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Troubleshooting Windows Small Business Server 2003

Troubleshooting Windows Small Business Server 2003 Microsoft Corporation Published: January 2007 Version: 4 This document describes problems that you might encounter when installing or using Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2003 with Service Pack 1 or Windows Small Business Server 2003 R2 (Windows SBS). To view troubleshooting information, click any of the following feature-area links. If this document does not list a solution for the problem you are having, try searching for a solution at the Windows SBS Solutions Center (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/? LinkID=70661). Troubleshooting Server Setup Troubleshooting Users and Groups Troubleshooting Client Computers Troubleshooting Windows Vista on your Network Troubleshooting Mobile Devices Troubleshooting E-mail Troubleshooting Monitoring Troubleshooting Backup and Restore Troubleshooting Internet Access Troubleshooting Your Intranet Troubleshooting Shared Network Resources Troubleshooting Remote Connections Troubleshooting Client Computer Licensing 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Troubleshooting Server Setup Setup initialization error: Source \SQL2000_SP3a\x86\Setup\Sqlspre.ini. Cause: You may receive this error when you try to install SQL Server 2000 Service Pack 3. It occurs when the Service Pack 3 Setup program tries to copy Setupsql.ini to the %Temp% folder, but cannot overwrite a pre-existing version of the file that is marked as read-only. Solution: Browse to the %Temp% folder on your system drive, and either delete the preexisting version of setupsql.ini or remove the read-only attribute. Then run SQL Server 2000 Service Pack 3 Setup again. Troubleshooting Users and Groups E-mail cannot be received or sent.

Cause: A user account has reached the assigned Exchange mailbox size limit. Solution: Save e-mail messages in a local folder on the client computer. If this problem occurs often, consider increasing the mailbox size for the user account. Files cannot be saved to shared folders on the server. Cause: The user account has reached the assigned disk quota limit. Solution: Save files in a local folder on the client computer. If this problem occurs often, consider increasing the disk quota for the user account. Password cannot be changed. Cause: The user account password does not comply with a password policy configured by the administrator. Solution: Create a new password that complies with the password policies configured by the administrator. User cannot connect remotely to a computer running Windows XP Professional. Cause: The user does not have permissions to log on by using Remote Desktop. Solution: Assign the user permissions to use Remote Desktop.

Note To complete the following procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Domain Admins security group. To assign user permissions to use Remote Desktop 1. On a computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003, click Start, and then click Server Management.

2. In the console tree, click Users. 3. In the details pane, right-click the user account that requires permissions to log on to
Terminal Services, and then click Change User Properties.

4. On the User Properties page, click the Terminal Services Profile tab. 5. Check the Allow to log on to Terminal Server check box.
Cause: The client computer running Windows XP Professional is not configured to allow Terminal Services connections. Solution: Configure the client computer running Windows XP Professional to use Remote Desktop. Note To complete the following procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Domain Admins security group. To configure the client computer running Windows XP Professional to use Remote Desktop 1. On the client computer, click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then click System.

2. On the Remote tab, under Remote Desktop, click Select Remote Users. 3. In the Remote Desktop Users dialog box, click Add. 4. In the Select Users dialog box, click Locations to specify the search location. 5. To specify the types of objects that you want to search for, click Object Types.

6. In Enter the object names to select, type the names of the objects that you want
to search for.

7. Click Check Names. 8. When the name is located, click OK. The name appears in the list of users in the
Remote Desktop Users dialog box. User account is locked out. Cause: There may be too many failed logon attempts. Solution: Unlock the user account. Note To complete the following procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Domain Admins security group. To unlock a user account 1. On a computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003, click Start, and then click Server Management.

2. In the console tree, click Users. 3. In the details pane, right-click the user account that is locked out, and then click
Properties.

4. On the User Properties page, click the Account tab. 5. Clear the Account is locked out check box to unlock the account.
Application with service account fails. Cause: Service account passwords have been changed but automatic logon properties have not been updated to use the new passwords. Windows Small Business Server does not automatically propagate password changes to all applications that use the service account. Solution: Update the service accounts and passwords used with a particular application by running Windows Small Business Server Setup again. New user cannot log on or access e-mail. Cause: A new user attempts to log on or access network resources immediately after the account is created and before Active Directory has had time to update. A delay can occur between the time a user account is created and when Active Directory recognizes the user account. Solution: Wait fifteen minutes and try again. Windows Small Business Server 2003 displays a GUID instead of a user name for an e-mail address. Cause: This problem can occur if a user account name contains Unicode characters. Solution: Use the Active Directory Users and Computers snap-in to change the SMTP e-mail address for the account. To change the SMTP e-mail address for a user account 1. Click Start, and then click Server Management.

2. In the console tree, double-click Advanced Management, double-click Active

Directory Users and Computers, double-click your server name, and then locate the account in either the Builtin or Users folder.

3. Right-click the account, click Properties, and then click the E-mail Addresses tab.

4. Under E-mail addresses, select the SMTP e-mail address to be changed, and then
click Edit.

5. In the E-mail address text box, replace the GUID with the correct e-mail alias, and
then click OK.

6. Click the Exchange General tab. 7. In the Alias text box, replace the GUID with the correct e-mail alias, and then click
OK twice to save your settings. Troubleshooting Client Computers I received the error, "This Service Pack requires the machine to be on AC Power before setup starts" when I install Service Pack 2 for Windows XP. The Setup program for Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2) requires that your computer uses AC power. If the battery power runs out during installation, the update cannot be completed. If this occurs, you might not be able to restore the operating system to its previous state. Solution: To resolve this issue, connect your computer to an AC power source, such as an electrical outlet, and then run Setup. For more information about this issue, see Article 883609, "This Service Pack requires the machine to be on AC Power before setup starts," at the Microsoft Knowledge Base (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=70662). After migrating user profiles, users cannot access redirected folders. Cause: If you made user profiles private, administrative credentials were removed from user folders on the client computer. Users need these credentials to access folders that are redirected to the server. After you migrate private user profiles (which include redirected folders), users may be unable to access their folders. Solution: Manually restore access to user folders on the client computer. To restore access to user folders on the client computer 1. Log on to the client computer.

2. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Performance and Maintenance. 3. Click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Event Viewer. 4. Under Event Viewer (Local), double-click Application. 5. Search for an event with the type listed as Error and the source listed as Folder
Redirection, and double-click that event. 6. Note the source and destination directory listed in the event description. Note To complete the next part of this procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Domain Admins security group. 1. Click Start, right-click My Computer, click Explore, and then browse to the user folder in the location you noted in step 6.

2. Right-click the folder, click Sharing and Security, click the Permissions tab, and
verify that the user's name does not appear. If the folder is empty, delete it. Note

To perform the next part of this procedure, the user whose profile you are redirecting must be a member of the Local Admins security group on the client computer. 1. Click Start, right-click My Computer, click Explore, and then browse to the user folder in the location you noted in step 5 of the first procedure.

2. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security. 3. On the Security tab, click Advanced. 4. On the Owner tab, click the user name in the Change owner to box, and then select
the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box.

5. Click Apply. 6. On the Permissions tab, verify that the user whose profile you want to redirect
appears in the list under Permission entries. If the user's name does not appear, click Add, type the user name under Enter the object name to select, and then click Check Names.

7. Click OK. 8. Click Apply, and then click OK. The Permission Entry page appears. 9. Select the Full Control check box, and then click OK. 10.
Click OK, and then click OK again.

11.Log off, and then log back on to the client computer. I received an error stating that Client Setup cannot migrate private user settings. Cause: This error occurs when one or more of the subfolders in a user's profile have been made private. This means that permissions giving other users access to the folders have been removed. Solution: Manually configure the client computer to remove the restrictions that are preventing the migration. If the client computer is running Windows XP Professional, make sure that the profile that did not migrate is configured as a "public" profile. To configure the user profile as a "public" profile 1. Click Start, and then click My Computer. 2. Double-click the drive where Windows is installed (usually drive C:, unless you have more than one drive on your computer).

3. Double-click the Documents and Settings folder. 4. Right-click the user folder that did not migrate, and then click Sharing and Security. 5. Select the Make this Folder Private check box, and then click OK.
6. If this setting does not appear in the Properties dialog box, perform step 6, and then follow the instructions for client computers running Windows 2000 Professional.

7. On the View tab, under Advanced settings, make sure Use simple file sharing
(Recommended) is selected, and then click OK.

If the client computer is running Windows 2000 Professional, log on to the client computer as the user with the profile that did not migrate, and then grant the Administrators group full control over the profile folder and all subfolders. To grant the Administrators group full control of the profile folder and all subfolders 1. Click Start, and then click My Computer. 2. Double-click the drive where Windows is installed (usually drive C:, unless you have more than one drive on your computer).

3. Double-click the Documents and Settings folder. 4. Right-click the user folder that did not migrate, click Properties, and then click the
Security tab.

5. Click Add, type Administrators in the text box, and then click OK. 6. Under Group or user names, click the Administrators tab, select Allow for the
Full Control permission, and then click OK. 7. Repeat steps 4 through 6 for all subfolders in the user profile. 8. Repeat steps 4 through 7 for each user folder that did not migrate. 9. While you are logged on with the user profile that did not migrate, give the user ownership of all files in his or her profile. To give the user ownership of all files in the user profile 1. Right-click the user folder to be migrated, click Properties, and then click the Security tab.

2. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab. 3. In the Change owner to box, select the user that you are giving ownership to, and
then click OK.

4. Select the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box, and then click
OK twice to save your settings. 5. Run Client Setup again. Note Perform these steps for each user profile listed in the error message. Note If you are running Windows 2000 Professional with Service Pack 2, you must upgrade to any later version of the service pack. Applications are missing after upgrading to Windows Small Business Server 2003. Cause: If applications other than those available by default were installed on client computers, they will not be upgraded. Solution: You must reinstall these applications on the computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003 and then reinstall them on client computers after the upgrade is complete. Command lines used to install these applications are stored in the registry in the following location: HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\SmallBusinessServer\clientsetup\sbs2k_archive\Client Applications\ Caution Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. Before making changes to the registry, you should back up any valued data on the computer.

After the upgrade is complete, start the Client Setup Applications Wizard and use the command lines to reinstall the applications. To start the Client Setup Applications Wizard 1. Click Start, and then click Server Management.

2. In the console tree, click Client Computers. In the details pane, click Set Up Client
Applications. 3. Follow the instructions in the wizard to add client applications. Older versions of Microsoft Office do not run on client computers that have an Office 2003 application installed. Cause: Older versions of Office conflict with Office 2003. Solution: To run older versions of Office, you must uninstall all versions of Office on the client computer, and then reinstall the version you want to use. To uninstall older versions of Office from the client computer 1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.

