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HP OpenView Performance Agents Metrics Help Text

Copyright (c) 2000-2002 Hewlett-Packard Company, Inc. All rights reserved.


Please note that not all of the Coda metrics are available on all of the supported platforms and OS versions. GLOBAL Metrics: GBL_ACTIVE_CPU GBL_BOOT_TIME GBL_COLLECTOR GBL_CPU_CLOCK GBL_CPU_IDLE_TIME GBL_CPU_IDLE_UTIL GBL_CPU_SYS_MODE_TIME GBL_CPU_SYS_MODE_UTIL GBL_CPU_TOTAL_TIME GBL_CPU_TOTAL_UTIL GBL_CPU_USER_MODE_TIME GBL_CPU_USER_MODE_UTIL GBL_DISK_PHYS_BYTE GBL_DISK_PHYS_BYTE_RATE GBL_DISK_PHYS_IO GBL_DISK_PHYS_IO_RATE GBL_FS_SPACE_UTIL_PEAK GBL_GMTOFFSET GBL_INTERRUPT GBL_INTERRUPT_RATE GBL_INTERVAL GBL_MACHINE GBL_MACHINE_MODEL GBL_MEM_PAGEIN GBL_MEM_PAGEIN_RATE GBL_MEM_PAGEOUT GBL_MEM_PAGEOUT_RATE GBL_MEM_PG_SCAN GBL_MEM_PG_SCAN_RATE GBL_MEM_PHYS GBL_MEM_SWAPIN_BYTE GBL_MEM_SWAPIN_BYTE_RATE GBL_MEM_SWAPOUT_BYTE GBL_MEM_SWAPOUT_BYTE_RATE GBL_MEM_UTIL

GBL_NET_COLLISION GBL_NET_COLLISION_RATE GBL_NET_ERROR GBL_NET_ERROR_RATE GBL_NET_IN_PACKET GBL_NET_IN_PACKET_RATE GBL_NET_OUT_PACKET GBL_NET_OUT_PACKET_RATE GBL_NUM_CPU GBL_NUM_DISK GBL_NUM_NETWORK GBL_NUM_USER GBL_OSNAME GBL_OSRELEASE GBL_OSVERSION GBL_RUN_QUEUE GBL_STARTED_PROC GBL_STARTED_PROC_RATE GBL_STATTIME GBL_SWAP_SPACE_AVAIL GBL_SWAP_SPACE_USED GBL_SWAP_SPACE_UTIL GBL_SYSCALL GBL_SYSCALL_RATE GBL_SYSTEM_ID TBL_FILE_TABLE_AVAIL TBL_FILE_TABLE_USED TBL_FILE_TABLE_UTIL TBL_MSG_TABLE_AVAIL TBL_MSG_TABLE_USED TBL_MSG_TABLE_UTIL TBL_PROC_TABLE_AVAIL TBL_PROC_TABLE_USED TBL_PROC_TABLE_UTIL TBL_SEM_TABLE_AVAIL TBL_SEM_TABLE_USED TBL_SEM_TABLE_UTIL TBL_SHMEM_TABLE_AVAIL TBL_SHMEM_TABLE_USED TBL_SHMEM_TABLE_UTIL CPU (Processor) Metrics: BYCPU_CPU_CLOCK BYCPU_CPU_SYS_MODE_TIME BYCPU_CPU_SYS_MODE_UTIL BYCPU_CPU_TOTAL_TIME BYCPU_CPU_TOTAL_UTIL BYCPU_CPU_USER_MODE_TIME BYCPU_CPU_USER_MODE_UTIL

BYCPU_ID BYCPU_INTERRUPT BYCPU_INTERRUPT_RATE DISK Metrics: BYDSK_BUSY_TIME BYDSK_DEVNAME BYDSK_ID BYDSK_PHYS_BYTE BYDSK_PHYS_BYTE_RATE BYDSK_PHYS_IO BYDSK_PHYS_IO_RATE BYDSK_PHYS_READ BYDSK_PHYS_READ_BYTE BYDSK_PHYS_READ_BYTE_RATE BYDSK_PHYS_READ_RATE BYDSK_PHYS_WRITE BYDSK_PHYS_WRITE_BYTE BYDSK_PHYS_WRITE_BYTE_RATE BYDSK_PHYS_WRITE_RATE BYDSK_UTIL NETIF (Network Interface) Metrics: BYNETIF_COLLISION BYNETIF_COLLISION_RATE BYNETIF_ERROR BYNETIF_ERROR_RATE BYNETIF_ID BYNETIF_IN_BYTE BYNETIF_IN_BYTE_RATE BYNETIF_IN_PACKET BYNETIF_IN_PACKET_RATE BYNETIF_NAME BYNETIF_OUT_BYTE BYNETIF_OUT_BYTE_RATE BYNETIF_OUT_PACKET BYNETIF_OUT_PACKET_RATE FS (File System) Metrics: FS_BLOCK_SIZE FS_DEVNAME FS_DEVNO FS_DIRNAME FS_FRAG_SIZE FS_INODE_UTIL FS_MAX_INODES FS_MAX_SIZE FS_SPACE_RESERVED FS_SPACE_USED FS_SPACE_UTIL

