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2009

Jr. Football PLAYBOOK


PLAYER COPY

Coaches Code of Ethics


y I will place the emotional and physical well-being of my players ahead of a personal desire to win. y I will treat each player as an individual, remembering the large range of emotional and physical development for the same age group. y I will do my best to provide a safe playing situation for my players. y I will promise to review and practice the basic first aid principles needed to treat injuries of my players. y I will do my best to organize practices that are fun and challenging for all my players. y I will lead by example in demonstrating fair play and sportsmanship to all my players. y I will provide a sports environment for my team that is free of drugs, tobacco, and alcohol, and I will refrain from their use at all youth sports events. y I will be knowledgeable in the rules of each sport that I coach, and I will teach these rules to my players. y I will use those coaching techniques appropriate for each of the skills that I teach. y I will remember that I am a youth sports coach, and that the game is for children and not adults.
Reprinted with permission from the National Alliance for Youth Sports, National Youth Sports Coaches Association, 2007.

Bill of Rights for Young Athletes


We all believe that all children and families who choose to do so have the right to participate in quality organized youth athletics. We believe that organized youth sports are for the children. As a parent, coach, volunteer, and program supporter please keep the following "Bill of Rights for Young Athletes" in mind at all times. Help us help our youth football program make the total player/family youth sports experience as positive as possible:

We believe that all children who choose to participate in organized youth sports have the following rights: y Right to participate in sports regardless of ability level. y Right to participate at a level commensurate with each child's maturity and ability. y Right to have qualified adult leaders. y Right to participate in safe and healthy environments. y Right to share in the leadership and decision-making of the sport. y Right to play as a child and not as an adult. y Right to proper preparation for participation in the sport. y Right to equal opportunity to strive for success. y Right to be treated with dignity by all. y Right to have fun through sport.
Reprinted with permission from Guidelines for Children's Sports, R. Martens and V. Seefeldt (Eds.)., Washington, D.C. American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, 1979.

As an organization, we have also adopted the National Youth Sports Coaches Associations position on winning and where we feel it best fits in youth sports competition:

WINNING AT ALL COSTS IS NOT WHAT YOUTH SPORTS ARE ABOUT... National Youth Sports Coaches Association's position on winning: "When it comes to youth sports, winning is an important component of the whole process. Both players and teams are obligated to play to win since that is the essence of competition. The problem with winning is when it starts to compromise more important ideals. When winning becomes the only objective, all of the other values of youth sports participation are lost."

Four for 4 Four Basics for 4 Quarters


ALIGNMENT:
knowing WHERE YOU ARE TO BE on the football field everytime youre ON the football field

ASSIGNMENT:
knowing WHAT YOU ARE TO DO from WHERE YOU ARE TO BE on the football field everytime youre ON the football field

TECHNIQUE:
knowing HOW YOU ARE TO DO WHAT YOU ARE TO DO from WHERE YOU ARE TO BE on the football field everytime youre ON the football field

EXECUTION:
simply DOING each of these things as well as YOU can every chance you get everytime youre on the football field!

On Offense on Defense and on Special Teams at EVERY Practice and in EVERY Game!
Reprinted with permission from Coach Mart!

Team Rules
y y y y y NO use of alcohol, tobacco, or illegal drugs! School comes first (before sports). Attend all practices, games & team functions. Report any and all injuries to coaching staff. Treat all teammates, coaches, opponents, officials, and fans with dignity and respect.

General Operating policies: These team rules will serve as a guideline for determining individual standing and continued participation of players, cheerleaders, coaches, staff, and volunteers within our football team. Transgressions of these team rules will be handled on a case by case basis. Among the determining factors involved in each individual case decision will be the overall well-being and positive long term development of the individuals involved in each particular situation, as well as the continued positive growth and development of our football program. Our Football team will also strive to work in concert with school, community, and municipal agencies in determining any club administration of consequence for each individual case and situation.

Coachs Points
y y y Your helmet is on your head for protection it is NEVER to be used as a weapon. If you attempt to use it as a weapon, you will be removed from our team! Never use your helmet to block or tackle. You may lead with your head, but the main point and force of contact must be your shoulder or chest. Remember at all times on the football field (in all practices and games) MOUTHPIECES IN and CHINSTRAPS BUCKLED!! ALWAYS remember: NEVER block an opponent if you cannot look him in the EYES. Or, in the words of an immortal coach: If you can see his crack, you must hold back! (or, If you only have his side, ya gotta let him slide). Always play through the whistle, never after it. In every pile after every play has been whistled dead always push off the ground, not off your opponent. Always strive to play as COMPLETE a football game as you can (in practices and on Game Day). Recognize your weaker areas and work hard to improve them dont simply try to hide them away! Remember: the more complete YOU are as a football player, the more complete WE are as a football team! Our football players are ALWAYS responsible for maintaining and demonstrating a high level of courteous and sportsmanlike conduct on the field of play (this includes: sidelines, practice fields, fieldhousesi, locker rooms, etc.). ANY and ALL unsportsmanlike conduct penalties thrown against a STORM player WILL result in that flagged players IMMEDIATE removal from the game for NO LESS than the next four plays from scrimmage. After those four plays, it will be at the discretion of the Head Football Coach as to when (or if) that player returns to the game. Any players who commit thoughtless penalties and/or executions on a continual basis may also be removed from game situations. In these cases, those players will remain on the sidelines until the situation can be positively addressed and remedied either through sideline component coaching or individualized attention in a practice setting. Our players are directly and soley responsible for maintaining a courteous and respectful relationship with game officials at all times. Absolutely NO displays of disrespect of any kind will be tolerated at any time. Players in violation of this policy will be immediately removed from the game and will not return. It is further expected that every member of the our football team will conduct themselves with utmost regard for decency, fair play, courtesy, and good sportsmanship at all times, and under all circumstances, while engaged in any activity as a representative of the our football team.

y y y

Nothing less is expected nothing less can be accepted.

General Policies
y We believe in the Do Right Principle. This means we expect our participants to know right from wrong and to DO RIGHT in any situation! There are instances when following or failing to follow this principle may be the deciding factor involving determinations concerning any individuals, their actions (or inactions), and their continued participation in our program. Remember: Theres never a wrong time to do the right thing More importantly, theres never a right time to do the wrong thing! y NEVER, EVER walk on the football field!!!!!!! o RUN onto the field to start every practice! o RUN to all stations, groups and breaks! o RUN into all huddles; RUN from all huddles to the line of scrimmage! o RUN onto the field; RUN to the sidelines! o RUN off the field to end every practice! o NEVER, EVER walk on the football field PERIOD!!! PRACTICE like you PLAY PLAY like you PRACTICE! o If you cant give the effort at practice, you wont give it in a game! o Remember: we have 1 scrimmage and 8 regular season games scheduled, and the possibility of three playoff games = 12 total possible game situations o We have 19 pre-season practices, and 33 regular season practices scheduled = 52 total possible practice situations PRACTICE is where we LEARN, EARN, and IMPROVE GAMES allow us to showcase what our PRACTICES instill in us!! y NEVER talk the talk ALWAYS walk the walk! o You dont ever need to talk about it you only ever need to just DO it. o Let your actions speak more completely and totally than words ever could o Never give an opponent more reason than he already has to elevate his game. We follow the ABLE approach to problem solving. Learn it, appreciate it and USE it to help YOU help US get from where we ARE to where we NEED TO BE!! FIRST: Make NO excuses!!!
(An excuse is an attempt to explain away a problem without owning up to it!)