2. Click Add or Remove Programs, click each version of Office installed on the client
computer, and then click Remove. After uninstalling all versions of Office, reinstall the version that you want to use on the client computer. The initial logon process is slow after joining the Windows Small Business Server domain. Cause: Redirection for My Documents folder has been enabled, and a large amount of data in the My Documents folder on the client computer is synchronizing with the server. Solution: No action is required. After the initial logon, only changes to the My Documents folder are synchronized. Synchronization does not take as long as the initial logon. Files in the local My Documents folder are not synchronizing with the server. Cause: Disk quotas have been exceeded. Solution: Reduce the size of the user's My Documents folder by deleting unnecessary files or compressing files. Or, increase the quota amount. To increase disk quotas 1. On a computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003, click Start, and then click My Computer.

2. Right-click the volume for which you want to modify quota values, and then click
Properties.

3. On the Quota tab, click Quota Entries. 4. Click the entries for the users whose options you want to modify, and on the Quota
menu, click Properties.

5. In the Quota Settings dialog box, do one of the following:


To track disk space usage without limiting disk space, click Do not limit disk usage. To limit disk space, click Limit disk space to. Type a numeric value, and select a disk space limit unit from the drop-down list. You can use decimal values, for example, 20.5 megabytes (MB).

Note If the volume is not formatted with the NTFS file system, or if you are not a member of the Administrators group, the Quota tab is not displayed in the volume's Properties dialog box. I received an error stating that Client Setup cannot migrate private user settings. Cause: This error occurs when one or more of the subfolders in a user's profile have been made private. This means that permissions giving other users access to the folders have been removed. Solution: Manually configure the client computer to remove the restrictions that are preventing the migration. If the client computer is running Windows XP Professional, make sure that simple file sharing is enabled on the computer, and then follow the steps outlined in the error message. To enable simple file sharing on a client computer running Windows XP Professional 1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.

2. Double-click Folder Options. 3. On the View tab, under Advanced settings, make sure Use simple file sharing
(Recommended) is selected, and then click OK. If the client computer is running Windows 2000 Professional, log on to the client computer as the user with the profile that did not migrate, and then grant the Administrators group full control over the profile folder and all subfolders. To grant the Administrators group full control of the profile folder and all subfolders 1. Click Start, and then click My Computer. 2. Double-click the drive where Windows is installed (usually drive C:, unless you have more than one drive on your computer).

3. Double-click the Documents and Settings folder. 4. Right-click the user folder that did not migrate, click Properties, and then click the
Security tab.

5. Click Add, type Administrators in the text box, and then click OK. 6. Under Group or user names, click the Administrators tab, select Allow for the
Full Control permission, and then click OK. 7. Repeat steps 4 through 6 for all subfolders in the user profile. 8. Repeat steps 4 through 7 for each user folder that did not migrate. 9. While you are logged on with the user profile that did not migrate, give the user ownership of all files in his or her profile. To give the user ownership of all files in the user profile 1. Right-click the user folder to be migrated, click Properties, and then click the Security tab.

2. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab. 3. In the Change owner to box, select the user that you are giving ownership to, and
then click OK.

4. Select the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box, and then click
OK twice to save your settings.

5. Run Client Setup again. Note Perform these steps for each user profile listed in the error message. Note If you are running Windows 2000 Professional with Service Pack 2, you must upgrade to any later version of the service pack. Troubleshooting Windows Vista on your Network The following are known issues for troubleshooting Windows Vista. They are listed in "Using Windows Vista and Outlook 2007 in a Windows Small Business Server 2003 Network " at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=77626). Troubleshooting Windows Vista Client Setup Not all applications that are selected in the Windows Small Business Server Client Setup tools are installed on Windows Vista I received an error stating that Client Setup does not configure client computers that are running this version of Windows The logon screen shows "Other User" when the computer restarts after joining the Windows Small Business Server domain during client setup I receive an error about multiple network adapters when I use Connect Computer to join a client to the domain, even though there is only one network adapter Troubleshooting upgrades of Windows XP to Windows Vista While upgrading Windows XP to Windows Vista, I receive a compatibility warning saying that the current ActiveSync version does not work with Windows Vista The Group Policy settings for Windows Vista Firewall are not applied after I upgrade a client computer from Windows XP to Windows Vista The CompanyWeb link that is listed in my computers network locations after I upgrade a client computer from Windows XP to Windows Vista is broken The "Connect to Small Business Server" shortcut does not work after I upgrade a client computer from Windows XP to Windows Vista I can no longer send a fax after I upgrade a client computer from Windows XP to Windows Vista Troubleshooting E-mail in Windows Vista Outlook cannot synchronize with the Exchange mailbox on the server Troubleshooting Remote Connections in Windows Vista I received an error stating that "Automation server can not create object" when trying to offer Remote Assistance to a client computer I cannot deploy Connection Manager using the Setup Configuration Wizard on computers I get an error message about a self-signed certificate when I browse to Remote Web Workplace from a computer that is running Windows Vista and that is not joined to the Windows Small Business Server domain Troubleshooting Printers and Faxes I see the shared printer in Windows Vista, even though I deleted the shared printer from the server

I deployed a printer to my x64 client computer, but the printer does not appear in the Printers list I changed the name of the shared printer, but the original printer still appears on my computer that is running Windows Vista I deployed a printer on Windows Vista but it does not appear in the printer folder I get an error message saying "To use the shared printer, you need to install a printer driver on this computer " I cannot send faxes by using Microsoft Outlook on a 64-bit edition of Windows Vista I can no longer send fax after upgrading from Windows XP to Windows Vista Enterprise Miscellaneous When I try to install the ISA Server 2004 hotfix on the server, I receive an error stating that Windows Installer cannot install the upgrade patch because the program to be upgraded may be missing The list of user profiles on a client computer says "None" The Windows Firewall settings list some applications twice, and one of the duplicated listings has its check box selected and is grayed out Troubleshooting Mobile Devices ActiveSync cannot be installed when a mobile device is connected to the client computer. Cause: If a mobile device is connected to the client computer, ActiveSync cannot be completely installed. Solution: Disconnect the mobile device from the client computer, log off, log on again, and then reinstall ActiveSync. For more information, open Help and Support and search for "To connect a mobile device by using a cradle or cable." Pocket PC 2003 is not automatically configured to synchronize with the server. Cause: The server is configured to connect to the Internet using a dialup connection instead of a broadband connection. Solution: Configure the Pocket PC 2003 using the instructions that came with your device, and manually configure it to synchronize with the server. You must also disable Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) on the mobile device. Note Before beginning the following procedure, obtain the server's fully qualified internal computer name and NetBios domain name. To disable SSL on the mobile device 1. Click Start, and then open ActiveSync.

2. Click Tools, and then click Options. 3. Click the Server tab, and then clear the This server uses an SSL connection check
box. Important Disabling SSL means that you will send user name and password information over the network. Ensure that you have enabled Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) encryption on your wireless LAN.

After running the Get Connected Wizard and selecting "Synchronize with this desktop computer," my mobile device is not synching with my Inbox, calendar or contacts. Cause: This problem can occur if any of the following conditions are true: The server is not connected to the Internet. The server is connected to the Internet using a dial-up connection. The user has configured ActiveSync to synchronize the mobile device with the server.

Solution: Manually configure ActiveSync to synchronize with the desktop computer. To manually configure ActiveSync to synchronize with the desktop computer 1. Plug the mobile device into the cradle.

2. On the desktop computer, click Start, click All Programs, and then click Microsoft
ActiveSync.

3. Click Tools, and then click Options. 4. On the Sync Options tab, clear the Enable synchronize with a server check box. 5. When prompted to remove all synchronized data using ActiveSync, click OK. 6. Select the Inbox, Calendar and Contacts check boxes, and then click OK.
The device then synchronizes with the desktop computer. Note The Routing and Remote Access (RRAS) Wizard configures mobile devices to synchronize with the server by default. Each time you run the RRAS Wizard, you must use the preceding steps to configure mobile devices to synchronize with the desktop computer. Using a hardware router prevents synchronization when the mobile device is cradled. Cause: If the server is configured with a single network card and a hardware firewall, routers that have built-in IP spoofing protection do not allow internal client computers to connect to the external domain. Solution: Consult with your hardware provider for updated firmware for your specific device. As an alternative, you can add a DNS zone to bypass IP spoofing by some hardware routers. To add a DNS zone 1. Click Start, click Run, and then type dnsmgmt.msc. The DNS Management Console appears. 2. Double-click your server name in the console tree.

3. In the details pane, right-click Forward Lookup Zone, and then click New Zone.
The New Zone Wizard appears. Click Next.

4. On the Zone Type page, select Primary Zone, clear the Store the zone in Active

Directory (available only if DNS Server is a domain controller) check box, and then click Next.

5. On the Zone Name page, in the Zone Name box, type the fully qualified domain

name of your external domain (for example, www.externaldomainname.com), and then click Next.

6. On the Zone Files page, click Next. 7. On the Dynamic Update page, select Do not allow dynamic updates, and then
click Next.

8. Click Finish to close the New Zone Wizard. 9. Right-click the new zone in the DNS Management Console details pane, and then click
New Host (A). The New Host dialog box appears.

10. 11.

Leave the Name field empty. In the IP address box, type the Server Local Area IP address, and then click Add Host. Click OK, and then click Done to close the New Host dialog box.

The initial synchronization of the mobile device failed. Cause: ActiveSync cannot create Microsoft Office Outlook 2003 profiles. If the user starts ActiveSync before running Outlook 2003, the user receives an error message stating that the profile cannot be found. Solution: Connect the mobile device by using the cradle or cable, open Outlook, and then reconnect the mobile device. The user cannot browse the Internet when the mobile device is connected using the cradle or cable (applies only if Internet Security and Acceleration Server 2000 is installed). Cause: If you connect the mobile device by using a cradle or cable, you are considered anonymous when browsing the Internet. If ISA Server is installed on the computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003, anonymous browsing is not allowed. Solution: Follow the instructions for Microsoft Pocket PC Phone Edition 2002, Microsoft Pocket PC Phone Edition 2003, or Microsoft SmartPhone 2003, and then follow the instructions to configure ActiveSync settings. To configure connection settings for Microsoft Pocket PC 2003 or Microsoft Pocket PC Phone Edition 2003 1. On the mobile device, click Start, and then click Settings.

2. On the Connections tab, click Connections. 3. Click Set up my proxy server. 4. On the Proxy settings tab, check the This network connects to the Internet box,
and then check the This network uses a proxy server to connect to the Internet box.

5. Type the proxy server name, and then click Advanced. 6. In the Port box, type 8080. 7. Click OK, and then click OK again.
To configure connection settings for Microsoft SmartPhone 2003 1. On the mobile device, select Start, select Settings, and then select Date connections.

2. Select Menu, select Edit Connections, and then select Proxy Connections. 3. Select Menu, and then select Add.

4. In the Connects From box, select Work. In the Connects To box, select The
Internet.

5. In the Proxy (name:port) box, type the server name and port, using the following
format: 6. ServerName :8080

7. Type your user name and password, and then select Done.
To configure connection settings for Microsoft Pocket PC Phone Edition 2002 1. On the mobile device, click Start, and then click Settings.

2. On the Connections tab, click Connections. 3. Under Work Settings, click Modify. 4. On the Proxy settings tab, check the This network connects to the Internet box,
and then check the This network uses a proxy server to connect to the Internet box.