FS_TYPE Metric Definitions GBL_COLLECTOR An ASCII string containing the collector name and version. GBL_INTERVAL The amount of time in the interval. This measured interval is slightly larger than the desired or configured interval if the collection program is delayed by a higher priority process and cannot sample the data immediately. GBL_OSNAME A string representing the name of the operating system. This is the same as the output from the 'uname -s' command. GBL_OSVERSION A string representing the version of the operating system. This is the same as the output from the 'uname -v' command. This string is limited to 20 characters, therefore the complete version name might be truncated. On Windows, this is a string representing the service pack installed on the operating system. GBL_OSRELEASE The current release of the operating system. This is the same as the output from the 'uname -r' command. GBL_SYSTEM_ID The network node hostname of the system. This is the same as the output from the 'uname -n' command. GBL_MACHINE A text string representing the type of computer as returned by the 'uname -m' command. GBL_NUM_CPU The number of CPUs physically on the system. This includes all CPUs, either online or offline. For HP-UX and certain versions of Linux, the sar(1M) command allows you to check the status of the system CPUs.

For SUN and DEC, the commands psrinfo(1M) and psradm(1M) allow you to check or change the status of the system CPUs. GBL_MEM_PHYS The amount of physical memory in the system (in KBs unless otherwise specified). On HP-UX, banks with bad memory are not counted. Note that on some machines, the Processor Dependent Code (PDC) code uses the upper 1MB of memory and thus reports less than the actual physical memory of the system. Thus, on a system with 256MB of physical memory, this metric and dmesg(1M) might only report 267,386,880 bytes (255MB). This is all the physical memory that software on the machine can access. On Windows NT, this is the total memory available, which may be slightly less than the total amount of physical memory present in the system. This value is also reported in the Control Panel's About Windows NT help topic. GBL_NUM_DISK The number of disks on the system. Only local disk devices are counted in this metric. GBL_NUM_NETWORK The number of network interfaces on the system. This includes the loopback interface. On certain platforms, this also include FDDI, Hyperfabric, ATM, Serial Software interfaces such as SLIP or PPP, and Wide Area Network interfaces (WAN) such as ISDN or X.25. The 'netstat -i' command also displays the list of network interfaces on the system. GBL_CPU_CLOCK The clock speed of the CPUs in MHz if all of the processors have the same clock speed. Otherwise, 'N/A' is shown if the processors have different clock speeds. GBL_MACHINE_MODEL The CPU model. This is similar to the information returned by the GBL_MACHINE metric and the uname command. However, this metric returns more information on some processors. On HP-UX, this is the same information returned by the model command. GBL_STATTIME An ASCII string representing the time at the end of the interval, based on local time. GBL_BOOT_TIME

The date and time when the system was last booted. GBL_GMTOFFSET The difference, in minutes, between local time and GMT (Greenwich Mean Time). GBL_ACTIVE_CPU The number of CPUs online on the system. For HP-UX and certain versions of Linux, the sar(1M) command allows you to check the status of the system CPUs. For SUN and DEC, the commands psrinfo(1M) and psradm(1M) allow you to check or change the status of the system CPUs. For AIX, the pstat(1) command allows you to check the status of the system CPUs. GBL_RUN_QUEUE The average number of 'runnable' processes during the interval. GBL_RUN_QUEUE is normally a very small number. Larger than normal values for this metric indicate CPU contention among processes. This CPU bottleneck is also normally indicated by 100 percent GBL_CPU_TOTAL_UTIL. It may be OK to have GBL_CPU_TOTAL_UTIL be 100 percent if no other processes are waiting for the CPU. However, if GBL_CPU_TOTAL_UTIL is 100 percent and GBL_RUN_QUEUE is greater than the number of processors, it indicates a CPU bottleneck. GBL_NUM_USER The number of users logged in at the time of the interval sample. This is the same as the command 'who | wc -l'. For Unix systems, the information for this metric comes from the utmp file which is updated by the login command. For more information, read the man page for utmp. Some applications may create users on the system without using login and updating the utmp file. These users are not reflected in this count. This metric can be a general indicator of system usage. In a networked environment, however, users may maintain inactive logins on several systems. On Windows systems, the information for this metric comes from the Server Sessions counter in the Performance Libraries Server object. It is a count of the number of users using this machine as a file server. GBL_SYSCALL The number of system calls during the interval.

