center that is, a computer laboratory (at least 4 computers) with a local network and internet connection becomes the venue for an ALS learning session ICT-based learning materials, collectively known as the eSkwela learning package, is used by the ALS learners and teachers. The package includes: ALS print modules converted into electronic or ICT format, otherwise known as eSkwela e-modules; eSkwela e-module guides for learners to guide them in studying each e-module; a Learning Management System (LMS) where eSkwela teachers and learners can access the e-modules and e-module guides and conduct ICT-based learning activities practice of blended learning, a combination of teacher and computer-aided instruction integration of project-based learning, where learners use ICTs available at the eSkwela Center as tools for making projects (text, photo, audio, video, multimedia productions) in context to what , to demonstrate authentic learning

Concept
The eSkwela Project traces its beginnings back in 2006, during the time of Dr. Emmanuel C. Lallana as a CICT Commissioner, when he was asked to head its newly-formed Human Capital Development Group (HCDG). When HCDG was still figuring out how it could live up to its name to develop the country's human capital Dr. Lallana thought it only makes sense for HCDG to partner with the Department of Education, look at the Philippine educational system and how ICTs can help improve it. This eventually paved the way for the provision of internet-connected computer laboratories to public high schools that is the iSchools Project, one of CICT-HCDG's projects under its ICT4BE Program. It became clear, though, that the non-formal education system better known as DepEd's Alternative Learning System was also in need of an ICT intervention. One of the most powerful graphs that I have seen when I was in government was produced by DepEd, recalled Dr. Lallana during the eSkwela Close-out ceremonies*. This is the graph of what happens to the 100 who enroll in Grade 1. For every 100 who enrolled in Grade 1, 14 will finish college. He wondered what happens to the 86 who fall by the wayside through 12 years of schooling.

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I found out that we are taking care of them with all of less than 1% of the DepEd budget. I thought that was particularly unjust. And so I said, technology must have a solution to this; technology has to find a way to solve this problem, to provide meaningful education for the majority who are out-of-school. In refining the eSkwela idea, Dr. Lallana also looked at non-traditional models such as the charter schools in the US and the NotSchool.net project 1, an initiative in the United Kingdom that provides online learning opportunities for people excluded from mainstream education. Upon bringing the proposal to DepEd's Bureau of Alternative Learning System, its Director, Dr. Carolina S. Guerrero, lent its support for the eSkwela idea and would be willing to sign off a partnership between CICT-HCDG and DepEd-BALS to implement it.

The APEC Education Foundation Years (2006-2007)


Public funds could not be accessed to finance eSkwela at that time, so CICT and DepEd decided to look at other sources of funding. CICT applied for a grant from the APEC Education Foundation (AEF), which recognized the potential of eSkwela. AEF approved only 6 out of 49 grant applications, and eSkwela was one of the six. During the AEF grant period, CICT would be in charge of project management. The grant would be used in converting an initial 35 ALS print modules into e-learning format, providing the computer equipment to set up 4 eskwela pilot sites one in the capital, one in each island group as proof of the eSkwela concept, training the ALS teachers who would be assigned at the pilot sites, and monitoring project implementation. eSkwela delivered these tasks and more: positive feedback from eSkwela learners and teachers
1

http://www.kslll.net/Documents/Summary_case%20studies_UK.pdf 8

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as well as improved test scores (A&E exam) also indicated how ICTs can enhance and improve educational opportunities for those who are out of school. Consequently, AEF granted access to additional funds for follow-through activities (eSkwela ICT Camp, an open source software training activity for eSkwela learners and teachers; eSkwela Content Development Conference for the content reviewers and developers), thus building on eSkwela's initial success.

The Expansion years (2008-2011)


CICT and DepEd agreed that eSkwela should continue beyond the AEF grant period. This prompted CICT to request for budget allocation from the eGov fund, which would become eSkwela's source of funding for the next three years. Much of the fund would be allocated and used for the development of the eSkwela instructional model (how ICTs will be used to enhance ALS), particularly in content development through the conversion of the ALS print modules into digital form(or e-modules) as well as the preparation of corresponding e-module guides. However, under the eGov funding, CICT would not be able to provide the computer equipment for the additional Centers; instead, it planned to involve the local community the DepEd division offices, LGUs, civic groups, NGOs, faith-based groups, and the private sector - in providing for the computers, infrastructure (the room or space for the Center, electric and internet connection fees), and center staff salaries/honoraria. As additional support to local partners, CICT would develop and prepare capability-building activities for the implementers, continuous handholding to eSkwela Centers, and project monitoring and evaluation. Roadshows were held for each of the country's regions as an initial activity to promote eSkwela to potential donors and funders. In addition to assisting these local partners (LPs) through the eSkwela setup process, CICT was also active in project advocacy. More eSkwela Centers would be established as the number of local partners increased. By July 2011, there would be 105 eSkwela Centers in the country that have been established and are being operated, managed and sustained by local partners. To date, an eSkwela Center can be found in a container van converted into an internet kiosk, in public markets, computer laboratories of private and public schools, barangay halls, in existing Community eCenters (CeCs). Local partners have made innovations of their own by making their eSkwela Centers mobile (computers transported from one area to another by motorcyle, van, or tricycle) and by making eSkwela available to other marginalized groups (street children, abused women and children, former club dancers / entertainers who have yet to complete their basic education). A teacher at one eSkwela Center has also started a distance learning model variety of eSkwela for Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs).

Awards
The eSkwela project was first acknowledged internationally in 2008 when it received a Certificate of Commendation at the UNESCO ICT in Education Innovation Awards. eSkwela would go on to receive another award from UNESCO at the 2010 King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa Prize for the Use of Information and Communication Technologies in Education, besting 46 other entries from 30 countries. Just before the turnover from CICT to DepEd, eSkwela was
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recognized for the third time, having been selected as one of the Laureates at the the 2011 Computerworld Honors Program.

Preparing for turnover from CICT to DepEd (2010-11)


Long before the eSkwela turnover process started, CICT knew eSkwela had to cease being a project and become a full-fledged delivery mode of ALS. Also, it understood that DepEd is the government agency who has the mandate on education, and it was only appropriate for it to take on the reins of eSkwela sooner than later. For CICT's Chairman, Sec. Ivan John E. Uy, CICT's role is not education its role is to look at how ICTs can be used as a tool to help everybody gain more knowledge and be able to exploit this tool for better education. CICT is the e in eSkwela. Our role is to act as a catalyst, to intervene in strategic areas using ICTs as an empowering tool.* While eSkwela was in the midst of expansion, preparations for the eventual turnover of eSkwela from CICT to DepEd were already being made through a series of capability building activities for selected DepEd staff (DepEd-BALS, Regional Coordinators from the DepEd regional offices, eSkwela trainers). They would be eventually organized to manage the eSkwela program, as shown in this chart:

Effective 1 May 2011, DepEd assumed the role of lead agency responsible for implementing and managing eSkwela. DepEd-BALS has also taken the cue from eSkwela and is supporting the further integration of ICTs in the Alternative Learning System, starting its own variant of eSkwela (e-learning) and working towards making the A&E exams available online. BALS also plans to tap computer laboratories of public schools for eSkwela, while continuing to provide assistance to parties who will initiate the establishment of new eSkwela Centers. Some of the eSkwela Regional Coordinators have already started training their regional teams in order to prepare them for their upcoming tasks.

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Phase Zero - Pre-setup


The rest of this manual is divided into the following phases:

Phase 1: Setup - all preparatory tasks needed to establish an eSkwela Center Phase 2: Operations day-to-day and strategic activities of an eSkwela Center Phase 3: Monitoring & Evaluation simultaneous with phases 1 and 2; M&E data to be used to improve setup and operations But before you proceed to phase 1,we would like you to go through Phase 0 (pre-setup) and think about the following questions:

Question 1: Is an eSkwela Center needed in my community?


The answer might seem obvious that yes, there is a need for an eSkwela Center not just in your community but everywhere, that there is a significant number of people that have yet to finish grade school or high school and that eSkwela can definitely step in to address this problem. But it is always a good exercise to really know your community in order to get a better grasp of what it needs, than immediately assuming that eSkwela is needed outright. These activities will help you determine whether your community needs an eSkwela Center:

Gather data on out-of-school youth and adults in your community. We recommend that you get relevant information on the educational profile of your community hard facts and figures, statistics that should be readily available, accessible and updated. You can approach the DepEd district / division office or your LGU's planning and development unit, as both maintain disaggregated, comprehensive records of the out-of-school population within their jurisdiction. Once you get a better picture of the educational situation by studying the said data, you can now make an informed decision on whether
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an eSkwela Center is best for your community. It will also guide you in planning for your eSkwela implementation, which you will eventually have to think about once you are in the eSkwela application stage (such as number of computers needed to serve the target number of learners to be served, corresponding space required, schedule of eSkwela sessions so that the target number of learners will be served).

Additionally, this data is will come in handy when you are already convincing groups and individuals in your community to support the setting up of an eSkwela Center, particularly in writing proposals to potential local partners.

Find out about existing programs for out-of-school youth and adults in your community. Most probably, there are other groups in your community that already have programs for OSYAs it could be programs on livelihood, arts, sports, basic computer literacy. Approach these groups and ask how they started and how they implement their programs. There could also be opportunities to collaborate and complement each other's programs in the future, so it is best to start building relationships with these organizations.

Question 2: Is my community ready for an eSkwela Center?


You and your community should not only be ready to use and benefit from eSkwela, but should also be able to support it. Setting up an eSkwela Center is not a mere matter of copying the emodules into computers. A lot of thought, planning, and action is essential; seeking help from your community makes these processes a whole lot easier. Find out about available ICT facilities that can be used for eSkwela. You do not have to start from scratch in setting up an eSkwela Center. The space and computer equipment needed for an eSkwela Center may already be available in your community. Talk to those who are in charge of these facilities and find out if it can be used for eSkwela:

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computer laboratories of schools - private or public, primary, secondary or tertiary) Community eCenters usually located in LGU offices (barangay, municipal or city halls) Internet / gaming cafs Computer schools other computer laboratories or similar facilities in your community

Talk to groups and individuals in your community who can support the eSkwela Center. Setting up an eSkwela Center can be too much of a task for one group. Tap the resources of other groups in your community. By distributing the responsibilities, setting up and implementing an eSkwela Center will not be as difficult. Also local partners will treat the eSkwela Center as their own project and will definitely look after its needs, because they already have a stake on it.

After providing going through the pre-setup exercise and your answers to these questions tell you that your community needs eSkwela and it is ready for eSkwela, you can now proceed to the first phase: setting up an eSkwela Center.

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Phase 1 Setup

1a. Contact DepEd


The first thing you have to do to start the eSkwela setup phase is to get in touch with DepEd through its eSkwela Regional Teams (RT). DepEd-BALS has assigned an eSkwela Regional Coordinator (RC) for each geographic region to oversee eSkwela's program implementation on a regional level. The Regional Team, led by its RC, can provide additional information about eSkwela as well as guide and assist you in eSkwela setup, operations and M&E. Working with DepEd's eSkwela Regional Teams has its perks. You will be assured that the Center you are setting up remains faithful to the ICT4E model as intended by DepEd and CICT, the same model that has made eSkwela a successful program. Once your Center is established, it will be included in DepEd's official list of eSkwela Centers and will have access to updates on the learning package (e-modules, e-module guides, LMS) as well as participation in capabilitybuilding activities. Please refer to the Annexes section for the contact information of the eSkwela Regional Coordinators.

1b. Application
The eSkwela model would not be implemented on a wide scale if there are no venues for replication. Essentially, this venue is the first thing that you and local partners have to provide. Whether you will set up a Center from scratch or make use of an existing facility, these requirements should be prepared:

Infrastructure Space / Room


Four walls, a roof, a door and a few windows - or a room where the eSkwela Center will be situated, is the literal venue for the Center. At the basic level, the Center's server and workstations (computers, computer table and chairs) should fit inside the room. The level of comfort of the learners should also be considered; at least 1.5 square meters should be allocated for each workstation (elbow room included). The following factors also have to be
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considered when choosing a space / room for your eSkwela Center: proximity to out-of-school youth and adults the nearer to OSYAs, the better so they would not have to worry about spending money just to get to the Center; power enough electric outlets for all the electrical equipment; 1 outlet per device is better. Ideally, the room should also have a separate circuit breaker to avoid overloading Internet connection the room should be within the service coverage area of a broadband Internet Service Provider (ISP) ventilation because of the additional heat generated by the computer units (especially if your Center would be using CRT monitors), it could get uncomfortably warm inside the Center. Thus, we encourage you to provide airconditioning unit/s. If however, at the time of your eSkwela application your Center could not afford airconditioning, you may choose to provide it at a later time as long as the room is well-ventilated. As long as you are not perspiring inside the Center with all computers and other equipment switched on the Center meets the ventilation minimum. Otherwise, it will be uncomfortable for the learners and could damage the Center's computers. Electric fans may be provided for the meantime to improve ventilation. Security if possible, you should choose a space/room for your Center where there are minimal theft incidents. It should also be well-lighted and fitted with grills and locks to discourage thieves.

Infrastructure Computers
You have to have at least 4 computers for your eSkwela Center: 1 server and 3 workstations. In general, the computers you need to provide for your eSkwela Center do not have to be top-ofthe-line; they don't even have to be brand new! The server would be the only computer that has to have higher specs (particularly in processor, memory, and hard disk); as long as the computers are internet / LAN-ready, can play audio, video, animation (Flash) and play without skipping these units should be fine and could still be used as workstations at the Center. Additionally, the following peripheral equipment should be provided: earphones or headsets one set per computer. Instead of speakers, these will be used by the learners to listen to the e-modules computer monitors LCD monitors are recommended; these consume less power and generate less heat local area network (LAN) the eSkwela LMS will not run without a LAN; also the internet connection will be shared to the workstations through the LAN sound card and video cards usually built-in; if the computer plays sound and video, it already has both cards furniture one chair and one computer table per computer unit; long tables that can fit multiple computers may also be used for the workstation computers. A work table may also be provided for other activities in the Center (meetings with the learners, lecture sessions) You may refer to the Annexes section for a menu of computer hardware options you can choose from for your eskwela Center. Because the eSkwela learning package can be accessed by a web browser, it can run on any operating system. If you cannot afford to buy multiple licenses for a proprietary operating system, you do not have to resort to software piracy to get the eSkwela software up and running - an open source operating system such as Linux Ubuntu / EdUbuntu is a very good, if not better, alternative and its free! You may download it at http://www.ubuntu.com/ (Ubuntu) or at http://edubuntu.org/ (Edubuntu).
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Staff
Even if your eSkwela Center has top-of-the line computer equipment, the Center equally needs staff who will run the Center. The most immediate staff that you need for your Center is the teacher. Called an eSkwela Learning Facilitator (LF), he/she will ensure that the eSkwela instructional model is implemented. Ideally, the LF should already be an ALS implementer (either a mobile teacher from DepEd, or an instructional manager from an LGU or an ALS service provider). The proposed LF is required to have basic training on ALS; likewise, he/she should already be a computer user (word processing, spreadsheets, slides, email, web browsing). Once you find your Center's Learning Facilitator/s, you can proceed to identifying these other personnel: Network Administrator (NA) handle the technical requirements of the Center (computer hardware and software troubleshooting). The NA does not have to be on a full-time basis; he/she just has to be available when the Center requires his/her technical expertise. Center Manager (CM) ensure that the eSkwela Center's setup and operational requirements are met; this is usually the person involved in filling out the Application Form, meeting potential local partners, sourcing additional funds. In other words, this person could be you! Some eSkwela Centers have also assigned a Laboratory Manager, who is supposed to be the frontliner or custodian at the Center. However, this is not a required position to fill; the LF or CM can perform this task on top of their main responsibilities at the Center. A more detailed breakdown of the responsibilities of each Center staff is available at the Annexes section of this manual.