5. Type the proxy server name, and then click Advanced. 6. In the Port box, type 8080. 7. Click OK, and then click OK again.
To configure ActiveSync settings 1. On the client computer, click Start, point to All Programs, and then click Microsoft ActiveSync.

2. On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the Rules tab. 3. In the Connection box (under Pass Through), click the down arrow, and then click
Work. The first time that you use the device to browse the Internet, you are prompted for a user name and password. Type a user name that is a member of the Windows Small Business Server Internet Users group, and save the password so that ActiveSync can synchronize with the server. Note If you still cannot browse the Internet, see the person responsible for your network to ensure that you have the correct permissions. A connection cannot be established between the mobile device and the client computer. Cause: There is a universal serial bus (USB) connection error. Solution: Upgrade to the latest version of ActiveSync. If the user is already using the latest version, remove the mobile device from the cradle (or disconnect the cable), turn the device off and then back on, and then reconnect it. The mobile device cannot be synchronized when connected using a cradle or cable. Cause: The Pass Through option is not configured correctly in ActiveSync. Solution: Configure the Pass Through option. To configure the Pass Through option 1. On the client computer, click Start, point to All Programs, and then click Microsoft ActiveSync.

2. On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the Rules tab. 3. In the Connection box (under Pass Through), click the down arrow, and then click
Internet. For more information, see Microsoft ActiveSync Help. To open ActiveSync Help, click Start, point to All Programs, click Microsoft ActiveSync, and then click Help. Outlook Mobile Access with Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) does not work on a SmartPhone 2002, PocketPC 2002, or Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) 2.0 phone. Cause: Some of these devices are not supported using the Windows Small Business Server unsigned certificate. Solution: Purchase a signed certificate from a trusted certification authority (CA) for the server to support these devices. Other considerations for troubleshooting mobile devices. If you continue to have a problem using your mobile device, consider the following questions: Does your mobile device have sufficient signal strength? Can you browse to other internal or external Web sites? Have you tried turning off the device and then turning it back on? Does your mobile device synchronize when connected to the server?

Have you allowed access to the Outlook Mobile Access Web service from the Internet using the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard? Are you using an external router? Are ports 80 and 443 open and pointed to the server? Have you tried reconfiguring your mobile device?

To reconfigure your mobile device 1. On the client computer, click Start, point to All Programs, and then click Microsoft ActiveSync. 2. Connect the mobile device to the client computer by using the cradle or cable included with the device.

3. Click Start, and then click All Programs. 4. Click Small Business Server Tools, and then click Configure Mobile Device.
The device will be reconfigured with the original Windows Small Business Server settings, and users will be able to synchronize with the server within a few seconds. Note The mobile device configuration program is at the following location: Program Files/Windows Small Business Server/Clients/SBSMobConfig.exe For more information, open Help and Support and search for "To allow access to Web services on the server. Troubleshooting E-mail

I cannot see my deleted mailbox item when I try to recover it by using the Recover Deleted Items option on the Tools menu in Outlook. Cause: You may not have selected the folder or the parent folder from where the item was permanently deleted. Solution: If you are recovering a permanently deleted mail item, ensure that you select the folder from which the mail was deleted. For example, if you have a subfolder in your Inbox named Meeting Minutes, you must select the Meeting Minutes folder before you choose the Recover Deleted Items option on the Tools menu. If you are recovering a deleted folder, ensure that you select the parent folder of the deleted folder. For example, if you permanently deleted a subfolder named Meeting Minutes from your Inbox, you must select the Inbox folder before you choose the Recover Deleted Items option on the Tools menu. Note You cannot recover a permanently deleted item if the retention time for permanently deleted items has elapsed. The default retention time is 30 days. An administrator can run the Backup Configuration Wizard to change the retention time or to turn it off. The Recover Deleted Items option is disabled on a Windows XP-based client computer. Cause: There are two possible causes. First, you may be using Outlook over the Internet (which is also called "RPC over HTTP") to check your e-mail. Second, you may have manually joined the Windows XP-based client computer t o the Windows Small Business Server network. If you did, then you bypassed Windows Small Business Server Client Setup, which enables the Recover Deleted Items option in Outlook. Solution: You must manually enable the Recover Deleted Items option. Note You must log in as an Administrator of the client computer to complete the following procedure. To manually enable the Recover Deleted Items option 1. On the client computer, exit Outlook.

2. Click Start, click Run, and then in the Open text box, type regedit.
Caution Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. Before making changes to the registry, you should back up any valued data on the computer. 3. Browse to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ Software\ Microsoft\ Exchange\ Client\ Options.

4. From the Edit menu, click New, and then click DWORD Value. 5. Type the name DumpsterAlwaysOn.
Note Do not type any spaces in the name. 6. Double-click DumpsterAlwaysOn, and then in the Value Data field, type 1. 7. Restart Outlook. I have more than one e-mail domain name, and the E-mail Domain page of the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard allows me to enter only one of the domain names. Cause: The Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard can configure reply-to addresses for only one e-mail domain on the E-mail Domain page.

Solution: Use one of the e-mail domain names when you run the wizard. Then, you can create a custom recipient policy in Exchange Server 2003 for a second e-mail domain. The custom recipient policy creates the appropriate e-mail addresses for users in the second email domain. For more information, search for "Create a New Recipient Policy" in Exchange server Help. To access Exchange server Help, click Start, click Server Management, and then press F1. Unsolicited e-mail is being delivered to Exchange server mailboxes. Cause: Connection filtering is not configured on your Exchange server. Solution: Exchange 2003 supports connection filtering based on block lists, which are lists that can be queried by your Exchange server to identify verified spam sources. Connection filtering uses external services that list known sources of unsolicited e-mail, dial-up user account lists, and servers open for relay based on IP addresses on block lists that they maintain. Connection filtering complements third-party content filter products. You can also configure connection filtering without using a block list provider by creating global accept and deny lists of SMTP addresses from which you want to globally accept or deny all e-mail. To configure connection filtering, you must first create and configure a connection filtering rule, and then apply it your SMTP virtual server. For more information, search for "Configure Connection Filtering" in Exchange server Help. To access Exchange server Help, click Start, click Server Management, and then press F1. Troubleshooting Monitoring I have received an alert notification that a user account is under attack. Cause: A user has repeatedly tried to log on due to losing or forgetting the user account password. This alert occurs when the number of failed logons for a specific user exceeds the Account Lockout Threshold. Solution: Reset the user account password. Note To complete the following procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Domain Admins security group. To reset a user's password 1. Click Start, and then click Server Management.

2. In the console tree, click Users. 3. In the details pane, select a user account, and then click Change Password.
4. Type and confirm the new password.

5. Select or clear the User must change password at next logon check box, and then
click OK. Cause: An actual attack has occurred. This alert occurs when the number of failed logons for a specific user exceeds the Account Lockout Threshold. Solution: You need to do the following if you suspect the account is under attack: Unplug the Internet cable from your server or router if you are certain that your network has been attacked. Open Event Viewer and view the audit logon events in the Security Events log to determine if an attack has occurred. To open Event Viewer 1. Click Start, and then click Server Management.

2. In the console tree, click Monitoring. 3. In the details pane, click View Event Logs.
View the event log to try and determine the IP address from which the attack is originating. Contact your Internet service provider (ISP) to report or block it. Check for any unknown user accounts by using the Manage Users snap-in in Server Management. Reset the user's password. Reset the administrator password. Disable the user account until the threat of the network attack passes.

Note To complete the following procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Domain Admins security group. To disable a user account 1. Click Start, and then click Server Management.

2. In the console tree, click Users. 3. In the details pane, select a user account, and then click Disable Account.
Note Disable accounts are not removed, but you cannot use them to log on or to access network resources. Consider setting strong password policies. Note To complete the following procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Domain Admins security group. To configure password policies 1. Click Start, and then click Server Management.

2. In the console tree, click Users. 3. In the details pane, click Configure Password Policies. 4. Select the check boxes to configure the policies you want, select when you want the
policies to become effective, and then click OK. If you are still setting up the network and thus do not want the policies to be effective yet, you can choose to make them effective in a few days. Note This action changes the password policies used in your entire network. Enabling or changing password policies requires all users to change their passwords the next time they log on to the network. For more information about keeping your network secure, visit the Microsoft Security and Privacy Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=102). Usage information for Internet activity cannot be viewed in the server usage reports. Cause: You might be using a router as a firewall to access the Internet. If so, usage information for Internet activity cannot be included in the report because Windows Small Business Server 2003 is unable to monitor firewall statistics for third-party devices.

Solution: Install a second network adapter on the computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003, and then enable the Routing and Remote Access service as the firewall on the server by using the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard. Cause: You might be using the Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server firewall to access the Internet. Windows Small Business Server 2003 is unable to monitor firewall statistics for ISA Server. Solution: Configure ISA Server for monitoring and reporting. For more information about configuring ISA Server for monitoring and reporting, search for "Configure monitoring and reporting" in the ISA Server Help. To access ISA Server Help, click Start, click Server Management, and then press F1. I am not receiving server performance or usage reports in Outlook Express. Cause: By default, Outlook Express blocks certain file attachments in e-mail to prevent you from opening potentially harmful attachments. As a result, you may not be able to open server performance or usage reports. Solution: Configure Outlook Express to allow attachments. To configure Outlook Express to allow attachments 1. Open Outlook Express.

2. On the Tools menu, click Options. 3. On the Security tab, clear the Do not allow attachments to be saved or opened
that could potentially be a virus check box, and then click OK. Note E-mail attachments can contain viruses. It is recommended that you open files sent by a reliable source only and that you use antivirus software to scan files received in e-mail. Server performance or usage report does not contain all selected log files. Cause: If a selected log file has not changed since the last time it was attached to a server performance or usage report, or if no new files exist for applications that generate multiple log files (such as Internet Information Services), the server performance or usage report will not contain attachments for those selections. Solution: No action is required. To review the latest version of a selected log file, open the file attachment from the previously delivered server performance or usage report. Services set to start automatically stop running. Cause: When configured to start automatically, a small number of services may stop running if they are not performing any tasks. When this happens, these services are reported in the server performance report as not running. This is known to occur with the following services: Fax Performance Logs and Alerts Removable Storage

Solution: The noted services are designed to stop running when they are not being used. If you do not want these services to be reported in the server performance report when they are not running, you can change the Startup type for the service to Manual. To change the startup type for a service to Manual 1. Click Start, and then click Server Management.

2. In the console tree, click Monitoring and Reporting, and then click View Services. 3. In the details pane, right-click the service that you want to change, and then click
Properties.

4. For Startup type, select Manual, and then click OK.


For more information, open Help and Support and search for "Monitoring overview." Monitoring alerts are not being delivered. Cause: After a Health Monitor configuration is imported using the Import Health Monitor Configuration Wizard, imported actions may not run as expected. This problem can occur when settings for imported actions remain associated with the computer from which they were exported. For example, the SMTP server specified for e-mail actions could be inaccurate, or an inaccurate file path could be specified for script actions. Solution: Review the settings for the imported actions and make changes as necessary. To view the imported actions 1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Health Monitor.