High system call rates are normal on busy systems, especially with IO intensive applications. Abnormally high system call rates may indicate problems such as a 'hung' terminal that is stuck in a loop generating read system calls. GBL_SYSCALL_RATE The average number of system calls per second during the interval. High system call rates are normal on busy systems, especially with IO intensive applications. Abnormally high system call rates may indicate problems such as a 'hung' terminal that is stuck in a loop generating read system calls. GBL_STARTED_PROC The number of processes that started during the interval. GBL_STARTED_PROC_RATE The number of processes that started per second during the interval. GBL_CPU_SYS_MODE_TIME The time, in seconds, that the CPU was in system mode during the interval. On a system with multiple CPUs, this metric is normalized. That is, the CPU used over all processors is divided by the number of processors online. This represents the usage of the total processing capacity available. GBL_CPU_USER_MODE_TIME The time, in seconds, that the CPU was in user mode during the interval. On a system with multiple CPUs, this metric is normalized. That is, the CPU used over all processors is divided by the number of processors online. This represents the usage of the total processing capacity available. GBL_CPU_TOTAL_TIME The total time, in seconds, that the CPU was not idle in the interval. This is calculated as
GBL_CPU_TOTAL_TIME = GBL_CPU_USER_MODE_TIME + GBL_CPU_SYS_MODE_TIME

On a system with multiple CPUs, this metric is normalized. That is, the CPU used over all processors is divided by the number of processors online. This represents the usage of the total processing capacity available.

GBL_CPU_IDLE_TIME The time, in seconds, that the CPU was idle during the interval. On a system with multiple CPUs, this metric is normalized. That is, the CPU used over all processors is divided by the number of processors online. GBL_CPU_SYS_MODE_UTIL Percentage of time the CPU was in system mode during the interval. A process operates in either system mode (also called kernel mode on Unix or privileged mode on Windows) or user mode. When a process requests services from the operating system with a system call, it switches into the machine's privileged protection mode and runs in system mode. This metric is a subset of the GBL_CPU_TOTAL_UTIL percentage. This is NOT a measure of the amount of time used by system daemon processes, since most system daemons spend part of their time in user mode and part in system calls, like any other process. On a system with multiple CPUs, this metric is normalized. That is, the CPU used over all processors is divided by the number of processors online. This represents the usage of the total processing capacity available. High system mode CPU percentages are normal for IO intensive applications. Abnormally high system mode CPU percentages can indicate that a hardware problem is causing a high interrupt rate. It can also indicate programs that are not calling system calls efficiently. GBL_CPU_USER_MODE_UTIL The percentage of time the CPU was in user mode during the interval. This metric is a subset of the GBL_CPU_TOTAL_UTIL percentage. On a system with multiple CPUs, this metric is normalized. That is, the CPU used over all processors is divided by the number of processors online. This represents the usage of the total processing capacity available. High user mode CPU percentages are normal for computation-intensive applications. Low values of user CPU utilization compared to relatively high values for GBL_CPU_SYS_MODE_UTIL can indicate an application or hardware problem. GBL_CPU_TOTAL_UTIL Percentage of time the CPU was not idle during the interval. This is calculated as

GBL_CPU_TOTAL_UTIL = GBL_CPU_USER_MODE_UTIL + GBL_CPU_SYS_MODE_UTIL

On a system with multiple CPUs, this metric is normalized. That is, the CPU used over all processors is divided by the number of processors online. This represents the usage of the total processing capacity available.
GBL_CPU_TOTAL_UTIL + GBL_CPU_IDLE_UTIL = 100%

This metric varies widely on most systems, depending on the workload. A consistently high CPU utilization can indicate a CPU bottleneck, especially when other indicators such as GBL_RUN_QUEUE are also high. High CPU utilization can also occur on systems that are bottlenecked on memory, because the CPU spends more time paging and swapping. GBL_CPU_IDLE_UTIL The percentage of time that the CPU was idle during the interval. On a system with multiple CPUs, this metric is normalized. That is, the CPU used over all processors is divided by the number of processors online. GBL_DISK_PHYS_IO The number of physical IOs during the interval. Only local disks are counted in this measurement. NFS devices are excluded. On Unix systems, this includes all types of physical reads and writes to and from disk, including file system IO, virtual memory IO and raw IO. GBL_DISK_PHYS_IO_RATE The number of physical IOs per second during the interval. Only local disks are counted in this measurement. NFS devices are excluded. On Unix systems, this includes all types of physical reads and writes to and from disk, including file system IO, virtual memory IO and raw IO. GBL_DISK_PHYS_BYTE The number of KBs transferred to and from disks during the interval. The bytes for all types of physical IOs are counted. Only local disks are counted in this measurement. NFS devices are excluded. On Unix systems, this includes file system IO, virtual memory IO, and raw IO. GBL_DISK_PHYS_BYTE_RATE The average number of KBs per second at which data was transferred to and from disks during the