We need to fix the problem! If you communicate honestly what happened (what you saw, what you did, etc.) we can begin the FIXING process If you only offer excuses, the problem only remains and gets worse! THEN:

Accept that something did happen. Believe that YOU can make it better. Learn how to correct it. Execute that correction from then on.
If we can all follow this approach we will be ABLE to improve as football players and football coaches, and THAT will improve us as a football TEAM!

Jr. FOOTBALL BASICS


We believe we stand a much greater chance of being successful in whatever pursuit were engaged in if we work together to eliminate as many mistakes as possible.
y We must work consistently to eliminate ALL penalties, most importantly the really sloppy, lazy, non-judgement calls like: o Illegal participation o Illegal formation o Illegal motion o False starts/offsides o Holding o Block in the back/clipping We will NOT tolerate unsportsmanlike penalties of ANY kind (on the field or on the sideline!) o Late hits o Spearing o Taunting o Foul/abusive/disrespectful action and/or language We must also strive to eliminate ALL mental mistakes as possible. Some very positive ways to achieve this are to constantly and consistently emphasize proper and complete: o ALIGNMENT, ASSIGNMENT, TECHNIQUE, & EXECUTION o Game situation knowledge and awareness (Field position, down & distance, quarter/half, time remaining, etc.) o Preparation = staying focused on your responsibilities so that you can have the most positive impact on our team effort when youre on the field. We must work to eliminate as many physical mistakes as possible, as well. Some positive ways to achieve this are: o By using proper ALIGNMENT, ASSIGNMENT, TECHNIQUE, & EXECUTION = doing YOUR job as thoroughly and effectively as YOU can on each and every play o By consistently demonstrating a dogged determination to be a positive part of every play by never giving up, and never giving in and by never settling to simply stand by and become a spectator (or cheerleader!).

Player Responsibilities
y Participants are responsible for providing their own transportation to and from ALL team practices, games, and team functions. While arrangements can be made through our team for car pools and such, no team personnel will be responsible for the transport of participants (whom they are not in the direct care/supervision of). Participants are responsible for attending all team functions (outside of practices and games). Participants are expected to follow all team guidelines, policies, and rules when involved in these functions. Participants are directly and solely responsible for contacting the name (or names) of anyone assigned to them on our Team Telephone Tree and for supplying timely, accurate information to said contact(s). Participants are directly responsible for maintaining and displaying a high level of courteous and socially acceptable behavior at ALL times most especially whenever they are involved in any activity in which they are wearing our team colors and/or logos! Remember: each of you represents the very best our program has to offer, and our program our ENTIRE program will be judged by the behavior of every one of its participants!

ALWAYS know who and what you are and let your behavior reflect that at all times.

YOU ARE A MEMBER OF OUR FOOTBALL TEAM Take PRIDE in that and make us PROUD!!

PRACTICE LOG
y y y y y y y y All participants are expected to dress appropriately for all practice situations and conditions (i.e. in all required equipment, in weather specific clothing, etc.) ALL personal business (bathroom breaks, equipment repair, etc.) is to be taken care of BEFORE practice STARTS. Team Practice STARTS at 6:00 PM!!! If youre not ON THE FIELD, WITH YOUR TEAMMATES by 5:55 PM YOURE LATE!!! Helmets go ON at the opening whistle of football practice. They come off only at the closing whistle of football practice or if a coach asks you to take them off! ALL participants are expected to remain alert and attentive to all coaches instruction and requests throughout football practice. All participants will be given water and rest breaks when appropriately scheduled or warranted, as a group or individually. All participants are expected to practice earnestly and enthusiastically. Bring it in means simply that. While gathering together, participants will give the coaches their UNDIVIDED attention, and will refrain from any lounging, talking, clowning, or any other displays of disrespect. Practice is over ONLY after the final whistle of the day. All equipment is to be worn until practice has ended, unless specifically directed otherwise by a member of the coaching and/or medical staff. All participants are expected to exit the practice facility in a clam and rational manner at the conclusion of each practice. Participants are SOLELY and directly responsible for their belongings while at football practice and are discouraged from bringing any and all non-essential gear.

y y y y

Reprinted with permission from Coach Mart!

General Practice Timeline


6:00 8:00 pm
6:00 - 6:20 = Pre-Practice 6:20 - 6:35 = Team Lap/Stretch/Form Running 6:35 6:50 = Individual Technique Stations - Offense: - Defense: y Line y Line y Ends y DEs y Backs y LBs y QBs y DBs 6:50 7:05 = Group Technique - Offense - Defense 7:05 7:25 = Game Situation Skellie - Our Offense vs. their defense y Kick Return kickoff y Offense vs. defense y PAT on score (or FG) y Punt 7:25 7:35 = Team PAT/Field Goal 7:35 7:50 = Game Situation Skellie - Our Defense vs. their offense y Kickoff kickoff return y Defense vs. offense y Punt Return y PAT/Field Goal defense 7:50 - 8:00 = Team cool down Team Goals: OFFENSE =
- Drive whenever we have the ball. - Always come away from the Green Zone with points. - Finish every touchdown with a successful try. - Score points in every quarter. - Do not turn the ball over. Ever.

DEFENSE =
- Do not allow our opponent to mount any sustained drives. - Do not allow the BIG Play. - Never allow a two point conversion. th - Allow NO points in the 4 Quarter - Force at least 1 turnover a game.

SPECIAL TEAMS =
- Never allow an opponent to score a TD on special teams. - Limit their return yardage maximize ours. - Maintain COMPLETE ball maintenance. - Never allow our kicks to be blocked. Ever. - Execute all our fakes properly deny them theirs working at all.

PRACTICE like you PLAY PLAY like you PRACTICE!

Four Quarters
You hear your coaches talk time and time again about the ingredients necessary to produce a successful football program:

PRIDE, SPORTSMANSHIP, TEAM WORK, DESIRE


While these are the essential four cornerstones our program has been built on, they will not guarantee success unless they are applied for FOUR QUARTERS!

And we cant ever PLAY for FOUR QUARTERS if we dont always PRACTICE for FOUR QUARTERS!
This type of commitment and dedication is not something that cam be turned on and off like a faucet. It IS it MUST BE a constant All of us, ALL TOGETHER for FOUR QUARTERS! Every chance we get This is what will separate us from our opponents This will be the strength we draw from This is something we will HAVE that they WILL NOT THIS is what makes us WHO and WHAT we are!!

Reprinted with permission from Coach Mart Lukk!

Football Officials Positioning & Responsibilities


3

Visitors Sideline SJ HL

R BJ U

LJ Home Sideline FJ

Referee - General oversight and control of game (Head Official). Gives signals for all fouls and is final authority for rule interpretations. Takes a position in backfield 10 to 12 yards behind line of scrimmage, favors right side (if quarterback is right-handed passer). Determines legality of snap, observes deep back(s) for legal motion. On running play, observes quarterback during and after handoff, remains with him until action has cleared away, then proceeds downfield, checking on runner and contact behind him. When runner is downed, Referee determines forward progress from wing official and, if necessary, adjusts final position o up legality of blocks by near linemen. Changes to complete concentration on quarterback as defenders approach. Primarily responsible to rule on possible roughing action on passer and if ball becomes loose, rules whether ball is free on a fumble or dead on an incomplete pass. During kicking situations, Referee has primary responsibility to rule on kickers actions and whether or not any subsequent contact by a defender is legal. The Referee stays wide and parallel on punts and will announce on the microphone when each period has ended.