2. In the console tree, click Actions. 3. In the details pane, right-click an action, and then click Properties.
4. Review the settings on each tab, and modify as necessary. 5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for each action. For more information, open Help and Support, and then search for "To update settings for an imported Health Monitor configuration." Troubleshooting Backup and Restore The server locks down, reporting Event ID 21192 and the error message, "The ISA Server Web filter was unable to connect to MSDE database...." Cause: If your server is running Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server, then at midnight ISA Server creates a new MSDE instance to store the next day's logging information for the Web and proxy traffic. If a backup is also a scheduled to begin at midnight, there is a conflict between the ISA Server MSDE instance and the backup process, and this conflict causes the server to lock down. Solution: To exit the lockdown, restart the Microsoft Firewall service. To restart the Microsoft Firewall service 1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Services.

2. In the list of services, right-click the Microsoft Firewall service, and then click
Properties.

3. Ensure that the Startup type is set to Automatic. 4. In Services status, click Start, and then click OK.
To prevent this issue in the future, schedule the server backup to start at either 11:30 P.M. or 12:30 A.M. This ensures that there is no conflict between the ISA Server MSDE instance and the backup process. To modify the Backup schedule settings 1. Click Start, and then click Server Management.

2. In the Admin Console, in Standard Management, click Backup. 3. In the details pane, click Modify the Backup Schedule. The Backup Configuration
Wizard starts.

4. On the Define Backup Schedule page, in the Start Backup at list box, choose
either 11:30 P.M. or 12:30 A.M. or later. Quarantined virus files are not backed up, and your backup reports a failed status. Cause: If the quarantine folder for your antivirus software is saved to a volume that is protected by a previous version of Volume Shadow Copy service, then the shadow copy captures the quarantine folder. As a result, the shadow copy includes viruses. Solution: You can either use the antivirus software to move the quarantine folder to a volume that is not protected by Volume Shadow Copy service or configure the anti-virus application to delete infected files instead of having them quarantined. For more information about resolving this issue, if you are using TREND Micro, Inc. antivirus software on your server, see Article 888035, Quarantined virus files are skipped and your backup reports a failed status on your Windows Small Business Server 2003-based computer at the Microsoft Knowledge Base (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=70319). I do not have a backup copy of the mailbox database on my server. Cause: You have not configured a back up solution for your mailbox database. Solution: Use the recovery storage group feature in Exchange Server 2003 to create a backup copy of the Exchange mailbox database on the server. You can do this while the original database is still running and serving client computers. For information about how to create a backup copy of the Exchange mailbox database on the server, see "Using Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Recovery Storage Groups" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=70663). The NTBackup log is blank. Cause: NTBackup.exe is being manually ended from the Task Manager, or NTBackup.exe encountered an error during launch. Solution: Run NTBackup manually, and load the Small Business Backup Script. To run NTBackup manually and load the script 1. Click Start, click Run, type ntbackup, and then press Enter. The Backup or Restore Wizard launches.

2. On the Welcome to the Backup or Restore Wizard page, click Advanced Mode. 3. Click the Backup tab. 4. From the Job menu, choose Load Selections. 5. In the File Name box type %sbsprogramdir%\backup. 6. Click Small Business Backup Script.bks to select, and click Open. 7. On the Backup tab, click Start Backup.
If the backup succeeds, run the Windows Small Business Server Backup Configuration Wizard from the Backup taskpad in Server Management. If the problem persists, click Start, click Server Management, click the Information Center link, and then click either Community Website or Technical Support to get information about the problem. If the backup fails, consult the error message for further information about the problem.

Backup fails, reporting "'Script.bks' file not found." Cause: The Exchange Information Store is not running. Solution: Start the Exchange Information Store. To start the Exchange Information Store 1. Click Start, click Run, and then type Services.msc.

2. In the details pane, right-click Microsoft Exchange Information Store, and then
click Start. Cause: A folder explicitly marked to be included in the backup is not on the system. The Small Business Backup Script has been deleted or is corrupted. The UNC path you are backing up to does not exist or is inaccessible.

Solution: Re-run the Backup Configuration Wizard from the Backup snap-in in Server Management, accepting the defaults to reset. Redirection of My Documents failed. Cause: Certain files cannot be made available offline. Files with the following extensions cannot be made available offline: .db* .ldb .mdb .mde .mdw .pst .slm

When you have configured users' My Documents folders to be redirected to the server, files with these extensions are saved to the server only, and they are not saved at logon or logoff to the client computer. The following error message appears if you try to synchronize these types of files: "Warnings occurred while Windows was synchronizing your data. Results: Offline files.Unable to make file name available offline. Files of this type cannot be made available offline." For more information about this issue, see article 252509, "Error Message: Files of This Type Cannot Be Made Available Offline," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base. Solution: If you have a file that cannot be made available offline and you want to avoid seeing this message at logoff and logon, you can perform one of the following actions: Move the files that cannot be made available offline out of the My Documents folder and in to a shared folder on the server. Disable offline files.

In both of these instances, a file that cannot be made available offline will be unavailable if the server becomes unavailable. However, it will be included in the backup of the server by default. If you disable offline folders, none of your files, regardless of whether they can be made available offline, will be available if the server becomes unavailable. To disable offline files 1. In Windows Explorer, click Tools, and then click Folder Options.

2. On the Offline Files tab, clear the Enable Offline Files check box.
Volume Shadow Copy Services fails, reporting error number 800xxxxx. There are several causes for Volume Shadow Copy Services failure. They are listed in order of probability: Low disk space on a drive with Volume Shadow Copies Services enabled. The disk is highly fragmented.

SQL Server 2000 is installed and one or more databases have a recovery model that is not set to Simple. Windows Small Business Server 2003 Backup can back up a database only if its recovery model is set to Simple. An Event Log is larger than 64 megabytes (MB). Directory Service Access auditing is enabled.

Use the information in the following sections to determine which of these issues is causing Volume Shadow Copy Services to fail and to correct the failure. Cause: Low disk space on a drive with Volume Shadow Copies Services enabled. Solution: Increase the space available on the system drive and on the drive with previous versions (Volume Shadow Copy Services) enabled. To verify that a drive with Volume Shadow Copies Services enabled has low disk space 1. Click Start, and then click My Computer.

2. Click the Shadow Copies tab. 3. Click the volume that has Shadow Copies enabled, and then click Settings. 4. In the Storage Area dialog box, click Details, and compare the Used and Maximum
Size columns to determine whether disk space is low. Cause: The disk is highly fragmented. Solution: Defragment all system hard disks. Cause: SQL Server 2000 is installed and one or more databases have a recovery model that is not set to Simple. Windows Small Business Server 2003 Backup cannot back up this type of database. Solution: Set the SQL Server 2000 database recovery model to Simple. To set the SQL Server 2000 database recovery model to Simple 1. Open SQL Server Enterprise Manager.

2. Double-click Microsoft SQL Servers, double-click SQL Server Group, (Local), and
then double-click Databases.

3. Right click each database, choose Properties, and then on the Options tab, under
Recovery, set the model to Simple. For more information about SQL Server database recovery models, see SQL Server Help and search for "recovery model." Cause: An Event Log is larger than 64 MB. Solution: Reduce the size of the Event Log to a maximum of 64 MB. Note To complete the following procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Domain Admins security group. To reduce the size of the Event Log 1. Click Start, click Administrative Tools, and then click Event Viewer. 2. In the console tree, click any Event Log that is larger than 64 MB.

3. On the Action menu, click Properties. 4. On the General tab, in Maximum log size, specify a log size of 64000 kilobytes or
less.

5. To put the new setting in effect, click Clear Log.


If you want to retain the information currently in the log, click Yes when a message appears asking if you want to save the original log before clearing it, and then click OK. Cause: Directory Service Access auditing is enabled. Solution: Disable Directory Service access auditing. To verify that Directory Service Access auditing is enabled 1. Click Start, click Run, and then type rsop.msc.

2. In the details pane, double-click Computer Configuration, double-click Windows


Settings, double-click Security Settings, double-click Local Policies, and then doubleclick Audit Policy.

3. In the Computer Setting column, verify that it reads either Success or Failure.
If Directory Service Access is not enabled, the entry in the Computer Setting column will read No auditing. To disable Directory Service access auditing 1. Click Start, and then click Server Management.

2. In the console tree, click Advanced Management, and then click Group Policy
Management.

3. Navigate to /Forest/Domains/your domain/Domain Controllers, and then right-click


Small Business Server Auditing Policy.

4. Click Edit to open Group Policy Object Editor.


5. In Group Policy Object editor, navigate to Computer Configuration/Windows Settings/Security Settings/Local Policies/Audit Policy.

6. Double-click Audit directory service access. 7. Clear the Success and Failure boxes if they are checked.

8. Click Start, click Command Prompt, and then type gpupdate /Force to refresh the
policy setting. Portions of a file are not backed up. Cause: The destination of the backup has previous versions (Volume Shadow Copy Services) enabled on it, and the allocated space for previous versions does not have enough room for the entire backup file. Solution: Either disable previous versions (Volume Shadow Copy Services) by using the Backup Configuration Wizard or choose another destination for the backup. Note Backing up to a volume on which previous versions are enabled will drastically reduce the number of previous versions from which users can restore. Backup fails, reporting "A fixed drive is not a valid drive." Cause: A timeout occured while writing the backup file to the destination. Solutions: If you are backing up to a network share, ensure the UNC path you are backing up to is always accessible. Ensure the drivers for the media of the backup destination are up to date. Contact the manufacturer for information about updating your drivers. Ensure there is no excessive activity on the device you are backing up to.

Cause: The drive you are backing up to is low on disk space. Solution: Ensure the disk to which you are backing up has adequate disk space to hold the backup. Backup fails, reporting "Tape media not found." Cause: No tape is in the drive. Solution: Put a tape in the drive. Cause: The system does not recognize the tape drive. Solutions: Ensure the tape in the drive is a tape that works with the drive. If the tape drive is external, ensure the power of the tape drive is on. Ensure that the system is detecting the tape drive.

To ensure that the system is detecting the tape drive 1. Click Start, click Administrative Tools, and then click Computer Management.

2. In the left pane, click Device Manager. 3. Navigate to the tape drive and double-click it to view Device status. 4. If the device is not working properly, click Troubleshoot to fix the problem.
Ensure the drivers for the media of the backup destination are up to date. Contact the manufacturer for information about updating your drivers.

Be sure the tape drive is compatible with Windows Small Business Server 2003. Consult the Windows Catalog Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=16906). Backup fails, reporting error number 8007422. Cause: Windows Management Instrumentation needs to be started in order for Windows Small Business Server Backup to determine success or failure. Solution: Start Windows Management Instrumentation. To start Windows Management Instrumentation 1. Click Start, click Run, and then type Services.msc.

