Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 18
1 CSR Masterclass Case Studies Content: 1. IBM 2. Unilever 3. FedEx 4. London city

1

CSR Masterclass Case Studies

Content:

1. IBM

2. Unilever

3. FedEx

4. London city Airport

2 IBM’s On Demand Community is a global volunteering programme which supports its employees in

2

2 IBM’s On Demand Community is a global volunteering programme which supports its employees in becoming

IBM’s On Demand Community is a global volunteering programme which supports its employees in becoming volunteers and provides them with IBM technology tools for use in non-profit community organisations and schools. The programme demonstrates IBM’s ability to deliver innovative solutions to social issues.

The company

IBM is a global information technology and business consultancy business, whose origins can be traced to the end of the 19th Century with the invention of the tabulating machine. The company was first listed on the New York Stock Exchange in 1911 and is the oldest Technology Company in the world.

IBM has two inter-related key business strands: first, to strive to lead in the invention, development and manufacture of advanced information technologies, including computer systems, software, storage systems and microelectronics; and secondly, to translate these advanced technologies into value for customers through professional solutions, services and consulting businesses worldwide. To deliver these services to clients IBM operates in 163 countries. In the UK it employs a workforce of around 21,000 and has an additional 5,000 agency staff.

IBM’s approach to corporate social responsibility (CSR) is traceable back to its founders in America. They committed IBM to a broad definition of leadership: ‘to be a trusted partner for customers, a reliable long-term investment, a progressive employer and a responsible corporate citizen’. Corporate milestones include: 1914, when IBM hired its first employee with a disability; 1935, when it declared that men and women would do the same kind of work for equal pay; and 1953, when it established a formal equal opportunity policy. More recently, in 1984 IBM incorporated sexual orientation into this policy.

3 This case study focuses on IBM’s On Demand Community, which provides resources and structures

3

This case study focuses on IBM’s On Demand Community, which provides resources and structures to support volunteering among IBM staff.

The drivers:

A key driver for IBM’s approach to CSR is the need to maintain its market position in a

changing business environment. IBM recognises that CSR benefits the company’s business by helping enhance a company’s reputation so increasing its brand value. Further benefit from CSR comes from demonstrating thought leadership. For IBM thought leadership includes being recognised as contributing to shaping the agenda of policy and practice outside of the company, whereby IBM is recognised for both great

products and great ideas. “Other benefits of CSR include staff retention and recruitment. This is important to us as a knowledge-based company, where much of our value resides

in the collective intellectual capabilities of our staff. This too drives our approach”, said

Mark Wakefield, IBM UK’s Corporate Community Relations Manager.

Taking action:

In the early 1990s IBM misjudged the importance of the emerging desktop computer hardware and software market. Part of its turn around strategy involved re-engineering itself to focus on its unique competency of being a complete IT solutions provider.

More recently IBM has, under the leadership of its new global Chief Executive, Sam J Palmisano, conducted a major review of the values of the company, with opportunities for full involvement from 319,000 staff around the world.

Following the review, in spring of 2003 over 300 senior executives met at their annual meeting to consider, amongst other matters, the next ‘great’ ideas that would guide IBM, promote it’s new technology strategy ‘On Demand’ computing and exemplify the three core values of the company: dedication to every client’s success; innovation that matters, for our company and for the world; trust and personal responsibility in all relationships. One of the ideas selected by the senior executives - the IBM On Demand Community employee volunteering programme - was launched in November 2003. The momentum behind realising the idea was generated by the personal championing of On Demand by IBM’s vice-president for Corporate Community Relations, Stan Litow.

IBM On Demand Community seeks to encourage and sustain corporate philanthropy through volunteering. Volunteers provide the mechanism to deploy valuable IBM technology tools targeted at schools and non-profit community organisations. The programme is designed to encourage staff engagement with the community in a variety of ways e.g: by acting as advisors to charities; supporting local schools as governors; running workshops and training sessions; and being mentors to young people.

4 The volunteering programme was developed and launched in just six months. During that time

4

The volunteering programme was developed and launched in just six months. During that time virtual workshops involving IBMers from around the world in the creation of the materials for the programme were held. Work was completed with HR and legal departments on, for example, the legal issues of volunteering arising from differing national legislation. An intranet website was developed containing a database of organisations providing opportunities for volunteering. In November 2003 IBM’s campaign to recruit 25,000 of its staff as volunteers commenced, underpinned by a new On Demand Community intranet and actively championed around the world by IBM’s regional and country Chief Executives.