interval. The bytes for all types of physical IOs are counted. Only local disks are counted in this measurement. NFS devices are excluded. This is a measure of the physical data transfer rate. It is not directly related to the number of IOs, since IO requests can be of differing lengths. This is an indicator of how much data is being transferred to and from disk devices. Large spikes in this metric can indicate a disk bottleneck. On Unix systems, this includes file system IO, virtual memory IO, and raw IO. GBL_FS_SPACE_UTIL_PEAK The percentage of occupied disk space to total disk space for the fullest file system found during the interval. Only locally mounted file systems are counted in this metric. This metric can be used as an indicator that at least one file system on the system is running out of disk space. On Unix systems, CDROM and PC file systems are also excluded. This metric can exceed 100 percent. This is because a portion of the file system space is reserved as a buffer and can only be used by root. If the root user has made the file system grow beyond the reserved buffer, the utilization will be greater than 100 percent. This is a dangerous situation since if the root user totally fills the file system, the system may crash. GBL_INTERRUPT The number of IO interrupts during the interval. GBL_INTERRUPT_RATE The average number of IO interrupts per second during the interval. GBL_MEM_PAGEIN The number of disk blocks paged into memory from the disk during the interval. This includes pages paged in from paging space and from the file system. GBL_MEM_PAGEIN_RATE The total number of disk blocks paged into memory per second from the disk during the interval. This includes pages paged in from paging space and from the file system. GBL_MEM_PAGEOUT The total number of page outs to the disk during the interval. This includes pages paged out to paging space and to the file system. GBL_MEM_PAGEOUT_RATE

The total number of page outs to the disk per second during the interval. This includes pages paged out to paging space and to the file system. On HP-UX 11i, the value shown is forced page outs initiated by vhand that are due to memory pressure. For HP-UX 11.0, the page out activity may include memory mapped IOs on some file systems (for example, VxFS). On Windows, this counter also includes paging traffic on behalf of the system cache to access file data for applications and so may be high when there is no memory pressure. GBL_MEM_UTIL The percentage of physical memory in use during the interval. This includes system memory (occupied by the kernel, buffer cache, and user memory. On HP-UX, this calculation is done using the byte values for physical memory and used memory, and is therefore more accurate than comparing the reported kilobyte values for physical memory and used memory. GBL_MEM_PG_SCAN The number of pages scanned by the pageout daemon during the interval. The clock hand algorithm is used to control page aging of the system. GBL_MEM_PG_SCAN_RATE The number of pages scanned per second by the pageout daemon during the interval. The clock hand algorithm is used to control page aging of the system. GBL_SWAP_SPACE_AVAIL The total amount of potential swap space, in MB. On HP-UX, this is the sum of the device swap areas enabled by the swapon command, the allocated size of any file system swap areas, and the allocated size of pseudo swap in memory if enabled. Note that this is potential swap space. This is the same as (AVAIL: total) as reported by the 'swapinfo -mt' command. On SUN, this is the total amount of swap space available from the physical backing store devices (disks) plus the amount currently available from main memory. This is the same as (used + available) /1024, reported by the 'swap -s' command. On Linux, this is same as (Swap: total) as reported by the 'free -m' command. GBL_SWAP_SPACE_USED The amount of swap space used, in MB.