2. In the details pane, right-click Windows Management Instrumentation, and then


click Start. If the problem persists, click Start, click Server Management, click the Information Center link, and then click either Community Website or Technical Support to get information about the problem. Backup fails, reporting "End of media encountered." Cause: The backup does not fit on the media to which you are backing up. Solutions: Reduce the size of the backup by excluding folders from the backup using the Backup Configuration Wizard. Purchase a backup device with larger capacity.

Cause: The destination of the backup is a hard drive formatted with the FAT file system. Drives formatted with FAT support a file size of up to 4 GB. If your backup is larger than 4 GB, it exceeds the size of the destination hard drive. Solution: Convert the drive to the NTFS file system using convert.exe. For information about using convert.exe, see article 214579, "How to Use Convert.exe to Convert a Partition to the NTFS File System," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base. Cause: The backup does not fit on the hard drive to which you are backing up.

Solution: Increase the amount of space available on the drive for the backup. Backup fails, reporting "An inconsistency was encountered." Cause: You are backing up to a UNC path on the local computer that is currently being backed up. Solution: Use the Backup Configuration Wizard to change the destination of the backup to another location. Alternately, you can use the wizard to exclude the UNC path from the backup. Users cannot restore files because the Previous Versions tab in the My Documents Properties dialog box is missing. Cause: If storage allocation has been enabled for deleted files, and the location to which My Documents is redirected has recently been changed, then the regularly scheduled snapshot has not occurred. Solution: No action is required. The Previous Versions tab will appear after the next regularly scheduled snapshot occurs. By default, snapshots are scheduled to occur at 7:00 A.M. and at noon. Note

If you have not run Client Setup on your client computer, you might need to manually install the Shadow Copy client. To manually install the Shadow Copy client, from the client computer click Start, click Run, and then type: \\server\ClientApps\ShadowCopy\SHADOWCOPYCLIENT.MSI Troubleshooting Internet Access I want to switch from using my existing DHCP server, such as a router device, to using Windows Small Business Server 2003 as my DHCP server. Cause: You must disable the existing DHCP server, install the DHCP Server service on your computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003, and then configure the DHCP scope for your network. Solution: Using Windows Small Business Server 2003 as your DHCP server ensures that your DHCP settings are properly configured for the local network. Not all DHCP scope options for the Windows Small Business Server network can be configured for the DHCP service of all router devices. For information about how to install and configure DHCP on your Windows Small Business Server network, open Help and Support and search for "Installing a DHCP server." I need to modify the phone number used by my dial-up connection to connect to the Internet. Cause: If you use a dial-up connection to connect to the Internet, the dialing is handled by the firewall on your computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003. As a result, to change the phone number used by the dial-up connection to the Internet, you must modify the connection information in the firewall settings for your computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003. Solution: The easiest way to change the phone number used by your dial-up connection is to run the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard and add a new dial-up connection. Note If you do not want to modify settings defined in the last run of the wizard for a specific component, select the option to not make changes for that component. You can then bypass the associated pages for that component. Note Running the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard does not require the computer running Windows Small Business Server to restart. However, users will experience a temporary loss of connectivity to the Internet while necessary services are restarted. I am having problems connecting to the server from a client computer. Cause: The network adapter on the client computer might be configured with a static IP address. Since the server performs network services that are dependent on the IP address of the local network adapter, using a statically assigned IP address on a client computer may result in connectivity issues with these services. Solution: Configure the client computer to use DHCP to acquire an IP address. You must use an IP address that is within the scope of your existing firewall device. If a router provides the DHCP service, you must configure the service for your network. For more information, see Appendix C in Getting Started. I need to change the IP address of the network adapter that connects to the Internet from dynamically assigned to statically assigned (or vice versa). Cause: The DHCP server at your Internet service provider (ISP) has switched from using a dynamic IP address to using a static IP address.

Solution: Reconfigure the network connection. To reconfigure the network connection 1. On a computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003, click Start, point to Control Panel, point to Network Connections, and then click the network connection you want to reconfigure.

2. Double-click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then modify how the IP address is
assigned to the network connection. Important If you are using a router to connect to the Internet, you must use a static IP address for the external interface (the interface that connects to your ISP) of the router. For more information, see the router manufacturer's documentation. Troubleshooting Your Intranet The user is prompted for credentials when trying to access the internal Web site. Cause: The internal Web site is based on Windows SharePoint Services. To use this site, users must be members of a Windows SharePoint Services site group. A user who is prompted for credentials does not have a site group membership. Solution: Create user accounts based on Windows Small Business Server templates. User accounts based on these templates have permission to access the internal Web site because the templates are members of the site groups by default. For more information, open Help and Support, and search for the topic "To add a user account." Documents on the internal Web site cannot be saved or edited. Cause: The client computer might be running a version of Microsoft Office that is earlier than Office XP. Solution: Upgrade the application on the client computer to Office XP or later so that the user can save or edit documents on the internal Web site. Search is not available on the internal Web site. Cause: The computer running Windows Small Business Server might be running Microsoft SQL Server Data Engine (MSDE). MSDE does not support full text searches. Solution: Upgrade MSDE to SQL Server 2000 or later and add full text search components. Evaluation and Not for Resale versions of SQL Server cannot be used to upgrade MSDE. The logon page for Remote Web Workplace appears in search engine results on the Internet. Cause: Components of the Internet called "Web robots" automatically search and catalog documents and pages that are published to Web sites by following hyperlinks on the various pages that have been published. You may experience this problem if you are not running Windows SBS 2003 with Service Pack 1 or Windows SBS 2003 R2. Solution: Either install Service Pack 1 for Windows SBS 2003 or upgrade your server to Windows SBS 2003 R2. By default, both of these prevent Web robots from cataloging Web sites on your server, including WWWRoot and Remote Web Workplace. For more information about Web robots, see the Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/? LinkId=25134). Troubleshooting Shared Network resources

Faxes are not being received. Cause: If no fax errors appear in the event log and you have an external modem and the fax service is running, the modem may need to be reset. Solution: Unplug the modem, and plug it back in to reset it. No option to route faxes to the document library ("Route to Document Library") is visible in the Fax Configuration Wizard or the Fax Admin console. Cause: You uninstalled and then reinstalled Fax Services using Add/Remove Windows components in Control Panel. Solution: Uninstall Fax Services using Add/Remove Windows components in Control Panel, and then reinstall the services using the Install option in Windows Small Business Server 2003 Setup. Note There is no option to "Reinstall" the Fax Services in Windows Small Business Server 2003 Setup. To uninstall and then reinstall Fax Services 1. Click Start, point to Control Panel, click Add or Remove Programs, and then click Add/Remove Windows Components.

2. In the Windows Components Wizard, clear the Fax Services check box. 3. Click Finish to close the wizard. 4. In the Add or Remove Programs dialog box, under Currently installed programs,
click Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2003, and then click Change/Remove.

5. Follow the instructions until you reach the Component Selection page. 6. To install Fax, under Action for the Fax Services, click the drop-down list, and then
change the action to Install.

7. Click Next to continue. Follow the instructions for completing Setup.


Users are unable to log on to the server following a virus scan Cause: You may encounter this issue if a virus is detected in an e-mail message while running a virus scan or while using real-time virus scanning on a computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003. In some scenarios, services and applications do not function properly. Event log messages are logged for affected services. Solution: Consider excluding some folders (such as e-mail and fax queues, and SQL databases) from real-time virus scanning. If the antivirus software has a "quarantine" feature, consider turning it off. For information about how to do this, visit the Web site of your antivirus software provider, or consult the online Help or user manual that came with the antivirus software. Consult your antivirus software provider to determine whether they offer an update for the problem. Note A quarantine state indicates that at least one virus was found and that your system may be infected. Make sure you have the latest virus signature installed on the server, and then perform a thorough scan for viruses. If quarantine happens repeatedly, ensure that all computers on the network have antivirus software running. Services or applications do not function properly after a virus scan

Cause: You may encounter this issue if a virus is detected in an e-mail message while running a virus scan or when using real-time virus scanning on a computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003. In some scenarios, services and applications do not function properly. Event log messages are logged for affected services. Solution: Consider excluding some folders (such as e-mail and fax queues, and SQL databases) from real-time virus scanning. If the antivirus software has a "quarantine" feature, consider turning it off. For information about how to do this, visit the Web site of your antivirus software provider, or consult the online Help or user manual that came with the antivirus software. Consult your antivirus software provider to determine whether they offer an update for the problem. Note A quarantine state indicates that at least one virus was found and that your system may be infected. Make sure you have the latest virus signature installed on the server, and then perform a thorough scan for viruses. If quarantine happens repeatedly, ensure that all computers on the network have antivirus software running. Troubleshooting Remote Connections Users receive a security alert when they try to connect to a secure Web site on the computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003. Cause: This commonly appears after using the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard to create an unsigned certificate for the company Web sites. Because the certificate was issued by Windows Small Business Server rather than by a trusted certification authority, the server itself is not being authenticated as the server that you want to connect to. Solutions: The session is still encrypted, so it is not possible for others to view information that you are sending. Users can click Yes to accept the unsigned certificate. If your company requires a higher level of security, consider purchasing a signed certificate from a trusted certification authority. If the Web site is being accessed from a private computer from which the site will be accessed repeatedly in the future, users can click View certificate to install the certificate into the certificate store of the client computer. Important For security reasons, users should not install the certificate if they are accessing the secure Web site from a public computer, such as an Internet kiosk. Sound cannot be disabled on remote desktop connections through the Remote Web Workplace. Cause: The Hear sounds from the remote computer on this computer option on the computer selection page cannot be disabled until the Remote Web Workplace Web site is added to the trusted sites zone in Internet Explorer. By default, sound will be played. Solution: Add the Remote Web Workplace to the trusted sites zone in Internet Explorer. To add the Remote Web Workplace to the trusted sites zone in Internet Explorer 1. Click Start, and then click Internet Explorer.

2. On the Tools menu, click Internet Options. 3. On the Security tab, click Trusted sites, and then click Sites.

4. Under Add this Web site to the zone, type the URL for the Remote Web Workplace,
and then click Add.

5. Click OK, and then click OK again.


Using Remote Web Workplace to connect a remote computer to a client computer results in an error message before the connection is established. Note The client computer you are connecting to must be running Microsoft Windows XP or later. Cause: The client computer may not be turned on. Solution: Verify that the client computer is powered on and connected to the Windows Small Business Server network. Cause: Remote Desktop connections may not be enabled on the client computer. Solution: Verify that Remote Desktop is enabled on the computer you are connecting to. Note To complete the following procedure, you must be logged on as a member of the Domain Admins security group. To enable Remote Desktop 1. Click Start, click Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, and then click System.

2. On the Remote tab, select the Allow users to connect remotely to this computer
check box.

3. Ensure that you have the proper permissions to connect to your computer remotely,
and then click OK. You must be an administrator or a member of the Remote Desktop Users group to connect remotely to your computer.