Umpire - Primary responsibility to rule on players equipment, as well as their conduct and actions on scrimmage line. Lines up approximately four to five yards downfield, varying position from in front of weakside tackle to strongside guard. Looks for possible false start by offensive linemen. Observes legality of contact by both offensive linemen while blocking and by defensive players while they attempt to ward off blockers. Is prepared to call rule infractions if they occur on offense or defense. Moves forward to line of scrimmage when pass play develops in order to insure that interior linemen do not move illegally downfield. If offensive linemen indicate screen pass is to be attempted, Umpire shifts his attention toward screen side, picks up potential receiver in order to insure that he will legally be permitted to run his pattern and continues to rule on action of blockers. Umpire is to assist in ruling on incomplete or trapped passes when ball is thrown overhead or short. On punt plays, Umpire positions himself opposite Referee in offensive backfield - 5 yards from kicker and one yard behind. Head Linesman - Primarily responsible for ruling on offside, encroachment, and actions pertaining to scrimmage line prior to or at snap. Generally, keys on closest setback on his side of the field. On pass plays, Linesman is responsible to clear his receiver approximately seven yards downfield as he moves to a point five yards beyond the line. Linesmans secondary responsibility is to rule on any illegal action taken by defenders on any delay receiver moving downfield. Has full responsibility for ruling on sideline plays on his side, e.g., pass receiver or runner in or out of bounds. Together with Referee, Linesman is responsible for keeping track of number of downs and is in charge of mechanics of his chain crew in connection with its duties. Linesman must be prepared to assist in determining forward progress by a runner on play directed toward middle or into his side zone. He, in turn, is to signal Referee or Umpire what forward point ball has reached. Linesman is also responsible to rule on legality of action involving any receiver who approaches his side zone. He is to call pass interference when the infraction occurs and is to rule on legality of blockers and defenders on plays involving ball carriers, whether it is entirely a running play, a combination pass and run, or a play involving a kick. Also assists referee with intentional grounding.

HL

LJ

Line Judge - Straddles line of scrimmage on side of field opposite Linesman. Keeps time of game as a backup for clock operator. Along with Linesman is responsible for offside, encroachment, and actions pertaining to scrimmage line prior to or at snap. Line Judge keys on closest setback on his side of field. Line Judge is to observe his receiver until he moves at least seven yards downfield. He then moves toward backfield side, being especially alert to rule on any back in motion and on flight of ball when pass is made (he must rule whether forward or backward). Line Judge has primary responsibility to rule whether or not passer is behind or beyond line of scrimmage when pass is made. He also assists in observing actions by blockers and defenders who are on his side of field. After pass is thrown, Line Judge directs attention toward activities that occur in back of Umpire. During punting situations, Line Judge remains at line of scrimmage to be sure that only the end men move downfield until kick has been made. He also rules whether or not the kick crossed line and then observes action by members of the kicking team who are moving downfield to cover the kick. The Line Judge will advise the Referee when time has expired at the end of each period. Also assists referee with intentional grounding and determines whether pass is forward or backward.

FJ

Field Judge - Operates on same side of field as Line Judge, 20 yards deep. Keys on wide receiver on his side. Concentrates on path of end or back, observing legality of his potential block(s) or of actions taken against him. Is prepared to rule from deep position on holding or illegal use of hands by end or back or on defensive infractions committed by player guarding him. Has primary responsibility to make decisions involving sideline on his side of field, e.g., pass receiver or runner in or out of bounds. Field Judge makes decisions involving catching, recovery, or illegal touching of a loose ball beyond line of scrimmage; rules on plays involving pass receiver, including legality of catch or pass interference; assists in covering actions of runner, including blocks by teammates and that of defenders; calls clipping on punt returns; and, together with Back Judge, rules whether or not field goal attempts are successful. Back Judge - Takes a position 25 yards downfield. In general, favors the tight ends side of field. Keys on tight end, concentrates on his path and observes legality of tight ends potential block(s) or of actions taken against him. Is prepared to rule from deep position on holding or illegal use of hands by end or back or on defensive infractions committed by player guarding him. Back Judge times interval between plays on 40/25-second clock plus intermission between two periods of each half; makes decisions involving catching, recovery, or illegal touching of a loose ball beyond line of scrimmage; is responsible to rule on plays involving end line; calls pass interference, fair catch infractions, and clipping on kick returns; together with Field Judge, rules whether or not field goals and conversions are successful; and stays with ball on punts. Side Judge - Operates on same side of field as Head Linesman, 20 yards deep. Keys on wide receiver on his side. Concentrates on path of end or back, observing legality of his potential block(s) or of actions taken against him. Is prepared to rule from deep position on holding or illegal use of hands by end or back or on defensive infractions committed by player guarding him. Has primary responsibility to make decisions involving sideline on his side of field, e.g., pass receiver or runner in or out of bounds. Side Judge makes decisions involving catching, recovery, or illegal touching of a loose ball beyond line of scrimmage; rules on plays involving pass receiver, including legality of catch or pass interference; assists in covering actions of runner, including blocks by teammates and that of defenders; and calls clipping on punt returns. On field goals and point after touchdown attempts, he becomes a double umpire.

BJ

SJ

Jr. Football Officials Policy


Our football team realizes that the relationship we build and maintain with the dedicated men and women who officiate our games is paramount to our entire program working positively to achieve all of the successes we espouse to strive for. We as team administrators, coaches, players, and supporters can never afford to have any shade of hypocrisy sour or blemish that essential relationship. In order to create, foster, and maintain as positive, respectful, sportsmanlike and consistent a relationship as possible, we must strive to uphold not only the letter of all our stated team rules, responsibilities and attitudes, but also the very spirit of those essential ideals, as well. And we must do so on a continuous basis. For these and other obvious reasons, our team policy regarding game officials shall be as follows: y Our Head Football Coach will be the only representative of our football team to speak (either directly or indirectly) to any game official on the field during the course of a game regarding any game situation/ruling/decision/call/etc. Whenever the head coach does speak to any game official, he shall do so in as courteous and respectful a tone and manner as possible. All team representatives will refrain from addressing or speaking any and all game officials anywhere off the field of play, other than to greet or thank them as graciously as possible.

y y

REMINDERS:
y y y Game officials are our equals they are here to provide and perform just as valuable and important role as any team administrator, coach, player, or supporter. As we err, so might they in that instance, we must afford them the same respect, understanding, empathy and support we would hope to have reserved for ourselves! The game officials are the neutral parties!!! We (the team administrators, coaches, players and supporters) are the ones with the vested interests, so theirs must be the benefit of any doubt!!!