The eSkwela Application Form


Once you are in touch with DepEd, the RC/RT will need more information on your eSkwela setup and operations plans and will ask you to fill out an eSkwela Application Form (see Annexes). Filling out the form should be easy, especially if you already have these basic requirements in place (which you would have already identified in the pre-setup exercise). The form is 5 pages long; Page 1 provides instructions, while Page 2-5 is the actual form proper. You may refer to the page-by-page breakdown and additional guidelines to the Form, as follows:

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Page 2

1 2 3 4 5 6

Type of lead organization Organization and center details, if lead organization is DepEd Organization and center details, if lead organization is non-DepEd - if LGU, NGO, civic org, private sector, faith-based group, etc Contact person - This person will coordinate with the RC during the setup phase Target date of eSkwela operations - if possible, please indicate exact date (dd/mm/yyyy) Target number of OSYAs for first batch of eSkwela learners - should be within the capacity of the eSkwela Center - learner-computer ratio should be 1:1 - a learner should attend at least 1 eSkwela learning session a week Schedule of eSkwela sessions - an eSkwela learning session should be at least 3 hours long

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Space / Room specifications Room size in square meters Electric outlets indicate number of electric outlets Aircon how many units Circuit breaker Work table Work space

Page 3

Computers - indicate availability and number; an eSkwela Center should have at least 4 computers (1 server, 3 workstations) Internet - availability and type of connection General computer specs - general indication that the computers meet the minimum specs for eSkwela Detailed computer specs (server) Performance (processor, memory, hard disk) Multimedia capability (sound card, video card, monitor, headset) if internet / network-ready

10 11 12

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Page 4

13 14

Detailed computer specs of workstations - if workstations have varying specs, use another page Center Manager Name Office / Organization Relevant experience Network Administrator Name Office / Organization Relevant experience Learning Facilitators number Name/s position / designation

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16

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Relevant experience (ALS training, level of computer literacy and use)

Page 5

17 18 19 20

Community Involvement How can eSkwela serve your organization, community and its OSYAs? Name, signature and contact information of the person who filled out the form - this is needed by DepEd for them to respond to your application Name, signature and contact information of the person who noted / approved the form for submission to DepEd - your need to get the head of your organization to sign off so that the planned Center he/she will included in your group's activities and allocate resources to move forward with the application and setup process

You would observe that the eSkwela Application Form not only gathers information, it also gets you to start on planning your approach on the setup process. Expect that you might not have all the setup requirements immediately available. We recommend that you print a copy of the form, study it and start thinking of how you can fill it out completely. If you can answer a portion of the form, fill it out; if you could not answer some questions, it means that some of the required resources are not yet there - so you should start thinking of how to get support from potential local partners in your community. When you feel that the basic setup infrastructure and staff requirements are in place and have filled out most (if not all) of the information requested in the form, you can send it to your designated eSkwela RC. You can print and send via courier (don't forgot the signatures in page
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5!) or you can send a scanned copy via email. An online version of the eSkwela Application Form will soon be available but in the meantime, you may download and print the current version, available at http://alseskwela.ning.com/page/site-inquiries. A filled-out Application is also available at the Annexes portion for your reference.

1c. Validation and Assessment Assessment of Application Form


Once the eSkwela RC receives your eSkwela Application Form, he/she will use it as basis for assessment. Expect to receive from the RC an eSkwela assessment form like this:

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1 2 3

Basic information of your proposed eSkwela Center (Location, Lead Organization, Target Operations Date, Contact Person) Status Requirements (Basic) - checklist of the infrastructure and staff requirements Findings and Recommendation Additional information and requirements For immediate action Next steps Status of your eSkwela setup - process flow that lets you see what steps you have completed vis-a-vis steps in the eSkwela setup, operations and M&E

The RC could give your proposed Center a better assessment if you send a completely filled-out Application Form. Also, remember that the assessment already identifies what you need to do to move forward the setup process so you have to act on the recommendation of your RC as indicated.

Site Inspection
Ideally, the eSkwela RC or designated members of the eSkwela RT assigned in your region should validate your eSkwela Application Form by dropping a visit at your proposed Center. However this may be deferred later in the setup or even operations phase of the Center. The RC/RT have to work with their own limited budget at their respective DepEd offices, and also attend to other more pressing tasks (eSkwela is only one of the many things that they do) which is why you need to provide information and corresponding evidence (pictures), as requested in the Application Form.
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If in case the RC/RT can go to your proposed Center, the site inspection will also be an opportunity for them to meet and talk to you, the head of your organization and local partners about eSkwela. During this visit, you would want these stakeholders to be present, so make sure that you coordinate with the RC/RT on the site inspection schedule.

1d. Memorandum of Agreement


To formalize the commitment of your organization and local partners, an eSkwela Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) will be prepared for your Center. These are the additional advantages of having a Center MOA: The MOA includes a well-defined list of responsibilities per local partner. So you know what to expect from each partner, and take action if any of the responsibilities are not being addressed. The MOA will encourage local partners to continue supporting the eSkwela Center. This is especially true in public offices (DepEd, LGU), where there is regular change in leadership. In the case of LGUs, a new Local Chief Executive (LCE) be it a barangay chairman, mayor or governor - tend to discontinue programs started by their predecessor especially if the previous LCE is a bitter political rival. Since the principal signatories in the MOA only represent their organizations, it suggests that the Center has partnered with the organizations (the LGU) and not the individual (the LCE). Hence, the new LCE will be more inclined to continue supporting the Center because of the MOA. Note: in addition to the MOA, you may also encourage your LGU partner (if applicable) through the Sangguniang Bayan (council) to prepare and approve a resolution to support eSkwela. Further, you can also ask the LGU to make the support of eSkwela a regular activity through an ordinance. A sample Resolution and Ordinance are attached in the Annexes portion The MOA will help you get additional funds for your Center. Potential donors and funders look for evidence in order for them to decide which programs and projects to fund. Having a MOA implies that your organization is serious in the implementation of eSkwela and will help convince these groups to support the Center. If your eSkwela Application Form indicates that your proposed Center meets the basic requirements as the RC/RT indicated in the assessment - the RC/RT will send a draft version of an eSkwela Memorandum of Agreement. You will be asked to assist in providing additional information needed in the MOA through the MOA Details Form (available in the Annexes section). Once the MOA has been reviewed by each local partner, it will be signed by the principal and witness signatories.

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Sample eSkwela Center MOA*

*CICT responsibilities to be transferred to DepEd after turnover of eSkwela

1 2 3

Local partners, with the following information for each partner: type of organization, principal office address, complete name of principal signatory Witnesseth that / whereas section, or relevant background information on eSkwela and premise of agreement among the partners Signatures of principals and witnesses (on all pages)

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4 5 6 7

Brief description of eSkwela Duties and responsibilities of CICT (transferred to DepEd through the BALS, DepEd Regional Offices) Duties and responsibilities of the DepEd Division Office (always a local partner in all eSkwela Centers Duties and responsibilities of a local partner

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8 9

Function of the local eSkwela Steering Committee Miscellaneous Provisions

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10

Effectivity and termination

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11 12

Main signature section for principal signatories Main signature section for witnesses

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13

Acknowledgement, with ID details of principal signatories

MOA duties from CICT to DepEd In anticipation of the eSkwela turnover, duties and responsibilities of the CICT will be transferred to DepEd through its BALS and Regional Offices. The matrix below reflects the changes due to the turnover:

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eSkwela Social Franchise Manual version 1.0 Duty / Responsibility 1 2 Assist in the setup of a working relationship between the parties involved in the implementation of the eSkwela Center. Organize and conduct capability-building activities pertinent to the operation of the eSkwela Center, including training on center management, network administration, training for learning facilitators. Provide electronic versions of the DepEd-BALS' print modules and a Learning Management System (LMS) customized for the eSkwela Center; Coordinate with the eSkwela Centers network administrator in the setup, testing and installation of the Center's computer equipment and network peripherals Monitor and evaluate (M&E) the implementation and operation of the eSkwela Center as well as recommend the best strategies and options for its sustainability. Provide the principal and primary funding for the operations of the eSkwela Center as may be allowed by law. Assign and supervise the District ALS Coordinators, mobile teachers and instructional managers who will be assigned as the learning facilitators at the eSkwela Center and who will implement the Instructional Model. Select the OSYAs who will participate as learners at the eSkwela Center. Provide for the training expenses and all possible incentives for professional development activities of the center manager, network administrator, mobile teachers and instructional managers at the eSkwela Center; Promote the integration of ICT in the ALS curriculum by, among others, encouraging and supporting ICT-related initiatives and projects of mobile teachers / instructional managers and learners. Facilitate the conduct of eSkwela training activities by providing administrative and logistical support whenever necessary. Grant permission for the utilization of any or all of the following, for the conduct of eSkwela learning sessions: Space/room, Computer units, Multimedia and network peripherals learning sessions. Ensure that the eSkwela Center has uninterrupted electricity and broadband Internet connection. Link the eSkwela program with existing community initiatives. Make recommendations on the designation of a Center Manager and Network Administrator for the eSkwela Center according to the requirements set by the Steering Committee. Assist in the M&E of the eSkwela Centers operations. Assign a point person for the local eSkwela Steering Committee.
DepEd DepEd LPs BALS, RO Division

3 4

6 7

8 9

10

11 12

13 14 15

16 17

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1e. Training
Even if a proposed eSkwela Center has completed the infrastructure and computer equipment requirements, the setup process is only halfway done if the Center staff does not undergo the required training.

Training for Learning Facilitators


As the eSkwela learning facilitators (LFs) is the Center staff directly involved in educating the out-of-school youth and adult learners, the LFs are the first of the Center staff to be trained. A 4-day training sessin, the eSkwela LF training will prepare the proposed LFs on the eSkwela Instructional Model. A select group of DepEd ALS personnel (mobile teachers, District ALS Coordinators or DALCs) from the DepEd Division Offices have been trained by CICT as eSkwela trainors for LFs; with training management being handled by the Regional Coordinators (RCs), the trainors regularly conduct training sessions for LFs of upcoming eSkwela Centers. The assessment of your eSkwela Application Form should indicate that your proposed Learning Facilitators will participate in an eSkwela LF training. Apart from trainings organized by the eSkwela RT, you must know that additional eSkwela LF trainings are conducted only when there are enough participants from potential eSkwela Centers. Thus, we strongly recommend that your proposed LFs attend the training once you are invited by your respective eSkwela RC or a representative of the eSkwela Regional Team (RT); they will coordinate with you regarding details of the said training activity. Remember, your proposed LFs should have the prerequisite Basic ALS training (conducted by the DepEd Regional Offices) in order to participate at the eSkwela LF training. Basic ALS concepts are not included in the LF training design, so make sure your LFs already took ALS training beforehand. Otherwise, you may inquire about an upcoming schedule of a Basic ALS training from your respective DepEd Regional Office so your proposed LFs can attend.

Training for Network Administrators


This 5-day training is usually conducted in parallel with the LF training. At the NA training, your proposed eSkwela Network Administrator will be trained on provide technical support for the implementation of the eSkwela Instructional Model.

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eSkwela LF and NA Trainings - Design

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Training for Center Managers


During eSkwela's years with CICT, a training program for Center Managers was also designed and conducted to prepare the CMs for their role of ensuring sustainability of the eSkwela Centers. Unlike the LF and NA training which can be handled by eSkwela trainors, resource persons from CICT's PhilCeC Program were invited as CM trainors. It will be up to DepEd-BALS whether to organize CM trainings the way CICT did. In any case, training courses on Community eCenter (CeC) management are offered regularly by the National Computer Center and Telecentre.org-Philippine CeC Academy (tPCA). Despite being a training activity outside of the eSkwela program, the content of tPCA's CeC management courses are equally relevant to the management and sustainability of an eSkwela Center; additionally, the resource persons of the CICT's previous eSkwela CM training runs are the same faculty who teach tPCA's courses. You may look up the schedule of tCPA's CeC management courses at http://philcecnet.ph/
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To give you an idea of the content of tPCA's CeC management courses, you may refer to CICT's design of the eSkwela CM training as consulted with tPCA faculty.

eSkwela CM Training Design

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Additional details on the eSkwela Training Programs are available at the Annexes portion.

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1f. Installation of eSkwela learning package


Upon completion of the LF and NA trainings, your Center will receive the basic eSkwela learning package. The basic package is an installer of the eSkwela Learning Management System (LMS), where your LFs and learners can access the eSkwela e-modules and corresponding e-module guides. Only 35 e-modules and corresponding e-module guides are in the basic package; only after your Center has installed the basic and has successfully completed the infrastructure setup will you receive the full eSkwela learning package (completion of the infrastructure setup may include preparation or renovation of space/room, purchase of required computer equipment, Internet subscription these are indicated in the assessment of your eSkwela Application Form). The full eSkwela learning package contains all eSkwela e-modules and emodule guides that are certified for deployment, to which all established eSkwela Centers are entitled to. A copy of the installer (DVD) of the basic eSkwela learning package will be provided to your eSkwela NA before the end of the training. A step-by-step manual on LMS installation is also included in the DVD. Installation of the package should be easy; if in case your NA encounters installation problems, he/she can contact the NA trainor to assist in setup troubleshooting.

Inauguration / Launch
Although not a required activity, you may want to organize a ceremonial event to formally launch your eSkwela Center (a sample program is included in the Annexes portion). You can have a simple ceremony if you opt to channel most of your resources to the operations of your Center. This is an opportunity for you to let the community know about your the eSkwela Center so it could garner more support and attract more out-of-school youth and adults to enlist as eSkwela learners.

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Phase 2 Operations

2a. Implementation of the eSkwela Instructional Model


The eSkwela Instructional Model integrates the use of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) in education. ICT, particularly the Internet, provides learners access to a multitude of resources. It allows learners to actively make choices about how to generate, gather, and share information. In addition, it encourages learners to interact and work together with their peers, teachers, and other experts in the field. The eSkwela instructional model is characterized by a blended type of learner-centered instruction consisting of three elements: 1. computer-aided learning via interactive e-learning modules 2. teacher-facilitated instruction & learning as aligned with the pace and need of the learner 3. collaborative group activities and projects The instructional model seeks to create a learning environment that adheres to the constructivist principle wherein the learner is an active participant in the learning process. The learner gains knowledge by integrating his/her new and previous experiences which is a result of his/her interaction with other people and the environment. Recognizing the importance of collaboration, the instructional model highlights the use of problem-based/project-based learning/authentic learning as an instructional approach. Following this method, learners work on real-world problems and projects to allow them to explore and discuss these problems in ways that are relevant to them. They work in groups, generating relevant data from a variety of sources, analyzing, and deriving knowledge from the information gathered.