Verify that Remote Desktop is enabled by creating a Remote Desktop connection from another computer on the Windows Small Business Server network, and then attempting to connect to your computer. To start Remote Desktop, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to Communications, and then click Remote Desktop Connection. If you are running any firewall software on the client computer, ensure that it is not blocking access to port 3389 (the port specific to Remote Desktop Connections). For more information, see the firewall manufacturer's documentation. Cause: The remote computer may have reached the maximum number of allowed connections. Solution: Verify that the computer you are connecting to has not reached the maximum number of allowed connections. If you are connecting to a computer running Windows XP Professional, only one user can be connected at a time. If you are connecting to an application sharing server, connections are determined by the number of client access licenses (CALs) purchased by your company. For more information, see your administrator. Cause: Firewall settings may be blocking port 4125. Solution: Verify that port 4125 (the port specific to the Remote Web Workplace) is open to the Internet on the computer running Windows Small Business Server. If you ran the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard, and chose to publish the Remote Web Workplace, this is configured automatically on the server. If you have a router or firewall device that does not support UPnP, you must manually configure this device to accept Internet traffic through port 4125. For more information, see the device manufacturer's documentation.

If the computer running Windows Small Business Server is running Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server, run the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard, choose to publish the Remote Web Workplace, and ISA Server will be automatically configured to allow Remote Desktop connections. If you are connecting from a remote computer that accesses the Internet through ISA Server, the person responsible for ISA Server must create a protocol rule allowing outbound traffic through port 4125. You must also install ISA Firewall Client on the remote computer. Verify that your Internet service provider (ISP) is not blocking Internet traffic through port 4125. A client computer does not appear in the Computers list after you click Connect to my computer at work. Cause: The client computer has not been joined to the Windows Small Business Server domain. Solution: Join the client computer to the Windows Small Business Server domain.

To join the client computer to the Windows Small Business Server domain 1. Open Internet Explorer, and type the following URL in the address bar: https://servername/connectcomputer (where servername is the name of the computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003).

2. Click Connect to the network now, and follow the instructions in the Network

Configuration Wizard to join the client computer to the Windows Small Business Server domain. Cause: The client computer is not running Windows XP Professional or later. Solution: Verify that the client computer is running Windows XP Professional or later. Cause: You are attempting to access the Remote Web Workplace from the computer you are logged on to. Solution: Access the Remote Web Workplace from another computer. Note Computers running server operating systems do not appear in the list of computers you can connect to. Application sharing servers are available through the Connect to my companys application-sharing server link. Links appear in and disappear from the Remote Web Workplace. Cause: Remote Web Workplace links are dynamic, and are based on Windows Small Business Server network features that are available from the Internet. Links may also be manually disabled by your network administrator for security reasons, and they may not appear if you are accessing the Remote Web Workplace from a public or shared computer that is using an earlier browser. Solution: This behavior is by design. If a link that you regularly use disappears, contact your administrator, upgrade the browser on the public or shared computer to the latest version, or access the Remote Web Workplace from a computer that is not public or shared. Remote Web Workplace features are inaccessible with my Web browser. Cause: Some browsers do not support technology required by the Remote Web Workplace. This technology may include the use of unsigned certificates, ActiveX Controls (which are required for Remote Desktop sessions), and Windows Integrated Authentication (which is required for accessing Monitoring links and your company's internal Web site).

Solution: Upgrade to the latest version of the Web browser and ensure the browser supports the noted technologies. The connection to the Remote Web Workplace is frequently interrupted or lost. Cause: The Remote Web Workplace contains a built-in timeout feature for security reasons. When your session has been inactive for a specified period of time, you are logged off automatically. The Remote Web Workplace will timeout after 20 minutes of inactivity by default if you use the site from a public or shared computer. If the computer is not public or shared, the timeout is 120 minutes by default. Solution: If you would prefer the 120-minute timeout, you can access the Remote Web Workplace from a computer that is not public or shared, and clear the I'm using a public or shared computer check box on the logon page. If you need more time, contact your network administrator. The timeout values for the Remote Web Workplace can be manually configured. However, seriously consider the security implications of a longer timeout. Cause: If you run a backup program or antivirus scan while remote users are connected to the network, Remote Web Workplace remote desktop sessions may be disconnected. If this occurs, the error message "An Internal Error has occurred" appears, and users are returned to the Remote Web Workplace computer selection page or log on page. At this point, users can log back on to the remote computer and resume work. Solution: A supported fix is available from Microsoft. For more information, see Knowledge Base article 821438 at the Microsoft Product Support Services Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=19635). Note As a best practice, backups and antivirus scans should be scheduled for times when users are least likely to be logged on to a remote session. Cause: Certain Internet connection types, such as dial-up and PPoE connections, may be subject to timeouts due to inactivity. Solution: This is by design. Contact your Internet service provider if you require a longer timeout period. Cause: Intermittent drops in connectivity may result from wireless or faulty network connections. Solution: Ensure that network hardware is not resetting. See your hardware vendors documentation. The company name on the logon page is incorrect or has changed. Cause: The name on the logon page of the Remote Web Workplace is the company name that was specified during Windows Small Business Server Setup. Solution: You can change this name by editing the following registry entry: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ RegisteredOrganization Caution Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. Before making changes to the registry, you should back up any valued data on the computer. Note Only names of 50 characters or less are supported. The link in the Remote Web Workplace introductory e-mail does not work.

Cause: Some e-mail programs, such as Outlook Web Access, may block links as a security precaution. Additionally, the Web site address may not be registered or immediately available. Solution: Type the address into your Web browser's address bar, or try the link later or from a different computer. If the site still does not appear, contact your network administrator. Troubleshooting Client Computer Licensing Users are unable to log on to the network or access network resources Cause: If Small Business Server 2003 cannot validate the number of installed client access licenses (CALs), the number of available licenses will be reset to five. This can occur if Active Directory is unavailable or if the license store becomes corrupt. When this happens, you will receive an error message that will also be logged to the System event log. The following error is also recorded in the Application event log: "No license was available for user Domain\Username using product Productname. Use Licensing from the Administrative Tools folder to ensure that you have sufficient licenses." Solution: To correct this problem, restore the CALs from a valid license store using the Restore License Wizard, or from System backup using the Backup or Restore Wizard. Alternately, you can use the Add License Wizard to reissue them. Note To complete the following procedures, you must be logged on as a member of the Domain Admins security group. To restore CALs using the Restore License Wizard 1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Licensing. Details about the currently installed CALs appear in the details pane.

2. Click Restore Licenses.


3. Follow the instructions to specify the file name and location of the backup file from which you want to restore the CALs. To restore CALs using the Backup or Restore Wizard 1. Insert the correct tape into the tape drive, or connect the removable hard drive to the system

2. Open the Backup or Restore Wizard. To do this, click Start, click Run, type
ntbackup, and then click OK. If the Backup or Restore Wizard does not recognize the backup media, the Recognizable Media Found dialog box appears. Select Allow Backup Utility.

3. On the Backup or Restore page, select Restore files and settings. 4. On the What to Restore page, under Items to restore, select the files or folders
that you want to restore, and then click Next.

5. On the Completing the Backup or Restore Wizard page, review the settings. If
you want to change the location to which the backup is restored or how the existing files that you are backing up are handled, click Advanced.

a.

On the Where to Restore page, you can change the location to which your files are restored, or you can choose to have your files restored to a single folder.

b. c.

On the How to Restore page, you can choose what to do with the versions of the files that already exist on your computer. On the Advanced Restore Options page, if you chose to restore to the original location on the Where to restore page, ensure that the Restore junction points, but not the folders and the file data they reference check box is selected. If you chose to save to a different location, ensure that the check box is not selected. Note Do recover files through a Remote Desktop session. To reissue CALs to the same server 1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Licensing. Details about the currently installed CALs appear in the details pane.

2. In the details pane, click Add Client Licenses to open the Add License Wizard, and
then follow the wizard instructions. telephone to reissue licenses. 4. After completing the wizard, refresh the Licensing console to verify the successful reissue of the CALs. Note You will be required to provide the license codes that you received when you purchased the CALs. Note If you have a choice between using the telephone or using the Internet to activate CALs, it is recommended that you use the Internet. Note If you are using the telephone to activate the CALs, be prepared to provide a customer service representative with the Installation IDs from the Confirmation Information page in the wizard. You can print both the contact information and Installation IDs from the Confirmation Information wizard page. Note If you have made changes to the hardware configuration of your computer since first adding the CALs, you may be required to transfer licenses rather than reissue them. Note To avoid the need to reissue CALs, it is recommended that you restore licenses from backup whenever possible. How to troubleshoot startup problems in Windows Server 2003 View products that this article applies to. : 325375 Article ID Last Review : December 3, 2007 Revision : 14.3 This article was previously published under Q325375 On This Page SUMMARY How to Start the Computer by Using the Last Known Good Configuration How to Start the Computer in Safe Mode To Use Event Viewer to Identify the Cause of the Startup Problem To Use System Information to Identify the Cause of the Startup Problem To View the Safe Mode Boot Log File To Use Device Manager to Identify the Cause of the Startup Problem How to Use System Configuration Utility To Create a Clean Environment for Troubleshooting To Isolate Problems by Using System Startup Options To Isolate Problems by Using Selective Startup Options

3. On the Contact Method page, select whether you will use the Internet or the

To Isolate Problems by Using the Startup Tab To Troubleshoot System Services To Troubleshoot the System.ini File To Troubleshoot the Win.ini File To Troubleshoot the Boot.ini File To Reset System Configuration Utility to Normal Startup How to Use the Microsoft Windows Recovery Console To Confirm That Your Hard Disk or File System Is Not Damaged How to Use Automated System Recovery To Create an ASR Disk Set by Using Backup How to Repair Your Installation of Windows How to Use the Microsoft Product Support Services Web Site to Find a Solution SUMMARY This article describes general procedures that you can use to troubleshoot startup problems in Windows Server 2003. A successful Windows startup includes of the following four phases: Initial phase Boot loader phase Kernel phase Logon phase If a problem occurs during one of these phases, Windows may not start correctly, and you may experience one of the following problems: The computer stops responding (hangs). You receive an error message. If a startup problem occurs after you click Microsoft Windows Server 2003 on either the boot loader menu or when you receive the "Please select the operating system to start" message, files that the operating system needs may be missing or damaged. Windows provides a variety of options that you can use to troubleshoot this issue, including Safe mode, the Recovery Console, and an Automated System Recovery. Back to the top How to Start the Computer by Using the Last Known Good Configuration If the startup problem occurs immediately after you make a change to the computer (for example, after you install a new driver), try to start the computer by using the Last Known Good Configuration feature. When you use the Last Known Good Configuration feature, you start your computer by using the most recent settings that worked. This feature restores registry information and driver settings that were in effect the last time the computer started successfully. Use this feature when you cannot start Windows after you make a change to the computer (for example, after you install or upgrade a device driver). To start the computer by using Last Known Good Configuration, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, and then click Shut Down. 2. Click Restart, and then click OK. 3. When you see the message Please select the operating system to start, press the F8 key. 4. Use the arrow keys to select Last Known Good Configuration, and then press ENTER. Note NUM LOCK must be off before the arrow keys on the numeric keypad will function. 5. If you are running other operating systems on the computer, click Microsoft Windows Server 2003 in the list, and then press ENTER. Notes By selecting Last Known Good Configuration, you can recover from problems such as a newly added driver that may be incorrect for your hardware. This feature does not solve problems caused by corrupted or missing drivers or files. When you select Last Known Good Configuration, only the information in registry key HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet is restored. Any changes you have made in other registry keys remain. If you can start your computer by using Last Known Good Configuration, the last change that you made to the computer (for example, the installation of a driver) may be the cause of the