Always bear in mind, as well: You dont know what they know and you didnt see what they saw

2009

Jr. Football

OFFENSE

Jr. FOOTBALL OFFENSE


Football is a very simple game. And it has always been the teams that execute their basic offense effectively who have enjoyed the most success. Just good, old fashioned, hard nosed, down your throat, stop us if you can offense. And thats exactly the way the we play offensive football! Every team has to start somewhere, and our team prides itself on running an established, basic offense and running that offense WELL! It is an offense that demands proper execution through hard work, determination, and attention to detail. It is an offense that promises success on the filed through proper execution. We would have it no other way and we will get it no other way

What it takes to play Our Offense:


1. Know your ALIGNMENT, know your ASSIGNMENT.
On each offensive play, you must know where you are to be and what you are to do from there. If you can do this, we can effectively move the football. If YOU cant WE cant, either!

2. ALWAYS use proper TECHNIQUE.


When carrying the ball, taking a fake, running a pattern, or throwing a block, PROPER TECHNIQUE is a must! Not only do we eliminate offensive breakdowns by eliminating poor technique across the board on each and every play, more importantly, we lessen the risk of serious injury by doing the right thing the right way!

3. Get where youre going Firstest with the Mostest.


Offense always has the advantage of knowing the snap count. Use that advantage to our advantage by getting where you need to be as quickly and effectively as possible. (And always arrive in an ill temper!)

4. Drive until the whistle blows.


We play hard on every down on each side of the ball and nothing demonstrates this more than our entire offense driving until the whistle stops play on EVERY play!

5. Stay focused move ahead productively.


In order to move the football and score points we must operate together as a team. We must stay together and stay on task by not dwelling on what has happened (good or bad), but by focusing on what is happening and on what we need to make happen to keep moving forward.

Jr. FOOTBALL OFFENSE


Our Offensive Goals:
We approach each game we are to play as the ONLY game we are to play. We prepare for each game generally with proper conditioning and a focused attitude, and specifically by concentrating on whatever aspects of our overall team effort we must fine tune to be successful against that particular opponent. No matter what we may determine to be our most productive formations, plays, and/or executions for each of these specific opponents, we have found that certain general offensive goals MUST be pursued against ALL opponents if we are to hold out any reasonable hope of being successful offensively. Chief among these are the following five basics:

1. Drive whenever we have the ball.


It is the job of our offense to put points on the scoreboard. The most convincing way to do this is to simply drive the ball through our opponent and into the end zone and to do so every time we have the ball!

2. Always come away from the Green Zone with points.


We call the area from the plus 20 yard line to the goal line the Green Zone.
(Conversely, we call the area from the minus 20 yardline to the goal line the Red Zone Think about it Green means GO!, Red means STOP!)

Whenever we have the ball in this area we must execute our offense as well as we possibly can and come away with something positive (like POINTS!!). If not, its like setting the table and throwing away the meal!

3. Finish every touchdown with a successful try.


Whether its one or two (especially two!) we must convert the try after weve gotten the touchdown. To put it simply points are points are points, and our job on offense is to make sure we end up with more of them than our opponent does. EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM COUNTS!!

4. Score points in each quarter.


Scoring points is a direct result of proper offensive execution and proper offensive execution is our goal every time we have the ball. Therefore, if it can be assumed that we should have the ball at least once every quarter, it can then be assumed that we should generate offensive points in each quarter! (Think about it!)

5. Do not turn the ball over. Ever.


Our offense can simply not score points without the football, gentlemen. Enough said

Jr. FOOTBALL OFFENSE


Offensive Terminology
Concepts of:
y
y

Offensive Right and Left = mean as WE align (FACING our opponent) Playside and Backside = PLAYSIDE means the side of the offense the play is designed to be run to
BACKSIDE means the opposite side (away from designed point of attack! On-side and Off-side)

y y

INTERIOR Offensive Line = Center, Guards (left and right) and Tackles (left and tight). These positions are ineligible to go downfield to receive passes and the last player on each side of the interior offensive line (usually the Tackles) MUST be covered on the line of scrimmage by an eligible receiver = our Offensive ENDS Offensive ENDS = TIGHT(Y) and/or SPLIT(X) (on each end of the Interior Offensive Line) REMEMBER: we play TIGHT ENDS and/or SPLIT ENDS ONLY!!!! (we have no positions called wide receiver, or wide out We call those positions Slot Receiver and/or Flanker)

In ALL formations and at ALL times we need:

SEVEN ON THE LINE!*


* no interior lineman should ever be uncovered (making the formation illegal!), and no eligible ends should be covered (and thereby made ineligible) at ANY time for ANY reason!!!

Offensive Backs: Fullback (4), Halfback (3), Slot/Wing back (2), Quarterback (1),

BASIC FORMATION TYPES


X 2 3 4 3 4 Y X Y 2

SLOT (slot left shown)

WING (wing right shown)

Y 2 4 3

* Coaching Staff will explain subtleties of definitions for Pro, Spread, and Special formation types

PRO* (pro right shown)

CC Football Offense Jr. STORM OFFENSE


Offensive Huddle

2006-07

2009

LOS

LOS

C LG LT Y 3 4 2 RG RT X

OUR SIDELINE

At the conclusion of every offensive play, the CENTER will hustle to a spot eight (8) yards directly behind the football, raise his arms and call Huddle Up Huddle Up!:
y y The offensive huddle will then be formed quickly and quietly around him (as diagramed above) As the QUARTERBACK enters the huddle, the CENTER will call ALERT! ALERT!

**** ALERT! means SILENCE!! **** ALERT! means SILENCE!! **** The Quarterback will receive the playcall and snapcount (from shuttle) at @ 5-8 yards outside the huddle, on the side closest to our sideline:
y QB will then hustle to huddle, step in and repeat playcall and snap count twice (Example: RobT Right 144 Power on one RobT Right 144 Power on one After calling play and snapcount, QB says, Ready BREAK!, with the rest of the huddle clapping loudly and answering BREAK! on that command then all players sprint to the line of scrimmage!! C.P. = Interior Offensive Linemen turn OUT at break Y, X, & 2 cross behind linemen on way to LOS

Follow Huddle to Snap procedure from this point

Jr. Football Offense


KEY:

2009
Quarterback Center

End
(Tight or Split)

Landmarks:

0 7 5 3 1 2 4 6 8

Labels:

Y 2

Backs:
Quarterback = 1 Slot/Wing = 2 Fullback = 3 Halfback = 4

Receivers:
Tight End = Y Split End = X Flanker = Z

Line Sets:

ROBB

Back Sets:

RO LA TO ST
BERNARD SCOTT STAN I (& Magnum) T PRO Spread Wish

y y y y

Back Sets are aligned left or right on Line Sets to make Formations.