Components
Curriculum Materials - The eSkwela project makes use of e-learning modules that are problem-solving/inquiry based, and encourages the practice of experiential approach to teaching and learning.

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A screenshot of an eSkwela e-module


Learning Management System -A Learning Management System (or LMS) is a software package that enables the management and delivery of online content to learners. Most LMSs are web-based to facilitate "anytime, any place, any pace" access to learning content and administration. 2 The LMS that is currently being used in the eSkwela sites is Moodle3. Moodle may be used via the world wide web or may be installed in the local area network.

2 3

From Wikipedia, Available at http://en.wikipedia.org/, Accessed on 13 May 2008. http://www.moodle.org 38

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A screenshot of the eSkwela LMS


Trainings - A program will not succeed unless the people who will implement it understand what they are doing and are confident to proceed as planned. Skillstraining seminars take care of this aspect of the program.

Learning sessions
Learners are required to attend the learning sessions for at least 6 hours a week. Depending on the schedule, a learner will have his/her sessions twice a week (3 hours per session) or thrice a week (2 hours per session). eSkwela practices the blended learning approach. Part of the weekly sessions goes to face-toface discussion and interaction with the learning facilitator, and part of it goes to working on the LMS. Each learner works on a different module depending on the result of his FLT and ILA. The modules he is studying were selected because it suit his needs and interest. Also, learners study the modules at their own pace. There are learners who can finish two modules in one session, but there are also those who can only study one per session.

Working through the modules


Learners work through selected modules by: a) Completing module pre-test b) Working on module activities, exercises and self-assessment c) Completing module post-test d) Participating in the discussion forum e) Doing the project
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Using the Learning Management System


The Learning Management System (LMS) serves as the virtual classroom in an eSkwela center. The LMS allows learning facilitators to manage their classes such as enrolment of learners, grading learner outputs, and customizing courses (See Moodle Tutorial). It also allows communication, interaction and collaboration among facilitators, mentors, experts and learners. Through the LMS, learners can post questions for facilitators, mentors and experts, and work on projects individually or with fellow learners. The LMS also contains the module guide which directs learners on how to work on the assigned module.

Module Guide as a Learning Scaffold


Each of the eSkwela modules is accompanied by a module guide. The guides provide structure to the learning process while also allowing for flexibility and self-paced learning. It specifies the activities that the learner should do and the educational resources that they can use to supplement the eModule. The following can be seen in a module guide:

a) Module overview: description, learning objectives, topics covered

b) Lesson Proper: instructions in studying the lesson, learning activities (i.e. discussion forum, quiz, assignment), and reference materials a.

c) Project: description, instructions, scoring guide

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The module guides can be customized based on the situation in the centers. Customization can be in the form of: translating text to the local dialect using other resources in making the project updating educational resources modifying scoring guide/rubric

Best Practices
1. Computer Literacy Sessions - Most of the eSkwela centers would allocate a few minutes each day for basic computer lessons for learners who are not computer literate. For example, learners are given time to play solitaire and jackstones so that they can be familiarized with clicking and double-clicking a mouse, while others use a game which will help the learners build their typing skills. Learners who are more adept at using the computer are more than willing to assist their fellow learners. 2. Orientation about the Module Guide - A module guide is a very important tool in an eSkwela center since it provides structure to the learning process. It can be overwhelming to look at in the beginning especially for first time users, and as such, an orientation on what and how to use it will be very helpful. By briefing the learners on the contents of the module guide, they get to familiarize themselves with its parts and feel at ease with using it. 3. Guidance of the Learning Facilitator - The LFs play an important role in the teaching and learning process in an eSkwela center. In all of the existing centers, LFs simplify explanations when the learners can not understand the lessons, translate terms in words that the learners can understand (usually using the local dialect) and moderate discussion forums. 4. Use of Alternative Resources in Making the Project - Some resources may not be readily available to the learners. Thus, it is important that learning facilitators be able to identify other resources that can be used and the same objective will still be accomplished. For example, allowing the use of downloaded pictures since the learners
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do not have a digital camera.

2b. Center Management


An eSkwela Center Manager's work does not end upon the completion of the eSkwela setup process. As bare minimum, the requirements indicated in your eSkwela Application Form should be able to immediately contribute to the operations of eSkwela. The table below is a list of those requirements and required actions for sustainability at the minimum level:
Requirement Infrastructure - Space/Room Electrical work Electric equipment Furniture Infrastructure - Computer equipment Computer hardware in case of malfunction or damage to computer hardware, seek the NA's advise and assistance for troubleshooting and repair report cases of software errors to NA for troubleshooting and solution (e.g., workstation not able to access e-modules through LMS) Coordinate with NA in case of interruption in Internet connection Monitor attendance of center staff provide quick response to problems in the elecrical work by seeking an electrician's help. have damaged / malfunctioning equipment checked by an electrician for repair and maintenance Check if furniture is in good condition and facilitate repairs, if needed Required Action (minimum)

Computer software

Internet connection Staff Learning Facilitators Center Manager Network Administrator

You must have observed that the actions listed in this table fall under the function of a Laboratory Manager, and that these actions are custodial and administrative in nature. Further, these actions do not solely have to be the responsibility of the Center Manager, as these can also be performed by LFs, especially if your CM is not based at the Center. As additional reference, you may refer to the day-to-day management issues relevant to an eSkwela Center as identified in The Community Telecentre Cookbook.4 Perhaps more important than the custodial function is the managerial function of the CM, as the primary responsibility of the eSkwela Center Manager is to ensure the Center's sustainability. Not only does the CM has to have the setup requirements in place, he/she also has to ensure that the Center continually receives support in order to keep these requirements in place. The next table lists down the recommended actions vis-a-vis requirements, which are more
4

Jensen, M. and Esterhuysen, Anriette (2001). The Community Telecentre Cookbook, pages 75-79. available at: http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0012/001230/123004e.pdf 42

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aligned with the duties and responsibilities of the eSkwela Center Manager:
Requirement Infrastructure Space/Room Recommended Action plan on alternative venues if commitment of LP who provided space/room has a terminal date make improvements on the eSkwela Center by getting additional funding from local partners (e.g., airconditioning units, electrial work) seek local partners who can contribute in improving the computer equipment (e.g., additional computers, upgrading of hardware, acquisition of multiple licenses for proprietary software) convince LPs to continuously provide for the payment of Internet connection, or better yet, upgrade to faster connection Secure the support of LPs in providing continuous salaries / honoraria of the Center staff

Infrastructure Computer Equipment

Staff

Getting Local Partner support


Notice from the previous table that much of the managerial functions revolve around securing the support of the local partners, which the CM can do through the following: Oversee preparation of communication materials for program advocacy. The CM should be able to convey the Center's need for support through communication materials, in a way appealing to potential LPs If needed, write funding proposals applicable to seeking assistance from grant-giving institutions. A grant writing proposal template is available at the eSkwela website, http://alseskwela.ning.com/page/site-inquiries, also available at the Annexes portion.

Develop and implement fundraising activities usually intended to get support from the
community. The CM should carefully plan such activities (e.g. benefit concert, play, movie screening, raffle) to raise the desired target amount. Initiate contact and communication with potential LPs. as CM, it is always good to know who to approach in getting more support for the Center. One will never know when an extra hand is needed in Center sustainability; thus, the CM should find ways on how to get through these potential partners. Accommodate individuals and groups who want to support the Center and identify ways on how they can provide concrete support. Because of its reputation as a very good and highimpact project, there will be instances where your eSkwela Center will be at the receiving end of donations however small it may seem (e.g., second-hand computers, DVDs of educational software). The CM should provide assistance to donors and inform them how the Center is using their donated goods; surely, they will remember your Center and could probably provide a more subtantial donation in the future. Continuously update the local partners on the implementation of eSkwela. The CM would want to keep the Center's local partners happy, and this is one way to do it. LPs would appreciate knowing how the support they provide eSkwela makes a positive impact on
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the lives of its out-of-school learners. Updates should not only be limited to good news, though; LPs would also like to know the challenges encountered at the eSkwela Center, and offer their advice or perhaps offer the solution.

Address conflict brought about by transition within local partners. The CM should be able
to mediate and provide the voice of reason in cases of conflict among eSkwela partners (e.g., change in leadership, change in priorities). CMs with an LGU as partner should especially anticipate such conflict and be able to recommend solutions to ease tension, and still make ailing partners fulfill their commitment of support.

Add-on Programs and Activities


The eSkwela Center Manager can also initiate add-on programs and activities once the sustainability of the Center is ensured: As an additional source of funding, the CM can propose that the eSkwela Center be made available to the public for computer rental or as an Internet caf when eSkwela learning sessions are not held. The income from the rental or Internet fees can then be used as additional funds for the Center (e.g. purchase of supplies, printer ink); The CM can propose a partnership with the local Public Employment Service Office to help eSkwela learners find jobs once they are certified as graduates of the ALS program; if the community is in need of additional eSkwela Centers, the CM can initiate the setup process of additional Centers.

Competencies: A Snapshot of the eSkwela Center Management Training


Reading up on the previous pages on Center Management, you might have already decided that the responsibilities of a Center Manager are more challenging than what you originally thought. Also, it might have already occurred to you that merely performing the functions of a Laboratory Manager or custodian amounts to very little in the long-term sustainability of the Center. Hence the Center Manager should not only address the day-to-day operations of the Center, but should also have the following competencies (as indicated in CICT's design of the eSkwela Center Management Training): 1. Service-oriented management while service with a smile is something that all CMs should aspire for, being service-oriented does not stop with the positive attitude . A CM should be able to internalize the critical role that he/she plays at Center, and how poor performance of those roles would lead to the non-fulfilllment of the eSkwela Center's objectives. A CM can serve with a smile because he is confident about the eSkwela Center's performance, which is also a reflection of the good job the CM is doing. With a service-oriented management perspective, the CM always has the clients in mind, (the clients in this case are out-of-school youth and adult learners at the Center). A good CM understands that the quality of work he puts in the setup and management of the Center has repercussions to the learning experience OSYA, as well as the success of the OSYA after staying with the eSkwela program. For example: when the Internet of an eSkwela Center gets disconnected due to inability to pay for the subscription fees, the CM should understand that the learners are being deprived of the online resources available on the net, and the opportunity to interact
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with learners and LFs from other eSkwela Centers. thereby decreasing the quality of the learning experience. While a service oriented CM would have acted on the problem earlier, is it is not too late for the CM to raise the funds from potential local partners to reconnect the eSkwela Center to the Web. As a service-oriented manager, a CM should also have these competencies: Sound decision-making because a good CM has an intimate knowledge of how the eSkwela Center runs, he/she is confident to call the shots regarding its day-today operations while still observing the general direction of the Center as set by DepEd and the local partners.

Resource management the ability to support eSkwela operations through


efficient and innovative use of limited resources will come in handy for the service-oriented Center Manager.

Center relations The idea of friend-raising is an equally effective strategy as


fundraising in gettting support for the Center. You'll never know who would be in a position to help the eSkwela Center at some point in the future. A grateful graduate of the eSkwela program who wants to give back to the Center, a stranger who sends an email inquiry on eSkwela, a masters student who wants to write a thesis on eSkwela these are just some of the random people that a CM would interact with in managing the Center. A good CM understands the importance of stakeholder relations, and how far these relationships would go in sustaining the eSkwela Center. 2. Social enterpreneurship While an eSkwela Center is an ICT4E program with development-oriented objectives (i.e., as opposed to profit-oriented), entrepreneurial principles do apply in a social context and may be used to sustain the eSkwela Center. There have been instances when some eSkwela CMs have been hesitant to practice social entrepreneurship, as they had an impression that anything with the word entrepreneur on it automatically means earning revenue for personal gain. After all, the eSkwela program is a delivery mode of the ALS program of DepEd and essentially still a government program. A social enterprise earns revenue but never for personal gain; instead the currency that is driving social enterprises is the achievement of their development objectives. (more information is available at Social Enterprise Coalition's Social Enterprise Explained).5 In eSkwela, the nonprofit objective has already been defined; it is up to the CM to lead the charge in taking the discipline of business to eSkwela, including the following:

Developing a business/sustainability plan A CM should be able to write a business


plan for eSkwela to strengthen its case for getting support from potential local partners. Moreover, the exercise of writing an eSkwela business plan will enable the CM to know the program inside out. As an added bonus, the contents of the business plan may be used to prepare communication materials for program advocacy.

a sample Business / Sustainability Plan Outline


5

http://www.socialenterprise.org.uk/data/files/publications/Social_Enterprise_Explained_- _May_2011.pdf 45

eSkwela Social Franchise Manual version 1.0 (based on CTC Net's CTC Start Up Manual, with minor revisions)6 I. Program 1. Needs assessment 2. Program description 3. User projections II. Operations 1. Organization, governance and staff 2. Timeline 3. Operational needs 4. Communications 5. Self-assessment and program evaluation 6. Possible challenges and solutions III. Financials 1. Setup expenses 2. Initial impact (after setup) 3. Operational expenses 4. Current support 5. Projections

A detailed guide on the business plan outline is available at CTC Net's CTC Start-Up Manual (link: http://www.ctcnet.org/ctc/ctcnetmanual/ch9.pdf) 3. Social Marketing and Networking Similar to social entrepreneurship, social marketing has practical roots from the profit sector (advertising, public relations, market research) but the intent is to create positive social change. 7 Before developing a social marketing plan, the CM should be able to identify the scope of the problem (i.e., an eSkwela stakeholder's negative behavior) and devise a way how to achieve behavioral change. The CM will find opportunities to use social marketing for the eSkwela Center, especially in convincing the community to provide support to the Center (e.g., the CM can decide to erase the stigma of ICTs having a negative influence to students); a social marketing plan to promote eSkwela to out-of-school youth and adults (e.g., how to encourage out-of-school adults who do not want to join eSkwela because of technophobia). a sample Social Marketing Plan Outline8
1. Executive Summary 2. Background, purpose and focus 3. Situation analysis 4. Target audience profile 5. Marketing objectives and goals
6 7

http://www.ctcnet.org/ctc/ctcnetmanual/ch9.pdf Serrat, O. (2010). The Future of Social Marketing, pp. 8-9. available at: http://www.adb.org/documents/information/knowledge-solutions/future-of-social-marketing.pdf 8 3 Serrat, O. (2010). The Future of Social Marketing, p. 2. available at: http://www.adb.org/documents/information/knowledge-solutions/future-of-social-marketing.pdf 46

eSkwela Social Franchise Manual version 1.0 6. Factors influencing adoption of behavior 7. Positioning statement 8. Marketing mix strategies 9. Plan for monitoring and Evaluation 10. Budget 11. Plan for Implementation and campaign management

A screenshot of the eSkwela CM online group


Much of the work in center management is social in nature, as it involves interaction and coordination work with stakeholders. Likewise, networking does not only occur between the Center implementers, supporters and beneficiaries, as written in previous pages; the CM can also network with fellow CMs from other eSkwela Centers. During its CICT years, the staff of all eSkwela Centers across the country were invited to participate in conferences, training workshops and participatory planning workshops. As DepEd will most probably organize similar activities in the future, CMs no longer have to meet faceto-face to maintain communication with fellow CMs and take advantage of remote networking via ICTs. The eSkwela website (http://alseskwela.ning.com). CICT has formed online communities for eSkwela Center staff (LFs, NAs, CMs). CMs can talk to fellow CMs on real- time (online chat) or by leaving a message or posting a CM-relevant entry at the discussion forums. A bulletin board is also available for announcements (CM capability-building activities, monitoring and evaluation, or simple greetings from one CM to another).