On HP-UX, 'Used' indicates written to disk (or locked in memory), rather than reserved. This is the same as (USED: total - reserve) as reported by the 'swapinfo -mt' command. On SUN, 'Used' indicates amount written to disk (or locked in memory), rather than reserved. Swap space is reserved (by decrementing a counter) when virtual memory for a program is created. This is the same as (bytes allocated)/1024, reported by the 'swap -s' command. On Linux, this is same as (Swap: used) as reported by the 'free -m' command. GBL_SWAP_SPACE_UTIL The percent of available swap space that was being used by running processes in the interval. This metric is a measure of capacity rather than performance. As this metric nears 100 percent, processes are not able to allocate any more memory and new processes may not be able to run. Very low swap utilization values may indicate that too much area has been allocated to swap, and better use of disk space could be made by reallocating some swap partitions to be user filesystems. GBL_MEM_SWAPIN_BYTE The number of KBs transferred in from disk due to swap ins (or reactivations on HP-UX) during the interval. GBL_MEM_SWAPOUT_BYTE The number of KBs transferred out to disk due to swap outs (or deactivations on HP-UX) during the interval. GBL_MEM_SWAPIN_BYTE_RATE The number of KBs per second transferred from disk due to swap ins (or deactivations on HP-UX) during the interval. GBL_MEM_SWAPOUT_BYTE_RATE The number of KBs per second transferred out to disk due to swap outs (or reactivations on HP-UX) during the interval. GBL_NET_IN_PACKET The number of successful packets received through all network interfaces during the interval. Successful packets are those that have been processed without errors. For HP-UX 10.20 and earlier releases, and other Unix systems, this is the same as the sum of the 'Ipkts' column from the 'netstat -i' command for the network devices. See also netstat(1). For HP-UX 11.0 and beyond, this metric will be the same as the sum of the 'Inbound Unicast Packets' and 'Inbound Non-Unicast Packets' values from the output of the 'lanadmin' utility for the network

interfaces. Remember that 'lanadmin' reports cumulative counts. For this release and beyond, 'netstat -i' shows network activity on the logical level (IP) only. On Linux, this is the same as the sum of the (RX packets: or RX-OK) entries from the 'netstat -i' command for the network devices. See also netstat(1). GBL_NET_IN_PACKET_RATE The number of successful packets per second received through all network interfaces during the interval. Successful packets are those that have been processed without errors. GBL_NET_OUT_PACKET The number of successful packets sent through all network interfaces during the last interval. Successful packets are those that have been processed without errors or collisions. For HP-UX 10.20 and earlier releases, and other Unix systems, this is the same as the sum of the 'Opkts' column from the 'netstat -i' command for the network devices. See also netstat(1). For HP-UX 11.0 and beyond, this metric will be the same as the sum of the 'Outbound Unicast Packets' and 'Outbound Non-Unicast Packets' values from the output of the 'lanadmin' utility for the network interfaces. Remember that 'lanadmin' reports cumulative counts. For this release and beyond, 'netstat -i' shows network activity on the logical level (IP) only. On Linux, this is the same as the sum of the (TX packets: or TX-OK) entries from the 'netstat -i' command for the network devices. See also netstat(1). GBL_NET_OUT_PACKET_RATE The number of successful packets per second sent through the network interfaces during the interval. Successful packets are those that have been processed without errors or collisions. GBL_NET_COLLISION The number of collisions that occurred on all network interfaces during the interval. A rising rate of collisions versus outbound packets is an indication that the network is becoming increasingly congested. This metric does not include deferred packets. For HP-UX 10.20 and earlier releases, and other Unix systems, this is the same as the sum of the 'Coll' (or collisions) column from the 'netstat -i' command for the network devices. See also netstat (1). For HP-UX 11.0 and beyond, this metric will be the same as the sum of the 'Single Collision Frames', 'Multiple Collision Frames', 'Late Collisions', and 'Excessive Collisions' values from the output of the 'lanadmin' utility for the network interfaces. Remember that 'lanadmin' reports cumulative counts. For this release and beyond, 'netstat -i' shows network activity on the logical level (IP) only. GBL_NET_COLLISION_RATE

The number of collisions per second that occurred on all network interfaces during the interval. A rising rate of collisions versus outbound packets is an indication that the network is becoming increasingly congested. This metric does not include deferred packets. GBL_NET_ERROR The number of errors that occurred on all network interfaces during the interval. For HP-UX 10.20 and earlier releases, and other Unix systems, this is the same as the sum of 'Ierrs' and 'Oerrs' from the 'netstat -i' command for the network devices. See also netstat(1). For HP-UX 11.0 and beyond, this metric will be the same as the sum of the 'Inbound Errors' and 'Outbound Errors' values from the output of the 'lanadmin' utility for the network interfaces. Remember that 'lanadmin' reports cumulative counts. For this release and beyond, 'netstat -i' shows network activity on the logical level (IP) only. On Linux, this is the same as the sum of the (RX errors: or RX-ERR) and (TX errors: or TX-ERR) entries from the 'netstat -i' command for the network devices. See also netstat(1). GBL_NET_ERROR_RATE The number of errors per second on all network interfaces during the interval. TBL_PROC_TABLE_AVAIL The configured maximum number of the proc table entries used by the kernel to manage processes. This number includes both free and used entries. On HP-UX, this is set by the NPROC value during system generation. AIX has a 'dynamic' proc table, which means the avail has been set higher than should ever be needed. TBL_PROC_TABLE_USED The number of entries in the proc table currently used by processes. TBL_PROC_TABLE_UTIL The percentage of proc table entries currently used by processes. TBL_SHMEM_TABLE_AVAIL The configured number of shared memory segments that can be allocated on the system. TBL_SHMEM_TABLE_USED The number of shared memory segments currently in use.