incorrect startup behavior. Microsoft recommends that you either remove or update the driver or program, and then test Windows for correct startup. Back to the top How to Start the Computer in Safe Mode When you start the computer in Safe mode, Windows loads only the drivers and computer services that you need. You can use Safe mode when you have to identify and resolve problems that are caused by faulty drivers, programs, or services that start automatically. If the computer starts successfully in Safe mode but it does not start in normal mode, the computer may have a conflict with the hardware settings or the resources. There may be incompatibilities with programs, services, or drivers, or there may be registry damage. In Safe mode, you can disable or remove a program, service, or device driver that may prevent the computer from starting. To troubleshoot startup problems in Safe mode, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, and then click Shut Down. 2. Click Restart, and then click OK. 3. When you see the message Please select the operating system to start, press F8. 4. In Windows Advanced Option Menu, use the arrow keys to select Safe Mode, and then press ENTER. Note NUM LOCK must be off before the arrow keys on the numeric keypad will function. 5. If you are running other operating systems on the computer, click Microsoft Windows Server 2003 on the list that is displayed, and then press ENTER. 6. Do one of the following: If the computer does not start in Safe mode, try starting the computer by using the Recovery Console. If you still cannot start the computer, look for possible hardware problems, such as defective devices, installation problems, cabling problems, or connector problems. Remove any newly added hardware, and then restart the computer to see if the problem is resolved. If the computer starts in Safe mode, go to the next section to continue to

troubleshoot the startup issue.


To Use Event Viewer to Identify the Cause of the Startup Problem View the event logs in Event Viewer for additional information that may help you to identify and diagnose the cause of the startup problem. To view events that are recorded in the event logs, follow these steps: 1. Do one of the following: Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Event Viewer. Start the Event Viewer snap-in in Microsoft Management Console (MMC). 2. In the console tree, expand Event Viewer, and then click the log that you want to view. For example, click System log or Application log. 3. In the details pane, double-click the event that you want to view. To copy the details of the event, click Copy, open a new document in the program in which you want to paste the event (for example, Microsoft Word), and then click Paste on the Edit menu. 4. To view the description of the previous event or the next event, press the UP ARROW key or the DOWN ARROW key. To Use System Information to Identify the Cause of the Startup Problem The System Information tool displays a comprehensive view of the computer's hardware, the system components, and the software environment. Use this tool to help identify possible problem devices and device conflicts. To do this, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, and then click Run. 2. In the Open box, type msinfo32, and then click OK. 3. Look for problem devices or device conflicts. To do so: a. In the console tree, expand Components, and then click Problem Devices. Note any devices that are listed in the right pane. b. In the console tree, expand Hardware Resources, and then click Conflicts/Sharing.

Note any resource conflicts that are listed in the right pane. c. If you identify a problem device, perform the appropriate action (for example, remove, disable, or reconfigure the device, or update the driver), and then restart the computer in normal mode. You can use Device Manager to remove or disable devices and their drivers. For more information about Device Manager, see the Use Device Manager to Identify the Cause of the Startup Problem section of this article. If the computer starts correctly, that particular device may be the cause of the startup problem. If you disabled a device to resolve the problem, make sure that the device is listed on the Windows Server 2003 Hardware Compatibility List (HCL), and that it is installed correctly. Also, contact the manufacturer to report the behavior and to obtain information about possible updates that can resolve the startup problem.For information about how to contact computer hardware manufacturers, click the appropriate article number in the following list to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 65416 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/65416/) Hardware and software vendor contact information, A-K 60781 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/60781/) Hardware and software vendor contact information, L-P 60782 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/60782/) Hardware and software vendor contact information, Q-Z

Microsoft provides third-party contact information to help you find technical support. This contact information may change without notice. Microsoft does not guarantee the accuracy of this third-party contact information.
4. If no device conflicts or problem devices are reported by the System Information tool, look for programs that start automatically when Windows starts. To do so, follow these steps: a. In the console tree, expand Software Environment, and then click Startup Programs. Programs that start automatically when Windows starts are listed in the right pane. b. Disable the programs, and then restart the computer. For information about how to disable the program, see the program documentation or contact the manufacturer. c. If you disable the startup programs, and the startup problem is resolved, enable

the programs again, one at a time. Shut down and restart the computer each time you enable a program, and note if the incorrect startup behavior occurs. If the behavior occurs, the last program that you enabled may be causing the incorrect startup behavior.
To View the Safe Mode Boot Log File To troubleshoot startup issues, view the boot log file, Ntbtlog.txt, and then make a note of the drivers and services that did not load when you started your computer in Safe mode. This log file is located in the %SystemRoot% folder (by default, this is the Windows folder). The log file lists devices and services that load (and do not load) when you start the computer in Safe mode. You can use a text editor such as Notepad to open and view the log file. Use the list of drivers and services that did not load at startup to help identify the possible cause of the startup problem. Note Some startup problems may occur early in the startup process. In this scenario, Windows may not save the boot log file to the hard disk.

To Use Device Manager to Identify the Cause of the Startup Problem Device Manager displays a graphical view of the hardware that is installed on your computer. Use this tool to resolve any possible device conflicts or to identify incompatible devices that may be the cause of the startup problem. To start Device Manager, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, right-click My Computer, and then click Manage. 2. Expand System Tools, and then click Device Manager. The devices that are installed on your computer are listed in the right pane. If a symbol is displayed next to a device, there may be a problem with the device. For example, a black exclamation point (!) on a yellow field indicates that the device is in a problem state. Note To disable a device in Device Manager, right-click the device, and then click Disable. 3. Investigate possible device conflicts. To do so, double-click the device in the right pane, and then click the Resources tab. If a device conflict exists, it is listed under Conflicting device list. Note the Use automatic settings check box. If Windows successfully detects a device, this check box is selected, and the device functions correctly. However, if the resource settings are based on Basic Configuration n (where n is any number from 0 to 9), you may have to change the configuration. To do so, either click a different basic configuration from the list or manually change the resource settings. WARNING This procedure may require that you change the computer's complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) settings and the basic input/output system (BIOS) settings. Incorrect changes to the BIOS of the computer can result in serious problems. Change the computer's CMOS settings at your own risk. If Windows cannot resolve a resource conflict, verify that the computer is configured to permit Windows to enumerate the devices in the computer. To do so, enable the Plug and Play OS setting in the Setup tool of the computer's BIOS. To change the computer's BIOS settings, see the computer documentation or contact your computer manufacturer. 4. If you identify a problem device, disable it, and then restart the computer in normal mode. If the computer starts correctly, the device that you disabled may be the cause of the startup problem. Make sure that the device is listed on the Windows Server 2003 Hardware Compatibility List (HCL) and that it is installed correctly. Also, contact the manufacturer to report the behavior and to obtain information about possible updates that can resolve the startup problem. For additional information about how to configure devices in Device Manager, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 323423 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/323423/) How to use Device Manager to configure devices in Windows Server 2003 Back to the top How to Use System Configuration Utility System Configuration Utility (Msconfig.exe) automates the routine troubleshooting steps that Microsoft Product Support Services technicians use when they diagnose Windows configuration issues. You can use this tool to modify the system configuration and troubleshoot the problem by using a process-of-elimination method. You must be logged on as Administrator or as a member of the administrative groups to use System Configuration Utility. If your computer is connected to a network, network policy settings may prevent you from using the utility. As a security "best practice," consider using the Run as command to perform these procedures. Note Microsoft strongly recommends that you do not use System Configuration Utility to modify the Boot.ini file on your computer without the help of a Microsoft support professional. Doing so may render your computer unusable.

To Create a Clean Environment for Troubleshooting 1. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig in the Open box, and then click OK. (To use the Run as command, type runas /user:administrator Path\msconfig.exe in the Open box, and then click OK. ) 2. Click the General tab, click Diagnostic startup - load basic devices and services only, click OK, and then click Restart to restart your computer. 3. After Windows starts, determine whether the problem still occurs. To Isolate Problems by Using System Startup Options 1. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig in the Open box, and then click OK. Click the General tab, and then click Selective Startup. Click to clear the following check boxes: Process SYSTEM.INI File Process WIN.INI File Load System Services You will not be able to clear the Use Original BOOT.INI check box. 4. To test the software loading process, make sure the Load Startup Items check box is selected, and then click OK. 5. Restart the computer when you are prompted to do so. To Isolate Problems by Using Selective Startup Options 1. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig in the Open box, and then click OK. 2. Click the General tab, and then click Selective Startup. 3. Click to clear all the check boxes under Selective Startup. You will not be able to clear the Use Original BOOT.INI check box. 4. Click to select the Process SYSTEM.INI File check box, click OK, and then restart the computer when you are prompted. Repeat this process and select each check box one at a time. Restart your computer each time. Repeat the process until the problem occurs. 5. When the problem occurs, click the tab that corresponds to the selected file. For example, if the problem occurs after you select the Win.ini file, click the WIN.INI tab in System Configuration Utility. To Isolate Problems by Using the Startup Tab The Startup tab lists items that load at startup from the Startup group, Win.ini load= and run=, and the registry. 1. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig in the Open box, and then click OK. 2. Click the Startup tab. 3. Click to clear all check boxes. 4. To start troubleshooting, click to select the first check box, click OK, and then restart the computer when you are prompted. Repeat this process and select each check box one at a time. Restart your computer each time. Repeat the process until the problem occurs. To Troubleshoot System Services 1. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig in the Open box, and then click OK. 2. Click the Services tab. 3. Make a note of any services that are not selected. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. IMPORTANT Do not skip this step. You will need this information later. Click Disable All, click OK, and then restart your computer. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig in the Open box, and then click OK. Click the Services tab. Click to select the check box of a service to turn it on, and then click OK. Restart your computer, and see if the problem occurs. Repeat steps 5 through 8 for each service until the problem occurs. When the problem occurs, you will know that the last service you turned on is causing the problem. Make a note of this service, and go to step 10. Click Enable All, click to clear the check box next to the faulty service, click to clear the check boxes of any other services you made note of in step 3, click OK, and then restart 2. 3.