I Formations (Straight I)
X 2 3 4 Y X

* STACK capability

Y 2 3 4

Rob I Left

Rob I Right

Y 2 3 4

Y 2 3 4

Lance I Left

Lance I Right

Y 2 3 4

X 2 3 4

Tom I Left

Tom I Right

X 2 3 4

X 2 3 4

Stan I Left

Stan I Right

Y 2 3 4

Lance I Left STACK

I Formations (Magnum)
X Y X

* STACK capability

3 4

3 4

Rob Magnum Left

Rob Magnum Right

3 4

3 4

Lance Magnum Left

Lance Magnum Right

3 4

3 4

Tom Magnum Left

Tom Magnum Right

3 4

3 4

Stan Magnum Left

Stan Magnum Right

3 4

Tom Magnum Right STACK

T Formations
X 2 3 4 Y X

* STACK capability
Y 2 4 3

Rob T Left

Rob T Right

Y 2 3 4

Y 2 4 3

Lance T Left

Lance T Right

Y 2 3 4

X 2 4 3

Tom T Left

Tom T Right

X 2 3 4

X 2 4 3

Stan T Left

Stan T Right

Y 2 4 3

Rob T Right STACK

Pro Formations
X 2 3 4 Y X

* STACK capability
Y 2 4 3

Rob Pro Left

Rob Pro Right

Y 2 3 4

Y 2 4 3

Lance Pro Left

Lance Pro Right

Y 2 3 4

X 2 4 3

Tom Pro Left

Tom Pro Right

X 2 3 4

X 2 4 3

Stan Pro Left

Stan Pro Right

C.P. = 2 is always slotted when out with SE

Y 2 4 3

Lance Pro Right STACK

Wish Formations
X Y X

* STACK capability
Y

3 2 4 4

3 2

Rob Wish Left

Rob Wish Right

3 2 4 4

3 2

Lance Wish Left

Lance Wish Right

3 2 4 4

3 2

Tom Wish Left

Tom Wish Right

3 2 4 4

3 2

Stan Wish Left

Stan Wish Right

3 4 2

Tom Wish Right STACK

Spread Formation
X 2 3 Y 4 4 X

* STACK capability
Y 2 3

Rob Spread Left

Rob Spread Right

Y 2 3

X 4 4

Y 2 3

Bernard Spread Left

Bernard Spread Right

Y 2 3

X 4 4

X 2 3

Scott Spread Left

Scott Spread Right

X 2 3

Y 4 4

X 2 3

Stan Spread Left

Stan Spread Right

C.P. = 2 is always slotted, 4 is always flanking when out with SEs

Notes:

Additional Formations
Y 2 3 X 4 4 3 X Y 2

Double Wing Left


Y 2 3 4 X X 4

Double Wing Right


Y 2 3

Double Slot Left (Tight)


Y 2 3 4 X X 4

Double Slot Right (Tight)


Y 2 3

Double Slot Left (Loose)


Y 2 3 4
RT LT

Double Slot Right (Loose)


X
RT LT

Y 2

Heavy Left
Y 2 4 3 X X

Heavy Right
Y 3 4 2

Bunch Left
Y 2 4 3
RT LT

Bunch Right
X X
RT LT

Y 3 4 2

Heavy Bunch Left

Heavy Bunch Right

CC Football Offense Jr. STORM OFFENSE


Passing Offense

2006-07

2008-09

0 15 9 7 8

PATTERN TREE

0 9 8 7 0 9 8 7

KEY:
To FIELD:
2 = Slant 4 = Hook 6 = In 8 = Post

5 10

To BOUNDARY:
1 = Quick Out 3 = Out 5 = Out & Up 7 = Corner 9 = Post/Corner 6

5 5

Neutral:
0 = Fly

6 4 3 6 4 1 2 3

4 2 2

1 LOS
X Y

1
2

Odd # patterns = TO BOUNDARY (outside)

Even # patterns = TO FIELD (inside)

Odd # patterns = TO BOUNDARY (outside)

- Pass Series
y 800 = Play Action

900 = Drop Back

- 100 Run Series action used as play fake: Y, X and backs used in pattern y 100 = Special!

CC Football Offense Jr. STORM OFFENSE

2006-07

2008-09

800 Flat Pass (Lance T Right)


Left
Rob I Left Stan I Left Rob Magnum Left Stan Magnum Left Rob T Left Stan T Left Rob Pro Left Stan Pro Left

Right
Lance I Right Stan I Right Lance Magnum Right Stan Magnum Right Lance T Right Stan T Right Lance Pro Right Stan Pro Right B C C E Y 2 4 3 T N T E X B B

900 Cross Pass (Stan Pro Right)


Left
Rob Pro Left Stan Pro Left Rob.. . Spread Left Stan Spread Left* Double Slot Left (Loose)*

FS SS

Right
Lance Pro Right Stan Pro Right LanceSpread Right Stan Spread Right* Double Slot Right (Loose)* B C E X 2 4 3 T N T E Y B C

Tom Wish Right 100 Release


Left
Tom Wish Left Tom I, Magnum, T Left ETC.

F B C E Y T G G T X E B C

Right
Tom Wish Right Tom I. Magnum, T Right ETC.

3 4 2

INDY

Y 2 3 4

X 2 4 3

INDY Left 6 0 8

INDY Right 8 0 6

Y 2 3 4

X 2 4 3

INDY Left 2 5 4

INDY Right 4 5 2

Y 2 3 4

X 2 4 3

INDY Left 0 3 9

INDY Right 9 3 0

CC Football Offense Jr. STORM OFFENSE


- Play Calling

2006-07

2008-09

Our playcall is a basic breakdown of how we set up and execute our offense. y We start by making a LINE SET call (Rob) y Next, a BACK SET call & direction are added (T Right) y From here, our SERIES/ACTION call is added: RUN SERIES = 100, 200, 300, 400 followed by BACK, LANDMARK & ACTION (for run series, i.e. 44 Power =
4 back following 3 back through the 4 hole, using 100 series action)

PASS SERIES = 800, 900, 100 followed by pattern action (Flat Pass, Release, etc.) or pattern numbers (as in Indy) Add SNAP COUNT, repeat and there you have our basic PLAYCALL: Rob T Right 144 Power, on TWO Rob T Right 144 Power, on TWO READY BREAK!!

- Cadence
We all break our offensive huddle, sprint to the LOS, come set in a 2 point stance and await the QBs cadence from there In most instances, he will begin our cadence with the call of DOWN! it is at this point that our offensive lineman rise and fall into a three point stance, and our 3 & 4 backs shift from their standard I set into the back set called in the huddle
(This allows our entire offense to come set, so we may legally begin any motion from here.)

We follow this call with a SET call, then a COLOR/Number call, which allows for any audibles and/or hot calls. The cadence is terminated at the number of GOs the ball will be snapped on. Example of a cadence call of On Two: DOWN SET BLUE 545 BLUE 545 GO GO! This allows us the ability to snap the ball and run most every play we have from Quick (no sound, QB/Center read), Down, Set, First Color, First Number, Second Color, etc See offensive playbook Addendum Offense 1 for Motion Explanation and Addendum Offense 2 for Audible Explanation

2009

Jr. Football

DEFENSE

Jr. FOOTBALL DEFENSE


Some of you may have heard it said that The best defense is a good offense. While that may be the thinking of some of our opponents, it simply will not do for us. We know that the best defense is THE BEST DEFENSE! That means THE best defense second to none!! What is required to achieve that defense is each individual athlete on defense playing to the best of their given ability and working well with each of their teammates to produce simply THE BEST DEFENSE. You owe that to your team, you owe it to yourselves and we as coaches will accept nothing less.

What it takes to play Our Defense:


1. Know your ALIGNMENT, know your ASSIGNMENT.
On every defensive play know where to be and what to do from where you are to be. If all eleven defenders do just that, many basic defensive breakdowns are eliminated and our defense plays like its capable of.

2. ALWAYS use proper TECHNIQUE.


Again, you owe it to the team, to yourselves and to your opponents. We will not tolerate sloppy, cheap, dangerous defensive technique! You can be just as tough, just as aggressive, just as effective within the rules of the game and that is the only way we play the game!