On Unix systems, a shared memory segment is allocated by a program using the shmget(2) call. Also refer to ipcs(1). On Unix systems (excluding HP-UX), this metric shows the number of shared memory segments that have been built. This includes shared memory segments with no processes attached to them. TBL_SHMEM_TABLE_UTIL The percentage of configured shared memory segments currently in use. TBL_MSG_TABLE_AVAIL The configured maximum number of message queues that can be allocated on the system. A message queue is allocated by a program using the msgget(2) call. Also refer to ipcs(1). TBL_MSG_TABLE_USED The number of message queues currently in use. A message queue is allocated by a program using the msgget(2) call. See ipcs(1) to list the message queues. On SUN and DEC, this metric shows the number of message queues that have been built. TBL_MSG_TABLE_UTIL The percentage of configured message queues currently in use. TBL_SEM_TABLE_AVAIL The configured number of semaphore identifiers (sets) that can be allocated on the system. TBL_SEM_TABLE_USED The number of semaphore identifiers currently in use. A semaphore identifier is allocated by a program using the semget(2) call. See ipcs(1) to list semaphores. On SUN, AIX, and DEC, this metric shows the number of semaphore identifiers that have been built. TBL_SEM_TABLE_UTIL The percentage of configured semaphores identifiers currently in use. TBL_FILE_TABLE_AVAIL The configured maximum number of the file table entries used by the kernel to manage open file

descriptors. On HP-UX, this is the sum of the 'nfile' and 'file_pad' values used in kernel generation. On SUN, this is the number of entries in the file cache. All entries are not always in use. The cache size is dynamic. Entries in this cache are used to manage open file descriptors. They are reused as files are closed and new ones are opened. The size of the cache will go up or down in chunks as more or less space is required in the cache. On AIX, the file table entries are dynamically allocated by the kernel if there is no entry available. These entries are allocated in chunks. TBL_FILE_TABLE_USED The number of entries in the file table currently used by file descriptors. On SUN, this is the number of file cache entries currently used by file descriptors. TBL_FILE_TABLE_UTIL The percentage of file table entries currently used by file descriptors. On SUN, this is the percentage of file cache entries currently used by file descriptors. BYCPU_ID The ID number of this CPU. CPUs are typically sequentially numbered, but may not start at zero. BYCPU_CPU_CLOCK The clock speed of the CPU in the current slot. The clock speed is in MHz for the selected processor. BYCPU_INTERRUPT The number of IO interrupts during the interval. BYCPU_INTERRUPT_RATE The average number of IO interrupts per second during the interval. BYCPU_CPU_USER_MODE_TIME The time, in seconds, during the interval that this CPU was in user mode. On Unix systems, this is a sum of time spent in user mode at normal and nice priorities. BYCPU_CPU_SYS_MODE_TIME The time, in seconds, that this CPU was in system mode during the interval.

BYCPU_CPU_TOTAL_TIME The total time, in seconds, that this CPU was not idle during the interval. BYCPU_CPU_USER_MODE_UTIL The percentage of time that this CPU was in user mode during the interval. On Unix systems, this is a sum of time spent in user mode at normal and nice priorities. BYCPU_CPU_SYS_MODE_UTIL The percentage of time that this CPU was in system mode during the interval. BYCPU_CPU_TOTAL_UTIL The percentage of time that this CPU was not idle during the interval. BYNETIF_ID The ID number of the network interface. BYNETIF_NAME The name of the network interface. On the Unix systems, these are the same names that appear in the 'Name' (or first) column of the 'netstat -i' command. BYNETIF_IN_BYTE The number of bytes received from the network via this interface during the interval. Only the bytes in packets that carry data are included in this rate. BYNETIF_OUT_BYTE The number of bytes sent to the network via this interface during the interval. Only the bytes in packets that carry data are included in this rate. BYNETIF_IN_PACKET The number of successful physical packets received through the network interface during the interval. Successful packets are those that have been processed without errors or collisions. For HP-UX 10.20 and earlier releases, and other Unix systems, this is the same as the sum of the 'Ipkts' column from the 'netstat -i' command for a network device. See also netstat(1). For HP-UX 11.0 and beyond, this metric will be the same as the sum of the 'Inbound Unicast Packets'