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Phase 3 Monitoring and Evaluation


Once the eSkwela Center in your community has been established and has started operations, the need for monitoring and evaluation (M&E) arises. The experience of implementing eSkwela will both have good and not-so-good moments; having a good program M&E will enable Center implementers and local partners to improve and enhance eSkwela.

M&E Definition
You will find below the OECD (2002a) definition of monitoring and evaluation 9,: Monitoring - is a continuous function that uses the systematic collection of data on specified indicators to provide management and the main stakeholders of an ongoing development intervention with indications of the extent of progress and achievement of objectives and progress on the use of allocated funds. Evaluation is the systematic and objective assessment of an ongoing or completed project, program, or policy, including its design, implementation, and results. The aim is to determine relevance and fulfillment of objectives, development efficiency, effectiveness, impact, and sustainability. An evaluation should provide information that is credible and useful, enabling the incorporation of lessons learned into the decisionmaking process of both recipients and donors. The development of the eSkwela M&E was based on UNESCO's ICT-In-Education Toolkit (http://www.ictinedtoolkit.org/usere/login.php). The CICT eSkwela Project Team identified an initial set of indicators, which was provided to a select group of eSkwela Center staff for review. The revised set of indicators were grouped according to the relevant project
9

4 Kusek, J. and Rist, R. (2004). Ten Steps to Results-Based Monitoring and Evaluation System, p. 12. available at: http://wwwwds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2004/08/27/000160016_20040827154900/Rendered /PDF/296720PAPER0100steps.pdf

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components (infrastructure, instructional model, community) and further classified according to type, source, form and frequency.

M&E at the program management level


The eSkwela Regional Teams (RT) from DepEd will continue to employ the M&E developed my the CICT-eSkwela Project Team, through the following: 1. M&E Forms indicators were grouped together to come with the following set of forms:
Component Instructional Model Center Management Form LF interview guide for site visit Learner interview guide for site visit Site profile Spot check rating sheet Site visit report Schedule of eSkwela learning sessions Minutes of steering committee

2. Site Visits expect members your DepEd RT to visit your eSkwela Center to gather M&E data. As with the practice of CICT, the site visits will both be announced and unannounced, inorder to get authentic data. The DePEd RT will also administer the eSkwela M&E forms during the site visit. 3. Multimedia M&E data is not always in the form of hard data and can be available in other media: pictures, video, sound bites. 4. eSkwela website - To complement the site visits - done less frequently because of restrictions in resources - other methods of keeping in touch with the eSkwela Centers are being utilized. Correspondence through the World Wide Web is a reliable and costeffective means (Email, chat, through the eSkwela Ning site). Beginning in 2010, the Center Managers participated in eSkwela Online Meetings, where they to give updates and raise concerns through a chat engine integrated with the eSkwela Ning site. The eSkwela implementers can also post multimedia M&E data at the website. 5. M&E Information System soon, the eSkwela M&E forms will be made available online and do not have to be administered manually, which will make it easier for the Center staff (data input) and Regional Team (data consolidation).

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M&E at the Center level


The responsibility of monitoring and evaluating eSkwela Center does not fall on just the eSkwela RT, but also on the Center staff. Your eSkwela RT will require your full participation in its M&E activities (e.g., accomplishment of M&E forms, participation in eSkwela online meetings), but M&E is not just about completion of requirements from a unit that is somewhat removed from the direct implementation of your eSkwela Center. It is actually the Center staff that is in the best position to use M&E data and analysis to make improvements in eSkwela implementation. Apart from the eSkwela M&E forms, you may also use these other data gathering modes: Observation often the most underrated M&E data gathering mode. Remember that while M&E instruments covers numerous indicators at one time, qualitative indicators do not translate well into forms; observation is an important M&E data gathering strategy Email archive provides a transcript of exhanges among various eSkwela stakeholders Discussion forum entries at the eSkwela LMS a good indicator on whether the learners were able to learn and articulate their ideas on the eSkwela e-modules Surveys could be useful in rating, evaluation of the eSkwela learning experience Interviews to validate data in eSkwela M&E forms Focus Group Discussion probe deeper into collective concerns and recommendations of eSkwela stakeholders Video recording setting up a video camera to record an eSkwela learning session without disrupting natural process of an eSkwela learning session Independent evaluator to produce an objective M&E report Remember that M&E of your eSkwela Center gets more complex from year to year. According to the UNESCO ICT-In-Education Toolkit, you should look at the following for each class of evaluation:

In the first year, you will only look at how well your eSkwela was established and operated. On the second year, it focuses more on the degree of proper use. It is only on the fourth year where evaluation can focus on long-term impact (effectiveness, subsequent application, degree of national effect).
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eSkwela Social Franchise Manual version 1.0

What does this say to you? It just means that in order for you to see the fruits of the hard work you have put in for your eSkwela, it should have gone through the rigid setup process, observed the Instructional Model, and sustained by it local partners and stakeholders. However, it does not mean that you are not already seeing the positive impact on the first years; most probably, you will see how stakeholders and beneficiaries have benefitted from eSkwela. You may use the indicators below (developed by CICT and the select eSkwela implementers) and see if you can add or improve on it.
Component Instructional Model Indicator Attendance rate of learners Attendance rate of teachers Integration of ICT Level of confidence of learners in ICT usage Level of confidence of teachers in ICT usage Level of proficiency of learners in ICT Level of proficiency of teachers in ICT Level of proficiency of teachers in the planned pedagogy Percentage of eSkwela learners over print module learners Percentage of full time eSkwela learners over print module learners Percentage of learners who are ICT users Percentage of passers over completers Percentage of passers over takers Percentage of teachers who are ICT users Practice of blended-learning approach Practice of self-paced learning Rate of log-ins in the eSkwela LMS (learners) Rate of log-ins in the eSkwela LMS (teachers) Level of awareness of eSkwela in the community Community support Additional eSkwela partners (NGOs, private individuals, cooperative Additional ICT equipment and supplies provided by the community Amount of funds Disconnection of utilities service (due to non-payment) Frequency and regularity of TPCA meetings Tie-ups with other community-oriented projects/activities Type of support Access to and use of computers and other ICTs Infrastructure Internet bandwidth per learner Internet reconnection lead time

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eSkwela Social Franchise Manual version 1.0 Internet service time Internet interruptions Interruption in utilities Number of hours per week for eSkwela Number of computers per 100 learners Repair and maintenance lead time Service time Technology-related policies Utility downtime Utility reconnection lead time Utilization rate of computers Utilization rate of other ICTs at the Center Training Capability of eSkwela facilitators in implementing the eSkwela Instructional Model ICT literacy rate among eSkwela Center implementers (CM, NA, Lfs) New Center staff trained by outgoing/current staff Performance of Center Manager Performance of Network Administrator Performance of Learning Facilitators Actions taken based on M&E results M&E Barriers in implementation Complete and on-time accomplishment of M&E instruments Lead time, submission of reports to program management Type and frequency of M&E

M&E with a purpose


Before you reach the M&E phase of eSkwela, you and your eSkwela partners have gone through the challenging task of setting up and operating an eSkwela Center. You can refer to the eSkwela Center Life Cycle to see where you are in terms of your eSkwela implementation. Take note that setting up good M&E practices at your eSkwela Center will enable you to go the full route (community expansion, i.e., set up additional eSkwela Centers). It is always good to start small so you can learn from your initial eSkwela experience and apply that in the expansion of eSkwela in your community. Also, make sure that the monitoring and evaluation data you gather does not end up in storage; it should be used to adjust and improve your eSkwela implementation plan.
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The Power of Measuring Results 10 If you do not measure results, you cannot tell success from failure. If you cannot see success, you cannot reward it. If you cannot reward success, you are probably rewarding failure. If you cannot see success, you cannot learn from it. If you cannot recognize failure, you cannot correct it. If you can demonstrate results, you can win public support. Source: Adapted from Osborne & Gaebler 1992.

10

4 Kusek, J. and Rist, R. (2004). Ten Steps to Results-Based Monitoring and Evaluation System, p. 11. available at: http://wwwwds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2004/08/27/000160016_20040827154900/Rendered /PDF/296720PAPER0100steps.pdf 53

eSkwela Social Franchise Manual version 1.0 Annexes

Annex A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U

Filename Contact Information of eSkwela Regional Coordinators Computer Hardware options for eSkwela Centers Roles of the eSkwela LF, CM, NA, steering committee eSkwela Application Form MOA Details Form Guidelines Memorandum of Agreement (Review and Signing) eSkwela Training Programs Sample program of activities, eSkwela inauguration M&E Form - Interview guide (Learning Facilitators) M&E Form - Interview guide (Learners) M&E Form Site Profile M&E Form Spot Check Rating Sheet M&E Form Site Visit Report M&E Form Schedule of eSkwela Learning Sessions M&E Form Minutes of Steering Committee Meeting Grant proposal template Sample ordinance Sample resolution Sample budget computation / costing of (eSkwela setup) Filled-out eSkwela Application Form Sample eSkwela project proposal

Contact Information of eSkwela Regional Coordinators Region CAR Region I Region II Region III Region IVA Region IVB Region V Region VI Region VII Region VIII Region IX Region X Region XI Region XII CARAGA ARMM NCR Regional Coordinator Dr. Jose A. Bogwana Ms. Vivian Luz S. Pagatpatan Mr. Romulo S. Ancheta Mr. Reynaldo F. Licay Ms. Elaine T. Balaogan Ms. Mariflor B. Musa Mr. Ricardo M. Tejeresas No RC Dr. Vivian L. Yarte Dr. Victoria A. Briones Ms. Lucena C. Yaez Ms. Edith B. Lago-Ortega Mr. Henry Antonio R. Pasquito Mr. Johnny M. Sumugat Ms. Marilyn F. Antiquina No RC Dr. Felicino C. Trongco Office Address Wangal, La Trinidad, Benguet DepEd Region I, San Fernando City, La Union DepEd Bayombong, Nueva Vizcaya RO 2 DepEd RO III, Government Center, Maimpis, City of San Fernando, Pampanga DepEd RO-IV-A, Karangalan Drive, Karangalan Village, Cainta, Rizal DepEd RO IV, MIMAROPA, Meralco Ave. Cor. St. Paul Road, Pasig City Rawis, Legazpi City DepEd RO VII, Lahug, Cebu City DepEd RO VIII, Candahug, Palo, Leyte DepEd RO IX, Airport Road, Tiguma, Pagadian City DepEd Cagayan de Oro, Yacapan cor. Velez CDO DepEd RO XI, F. Torres St. Davao City DepEd RO XII Carpenter Hill, Koronadal City DepEd RO Butuan City Misamis St., Bago Bantay, Quezon City Office Phone Number (074) 422-5187 (072) 607-8183 (078) 805-3828 (045) 455-2314 (02) 647-6886 (02) 637-2912 (052) 482-0369 (032) 414-7323 (053) 323-3854 (062) 215-3794 (8822) 724-969 (082) 227-9342 (083) 228-8825 (085) 342-8207 (02) 929-4348 Email Address depedcar.eskwela@gmail.com depedr1.eskwela@gmail.com depedr2.eskwela@gmail.com depedr3.eskwela@gmail.com depedr4a.eskwela@gmail.com depedr4b.eskwela@gmail.com depedr5.eskwela@gmail.com depedbals.eskwela@gmail.com depedr7.eskwela@gmail.com depedr8.eskwela@gmail.com depedr9.eskwela@gmail.com depedr10.eskwela@gmail.com depedr11.eskwela@gmail.com depedr12.eskwela@gmail.com depedcaraga.eskwela@gmail.com depedbals.eskwela@gmail.com depedncr.eskwela@gmail.com

ANNEX A

Hardware Options for the eSkwela Project


Ncomputing X550/L130 Description Thin client technology. Can connect additional workstations to 1 server; user units share the resources of the server. N/A: shared resources of the server One set of the X550 kit includes: 1 PCI card w/ 5 ethernet ports, 5 access devices One set of the L130 kit includes: 1 access device; 1 workstaion, 1 access device. (The access device replaces the system unit in a full set-up, device to which the monitor, keyboard, mouse of each workstation will be connected) X550: P 24,750.00/set L130: P 9,999.00/set HMR Refurbished Refurbished computers from an Australian leasing company. HMR guarantees that all units are working Petium IV 2.4 Ghz 512MB RAM, 40GB HDD, CD-ROM, FDD, USB, SOUND and LAN CARD Monitor, keyboard, mouse w/ WinXP Professional OS and Office 2003 Brand New Computers Complete system, as what can be bought from major computer stores INTEL CELERON 430 JETWAY 131 Motherboard w/ onboard video, sound and LAN 1GB DDR2 RAM, 160gb Harddrive DVD optical drive, keyboard, mouse speaker, ATX Casing, AVR

Specs (workstation)

Price per unit

P 7,530.00 (per unit)

P 14,429.00 (per unit) 1 server, 8-port or 16-port switch, patch cords, AVR; Software for EACH unit.

Additional 1 Server. For each access device: Monitor, keyboard, 1 server, 8-port or 16-port switch, patch cords, AVR components needed mouse, patch cord, AVR. Software: for server only for whole set-up since these will be shared through each access device Warranty Maintenance Pros 3 years for Ncomputing products (acesss devices and PCI card) Low: access devices hardly needs maintenance. Center only needs to maintain/upgrade the server.

3 months, can arrange for 6 months but with additional Usually 1 year cost Mid to high: maintenance is done per unit since each workstation has a full system unit with complete parts. Mid to high: maintenance is done per unit since each workstation has a full system unit with complete parts. Brand new, easier to repair/replace since newer models. Workstations be used for different uses graphics editing, simple video production, etc.

Low cost solution centers don't need to buy full Lowest cost option - price indicated is for the complete system units. Low electricity consumption: 3-watts set. (X550) and 5-watts (L130) per acces device. Savings on software only the server needs software. Enough for the eSkwela model to work and other basic office tasks, web-browsing & media viewing. Limited use not for heavy graphics editing, etc. Workstations will not be useable if the server crashes Unsure how long the units will last or before the units experience problems since second hand units. Replacement parts may be hard to find since these are old models. May become obsolete faster since these are old models. Power consumption can be high since it is still a full system unit. Per unit maintenance. Demo unit was tested by the eSkwela Project Team and it worked with the eSkwela model.

Cons

High power consumption since each user will use a full system unit. Usually the specs of the units will be bough will be more than what the center needs, thus the units are not maximized. Per unit maintenance.