3. Play with pride.


Remember who and what you are and let your play reflect that at all times.

4. Be a hitter.
Be aggressive take the initiative on EVERY defensive play. Remember, Its far better to give than to receive!

5. NEVER say Die.


I cant means I dont want to No matter what the situation, no matter how bad things may appear if YOU, as a player, refuse to give up, then WE as a TEAM will not

Jr. FOOTBALL DEFENSE


Our Defensive Goals:
As you know (from carefully having studied the Offensive section of your playbook already!), we enter each of our games with a set offensive game plan meaning: we have a list of certain, specific things we feel we need to accomplish on offense to be successful against that particular opponent. Well, we do the same thing on DEFENSE, as well and a key ingredient to our achieving success on the field is that the heart of our defensive game plan our defensive goals never vary from game to game, from opponent to opponent. We want our defense to dictate the flow of the game. We know that if the following five defensive goals are achieved in each game and against each opponent, the result will be nothing short of success:

1. Do not allow our opponent to mount any sustained drives.


The best way to keep an opponent from scoring is to keep their offense off the football field. Simple enough.

2. Do not allow the BIG play.


Nothing hurts a defense more quickly or more deeply than keeping an opponent down, only to have them bust out with a large gain (or a long score!). Remember, each play is crucial as soon as YOU let up, you let US down

3. Never allow a two point conversion.


This comes down to pride, gentlemen A touchdown hurts enough dont allow an opponent to add insult to injury with a successful two point try! We need to take whatever momentum they thought they got with the six by denying them the two!

4. Allow no points in the fourth quarter.


Again, this is a matter of pride. To control the game, we must control the final period of play. If we are behind, we cannot afford to fall further behind. If we are ahead, we cannot allow our opponent to get back in the game.

5. Force at least one turnover a game.


Average football teams wait for things to happen good teams MAKE things happen! We can score points more quickly and score more points! with the ball than without it!

Jr. Football Defense


General Defensive Considerations: y y y y y y

2008-09

Opponents skills and abilities:  Size, strength, speed and ability to use them effectively on the football field Your own skills and abilities strengths and weaknesses:  Size, strength, speed and ability to use them effectively on the football field Your knowledge (and application!) of correct and accurate game situation: down, distance, time Your actual play = Alignment, Assignment, Technique, & Execution No dumb mistakes (mental and physical!!) Know field and playing conditions and play accordingly:  Wet = give a bigger cushion, strive for more controlled cuts, possibility that straight ahead running replaces edge running, possibility that passes may not be thrown as accurately or with as much velocity  Windy = the football may carry when thrown with the wind, and hang when thrown into the wind Cross winds may also affect movement of the ball in the air

Notes:

CC Football Defense Jr. STORM OFFENSE


Defensive Huddle

2006-07

2009

LOS M LE LT N RT W S LC F RC RE

LOS

Our DEFENSIVE huddle remains the same in principle regardless of the base defense were in, or the defensive variation called: MIKE facing huddle yard off ball, Defensive Linemen, Linebackers, DBacks. All defensive players will face the ball (except M, who faces huddle).
The defensive unit will huddle @ 1 yards off the football on the HUDDLE! HUDDLE! call

of the designated huddle caller (usually LT)

**** HUDDLE! means SILENCE!!! ***** HUDDLE! means SILENCE!!! ****


After huddle is formed (as M gets defensive call from sideline) SAM will make the Down and Distance call (this must be done on every play!!) Example: Third and seven Third and seven MIKE then steps to huddle, makes defensive call:

Wide 6, Wide 6
After making defensive call, M says, Ready BREAK!, with the rest of the huddle clapping loudly and answering BREAK! on that command
The defense then aligns in its proper set, any/all read calls are made then PLAY DEFENSE!!

C.P. = In any hurry up or No huddle situations, M makes defensive calls FROM THE LINE!!

Jr. Football Defense 101: Tackling


TECHNIQUE: In order to be an excellent and effective defensive football player it is necessary to practice the fundamentals of tackling on a frequent basis. A PROPER TACKLE is an aggressive, attacking action that incorporates the fundamentals of: APPROACH, COLLISION, and FINISH. THE APPROACH: Attack the ball carrier where he is as you approach, keep your butt down, your knees bent, and your head up keep your eyes open and at ball level. THE COLLISION: As you come to the point of contact, accelerate through the ball make contact with your shoulder, and punch your arms up through the armpits, snap your butt and roll your hips into the ball carrier. THE FINISH: Wrap and squeeze with your arms and continue to drive your legs!! Get after people on every play, and OUT HIT THEM! Once you see the ball, come full speed not half speed! Youve got to want to get in on the hit on every defensive play!!

TACKLING
This is what defensive football is all about! You cant beat a defender whos going full speed toward the ball carrier. This is where playing the best defense youre capable of gains respect for you as a football player, and for us as a football team. If you can tackle aggressively and effectively in every game opponents will let down when they play us! Every part of every tackle is important an assisted tackle is just as important as a solo tackle! If eleven defenders are flying to the ball on every play well get as many of us as possible on the ball carrier

ALWAYS REMEMBER:

NEVER HIT WITH YOUR HEAD!!


You may lead with your head, but the MAIN POINT and FORCE of contact MUST be your shoulder or chest!
WARNING: Keep your head up. Do not butt, ram, spear, or strike an opponent with any part of your helmet or faceguard. This is a violation of football rules and may cause you to suffer severe brain or neck injury, including paralysis or death and possible injury to your opponent. Contact in football may result in Concussion/Brain injury which no helmet can prevent. Symptoms include: loss of consciousness or memory, dizziness, headache, nausea, or confusion. If you have symptoms, immediately stop and report them to your coach, trainer, and parents. Do not return to a game or contact until all symptoms are gone and you receive medical clearance. Ignoring this warning may lead to another and more serious or fatal brain injury. NO HELMET SYSTEM CAN PROTECT YOU FROM SERIOUS BRAIN AND/OR NECK INJURIES INCLUDING PARALYSIS OR DEATH. TO AVOID THESE RISKS, DO NOT ENGAGE IN THE SPORT OF FOOTBALL.