your computer. As a workaround, you can leave the faulty service turned off (not selected). Contact the manufacturer of the faulty service for more assistance. Note You might be able to determine more quickly which service is causing the problem by testing the services in groups. Divide the services into two groups--select the check boxes of the first group, and clear the check boxes of the second group. Restart your computer, and then test for the problem. If the problem occurs, the faulty service is in the group with the selected check boxes. If the problem does not occur, the faulty service is in the group with the cleared check boxes. Repeat this process on the faulty group until you have isolated the faulty service. To Troubleshoot the System.ini File 1. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig in the Open box, and then click OK. 2. Click the SYSTEM.INI tab. 3. Make a note of any items that are not selected. You might have to expand some items (such as [drivers]) to determine if any sub-items are not selected. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. IMPORTANT Do not skip this step. You will need this information later. Click Disable All, click OK, and then restart your computer. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig in the Open box, and then click OK. Click the SYSTEM.INI tab. Expand all items in the list, click the check box of an item to turn it on, and then click OK. Restart your computer, and see if the problem occurs. Repeat steps 5 through 8 for each item until the problem occurs. When the problem occurs, you will know that the last item you turned on is causing the problem. Make a note of this item, and then go to step 10. Click Enable All, click to clear the check box next to the faulty item, click to clear the check boxes of any other items you made note of in step 3, click OK, and then restart your computer. As a workaround, you can leave the faulty item turned off (not selected). If possible, contact the manufacturer of the faulty item for more assistance. Note You might be able to determine more quickly which System.ini item is causing the problem by testing the items in groups. Divide the items into two groups--select the check boxes of the first group, and clear the check boxes of the second group. Restart your computer, and then test for the problem. If the problem occurs, the faulty service is in the group with the selected check boxes. If the problem does not occur, the faulty service is in the group with the cleared check boxes. Repeat this process on the faulty group until you have isolated the faulty System.ini item. To Troubleshoot the Win.ini File 1. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig in the Open box, and then click OK. 2. Click the WIN.INI tab. 3. Make a note of any items that are not selected. You might have to expand some items (such as [OLFax Ports]) to determine if any sub-items are not selected. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. IMPORTANT Do not skip this step. You will need this information later. Click Disable All, click OK, and then restart your computer. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig in the Open box, and then click OK. Click the WIN.INI tab. Expand all items in the list, click the check box of an item to turn it on, and then click OK. Restart your computer, and see if the problem occurs. Repeat steps 5 through 8 for each item until the problem occurs. When the problem occurs, you will know that the last item you turned on is causing the problem. Make a note of this item, and then go to step 10. Click Enable All, click to clear the check box of the faulty item, click to clear the check

10.

10.

boxes of any other items you made note of in step 3, click OK, and then restart your computer. As a workaround, you can leave the faulty item turned off (not selected). If possible, contact the manufacturer of the faulty item for more assistance. Note You might be able to determine more quickly which Win.ini item is causing the problem by testing the items in groups. Divide the items into two groups--select the check boxes of the first group, and clear the check boxes of the second group. Restart your computer, and then test for the problem. If the problem occurs, the faulty service is in the group with the selected check boxes. If the problem does not occur, the faulty service is in the group with the cleared check boxes. Repeat this process on the faulty group until you have isolated the faulty Win.ini item. To Troubleshoot the Boot.ini File Only system administrators and advanced users should try to change the Boot.ini file. Steps for troubleshooting Boot.ini are beyond the scope of this article. For additional information, search the Microsoft Knowledge Base. To do this, visit the following Microsoft Web site: Microsoft Product Support Services http://support.microsoft.com (http://support.microsoft.com/) To Reset System Configuration Utility to Normal Startup To reset System Configuration Utility to normal startup, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig in the Open box, and then click OK. 2. On the General tab, click Normal Startup - load all device drivers and services, and then click OK. 3. Restart your computer. Back to the top How to Use the Microsoft Windows Recovery Console The Recovery Console is a command-line tool that you can use to repair Windows if the computer does not start properly. You can start the Recovery Console from the Windows Server 2003 CD or at startup if the Recovery Console was previously installed to your computer. Use the Recovery Console if you used the Last Known Good Configuration startup option and it was not successful and you cannot start the computer in Safe mode. Microsoft recommends that you use the Recovery Console method only if you are an advanced user who can use basic commands to identify and locate problem drivers and files. To use Recovery Console, follow these steps: 1. Insert the Windows Server 2003 installation CD in your CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive, and then restart the computer. 2. When you are prompted during text-mode setup, press R to start the Recovery Console. You can use the Recovery Console to: Access the drives on your computer. Enable or disable device drivers or services. Copy files from the Windows Server 2003 installation CD or copy files from other removable media. For example, you can copy a file that you need that was deleted. Create a new boot sector and a new master boot record (MBR). You might have to do this if there are problems starting from the existing boot sector. To Confirm That Your Hard Disk or File System Is Not Damaged To confirm that your hard disk or file system is not damaged, start your computer from the Windows Server 2003 CD, start the Recovery Console, and then use the Chkdsk commandline utility. This may solve your problem. IMPORTANT Microsoft recommends that only advanced users or administrators use the Recovery Console. You have to know the password for the Administrator account to use the Recovery Console. For additional information about how to test and repair a damaged hard disk by using Chkdsk,

see the "Using the Recovery Console and Using the Recovery Console Command Prompt" sections in the following article: 307654 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307654/) How to install and use the Recovery Console in Windows XP Note If Chkdsk reports that it cannot access your hard disk, you may have a hardware failure. Examine all cable connections and any jumper settings on your drive. Contact a computer repair professional, or the manufacturer of your computer for more assistance. If Chkdsk reports that it cannot fix all hard disk problems, your file system or MBR may be damaged or no longer accessible. Try using the appropriate Recovery Console commands, such as Fixmbr and Fixboot, contact a data recovery service, or repartition and then reformat your hard disk. WARNING: If you repartition and reformat your hard disk, you lose all information on the disk. IMPORTANT For more assistance, contact your computer manufacturer or a Microsoft Product Support Services professional. Only qualified personnel should try to repair your computer. If the computer repair is performed by non-qualified personnel, this may nullify your computer's warranty. For additional information about how to Use Recovery Console, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 326215 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326215/) How to use the Recovery Console on a Windows Server 2003-based computer that does not start Back to the top How to Use Automated System Recovery To recover from a system failure by using Automated System Recovery (ASR), follow these steps: 1. Make sure you have the following on hand before you start the recovery procedure: Your previously created ASR floppy disk. Your previously created backup media. The original operating system installation CD. If you have a mass storage controller and you are aware that the manufacturer

has supplied a separate driver file for it (different from the driver files that are available on the Setup CD), obtain the file (on a floppy disk) before you start this procedure.
2. Insert the original operating system installation CD into your CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive. 3. Restart your computer. If you are prompted to press a key to start the computer from CD, press the appropriate key. 4. If you have a separate driver file as described in step 1, press the F6 key to use the driver as part of Setup when you are prompted. 5. Press the F2 key when you are prompted at the start of the text-only mode section of Setup. You are prompted to insert the ASR floppy disk that you previously created. 6. Follow the on-screen instructions. 7. If you have a separate driver file as described in step 1, press F6 (a second time) when you are prompted after the system restarts. 8. Follow the on-screen instructions. Notes ASR does not restore your data files. See Windows Help for more information about backing up and restoring your data files. If you are restoring a server cluster in which all nodes failed and the quorum disk cannot be restored from backup, use ASR on each node in the original cluster to restore the disk signatures and the partition layout of the cluster disks (quorum and nonquorum). For more information about backing up and restoring server clusters, see Windows Help. To Create an ASR Disk Set by Using Backup To use ASR, you must have an ASR disk set. To create an ASR disk set, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Backup. By default, the Backup or Restore Wizard starts, unless it is disabled. You can use the

Backup or Restore Wizard to create an ASR disk set by answering All information on this computer in the What do you want to backup? section. Otherwise, you can go to the next step to create an ASR disk set in Advanced Mode. 2. Click the Advanced Mode link in the Backup or Restore Wizard. 3. On the Tools menu, click ASR Wizard. 4. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen. Notes You need a blank 1.44 megabyte (MB) floppy disk to save your system settings and media to contain the backup files. If your computer does not have a floppy disk drive, perform an ASR backup on the computer without the floppy disk drive. Copy the Asr.sif and Asrpnp.sif files that are located in the %SystemRoot%\Repair folder to another computer with a floppy disk drive, and then copy those files to a floppy disk. To perform this procedure, you must be a member of the Administrators or Backup Operators group on the local computer, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority. If the computer is joined to a domain, members of the Domain Admins group might be able to perform this procedure. As a security "best practice," consider using the Run as command to perform this procedure. This procedure backs up only those system files that you must have to start your system. You must back up your data files separately. After you create the ASR set, label this floppy disk and the backup media carefully and keep them together. To use the backup media, you must have the floppy disk that you created with that set of media. You cannot use a floppy disk that you created at a different time or with a different set of media. You must also have your Setup CD available at the time you perform ASR. Keep the ASR set in a secure location. The ASR set contains information about your systems configuration that might be used to cause damage to your system. If you are backing up a server cluster, run the Automated System Recovery Wizard on all nodes of the cluster, and make sure that the Cluster service is running when you start each ASR backup. Make sure that one of the nodes on which you run the Automated System Recovery Preparation Wizard is listed as the owner of the quorum resource while the wizard is running. Back to the top How to Repair Your Installation of Windows You may be able to repair a damaged Windows Server 2003 installation by running Windows Setup from the Windows CD. To repair your installation of Windows, follow these steps: 1. Insert the Windows Server 2003 CD in the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive. 2. If the Windows CD displays the What would you like to do? menu, click Exit. 3. Turn off your computer, wait ten seconds, and then turn your computer back on. 4. If you are prompted to start your computer from the CD, do so. Note You must be able to start your computer from the Windows Server 2003 CD-ROM to run Windows Setup. Your CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive must be configured to do so. For information about how to configure your computer to start from the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive, see the documentation that is included with your computer, or contact your computer manufacturer. 5. After Setup starts, press ENTER to continue the setup process. 6. Press ENTER to select the option To set up Windows now, press ENTER. Do not select the Recovery Console option. 7. Press F8 to accept the licensing agreement. Setup searches for previous installations of Windows. If Setup does not find a previous installation of Windows Server 2003, you might have a hardware failure. Hardware failures are beyond the scope of this article. See a computer hardware specialist for more help or try the Hardware troubleshooter. For more information about the Hardware Troubleshooter, see the Windows Server 2003 Help topic "Using Troubleshooters."

If Setup does find a previous installation of Windows Server 2003, you may receive the following message: If one of the following Windows Server 2003 installations is damaged, setup can try to repair it. Use the up and down arrows to select an installation. To repair the selected installation, press R. To continue without repairing, press ESC. Select the appropriate Windows Server 2003 operating system installation, and then press R to try to repair it. Follow the on-screen instructions to repair the installation.

Notes You might have to change the boot drive sequence in your BIOS settings to successfully start your computer from the Windows Server 2003 CD. Contact the manufacturer of your computer, or see your manufacturer's documentation, for more information. If you cannot start your computer from the Windows Server 2003 CD, you might have a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive failure or other hardware failure. Hardware failures are beyond the scope of this article. See a computer hardware specialist for more help or try the Hardware troubleshooter. For more information about the Hardware Troubleshooter, see the Windows Server 2003 Help topic "Using Troubleshooters." After you repair your Windows Server 2003, you may be required to reactivate your copy of Windows Server 2003.