Remarks

X550: Max of 10 computers to 1 server, workstations should be less than 10m from the server. L130: Max of 30 computers to 1 server, recommended for workstations more than 10m from the server. 5 units + 1 server: P 75,149.00 / P 104,444.00 10 units + 1 server: P 128,749.00 / P 181,689.00

Total Price (w/ Ubuntu)

N/A. Units comes with pre-installed Windows XP OS and MS Office 5 units + 1 server: P 62,849.00 10 units + 1 server: P 104,369.00

5 units + 1 server: P 95,894.00 10 units + 1 server: P 167,789.00 5 units + 1 server: P 138,118.00 10 units + 1 server: P 240,208.00

Total Price 5 units + 1 server: P 87,178.00 / P 181,689.00 (w/ Windows) 10 units + 1 server: P 140,778.00 / P 193,718.00 Please see additional sheets for detailed information.

ANNEX B

Hardware Options for the eSkwela Project

eSkwela Project Options for Hardware Requirements of the Centers Option 1: NComputing Ncomputing is a thin-client solution which lets you share the resources and applications installed in one PC (server) to several computers through an access device where all you need to connect is a set of keyboard, mouse, monitor and earphones (optional for sounds). Basically, you won't need to buy a separate system unit/CPU for each user. The only system unit you will need to buy is the server. The number of additional units you can connect share the server with will depend on the Ncomputing model that will be purchased. For the X-series, it will utilize the PCI-card slot of the server to connect 3 (min) additional computers using the available ethernet ports at of the Ncomputing PCI card. For the Lseries, you can connect a maximum of 30 computers using ethernet cables and a switch. The number of computers that you can connect together will be dependent on the number of L-series units you buy and number of available ports in the switch minus 2 ports (one for the server and one for the router). Each access device has the following ports: keyboard, mouse, monitor and headset/earphone. Only the L230 model has a USB port. To know more about Ncomputing, visit their website at www.ncomputing.com Option 2: HMR HMR is a company that is into surplus equipment selling. The computers being offered in this option comes from an Australian leasing company and were refurbished to working conditions. The seller guarantees that they only get units from Australia that are working. A test unit was also tested at CICT and was proven to work with the requirements of the eSkwela Project model. Option 3: All brand new

Hardware Options for the eSkwela Project Cash out for 5 units + 1 server TOTAL CASH OUTLAY: P 75,149.00 if Ubuntu OS (open source) is used P 87,178.00 if Windows OS and MS Office will be used Breakdown: P 24,750.00 for one (1) set of X550 kit P 24,850.00 for five (5) of Bnew LCD monitors P 800.00 for five (5) of Bnew keyboards P 600.00 - for five (5) of Bnew mouse P 650.00 - for five (5) of Bnew 10m patch cords P 1,950.00 for five (5) of AVR P 21,549.00 one (1) server unit P 8,530.00 Windows 7 Professional OEM for server (not included in computation if Ubuntu) P 3,499.00 MS Office 2007 student for server (not included in computation if Ubuntu) Cash out for 10 units + 1 server TOTAL CASH OUTLAY: P 128,749.00 if Ubuntu OS (open source) is used P 140,778.00 if Windows OS and MS Office will be used

Model Ncomputing Model X550

Description

Price per unit

Remarks

With one (1) X550 P 24,750.00 kit, you can connect five (5) additional computers. One kit inlcudes one (1) Ncomputing PCI device with five (5) ethernet ports, five (5) access devices and the V-software installer.

Remarks: Ncomputing gives 3-year warranty on their products (PCI card and access device) Price can still be further reduced if the site has existing and Breakdown: working hardware/peripherals P 49,500.00 for two sets of (monitor, keyboard, mouse) X550 kits since it can work with existing P 49,700.00 for ten units of hardware Bnew LCD monitors Server needs to have better specs in order to share its P 1,600.00 for ten (10) units resources; quoted server is of Bnew keyboards sufficient Initial capital layout may prove to P 1,200.00 for ten (10) units be a bit higher than the lowest of Bnew mouse cost option, but savings that will be generated will come from the P 1,300.00 for ten (10) pieces electric consumption saved from of 10m patch cords daily use, low maintenance requirements/expenses, and the P 3,900.00 - for ten (10) units number of software licenses (if of AVR Windows/MS Office will be used) needed (since you only need to P 21,549.00 one (1) server purchase 1 OS license and 1 unit complete with monitor Office for the server; access devices need no OS/Office to P 8,530.00 Windows 7 run since this will be shared Professional OEM for server through the server) (not included in computation if Ubuntu) Pros: P 3,499.00 MS Office 2007 student for server (not included in computation if Ubuntu) Low-cost solution, since the center won't have to buy a whole system unit; Low electricity consumption power consumption of the Xseries is just 3-watts (compared to a full system unit that has a power consumption of 110-watts avg.);

Hardware Options for the eSkwela Project Cash out for 5 units + 1 server Cash out for 10 units + 1 server

Model

Description

Price per unit

Remarks Low-maintenance since the access device has no moving parts, it is easier to maintain. The only part you have to upgrade or replace is the server and the peripherals; access device need not be upgraded or replaced (if broken only); One-unit upgrade all you need to do to upgrade the entire system/network is to upgrade the server and the entire Ncomputing system/network is also upgraded

Cons: Limited use - not recommended for use with heavy graphics editing, or the like. But enough for the eSkwela model, and word processing, basic office applications, web browsing, and media viewing (or the basic computer needs of community ecenters); Units will not work if the server crashes or experiences technical problems.

Hardware Options for the eSkwela Project Cash out for 5 units + 1 server TOTAL CASH OUTLAY: P 101,444.00 if Ubuntu OS (open source) is used P 113,473.00 if Windows OS and MS Office will be used Breakdown: P 49,995.00 for five (5) units of L130 kit P 24,850.00 for five (5) of Bnew LCD monitors P 800.00 for five (5) of Bnew keyboards P 600.00 - for five (5) of Bnew mouse P 780.00 - for six (6) of Bnew 10m patch cords P 1,950.00 for five (5) of AVR P 21,549.00 one (1) server unit P 920.00 8-port switch P 2,320 16-port switch P 8,530.00 Windows 7 Professional OEM for server (not included in computation if Ubuntu) P 3,499.00 MS Office 2007 student for server (not included in computation if Ubuntu) P 8,530.00 Windows 7 Professional OEM for server (not included in computation if Ubuntu) P 3,499.00 MS Office 2007 student for server (not included in computation if Ubuntu) P 2,320.00 16-port switch Cash out for 10 units + 1 server TOTAL CASH OUTLAY: P 181,689.00 if Ubuntu OS will be used P 193,718.00 if Windows OS and MS Office will be used Breakdown: P 99,990.00 for ten (10) units of L130 kits P 49,700.00 for ten units of Bnew LCD monitors P 1,600.00 for ten (10) units of Bnew keyboards P 1,200.00 for ten (10) units of Bnew mouse P 1,430.00 for ten (11) pieces of 10m patch cords P 3,900.00 - for ten (10) units of AVR P 21,549.00 one (1) server unit complete with monitor

Model Ncomputing Model L130 No PCI card to be installed on the server. Shares the server to the access devices through the switch and ethernet cables. One (1) access device, one workstation. Can share the server upto 29 computers. Recommended with centers that have workstations more than 10 meters away from the server.

Description An L130 kit includes only one (1) access device and the V-software installer.

Price per unit P 9,999.00

Remarks Remarks: same as the X-series, but has a 5-watt cosumption

Hardware Options for the eSkwela Project Cash out for 5 units + 1 server TOTAL CASH OUTLAY: P 62,849.00 Breakdown: P 37,650.00 five (5) workstations P 21,549.00 one (1) server unit complete with monitor P 780.00 five (5) pcs of 10m patch cords P 1,950.00 five (5) units of AVR P 920.00 8-port switch Cash out for 10 units + 1 server TOTAL CASH OUTLAY: P 104,369.00

Model HMR Philippines Refurbished PCs

Description

Price per unit

Remarks

Petium IV 2.4 Ghz P 7,530.00 512MB RAM, 40GB HDD, CD-ROM, FDD, USB, SOUND and LAN CARD w/ WinXP Professional OS and Office 2003

Remarks: 3 mos warranty given by seller; Comes with CRT monitor; option Breakdown: for LCD but to add 3,000.00 P 75,300.00 for ten (10) pesos to price; workstations Units comes from Australia and are refurbished units; P 21,549.00 one (1) server Seller guarantees that the units unit complete with monitor are working when they buy them; Test unit tested by CICT is P 1,300.00 for ten (10) pieces working and works well with the of 10m patch cords eSkwela model; Seller can also come up with P 3,900.00 - for ten (10) units refurbished server options. of AVR P 2,320.00 16-port switch Pros: Lowest cost

Cons: not sure how long they will last or before the units experience problems; replacement parts may be hard to find since these are old models; may become considered outdated faster since these are old models; Power consumption is high since it is still a full system unit and Mid to high maintenance Replacement/repairs that will be done is per unit since each unit is treated as a separate workstation.

Hardware Options for the eSkwela Project Cash out for 5 units + 1 server TOTAL CASH OUTLAY: P 95,894.00 - if Ubuntu OS (open source) is used P 138,118.00 if Windows OS and MS Office will be used Breakdown: P 71,245.00 for five (5) workstations Cash out for 10 units + 1 server TOTAL CASH OUTLAY: P 167,789.00 - if Ubuntu OS (open source) is used P 240,208.00 if Windows OS and MS Office will be used Breakdown: P 142,490.00 for ten (10) workstations

Model Brand new computer

Description (based on the minum requirements of the eSkwela Project; computed using SRP pricelists of major computer stores in the Philippines)

Price per unit P 14,249.00/ workstation P 21,549.00/server P 8,530.00 Windows 7 Professional OEM for server P 2,540.00 Windows 7 Stater Edition OEM (per workstation) P 3,499.00 - MS Office 2007 student (per unit including server)

Remarks Remarks: Everything brand new Pros: Can be used for different uses graphics editing, simple video production, etc. (but this can also be done on the server)

Cons: High power consumption since each user will use a full system P 21,549.00 server P 21,549.00 server unit; Most of the computer resources P 780.00 for five (5) pieces of P 1,430.00 for eleven (11) (in terms of power and specs) 10m patch cords pieces of 10m patch cords are usually untapped with what is being done in most of the P 920.00 8-port switch P 2,320.00 16-port switch community e-centers. This translate to wasted energy and P 8,530.00 one (1) Windows P 8,530.00 Windows 7 high electricity consumption; 7 Professional OEM for server Professional OEM for server Mid to high maintenance Replacement/repairs that will be P 12,700.00 five (5) Windows P 25,400.00 ten (10) Windows done is per unit since each unit 7 Stater Edition OEM for the 10 7 Stater Edition OEM for the 10 is treated as a separate workstations (not included in workstations (not included in workstation. computation if Ubuntu) computation if Ubuntu) P 20,994.00 six (6) units of MS Office 2007 student - per unit including server (not included in computation if Ubuntu) P 38,489.00 - MS Office 2007 student - per unit including server (not included in computation if Ubuntu)

ANNEX C

Center Manager The designated eSkwela Center Manager shall be responsible for overseeing, monitoring, and sustaining all aspects of the Centers operations both as an eLearning Center and as a Community eCenter. He/She shall be the main link among the eSkwela Project Management Office of CICT and local eSkwela Steering Committee. He/She shall report directly to the Head of the local eSkwela Steering Committee. The eSkwela Center Manager is designated to manage the day-to-day operations of the Center, including but not limited to the following: ensure that the Center Policies and Procedures are enforced at all times; ensure that the facilities of the center are maintained in good working order; take responsibility for the administration of any money collected by the center on a daily basis, if any; maintain relevant up-to-date records for the center;

Together with the eSkwela PMO and the local eSkwela Steering Committee: set up a schedule to maximize the use of the Center, with priority given to non-formal educational purposes; plan for and ensure technical and financial sustainability of the Center; promote the Center to the community; keep the community informed of the activities of the Center Attend eSkwela-related meetings, conferences, and training workshops, as necessary; Submit the following reports to the eSkwela PMO at the end of every quarter or as needed: Progress/Operations Report, Monitoring and Evaluation Report, Financial Report, and Incident Report/s; and Undertake additional tasks to benefit the Center as directed by the local eSkwela Steering Committee and/or the eSkwela PMO. Learning Facilitators The designated eSkwela Learning Facilitator shall be responsible in assisting learners as they go through the non-formal education modules of eSkwela. He/She shall report directly to the designated eSkwela Center Manager. The responsibilities of the eSkwela Learning Facilitator shall be as follows: Identify the learners entry level capacity through the completion of literacy tests; Define the learners learning needs and identify the most appropriate means for meeting those needs through the formulation of Individual Learning Agreements among the learners; Provide necessary support for learners to achieve their learning goals through the use of eSkwela learning modules and other supplementary materials; Monitor the learning modules used by the learners based on the Individual Learning Agreement; Perform formative and summative assessment of learners learning; Assist the learner in the completion of assessment requirements for accreditation and certification; Attend eSkwela-related meetings, conferences, and training workshops, as necessary; and Submit all the necessary reports on the learners to the eSkwela Center Manager.

Network Administrator The designated eSkwela Network Administrator shall be responsible for ensuring that the Centers equipment and systems are working properly. He/She shall report directly to the designated eSkwela Center Manager. The responsibilities of the eSkwela Network Administrator shall be as follows: Ensure that the hardware, software, and systems of the center are maintained in good working order and updated, as necessary; Maintain and update the eSkwela Learning Management System; Recommend strategies to ensure technical sustainability of the Center; Attend eSkwela-related meetings, conferences, and training workshops, as necessary; Submit the following reports to the eSkwela Center Manager at the end of every month or as needed: System Monitoring Report, Incident Report/s, and other relevant reports; and Undertake additional tasks to benefit the Center as directed by the eSkwela Center Manager.

Regional Coordinators Once the eSkwela Project has been successfully turned over to DepEd, the Regional Coordinator will assume the following roles: 1. Set-up of eSkwela Centers provide handholding assistance to individuals and organizations interested in setting up an eSkwela Center within the region, which includes the following: respond and provide assistance to inquiries about the eSkwela project; conduct project orientation meetings with potential eSkwela partners;

assess eSkwela Application Forms and recommend strategies on how to meet the requirements in setting up and eSkwela Center validate data gathered in the eSkwela Application Forms through site visits;

facilitate the preparation of eSkwela capability building activities, including training workshops for eSkwela learning facilitators, network administors, and center managers. Prepare the draft Memorandum Of Agreement (MOA) among the eSkwela partners, as well as include revisions from the partners in the final version Represent the eSkwela Project in related events and activities in the assigned region, which includes the following: inauguration ceremony of a new eSkwela Center;

education events where eSkwela is invited (e.g., exhibit, fair, expo, conference)

Prepare project advocacy materials as needed (brochures, sample e-modules, tarps, slide presentations)

2. Operations and Sustainability of the eSkwela Centers monitor and evaluate the eSkwela Centers within the region, including the following: Provide templates of the M&E forms to be filled up by the eSkwela Center implementers; Gather accomplished M&E forms on a regular basis Conduct announced and unannounced site visits During site visits, conduct the following M&E methods: Steering Commitee meeting interview / focus group discussion with learners interview / focus group discussion with implementers observation (documented in a site visit report)

Consolidate and analyze M&E data through periodic reports, to be submitted to DepED-BALS. Using the M&E data as basis, recommend strategies on improving the operations of the eSkwela Centers and ensuring their sustainability.