Jr. Football Defense


Defensive Communication

2008-09

In all of our defensive sets COMMUNICATION is the key that will unlock the door to our greatest success. No matter how physically talented we are as a defense no matter how strong, how fast, how smart, how tough, or how nasty we may be if we dont COMMUNICATE (and communicate effectively!) we will never come close to realizing our full potential as a defensive unit. Well never be as good as we could be. Well never play at the level were truly capable of achieving And that is certainly not what were about! One of the things that allows our defense to communicate effectively is making sure everyone is involved in that communication. And we do mean EVERYone! The players on the field The players on the sideline The coaches on the field The coaches in the pressbox EVERYONE!! As soon as you recognize a play, YELL!! If you see a sweep, yell SWEEP!. If you see the quarterback drop back to pass, yell PASS!. If you see a draw play, yell DRAW!!. Always remember: in order to play solid defensive football, we need to know whats happening at all times!! As soon as you see something happening alert your teammates!! Besides these obvious, recognition-type calls (i.e. SWEEP!, COUNTER!, PASS!, etc.) we also have a few other key defensive communications. Whenever the football is on the ground (no matter who put it there or how it got there!) we ALL yell BALL!!. This alerts our entire team that the football is free somewhere on the football field and greatly increases our chances of falling on it!! Whenever you HEAR BALL!!, YELL BALL!! whether youve actually seen it or not!!! Footballs are well known for taking crazy bounces, and if there are eleven of us looking for it, chances are itll bounce our way!! Whenever the opposing quarterback drops back to pass, naturally the defense yells PASS!!. But what do we yell when he actually throws the football? We all yell AIR!! this allows everyone on defense to make an immediate and seamless transition from pass rush/pass coverage to pass defense and pursuit Since our defense is now more effectively defending the pass while its still in the air, we should naturally expect to produce a greater number of passes defensed and interceptions. Whenever we intercept a pass, the defender who made the interception yells SCORE!!. Once again, whenever you hear SCORE!, yell SCORE!! (whether you see the interception or not!). This allows our entire defensive unit to immediately and seamlessly transition to an OFFENSIVE UNIT producing legal blocks and positive return schemes that move the ball further up the field in the direction we need to go!! REMEMBER: To play quality defense To play successful defense To play OUR STYLE of DEFENSE We ALL have to know whats going on at all times!! And, when we do, its so much easier for all of us to

Jr. Football Defense


KEY:

2008-09
Quarterback Center

End
(Tight or Split)

Landmarks:

C
GAP

B
GAP

A
GAP

A
GAP

B
GAP

C
GAP

Defensive Labels:

Line: LT = LARRY D-Ends: LE = JAKE Backers: W = WILL

N = MOE

RT= CURLY

All defensive sets can be flexed out of a standard Base 50 defense. Labels apply at all times, however, individual or package substitutions can be made at any time

RE = ELWOOD M = MIKE S = SAM F = FREAK ( $ = MONEY)

D-Backs: LC = LOCK RC = ROCK

BASE 40
* CP = package substitutions can be made at any time (i.e. D-Back [$] for N)

LE LC S

LT M

RT

RE W RC

$* 4-4

LC

LE

LT S

RT M

RE W RC

* CP = package substitutions can be made at any time

$*

4-5

LC
* CP = package substitutions can be made at any time

LE

LT S F

RT M

RE W*

RC

BASE 50

LC

LE

LT S

N M

RT W

RE RC

5-2

* CP = package substitutions can be made at any time

LC

LE

LT M

N W

RT

RE RC

*S

BASE 60

LC
* CP = package substitutions can be made at any time

LE

LT S

M* W F

RT

RE RC

6-1

LC
* CP = package substitutions can be made at any time

LE

LT

N W

M*

RT

RE RC

S*

Goal Line

* CP = package substitutions can be made at any time

LC

LE

LT

S* M

W* F

RT

RE

RC

Jr. Football Defense


Defensive Line technique:
TE T G G T

2009

TE

4i

2i S/W 1 S/W 1

2i

4i

9 = outside shoulder of Tight End 6 = head up on Tight End 7 = inside shoulder of Tight End

5 = outside shoulder of Tackle 4 = head up on Tackle 4i = inside shoulder of Tackle

3 = outside shoulder of Guard 2 = head up on Guard 2i = inside shoulder of Guard

0 = head up on Center Strong/Weak 1 = shoulder of Center

2i = inside shoulder of Guard 2 = head up on Guard 3 = outside shoulder of Guard

4i = inside shoulder of Tackle 4 = head up on Tackle 5 = outside shoulder of Tackle

7 = inside shoulder of Tight End 6 = head up on Tight End 9 = outside shoulder of Tight End

Basic Defensive Line Stunts:

PINCH

FIRE

Slant Right =

SURF

Slant Left =

SLUG

Cross Right =

CRAB
LE LT N RT RE

Cross Left =

CLUB
LE LT N M RT RE

Jr. Football Defense


Pass Coverage:

2009

We use primary zone coverage schemes and packages from all sets manning up occassionaly, either across the field, or sometimes splitting coverage (zone & man, usually overtop/underneath)

Cover 1 ZERO = CBs, LBs manned up (outside in), F plays centerfield Cover 2 DEUCEs = F & S split deep halves, CBs in flats, LBs drop to curls Cover 3 TREYs = CBs & F drop to deep thirds, LBs have curls and flats COVER 4 QUATRO = LC, F, $, & RC to deep s, DEs to flats, SAM & WILL to hooks Nickel BUFFALO = $, F & W have deep thirds, CBs stretched flats, LBs underneath

Defensive Line

Linebackers Left Corner

Right Corner

Safeties

Blitzes:
y

Defensive Calls: 1. Base (or variation) Alignment = i.e. 50, 5-2 2. Any line/linebacker shades from that base: Straight = normal alignment Stud = gap/stack to strong Dog = gap/stack to weak 3. Any stunt(s) or blitz(es) 4. Any Coverage change (# of Safeties always dictates
basic coverage meaning: if were in single safety = ZERO or TREYS Double safety = DEUCES etc.). A coverage call will only be added to change that

All blitzes are called by naming the backer(s) who is/are to blitz, and giving them directions to blitz i.e. UP means straight up blitz, TWIST means to twist with the DT/N in front of them Linebackers should understand and execute ALL blitzes properly = either get free, or free up someone else! Defensive lineman should also understand their role in blitz situations = occupy offensive players to free up linebackers

Call: 5-2, Stud Surf Mike Twist


- 5-2, Stud means: 5-2 alignment, gapped/stacked to strong - Surf means: Defensive line slanting right - Mike Twist means: Mike linebacker blitzes, twisting with LT - Cover 2 (DEUCES) pass coverage (since were in 5-2 = S & F have deep s, WILL owns middle hook/curl)

LC

LE

LT M

N W

RT

RE RC

NOTES:

Jr. Football Defense


Base 50, Cover 1: ZERO
2 1 3 2 1

2008-09

LE LC

LT W

N M

RT S

RE

RC

5-2, Cover 2: DEUCES

LE LC

LT W

N M

RT

RE

RC

S
F

Jr. Football Defense


Base 50, Cover 3: TREYs:

2008-09

LE LC

LT S M

RT W

RE

RC

Base 40, Cover 4: Quarters

LE LC S

LT M

RT

RE W

RC

$ F

2009

Jr. Football

SPECIAL TEAMS

Jr. FOOTBALL SPECIAL TEAMS


At first glance, special teams play may seem unglamorous, unrewarding, unimportant, and unenviable. That may be how many of our opponents feel about special teams, but we know better. We will always take a great deal of pride in the play of our special teams and in our special teams players. We have seen time and time again how crucial this phase of the game truly is. To put it simply, special teams can make or break a game. Special teams plays executed properly can lead to a HUGE momentum swing for us: possession of the football, great field position, and (best of all!) POINTS. Special teams play executed poorly can only hand these things to our opponents and take away from our total team effort Remember: Every phase of the game is important and the team that dominates the most phases enjoys the most success.

What it takes to play Our Special Teams:


1. Know your ALIGNMENT, know your ASSIGNMENT.
Knowing where to be and what you are to do every time youre on the field and then just doing it!!

2. ALWAYS use proper TECHNIQUE.


Nothing kills a seemingly great special teams play more quickly or cruelly rthan an illegal block, a hold, or an arm tackle. And nothing can be more dangerous to yourself, to your opponent even to your teammates. Remember we may only get one chance to do something, but we do it the right way every chance we get!