and 'Inbound Non-Unicast Packets' values from the output of the 'lanadmin' utility for the network interface. Remember that 'lanadmin' reports cumulative counts. For this release and beyond, 'netstat i' shows network activity on the logical level (IP) only. On Linux, this is the same as the sum of the (RX packets:) entries from the 'netstat -i' command for a network device. See also netstat(1). BYNETIF_IN_PACKET_RATE The number of successful physical packets per second received through the network interface during the interval. Successful packets are those that have been processed without errors or collisions. BYNETIF_OUT_PACKET The number of successful physical packets sent through the network interface during the interval. Successful packets are those that have been processed without errors or collisions. For HP-UX 10.20 and earlier releases, and other Unix systems, this is the same as the sum of the 'Opkts' column from the 'netstat -i' command for a network device. See also netstat(1). For HP-UX 11.0 and beyond, this metric will be the same as the sum of the 'Outbound Unicast Packets' and 'Outbound Non-Unicast Packets' values from the output of the 'lanadmin' utility for the network interface. Remember that 'lanadmin' reports cumulative counts. For this release and beyond, 'netstat -i' shows network activity on the logical level (IP) only. On Linux, this is the same as the sum of the (TX packets:) entries from the 'netstat -i' command for a network device. See also netstat(1). BYNETIF_OUT_PACKET_RATE The number of successful physical packets per second sent through the network interface during the interval. Successful packets are those that have been processed without errors or collisions. BYNETIF_COLLISION The number of physical collisions that occurred on the network interface during the interval. A rising rate of collisions versus outbound packets is an indication that the network is becoming increasingly congested. This metric does not currently include deferred packets. This data is not collected for non-broadcasting devices, such as loopback (lo), and is always zero. For HP-UX 10.20 and earlier releases, and other Unix systems, this is the same as the sum of the 'Coll' (or collisions) column from the 'netstat -i' command for a network device. See also netstat(1). For HP-UX 11.0 and beyond, this metric will be the same as the sum of the 'Single Collision Frames', 'Multiple Collision Frames', 'Late Collisions', and 'Excessive Collisions' values from the output of the 'lanadmin' utility for the network interface. Remember that 'lanadmin' reports cumulative counts. For this release and beyond, 'netstat -i' shows network activity on the logical level (IP) only.

BYNETIF_COLLISION_RATE The number of physical collisions per second on the network interface during the interval. A rising rate of collisions versus outbound packets is an indication that the network is becoming increasingly congested. This metric does not currently include deferred packets. This data is not collected for non-broadcasting devices, such as loopback (lo), and is always zero. BYNETIF_ERROR The number of physical errors that occurred on the network interface during the interval. An increasing number of errors may indicate a hardware problem in the network. For HP-UX 10.20 and earlier releases, and other Unix systems, this is the same as the sum of 'Ierrs' and 'Oerrs' from the 'netstat -i' command for a network device. See also netstat(1). For HP-UX 11.0 and beyond, this metric will be the same as the sum of the 'Inbound Errors' and 'Outbound Errors' values from the output of the 'lanadmin' utility for the network interface. Remember that 'lanadmin' reports cumulative counts. For this release and beyond, 'netstat -i' shows network activity on the logical level (IP) only. On Linux, this is the same as the sum of the (RX errors: or RX-ERR) and (TX errors: or TX-ERR) entries from the 'netstat -i' command for a network device. See also netstat(1). BYNETIF_ERROR_RATE The number of physical errors per second on the network interface during the interval. BYNETIF_IN_BYTE_RATE The number of bytes per second received from the network via this interface during the interval. Only the bytes in packets that carry data are included in this rate. BYNETIF_OUT_BYTE_RATE The number of bytes per second sent to the network via this interface during the interval. Only the bytes in packets that carry data are included in this rate. FS_DEVNO On Unix systems, this is the major and minor number of the file system. On Windows, this is the unit number of the disk device on which the logical disk resides. FS_DEVNAME The path name string of the current device.