Steering Committee Supervise the preparations for the Centers operations; Grant permission for the Learning Facilitators, Center Manager, and Network Administrator to undergo training as deemed appropriate by CICT and/or DepED; Conduct regular steering committee meetings to discuss and decide on concerns and issues pertinent to the Centers implementation and operation; Undertake additional tasks to benefit the Center.

ANNEX D

Guidelines: Filling out the eSkwela Application Form Please make sure that you fill out all items completely. Please provide details as necessary, particularly on the section AVAILABILITY OF INFRASTRUCTURE REQUIREMENTS. Please make sure that the application form is duly signed by the head of the organization initiating the setting up of an eSkwela Center. Include photos of the proposed site: at least 2 photos of the interior room at least 2 photos of the exterior building/room photos of the computer units photos of the Center Manager, Network Administrator and Learning Facilitator/s Your DepEd eSkwela Regional Team will send an application assessment which includes recommendations in order for the proposed site to move forward in the set-up process. You can send a scanned copy of the duly accomplished and signed application form and the required photos via email to the eSkwela Regional Coordinator assigned in your area:
CAR Region 1 Region 2 Region 3 Region 4A Region 4B Region 5 Region 6 Jose A. Bogwana Vivian Luz S. Pagatpatan Romulo S. Ancheta Reynaldo F. Licay Elaine T. Balaogan Mariflor B. Musa Ricardo M. Tejeresas No Regional Coordinator depedcar.eskwela@gmail.com depedr1.eskwela@gmail.com depedr2.eskwela@gmail.com depedr3.eskwela@gmail.com depedr4a.eskwela@gmail.com depedr4b.eskwela@gmail.com depedr5.eskwela@gmail.com depedbals.eskwela@gmail.com Region 7 Region 8 Region 9 Region 10 Region 11 Region 12 CARAGA ARMM NCR Vivian L. Yarte Victoria A. Briones Lucena C. Yaez Edith B. Lago-Ortega Johnny M. Sumugat Marilyn F. Antiquina No Regional Coordinator Felicino C. Trongco depedr7.eskwela@gmail.com depedr8.eskwela@gmail.com depedr9.eskwela@gmail.com depedr10.eskwela@gmail.com depedr12.eskwela@gmail.com depedcaraga.eskwela@gmail.com depedbals.eskwela@gmail.com depedncr.eskwela@gmail.com

Henry Antonio R. Pasquito depedr11.eskwela@gmail.com

When sending the eSkwela application documents via email, please indicate in subject heading: eSkwela Application Form - <location of proposed site>

APPLICATION FORM
Please indicate (mark with an x) the organization initiating the set-up of an eSkwela Center: DepED LGU NGO Civic Org

DATE RECEIVED BY DEPED: ______________________

Other

If other, please specify: Name Position Office / Organization Telephone Email

If DepED initiated, please indicate the following:

If Non-DepED initiated, please indicate the following:

Region ALS Division, District Location of potential site (please indicate exact address Name of Organization Location of proposed site (please indicate exact address)

Contact Person (for eSkwela set-up and this form)

Target Date of eSkwela Operations:

AVAILABILITY OF INFRASTRUCTURE REQUIREMENTS

Target Number of OSYAs for first batch of eSkwela learners: Schedule of eSkwela sessions (Please mark planned operating hours and days with an X) AM 8:00 9:00 9:00 10:00 10:00 11:00 11:00 12:00 PM 1:00 2:00 2:00 3:00 3:00 4:00 4:00 5:00 5:00 6:00 6:00 7:00 7:00 8:00 8:00 9:00
M T W Th F Sat Sun

Space/Room
Room Size (in sq. mtrs.) square meters Electric Outlets (no. of slots) slots Aircon (no. of units) Circuit Breakers (availability and use)
No circuit breakers installed

computers and airconditioning units share one circuit breaker separate circuit breakers for computers and airconditioning units

Work table
Availabl e Not Available e

Work Space
Availabl

Chairs (no. of chairs)

Computer Tables
Lacks tables for units

Not Available

Uses long tables, units / users are placed / positioned very close together Uses long tables, with ample space between units / users one table for each computer

Computers

Yes

No

Internet
If yes, indicate service provider:

Yes

No

If yes, what type (mark x) If Broadband, What speed?

Dial-up

DSL / Broadband

How many? Computer Specs - General

Yes
Do the computers run on Windows? (if yes, please indicate version Windows 98, 2000, XP or Vista) Can you play audio (CDs, mp3s) in the computers? Can you play video (VCDs, DVDs) in the computers? Are the computer units networked? (with LAN cables or wireless)

No

Computer Specs - Detailed


You may ask the resident IT/computer expert in your office (Network Administrator, MIS, programmer):

Performance Technical Specs Processor


Intel Pentium III (less than 866MHz) Intel Pentium III (866MHz and above) Intel Pentium Dual Core and above

Multimedia Capability Hard Disk


Less than 80GB 80GB More than 80 GB

Internet / NetworkReady Headset


No Yes

Memory
Less than 1GB 1GB More than 1GB

Hard Disk (available space


Less than 10GB 10GB More than 10GB Thin clients / NComputing

Sound Card
Built-in Separate sound card None

Video Card
Built-in Separate video card None

Monitor
CRT LCD

LAN Card
None LAN Card Wireless LAN Adapter

1 Server PC Type Operating System

Software Software Name

License Type
Licensed Open Source Unlicensed

Version

Application

Licensed Open Source Unlicensed

Performance Technical Specs Processor


Intel Pentium III (less than 866MHz) Intel Pentium III (866MHz and above) Intel Pentium Dual Core and above Workstation PCs Number of Units: Think clients / NComputing

Multimedia Capability Hard Disk


Less than 40GB 40GB More than 40 GB More than 10GB Thin clients / NComputing

Internet / NetworkReady Headset LAN Card


None LAN Card Wireless LAN Adapter

Memory
Less than 512MB 512MB More than 512MB Thin clients / NComputing

Hard Disk (available space


Less than 10GB 10GB

Sound Card
Built-in Separate sound card None

Video Card
Built-in Separate video card None

Monitor
CRT LCD

Less than half of the units have headsets Half of the computers have headsets More than half of the computers have headsets

Type Operating System

Software Software Name

License Type
Licensed Open Source Unlicensed

Version

Application

Licensed Open Source Unlicensed

AVAILABILITY OF STAFF REQUIREMENTS Center Manager


Name Office / Organization Please indicate relevant experience (educational background, work experience, training)

Network Administrator

Learning Facilitators
How Many? Name 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Relevant Experience (yes or no) Position / Designation
Trained in ALS? (If Yes, please indicate date of training) Computer user? / Does he make use of the computer for routinary tasks (e.g. reports, letters, etc)? Does he/she make use of the Internet (e.g. e-mail, browsing, chat)?

Community Involvement
Please indicate (mark with an X) the involvement of your community in the implementation of eSkwela (please specify for NGO, Civic Org, or Other):

Civic Org DepED Provision of Space/Room for eSkwela Renovation of space/room (if needed) Electricity Internet Airconditioning Units Headsets Computer Tables and Chairs Supplies (print modules for modules where eSkwela e-modules are not yet available; materials for learner portfolio) Computers License for OS (if proprietary; i.e. Windows) Repair and Maintenance of computers Center Manager, salary Network Administrator, salary Learning Facilitators, salary Accomplished by: (Name & Signature) Position/ Designation: Contact Number/s: E-mail Address: Noted by: LGU NGO

Other

How can eSkwela, as a project, serve your organization, your community and its out-ofschool youth and adults?


revised as of 17 May 2011

(Name & Signature of Immediate Superior / Head of Organization)

Position/ Designation: Contact Number/s: E-mail Address:

ANNEX E

Details Memorandum of Agreement Please fill up completely and send back to CICT (cict.eskwela@gmail.com) NOTE: This form will help CICT prepare the final MOA for your eSkwela Center; Principal and Witness signatories DO NOT have to sign this form we are only asking for the relevant information, as requested below. 1. ORGANIZATION 1A. COMPLETE NAME 1B. INITIALS 1C. REGISTERED UNDER (Include No.) 1D. COMPLETE ADDRESS

Department of Education Division of ___________

2. PRINCIPAL SIGNATORY 2A. ORGANIZATION (Initials) DEPED DIVISION 2B. COMPLETE NAME 2C. POSITION Type Schools Division Superintendent 2D. GOVERNMENT ISSUED ID No. Date of Issue Place of Issue

3. WITNESS 3A. ORGANIZATIO N (Initials) DEPED DIVISION 3B. COMPLETE NAME 3C. POSITION

ANNEX F

GUIDELINES Memorandum of Agreement (review and signing)


IA. Memorandum of Agreement (draft)

1. The MOA draft is based on a previous template reviewed by the CICT legal office (pre-turnover to DepEd), and has been consulted with and approved by the DepEdBALS eSkwela team. Please focus on reviewing the tasks and responsibilities of the parties of your organization and not so much on the style, format, or syntax. 2. Please have the MOA reviewed by the head of the local partners or their alternate / designate. Also, please bear in mind that the draft version of the MOA is not intended to be printed and signed yet. The DepEd-eSkwela Regional Team will prepare the final version after gathering the details (as specified in II. MOA Details Form) and revisions particular to your eSkwela Center. A copy of the final version will be sent to you via email (based on the revisions in the said draft MOA), for printing and signing of the local partner signatories.

3. Please coordinate with the other partners of your eSkwela Center re: the review of each organization's duties and responsibilities at the eSkwela Center. You may refer to the table below for the partners applicable to your Center:
eSkwela local Partner DepEd Division Office* LGU Office to contact re: review of eSkwela MOA Schools Division Superintendent If barangay: Barangay Chairman If municipality/city: Mayor If province: Governor President / Chairman or equivalent Pastor / Bishop or equivalent Owner / proprietor

NGO / Civic org Church / religious group Local business

*For the non-DepEd-led eSkwela Centers, please bear in mind that the DepEd Division Office will be included as one of the eSkwela Center's local partners.

We highly recommend that you set an appointment with the concerned signatories for MOA review and secure verbal approval in the same meeting to avoid unnecessary delays.

4. Once the MOA has been reviewed by all the partners, please inform your respective eSkwela
Regional Coordinator (RC) or a member of the DepEd-eSkwela Regional Team. You may also clarify or raise questions on the MOA via telephone or email (contact information available at http://alseskwela.ning.com/page/eskwela-faqs-for-potential) 5. The DepEd-eSkwela Regional Team (RT) will prepare the final version of the MOA (including the revisions and signature fields per page), and will be sent to you via email for printing. The routing of the MOA for signing (principal and witness) is as follows: RT sends final MOA soft copy via email to local partners local partners print and sign the MOA local partners to send signed MOA copies back to RT DepEd Regional Office to sign the MOA RT to send signed and notarized MOAs to local partners Again, we highly recommend for you to set an appointment with the concerned signatories and have the MOAs signed in the same meeting to avoid unnecessary delays. Number of original copies The number of original copies of the MOA is dependent on the number of partners for your eSkwela. If for example the local partners of your eSkwela include the DepEd Division Office and an additional organization, you will print 5 copies, the breakdown of which is as follows:

Group DepEd Division Office Additional organization (could be LGU/NGO/civic org etc. DepEd Regional Office

No. of original copies 1 1

2 (1 for records, 1 for Regional Team) 1

Notary Public

The CICT-eSkwela Project Team will keep in touch with you to assist once the MOAs have been finalized. IB. MOA Details Form

1. In relation with the eSkwela draft MOA, the following information on the local partners are needed to prepare the final version: official, complete address of each partner details of principal and witness per local partner - including complete name, position, Passport Number and date of place and issue (principal signatory only; if principal does not have a passport, a valid government-issued ID - GSIS / SSS / Driver's License / PRC - may be used instead. Community Tax Certificate, or CTC Nos., also known as cedulas are no longer accepted in MOAs.

2. Please furnish your RC/RT with the aforementioned information by fillling out the attached eSkwela MOA Details Form.

ANNEX G

eSkwela Training Programs


1. Basic course on ALS (5 days) required training before eSkwela LF training The basic course on ALS is suited particularly for those who are implementing the eSkwela project but are not from the DepED BALS. The content of the training are the following: Advocacy and Social Mobilization Network and Linkages Assessment of Learners Teaching and Learning Strategies Utilization of digitized modules and LMS Community immersion

For those who would like to avail of this training, you may send a letter of request to DepED BALS. DepED BALS will send the trainers so the schedule of this training has to be coordinated with them. You would also have to shoulder the transportation, meals and accommodations of the trainers. 2. Learning Facilitators Training(5 days) The LF training looks into reviewing the eSkwela instructional model and the appropriate strategies to be used for teaching. Its main objective is to orient and train its participants on the effective use of ICT to improve the teaching and learning process in the context of alternative education. It is hoped that the participants will be equipped to enable their teaching to be more: Learner-centered Thematic Blended Experiential

The training introduces the participants to the use of a discussion forum as a tool for stimulating critical thinking and a way in which learners can interact with their colearners and facilitators. It also emphasizes the principle of project-based learning wherein learners do projects that integrate life skills and lessons learned from the module. Lastly, it presents relevant monitoring procedures and alternative assessment strategies (e.g. performance-based, online, contextualized activities) and how it can be applied. The participants of this training are the Learning Facilitators (paid and/or volunteers). 3. Network Administration Training The Network Administration training aims to equip lab managers and technicians with skills on networking systems and procedures as well as proper equipment maintenance. They will also be trained on the use of the Edubuntu operating system, as well as the installation and maintenance of the digitized modules and the LMS.

The participants of this training are the assigned Network Administrators or the person assigned to provide technical support to the eSkwela center. 4. Center Management Training The Center Management training covers the eSkwela set-up, operations and sustainability. Its main objective is to train the participants in setting up, operating and sustaining an eSkwela center. The participants of this training are the Center Managers and a representative from the local eSkwela steering committee.