3. Desire.
Wanting to make a positive impact on the game by making something good happen for us.

4. Determination.
Knowing that its up to you to do your job for the play to turn out successfully and letting no one and/or no thing stand in the way of your doing it.

5. Pride! Pride!! PRIDE!!!.


In one form or another, one of our special teams is always the first unit of our team that an opponent sees. ALWAYS let them know right from the start who we are, and what were about. Set the tone Set the tempo and follow through every chance you get

Jr. FOOTBALL SPECIAL TEAMS Our Special Teams Goals:


Just as with our offensive and defensive units, our special teams units have an established group of game day goals which we are determined to meet against every opponent we play, and in every game we play them. These are constant, consistent goals we strive to consistently achieve, with the knowledge that doing so will only improve our total team effort to succeed and that failing to meet them is not an option!

1. NEVER allow an opponent a touchdown on special teams.


We need to dominate this area of the contest totally and completely. Nothing demonstrates this ideal more concretely than denying any of their units the end zone.

2. Limit their return yardage maximize ours.


Our job is to set our offensive and defensive units up with the most advantageous field position possible. This means bottling our opponents up and not allowing them to establish better field position when we kick the ball to them and moving the ball further back up the field from where they kicked it to us. Simple

3. Complete ball maintenance.


Whenever our opponent kicks us the ball we must maintain it. Whenever we kick it to them we must contain it and cover it if they put it on the floor.

4. Have none of our kicks blocked. Ever.


This is a matter of pride and proper execution. Most blocked kicks are the direct result of improper and/or lazy execution on our part. We dont teach football that way you dont play football that way.

5. Execute our fakes properly deny their fakes the possibility of working AT ALL!.
We play hard-nosed, up front, in your face and down your throat football all the time. But, every once and awhile, we throw something extra in to the mix. If we ever do when we do that something special MUST work. Conversely, we cannot afford to EVER have those tables turned on us, so to speak. Much like blocked kicks, successful fakes by our opponents (onsides kicks, fake punt/PAT/field goals, etc) are the direct result of improper/lazy execution on our part. Again, we dont TEACH football that way you dont PLAY football that way. EVER!

Jr. FOOTBALL SPECIAL TEAMS


Alignments
KICKOFF/FREE KICK
50

40

LC

LE

LT

RT

RE

RC

30

M K

Kickoff/Free Kick Huddle (& break!): K LC W LE S LT M RT RE F RC

KICKOFF/FREE KICK RETURN*


40

50

LT

LG

RG

RT

40

30

20

* Hands team = walk up to 50 for all but 4 and 1 (replace personnel as needed)

Jr. FOOTBALL SPECIAL TEAMS


PUNT RETURN
20

LE
30

LT

RT

RE RC

LC S M W

40

F
50

PUNT

40

Y 2
30

LT

LG 3

RG

RT 4

P.A.T/FIELD GOAL
G

Y 3

LT

LG

RG

RT 4

10

H K

Jr. FOOTBALL SPECIAL TEAMS


KICKOFF/FREE KICK ASSIGNMENTS:

40

:A
LC LE LT RT K RE RC

50

40

30

40

:C
LC LE LT RT K RE RC

50

40

30

Jr. FOOTBALL SPECIAL TEAMS


PUNT COVERAGE ASSIGNMENTS:

40

50

40

Y 2
30

LT

LG 3

RG

RT 4

Punt RIGHT:
Y, X = Fly to ball 2, 4 = Allow no penetration, get to landmark (#s); Flyin Ten, then fly to ball, make tackle. LT, RT = Allow no penetration, clean release, get to landmark (split hashes and #s), Flyin Ten, fly to ball, make tackle. LG, RG = Allow no penetration, clean release, get to landmark (hashes), Flyin Ten, then fly to ball, make tackle. C = Good snap, allow no penetration, clean release, get to landmark (right of midline), fly to ball, make tackle. 3 = Allow no penetration, clean release, get to landmark (left of midline), fly to ball, make tackle. P = field snap cleanly, good directional punt (call direction!!), drift to safety never have to make a tackle!!!

Notes:

Jr. FOOTBALL SPECIAL TEAMS


KICK COVERAGE RULES:

Our kicking game demands intelligent, aggressive, unrelenting TEAM KICK COVERAGE!!! General rules for ALL kick coverage scenarios: y y y Hustle downfield on every kick remember, as soon as you let up, you let us down..!! Run downfield with the intention of making the tackle on every kick! Do not be denied!! Always stay disciplined in coverage = honor your landmarks (know your adjustments and follow them!!!), take proper angles, use good tackling technique!! (NO arm tackles, ever!) Remember your Flying Fifteen (on kickoff/free kick) and Flying Ten (on punts)! ALWAYS KEEP BALLCARRIER INSIDE AND IN FRONT!!! Allow NO CUTBACKS, NO ESCAPE = PURSUIT, INSIDE AND IN FRONT!!! Angles ANGLES! ANGLES!! INSIDE AND IN FRONT!!!

y y y y

KICK RETURN RULES:

Good kickoff return units accumulate a lot of yardage and make life easier for the offense. For every 10 yards gained by the kickoff team, the offense has one less first down to make on its subsequent drive. A good return enables the offense to exploit its full repertoire, whereas a poor return can constrict the offensive play calling. PRINCIPLES The kickoff return team is an 11-man enterprise in which every player has to learn both the general principles and the specific responsibilities of his position. GENERAL PRINCIPLES 1. Always get into a good position to block your man above the waist with your head in front of him. Your primary "don't": no clipping penalties. 2. Front line: Always be alert for an on-side kick. Make sure the ball is kicked deep before dropping back to execute your blocking technique. 3. Once the kickoff travels 10 yards, it becomes a free ball and belongs to the team that recovers it. 4. If you touch the ball before it goes 10 yards, it becomes a free ball. 5. Never let the football hit the ground, as it may be difficult to pick up. Catch the ball on the fly. Learn when to field a ball kicked near the sideline and when to let it go out of bounds. 6. Remember, you can call for a fair catch on a kickoff. All fair catch rules apply. 7. Any time the ball is kicked between the middle and deep backs, allow the deep back to come up and make the catch rather than have the middle back back-pedal to make the catch. 8. Whenever your ball-carrier breaks into the open and is surely heading for a touchdown, all blocking must stop. You never want to have a touchdown called back because of a penalty from an unnecessary block behind the return man.

Jr. FOOTBALL SPECIAL TEAMS


KICK OFF RETURN ASSIGNMENTS: WEDGE
40

50

LT

LG

RG

RT

Y
40

2 3

30

20

WALL RIGHT*
40

50

LT

LG

RG

RT

Y
40

2 3

30

20

Thank You to Coach Mart, for the permission to reprint several of these pages. I know there is many years of hard work, and refinement that has went into your playbooks, as apparent with the many pages I used. Thanks Again, Coach Robb

I cant.
means

I dont want to.

Thank You to the entire coaching staff, for their hard work, dedication and leadership. After all; this is all for and about the kids. We are here to educate, refine, and compete at a high level, and as youth coaches, we ensure that, that happens consistently. A special thank you to Coach Scott for all that you have done. Thanks Again, Coach Robb