On HP-UX, this is the 'fsname' parameter in the mount(1M) command. For NFS devices, this includes the name of the node exporting the file system. On SUN, this is the path name string of the current device, or 'tmpfs' for memory based file systems. See tmpfs(7). FS_DIRNAME The path name of the mount point of the file system. On the Unix systems, see mount(1M) and mnttab(4), tmpfs(7) on SUN, and filesystems(4) on AIX. On Windows, this is the drive letter associated with the selected disk partition. FS_TYPE A string indicating the file system type. On Unix systems, some of the possible types are: hfs - user file system ufs - user file system ext2 - user file system nfs - network file system cdfs - CD-ROM file system vxfs - Veritas (vxfs) file system nfs - network file system nfs3 - network file system Version 3 FS_BLOCK_SIZE The maximum block size of this file system, in KB. FS_FRAG_SIZE The fundamental file system block size, in KB. FS_MAX_SIZE Maximum number that this file system could obtain if full, in MB. FS_SPACE_UTIL Percentage of the file system space in use during the interval. FS_MAX_INODES Number of configured file system inodes. FS_INODE_UTIL

Percentage of the inodes for this file system that were in use during the interval. FS_SPACE_USED The amount of file system space in MBs that is being used. FS_SPACE_RESERVED The amount of file system space in MBs reserved for superuser allocation. BYDSK_ID The ID of the current disk device. BYDSK_DEVNAME The name of this disk device. On HP-UX, the name identifying the specific disk spindle is the hardware path which specifies the address of the hardware components leading to the disk device. On SUN, for CDs and disks, this is the device name compliant with the SVR4 Interface Definition and the slice (partition) number is replaced with an asterisk. An example of a device name is 'c0t3d0s*'. These names are the same disk names displayed by 'iostat'. On AIX, the path name string of this disk device. This is the fsname parameter in the mount(1M) command. If more than one file system is contained on a device (that is, the device is partitioned), this is indicated by an asterisk ('*') at the end of the path name. On DEC, this is the file-system parameter in the mount(1M) command. On Windows, this is the unit number of this disk device. BYDSK_PHYS_READ The number of physical reads for this disk device during the interval. On AIX, this is an estimated value based on the ratio of read bytes to total bytes transferred. The actual number of reads is not tracked by the kernel. This is computed as
BYDSK_PHYS_READ = BYDSK_PHYS_IO * (BYDSK_PHYS_READ_BYTE / BYDSK_PHYS_IO_BYTE)

BYDSK_PHYS_WRITE The number of physical writes for this disk device during the interval.

On AIX, this is an estimated value based on the ratio of write bytes to total bytes transferred because the actual number of writes is not tracked by the kernel. This is computed as
BYDSK_PHYS_WRITE = BYDSK_PHYS_IO * (BYDSK_PHYS_WRITE_BYTE / BYDSK_PHYS_IO_BYTE)

BYDSK_PHYS_READ_BYTE The KBs transferred from this disk device during the interval. On Unix systems, this includes all types of physical disk reads, including file system, virtual memory, and raw reads. BYDSK_PHYS_WRITE_BYTE The KBs transferred to this disk device during the interval. On Unix systems, this includes all types of physical disk writes including file system, virtual memory, and raw writes. BYDSK_PHYS_BYTE The KBs transferred to or from this disk device during the interval. On Unix systems, this includes all types of physical disk IOs including file system, virtual memory, and raw IOs. BYDSK_PHYS_IO The number of physical IOs for this disk device during the interval. On Unix systems, this includes all types of physical reads and writes to and from disk, including file system IO, virtual memory IO and raw IO. BYDSK_PHYS_READ_BYTE_RATE The average KBs per second transferred from this disk device during the interval. On Unix systems, this includes all types of physical disk reads, including file system, virtual memory, and raw reads. BYDSK_PHYS_WRITE_BYTE_RATE The average KBs per second transferred to this disk device during the interval. On Unix systems, this includes all types of physical disk writes including file system, virtual memory, and raw writes.

BYDSK_PHYS_BYTE_RATE The average KBs per second transferred to or from this disk device during the interval. On Unix systems, this includes all types of physical disk IOs including file system, virtual memory, and raw IOs. BYDSK_PHYS_IO_RATE The average number of physical IO requests per second for this disk device during the interval. On Unix systems, this includes all types of physical reads and writes to and from disk, including file system IO, virtual memory IO and raw IO. BYDSK_PHYS_READ_RATE The average number of physical reads per second for this disk device during the interval. On Unix systems, this includes all types of physical disk reads, including file system, virtual memory, and raw reads. BYDSK_PHYS_WRITE_RATE The average number of physical writes per second for this disk device during the interval. On Unix systems, this includes all types of physical disk writes including file system, virtual memory, and raw writes. BYDSK_BUSY_TIME The time, in seconds, that this disk device was busy transferring data during the interval. On HP-UX, this is the time, in seconds, during the interval that the disk device had IO in progress from the point of view of the Operating System. In other words, the time, in seconds, the disk was busy servicing requests for this device. BYDSK_UTIL The percentage of the time that this disk device was busy transferring data during the interval. On HP-UX, this is the percentage of the time during the interval that the disk device had IO in progress from the point of view of the Operating System. In other words, the utilization or percentage of time the disk was busy servicing requests for this device.