Trainee Qualifications
eSkwela centers should be guided by the selection criteria in sending participants for the training. The basic qualifications are as follows: 1. Training for Learning Facilitators 1.1 Should have already undergone the Basic Training on ALS understands the 4As of adult learning can identify active learning strategies familiar with pre-entry requirements of a learner such as FLT and ILA 1.2 Familiar with various learner assessment strategies (authentic assessment, teacher-made tests) 1.3 Are regular computer and Internet users (not just computer literate, i.e. must be using the Internet and office productivity tools for regular work, research, and communications) can do basic computer operations i.e. starting-up a computer, moving and clicking the mouse, identifying and using toolbars and icons can create documents using productivity tools such as MS Word/Writer, Excel/Calc, Powerpoint/Impress can search information using a web browser i.e. yahoo, google uses e-Mail to communicate and exchange information familiar with other communication tools (chat, social networking sites, forum) 1.4 Will be assigned as learning facilitator in the eSkwela center 2. Training for Network Administrators 2.1 Have a working understanding and knowledge of computer and network equipment, peripheral devices, software applications and drivers Can install and configure a variety of computer components to work together properly

Can install/configure/(patch)/manipulate operating systems, software applications and drivers (open source or proprietary)

2.2 Demonstrate knowledge in computer networking Understands networking concepts (network topologies, protocols, etc.) Understand the meaning of common error messages Able to install and configure a simple local area network 2.3 Perform maintenance of computer hardware and network can determine hardware or software problems install and update anti-virus, anti-spyware and other software applications to secure and maintain computers and networks can develop laboratory policies, procedures, and practices related to use of computers/technology 2.4 Exposure to ubuntu/open source software

ANNEX H

With deep gratitude, we would like to express our heartfelt ' gratefulness and sincerest appreciation to all those who in ne way or another contributed the success of this momentous event.
I

pecial thanks to the following:


./ CICT ./ Cebu City Government ./ Rotary Club of Cebu, Cebu Port Centre ./ Hon. Joy Augustus Young ./ Hon. Jocelyn G. Pesquera

Dr. Emmanuel C. Lallana


nlls serves as your IDYUanOD

PART I Invocation.......................................

LAUNCHING CEREMONY

Mrs. Rebecca T. Ouano


Tejero ALS, Coordinator, Center Manager

Honorary Message

_ ..,'

;~

Hon. Jesli A. Lapus


DepEd Secretary

Launching Statements

:.........

Dir. Goffrey L. Rodriguez


Director IV, CICT RO VII

Pambansang Awit...........................

Dr. Victorina S. Veloso


ES1, ALS

Mr. Antonio D. Ynoc


President, Rotary Club of Cebu, Port Center PART II. Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

Welcome Remarks..........................

Dr. Lorna E. Ranees


Schools Division Superintendent

Acknowledgement

Mr. Woodrow M. Denuyo


Asst. Schools Div. Superintendent

PART III. Blessing of the eSkwela Laboratory

Greetings

Hon. Tomas R. Osmena


Mayor - Cebu City PART IV. Signing of MOA and Deed of Donation by the 4 Partner agencies CICT

Project Overview

Dr. Emmanuel C. Lallana


Outgoing CICT Commissioner

4- LGU
~ DepEd 4- Rotary Club of Cebu, Port Centre PART V. Merienda Cena

Message

Dr. Angelo Timoteo M. Diaz de Rivera


CICT Commissioner

Introduction of the Guest of Honor ..

Dr. Carolino B. Mordeno


Director IV, DepED RO VII

M,. A,.d,llW SOlO,.

~g>~

Page 1 of 2

ANNEX I

Interview Schedule Notes: a. These questions may be asked in individual interviews or during a focused group discussion with LFs. b. If possible, please do an audio recording of the interview/ discussion. c. Answers may vary depending on which module/module guide. You need to probe which they are referring to when they give a particular answer. Or you could take up each module separately (one by one). Name of Center: ________________________________________________________ Date: _________________________________________________________________ Interviewees/FGD Participants: ____________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________

1) On average, how long does it take for a learner to complete a module using the module guide?

2) Are the learners participating in the discussion forum? How often? How do you find the quality of their participation?

3) What do you think are the advantages of having the discussion forum? What are the disadvantages of having the discussion forum, if any?

4) Are the learners making use of the recommended Web resources listed on the module guide? 4a) If yes, do they find the resources useful for learning the module better?

Page 2 of 2

4b) If not, why are they not using the recommended Web resources?

5) Are the learners doing the project specified in the module guide? 5a) If yes, what has been their experience in doing the project? For example, do they doing the project difficult? Do they think it is worth their while and useful for meeting the module objectives?

5b) If not, why do they think are they not doing the project?

6) How useful are the module guides in helping the learners meet module objectives?

7) What suggestions or recommendations do you have for improving the usefulness of the e-modules? the module guides?

Page 1 of 2

ANNEX J

Interview Schedule - Learners Notes: a. These questions may be asked in individual interviews or during a focused group discussion with the learners. b. If possible, please do an audio recording of the interview/ discussion. c. Answers may vary depending on which module/module guide. You need to probe which they are referring to when they give a particular answer. Or you could take up each module separately (one by one). Name of Center: ________________________________________________________ Date: _________________________________________________________________ Interviewees/FGD Participants: ____________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________

1) Madali nyo bang nasundan ang module guide? Bakit?

2) Nasubukan na ba ninyo na sumagot sa discussion forum? (Have you participated in the discussion forum?) a) Kung oo, nakatulong ba ang forum para lalong madagdagan ang inyong kaalaman? (If yes, did the forum increase your knowledge on the subject matter?)

b) Kung hindi, bakit hindi kayo nakasagot ng forum? (If no, why did you not participate in the forum?)

3) Ginamit nyo ba o binasa ang mga recommended web resources na nakasulat sa module guide? (Did you use/read the recommended Web resources listed on the module guide?) a) Kung oo, nakatulong ba ito sa inyo para mas maintindihan ang modyul? (If yes, did you find the resources useful for learning the module better?)

Page 2 of 2

b) Kung hindi, bakit hindi ninyo ginamit ang web resources? (If not, why are they not using the recommended Web resources?) 4) Ginawa nyo ba ang project na nakalagay sa module guide? (Did you do the project specified in the module guide?) a) Kung oo, ano ang naging experience nyo sa paggawa ng project? Nakatulong ba ito para mas lumawak ang inyong kaalaman? Ano ang pinakamahirap o pinakachallenging sa paggawa ng project? (If yes, what has been their experience in doing the project? For example, do they find doing the project difficult? Do they think it is worth their while and useful for meeting the module objectives?)

b) Kung hindi, bakit hindi kayo gumawa ng project? (If not, why do they think are they not doing the project?)

5) Sa pangkalahatan, nakatulong ba ang module guides sa pag-aaral ninyo ng eModule? Paano ito nakatulong? (How useful are the module guides in helping the learners meet module objectives?)

ANNEX K

Site Control No. Site Partners


Name of Organization

Date of Site Launch

Site Profile Complete Site Address


Building / Street City Province

Address

Current Head of Organization

Telephone No.

Organizations Contribution

Steering Committee
(member orgs should be Site Partners)

Name of Organization

Name

Position

Start Date

Telephone No.

Email Address

Site Implementers
Name Center Manager Network Administrator Facilitators (Teachers) Position Organization Start Date Telephone No. Email Address

ANNEX L

Spot Check Rating Sheet


Score

Announced Unannounced
1 Less than half of the units are god working stations 4 There is power/electricity

Site Date of Visit


1 No power/electricity

Working condition, computers

4 All of the units are in good working condition

3 More than half of the units are in good working condition

2 Half of the units are in good working condition

Score

Electricity

Access to eSkwela LMS

All of the units can More than half of access the the units can eSkwela LMS access the eSkwela LMS

Half of the units can access the eSkwelaLMS

Less than half of the units can access the eSkwela LMS

connected

not connected

(connection)

Internet

All of the headsets More than half of are working the headsets are working

Half of the headsets are working

Less than half of the units are working

working

not working

Working headsets

AC Unit

All scheduled learners are present

Learners

More than half of the scheduled learners are present

Half of the schedule learners are present

Less than half of the scheduled learners are present

Present

Absent

Learning Facilitator

All units have Internet access

Internet (access per unit)

More than half of the units have Internet access

Half of the units have Internet access

Less than half of the units have Internet access

Present

Absent

Center Manager

AVE. SCORE Accomplished by:

0.00

out of

ANNEX M

Site Visit Report


Date of Visit Time start Name 1 2 Note Site Organization

Time End

Prepared by

ANNEX N

Commission on Information and Communications Technology Department of Education Region ____ Division of ______________

Schedule of eSkwela Learning Sessions


S.Y._______________ MONDAY
(enter time slot here) (enter time slot here) (enter time slot here) (enter time slot here) (enter time slot here) (enter time slot here) (enter time slot here) (enter time slot here) (enter time slot here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here)

TUESDAY
(Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here)

WEDNESDAY
(Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here)

THURSDAY
(Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here)

FRIDAY
(Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here)

SATURDAY
(Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here) (Enter name of assigned teacher here)

Prepared by:
(position)

Recommended Approval:
(position)

Approved by:
(position)

ANNEX O

Minutes of Steering Committee


Date of Meeting Time start Participants Name 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Site Name Site Ctrl. No. Organization Venue Remarks

Agenda

Summary Concern raised

Action point

Lead org/person

Remarks

Other Concerns

Time End

Prepared by Date Prepared

ANNEX P

A Grant Proposal for the Set-up of an eSkwela Center in ______________ Submitted to: (Name of Grant Organization) Submitted by: (Name of Organization submitting the proposal)

Executive Summary The (name of organization) requests that (name of grant organization) support the eSkwela project (a community based e-Learning center for Out-of-School youth and adults) in (name of area here), by providing for the (specify project component) requirement of the project. (Insert brief background on the locality (district/region) where you plan to set-up an eSkwela Center. Also, include the number of out-school-youth and adults in said locality). The eSkwela program has had significant success in bringing learning opportunities enhanced by Information and Communications Technology to the out-of-school youth and adults in the Philippines. The Commission on Information and Communications Technology (CICT) and Department of Education - Bureau of Alternative Learning System (DepEd-BALS) has worked together in recent years, with the local stakeholders Local Government Units (LGUs), Deparment of Education Division Offices, Non-Government Organizations (NGOs), civic groups, faith-based groups and local businesses - to realize the establishment and operations of eSkwela Centers across the country. The work done by these partners groups has been appreciated by implementing ALS teachers and OSYA learners nationwide. eSkwela as a project has also benn duly recognized internationally (recipient of Certificate of Commendation at the 2007-2008 UNESCO ICT in Education Awards; Honorable Mention at the 2010 UNESCO King Hamad Bin Isa Al-Khalifa Prize for the Use of ICT in Education; Laureate, Computer World Honor's Program). The success of eSkwela would not have been achieved if not for the critical support provided by local partners. With the same support from both key proponents and local partners, we intend to bring the eSkwela Project to (insert locality/area here. Once realized, the eSkwela Center will serve (insert number of target OSYs and adults to be served by your eSkwela) out-of-school youth and adults in our community. Consequently, the eSkwela learners can gain an equivalent of a high shool diploma, land better jobs and learn life skills. The Problem Studies show an increasing number of school age Filipinos that are out of school. A huge percentage of Filipino children and youth aged 6 to 17 years are not attending school. The Department of Education (DepEd) estimated that, in 2003, there were a total of 5.18 million out-of-school youth (1.84 million out-of-school children aged 6 to 11 years old, and 3.94 million young people aged 12 to 15) in the country. 1 Further, around 17 million Filipinos about 20% of the population have not finished the countrys basic education requirements.
1

Guerrero, C.S. / Bureau of Alternative Learning System. Alternative Learning System: The Other Side of Basic Education. Presentation delivered by Guerrero, C.S., Director of the Department of Educations Bureau of Alternative Learning System. Metro Manila: Department of Education, 2004.

(Insert baseline info on number of OSYs and adults in your area here). The dropout rate for secondary public Enter/Sta Drop y Out schools in the Philippines has also 10 0 significantly increased from 9% in SY 0 3 8 4 1998-1999 to 13.10% in SY 2002-2003. 4 5 0 2 7 7 6 The completion rate for the latter School 8 7 0 10 6 Year was pegged at 59.79% -- meaning, 0 4 6 0 5 out of ten secondary school students, 6 4 2 8 3 2 0 only six actually graduate to the next 1 3 0 4 level. It is further estimated that only Grade Grade HS HS College Colleg 1 6 I IV I e Graduat Graduat Graduat four out of ten youths who enter e e e elementary school get to finish high source: Department of Education school, as seen in the Cohort Survival Trend graph shown on the right. The graph shows that for every 100 students that enter the formal education system at Grade 1, only 66 graduate from Grade 6 while only 43 graduate from 4th year high school. Every year, there are more and more young people who should be attending schools but are not, due to various reasons. As illustrated in the succeeding chart (2003 Functional Literacy, Education and Mass Media Survey), parents cite these leading reasons why their children do not attend schools: working or looking for work (mostly males) - 30% lack interest in going to school - 22% high cost of education - 20% (n.b. basic education in the country is free; as such, cost would include personal transportation fare, meal allowance, clothing, expenses for materials, projects, etc.)

School is very far 1.5% Cannot cope w/ school work 2.2% Illness/disability 2.5%

No school w/in area 0.4%

Others 9.3%

Housekeeping 11.8%

Employment / looking for work 30.5%

High cost of education Lack of personal interest 19.9% 22.0%

SOURCE: 2003 FLEMMS

While the Department of Education seeks to bring these young people back to the formal education system, studies show that the existing full-time education model being used by traditional education systems does not work for these out-of-school youngsters. (Describe the educational situation in your community. Provide hard / numerical data. You may get this from the DepEd Division Office or the LGU). DepEd's Bureau of Alternative Learning System In response to this, the Bureau of Alternative Learning System of the Department of Education (DepEd-BALS) has been mandated by virtue of Executive Order No. 356 (September 14, 2004), "to protect and promote the right of all citizen to quality basic education and to promote the right of all citizens to quality basic education and such education accessible to all by providing all Filipino children in the elementary level and free education in the high school level. Such education shall also include alternative learning system for out-of school youth and adult learners." (Section 2 of PA. 9155, The Governance of Basic Education Act of 2001) The Bureau has developed and is currently implementing various programs, including the Accreditation and Equivalency Program a self-paced alternative learning / nonformal program that allows learners to proceed with their basic education and prepare

them to take the Accreditation and Equivalency Certification Exam, which if they pass, serves as an equivalent to the High School diploma.2 Unfortunately, despite the big number of target clients, the Bureau receives less than 1% (in the year 2005, the figure was at 0.068%) of the total education budget. Program Description To respond to the needs of this underserved sector of society, the Commission on Information and Communications Technology Human Capital Development Group (CICT-HCDG), in close coordination with DepEd-BALS, proposed to establish Community e-Learning Centers that would be dedicated to serve the learning needs of the out-of-school youth and adult learners through ICT. These e-Learning centers would be called eSkwela a play on the vernacular equivalent of school. The eSkwela Project is envisioned to provide ICT-enhanced educational opportunities for Filipino out-of-school youth and adults. It likewise aims to help reduce the digital divide and enhance the capacity of these individuals to be successful participants in a global and knowledge-based economy. The initiative responds directly to a national development priority and brings e-learning opportunities and ICT for learning resources to mobile teachers / instructional managers and out-of-school learners in the Philippines in an exciting, innovative, and locally meaningful way. Under this project, community-based e-Learning Centers or eSkwelas are being established in major centers around the country to conduct ICT-enhanced alternative education programs for interested individuals. These centers serve as venues where out-of-school learners and other community members can learn new life skills and competencies, and/or help prepare learners to rejoin the formal school system, if so desired. Because of the success of the eSkwela project, it has been upgraded into a regular program and management has been turned over by CICT to DepEd on 1 May 2011, It is envisioned to provide three tracks to participating learners: 1. 2. 3.
2

Accreditation and Equivalency (A&E) Program the project provides an ICTbased A&E Program that will enable learners to complete their basic education; Review/ Catch-up opportunity for those who wish to return to formal schooling (i.e. for those who temporarily drop out due to illness, to help out in the farm during the harvest season, etc.) Livelihood (using existing and planned e-learning modules geared for skills development, livelihood, entrepreneurship, and cottage industries) or ICTRenaming the Bureau of NonFormal Education to Bureau of Alternative Learning System. http://ops.gov.ph/records/eo_no356.htm accessed: November 17, 2007.

related skills (e.g. Digital Media Arts Program) for out-of-school adults, housewives, and other community members who wish to update their skills; eSkwela Centers There are currently 95 eSkwela Centers across the country, who have so far brought ICT-enhanced learning opportunities to more than 6,000 learners. The eSkwela program encourages a community-led approach, as reflected in the relevant program components: Content CICT and DepEd took on the role of converting the 340 ALS print modules into digital form, taking advantage of ICT features that otherwise are not present in its print counterpart. Additionally, 4 vocational / technical modules from TESDA are being developed also to be included in eSkwela as an extension program. Stakeholders Training DepEd is in the process of conducting a series of training courses for eSkwela Learning Facilitators and Network Administrators. A pool of trainors was formed from the local DepEd officers and staff (one trainor pool per region) and have undergone trainor's training with CICT, they in turn will train the would-be site implementers within their respective regions. Infrastructure This where the local community can come in as partners and provide support. Computer hardware, network peripherals, Internet connection, and allocation of space / room for the Center will be the conuterpart of the local community (LGU, DepEd Division Office, NGO, civic organization, faith-based groups, local businesses)

Distribution of responsibilities (addressing requirements) in eSkwela Center set-up

Requirement

DepEd (BALS, Regional Office)

DepEd Division Office

Local Partner (LGU, NGO, civic org, faith-based group, local business)

Content Training of Center staff Computers Space / room Monitoring and Evaluation

Plans for eSkwela Setup and Operations In order to realize the objective of setting-up an eSkwela in (insert name of proposed area), a detailed plan has been laid out, further subdivided into four stages, namely pre-implementation, preparation, and implementation. Stage 1: Pre Implementation Stage The (insert name of lead local partner) will spearhead the community mobilization through an orientation on the project and the opportunities where each group can come in as a supporter. It will organize a community mobilization meeting to be attended by the critical stakeholders: the Local Government Unit (LGU), the local Alternative Learning System (ALS) office. The participation of other local organizations (civic orgs, NGOs) is equally important; hence they will also be invited to participate in the initial community mobilization meeting. Stage 2: Preparation Stage After the community mobilization series of meeting, commitments from the stakeholders would have been fleshed out. (Insert the details of the support coming from the community which group/office/agency will provide what project component. Write in narrative and in table/chart form). Stage 3: Implementation Stage (this portion should include the following: schedule of learning sessions, IMs and Mobile Teachers, eSkwela site implementers, enrollment process, house rules, and the learning process with emphasis on the blended learning approach) COST ESTIMATE AND FINANCING PLAN The estimated cost of setting up an eSkwela Center in _________ is at (amount), with the cost breakdown below (adjust accordingly):
ITEM Computer workstations Server Scanner Printer (inkjet) QUANTITY 21 1 1 1 COST (unit) P15,000.00 20,000 5,000 7,500 TOTAL P300,000.00 20,000 5,000 7,500

Supplies (in detail, per item)

Utilities Electricity Internet (DSL)

Salaries/Honorarium Center Manager Network Administrator ALS Teachers

TOTAL

(please write how much you would ask for this proposal and for which component VERY IMPORTANT). It is also critical to write about the expected impact of an eSkwela Center in your community. You may mention the number of OSYAs who would benefit from this program, how they were given a fighting chance (opportunities to pursue higher education, get a job, or simply learn a new life skill) through the eSkwela project.

ORDINANCE NO. SP-______ S-2008 (PO2008-###)

ANNEX Q

AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING THE (NAME OF PROVINCE/MUNICIPALITY/CITY) ALTERNATIVE LEARNING PROGRAM THAT WILL PLAN AN D COORDINATE THE IMPLEMENTATION AND ADMINISTRATION FO THE MUNICIPALITY/CITYS ALTERNATIVE LEARNING SYSTEM ACCREDITATION AND EQUIVALENCY PROGRAM UNDER THE (i.e., LOCAL SCHOOL BOARD/OFFICE OF THE MAYOR/GOVERNOR) OF THIS (PROVINCE/MUNICIPALITY/CITY) AND APPROPRIATING NECESSARY FUNDS THEREFOR. Introduced by (Councilors/BM) Juan Dela Cruz, etc. etc. WHEREAS, it is a declared policy of the State provided under Section 2 of Republic Act 9155, The Governance of Basic Education Act of 2001, to protect and promote the right of all citizens to quality basic education and to make such education accessible to all by providing all Filipino children, a free and compulsory education in the elementary and high school levels. Such education shall also include alternative learning systems for out-of-school youth and adult learners. It shall be the goal of basic education to provide them with the skills, knowledge and values they need to become caring, self-reliant, productive and patriotic citizens; WHEREAS, Section 12.1 Rules XII of RA 9155 stipulates that the Alternative Learning System is a parallel learning system to provide a viable alternative to the existing formal education instruction, encompassing both the non-formal and informal sources of knowledge and skills; WHEREAS, there are people, due to financial and/other difficulties did not finish either elementary or secondary education, but express willingness to finish secondary education; WHEREAS, for the last 10 years the Department of Educations Bureau of Alternative Learning System (DepEd-BALS) intensified their Basic Literacy Program for non-literates and semi-literates as well as the Accreditation and Equivalency System (A&E) for elementary and secondary undergraduates. The A&E Program provides an alternative means of certification of learning which is parallel and comparable to the formal elementary and secondary schools; WHEREAS, Administrative Order No. 116 mandates all concerned government agencies and local government units to support the Alternative Learning System Accreditation and Equivalency (ALS A&E) that provides an alternative means of certification of learning to those Filipinos aged 15 years and above whoa re unable to avail of the formal school system or have dropped out of formal elementary and secondary education; WHEREAS, the ALS A&E can be acquired through varied learning support delivery system provided by a trained Instructional Manager (IM); WHEREAS, the eSkwela Project, a project of the CICT in partnership with DepEd-BALS, is a new mode of delivery system of the ALS that incorporates the power of ICT for education into non-formal education thru the establishment of community e-Learning centers that caters to out-of-school youth and adults; WHEREAS, the City Government has a pool of Instructional Managers, who have undergone trainings and had been certified by the Alternative Learning Division of Department of Education (Regional Office) as Instructional Manager of the ALS A&E; WHEREAS, the City Government having a pool of Instructional Managers has been awarded by the

Alternative Learning Division of the Department of Education National Capital Region as an accredited Service Provided of the ALS A&E through its two offices the Industrial Relations Office and Social Services Development Department. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BYTHE CITY COUNCIL OF (name of LGU) IN REGULAR SESSION ASSEMBLED: SECTION 1. There is herby established the (name of LGU) Alternative Learning Program under the Local School Board that will plan and coordinate the implementation and administration the Citys Alternative Learning System Accreditation and Equivalency Program. Further, the Instructional Managers who had undergone trainings and had been certified by the Alternative Learning Division of the Department of Education NCR and had been certified by the Alternative Learning Division of the Department of Education NCR, as Instructional Managers of the ALS A&E are hereby tasked to formulate Implementing Rules and Regulations immediately upon approval of the said ordinance in order to effect full compliance for the same. SECTION 2. Objectives/Purpose 1. Help the City Government in addressing the learning needs of the marginalized groups of the citys population including the deprived and underserved. 2. Generate awareness and support in term of resources between and among partner agencies, thus putting all efforts together for the benefit of out-of-school youth and adults including other marginalized group all over the City. 3. Establish network linkages with various organizations in delivering the Alternative Learning System (ALS) programs and project to a wider coverage. 4. City-wide promotion of the Alternative Learning System Accreditation and Equivalency as an alternative pathway of learning for people 15 years of age and above, who dropped out of the formal school system and who wish to finish primary and secondary education. 5. Identification and establishment of possible eSkwela Community e-Learning Center (eSkwela Center) in every barangay or community where the out-of-school youth and adult learners are provided alternative learning programs and receive accreditation for at least the equivalent of a high school education. 6. Act as Service Provider of the Alternative Learning Center. SECTION 3. Functions. As a Service Provider of the ALS A&E, the Instructional Managers under the supervision of IRO-PESO will have the following functions: 1. On Project Implementation: 1. Oversee the day to day operation of the project implementation of affiliate members contracted. 2. Establishment of the eSkwela Center and provision of all necessary equipment needed to run the said center, including the hiring of the qualified staff. 3. Provide learning support services for the specified number of learners as described in the

approved ALS A&E project proposal. 4. Undertake activities stipulated in the project to ensure effective implementation of the project. Project includes, but is not limited to, social mobilization activities, enrollment, conduct of learning support service, computer literacy of learners, assessing learner progress, counseling, regular monitoring evaluation, etc.) 2. On Program Administration: 1. Provide basic computer literacy courses and introductory courses to the eSkwela Courseware being utilized at the Center. 2. Provide diagnostic services to determine the level of competency of each learner. 3. Reproduce copies of ALS A&E learning materials, not yet included in the list of digitized ALS modules, for distribution to each individual learner based on learners specified needs. 4. Provide regular equipment maintenance and technical support to ensure continued operations. 5. Provide supplementary learning materials as part of its equity contribution based on expressed learning needs of the learners or as necessary. 6. Provide each learner with expendable supplies and materials such as plastic envelopes, paper and pencil. 7. Provide space within the learning center for the conduct of learning group sessions and storage of one complete set of learning materials per learning center and ensure the safekeeping and security of said learning center. 8. Prepare ALS A&E Learning Support delivery System (LSDS) project proposals. 9. Recruit Center Managers that will manage the day-to-day operations of the eSkwela Center. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Recruit additional Instructional Managers if necessary. Recruit learners in coordination with the Instructional Managers. Conduct social mobilization and advocacy activities. Monitor and evaluate the performance of Instructional Managers. Evaluate learners progress. Coordinate the printing and distribution of instructional materials. Networking and alliance building.

17. Submit program reports to DepEd-BALS District, Division, Regional, and BNFE offices. SECTION 4. Coverage. Fifteen (15) years old and above, out-of-school youth of (LGU). SECTION 5. Program Implementation. The first target beneficiaries/The first eSkwela Center or ALS

Learning Center will be established at the Poblacion area for reasons of accessibility for both learners and Instructional Managers. SECTION 6. Funding. An initial funding necessary for the operation shall be allocated and to be taken from the Special Education Fund or from any available funds of the City Treasury. SECTION 7. Effectivity. This Ordinance shall take effect fifteen (15) days after publication in newspaper of general circulation. ENACTED: (date)

(NAME OF PRESIDING OFFICER) Postion ATTESTED:

(NAME) Legislative Staff Officer APPROVED: (date)

(NAME OF MAYOR/GOVERNOR) Name of Municipality/City/Province CERTIFICATION This is to certify that this Ordinance which was APPROVED on Second Reading on (date) was finally PASSED on Third/Final Reading by the City Council on (date).

(NAME) Legislative Staff Officer

ANNEX R

ANNEX S Sample Budget Computation / Costing for setting up an eSkwela Center (computers excluded in computation; useful if raising funds for Center operational expenses) MODEL 1A Assumptions No. of PCs Sessions per day Operating days per week No. of Learners Sessions per week per learner Session months per year No. of ALS Teachers Transpo Fare (one-way) Electric Cost per PC Internet Connection Fee Supplies Cost per Learner Expenses Electricity Repair and Maintenance Internet Salary - Center Manager Salary - Lab Manager Salary - ALS (2) Supplies Transportation Total Expenses Cost per learner per month 4 2 5 40 2 10 2 Php30 Php500 Php1,000 Php15 MODEL 1B 10 2 5 100 2 10 4 Php30 Php500 Php2,000 Php15 MODEL 1B 20 2 5 200 2 10 4 Php30 Php500 Php2,000 Php15

Php2,000 500 1,000 13,000 10,500 21,000 600 480 49,080 Php1,227

Php5,000 Php10,000 1,000 1,000 2,000 2,000 13,000 13,000 10,500 10,500 42,000 42,000 1,500 3,000 480 480 75,480 81,980 Php755 Php410

Sample Budget Computation / Costing for setting up an eSkwela Center (computers have to be purchased; no shared facility in community that can be used for eSkwela)

Assumptions Number of Computers (workstations for learners) Sessions per day Operating days per week Sessions per week per learner Number of Learners Session months per year No. of ALS Teachers Transpo Fare (one-way) Electric Cost per PC Internet Connection Fee Supplies Cost per Learner

20 2 one session in the morning, one session in the afternoon 5 operating on weekdays 2 100 10 5 Php30 Php500 Php2,000 Php15

Expenses Recurring Electricity Repair and Maintenance Internet Salary - Center Manager Salary - Network Administrator Salary - ALS Supplies Transportation Total Cost per learner per month Infrastructure Computer Server Computer Workstations Wireless Adapters Wireless Router Computer Tables Airconditioning Units (2 units) Monobloc Chairs Renovation Total Cost per learner per month TOTAL COST (with Infra)

Php10,000 1,000 2,000 up to 2.0 Mbps 13,000 10,500 could be lower (Network Admin. can be part-time) 52,500 can be removed if ALS Teacher is receiving salary from DepEd/Service provider NGO 1,500 24,000 transpo to and from eSkwela Center (twice a week) 114,500 Php57,250

Php30,000 500,000 42,000 4,000 31,500 40,000 9,450 100,000.00 756,950 Php378,475 Php435,725

Sample Budget Computation / Costing for setting up an eSkwela Center (eSkwela will be integrated in an existing computer facility / lab in the community) MODEL 2A Assumptions No. of PCs Sessions per day Operating days per week No. of Learners Sessions per week per learner Session months per year No. of ALS Teachers Transpo Fare (one-way) Electric Cost per PC Internet Connection Fee Supplies Cost per Learner Expenses Electricity Internet Salary - Center Manager Salary - Lab Manager Salary - ALS (2) Supplies Transportation Total Expenses Cost per learner per month 4 1 5 20 2 10 2 Php30 Php250 Php500 Php15 MODEL 2B 10 1 5 50 2 10 4 Php30 Php250 Php1,000 Php15 MODEL 2B 20 1 5 100 2 10 4 Php30 Php250 Php1,000 Php15

Php1,000 500 13,000 10,500 21,000 300 480 46,780 Php2,339

Php2,500 1,000 13,000 10,500 42,000 750 480 70,230 Php1,405

Php5,000 1,000 13,000 10,500 42,000 1,500 480 73,480 Php735

ANNEX U

COMMISSION ON INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY CICT-NCC Building, Carlos P. Garcia Avenue, Diliman 1101 Quezon City, Philippines Telefax (632) 920.7412 Trunk Line (632) 920.0101 local 201

www.cict.gov.ph
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BUREAU OF ALTERNATIVE LEARNING SYSTEM DepEd Complex, Meralco Ave., Pasig City Telephone Number: (632) 632-1361 to 71

www.deped.gov.ph

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