The scheme works as follows. Once registered on the site, IBMers have immediate access to a full range of technology solutions that support IBM’s commitment to its philanthropic priorities: advancing achievement in schools; working to promote digital inclusion; and improving strategies and outcomes for non-profit organisations through technology. Resources on the site also enable employees to receive on-line training to improve their capability as volunteers. Volunteering occurs in the employee’s own time, although with flexible working this can be during ‘working’ hours. The intranet site helps employees to select their volunteering depending on how much time they have to give.

Volunteers are asked to track and log the time they give. If they achieve 40 hours in five months they can nominate the organisation that they are volunteering with to receive a donation of either IBM equipment or a small cash grant. The donation process assesses bids against specific criteria and there is a sliding scale for equipment donations up to the value of £4,000, depending upon the numbers of volunteers involved and whether any of the resources available on the On Demand Community intranet site have been used.

Examples of volunteering in the UK include IBMers using their consulting skills to assist head teachers on the processes of managing change within schools, to improve standards of education. Well over 600 IBMers are currently providing virtual mentoring from IBM staff, for school students, through the IBM MentorPlace programme, launched in the UK in 2002. The scheme focuses mainly on students studying subjects such as IT, science and business studies. Mentors provide practical advice and study support. So far over 1000 students from more than 35 schools across the UK have benefited.

IBM volunteers are helping to introduce technology appropriately to nursery schools. IT equipment in nurseries has tended to be second-hand, and teaching was done by staff with limited knowledge of technology and even less confidence in using it. IBM donates specially developed units - KidSmart installations - to not-for-profit or state run nurseries in areas of significant disadvantage, that are selected by professionals as part of its KidSmart Early Learning programme. The programme aims to provide young children with access to technology, better preparing them for life-long learning and it contributes to digital inclusion. Since 2000 over 650 KidSmart computer units have been donated in the UK alone and many thousands more worldwide.

5 KidSmart is a partnership between a voluntary organisation, Early Education, which helps to select

5

KidSmart is a partnership between a voluntary organisation, Early Education, which helps to select the nurseries and manage the programme, local education authority personnel, who attend IBM-run training sessions and then cascade the training down to the nurseries and IBMers, who volunteer to work with the programme by helping to set up the equipment at the nursery, and providing practical advice to staff and parents.

“Our research showed that, as much as communities appreciate donations of money and equipment, local agencies and schools are most interested in receiving volunteers who can share their skills and intellectual capital”, said Stanley Litow, talking about the IBM On Demand Community initiative.

Globally IBM set a target of recruiting 25,000 employee volunteers in two years. In less than half that time very nearly 25,000 employees had registered, including more than 1,200 in the UK.

The business benefits

IBM firmly believes that there is business benefit: ‘There has always been a direct correlation between IBM’s corporate citizenship and our mainstream market place activities’ says Sam J Palmisano, Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer.

As an example new graduates are actively encouraged to volunteer. This is because IBM feels that volunteering provides them with an opportunity to learn new skills such as team working, customer relations, project management and leadership.

Another benefit of volunteering is that staff act as IBM ambassadors and become the face of IBM in communities. This helps change any preconceived idea that IBM is a faceless corporation, solely out to make a profit”, said Mark Wakefield. “It demonstrates our commitment both to society and to our staff and that appeals to potential new recruits.”

IBM has found that engagement in the community helps to maintain the company’s presence in the public eye. It also believes that it helps to improve its understanding and identification of new market opportunities,. Through the interaction that volunteers have with a wide spectrum of the community.

Why is it CSR?

The consultation process that initiated the development of IBM On Demand Community demonstrated openness and active participation of IBMers, which is an important process underpinning CSR. Furthermore, the actions of employees supported by IBM are completely voluntary. By providing resources (information and grants for IBM equipment) and structures (intranet and an IBM community relations team) to support

6 volunteering, IBM is demonstrating corporate responsibility that goes well beyond compliance. What next? IBM

6

volunteering, IBM is demonstrating corporate responsibility that goes well beyond compliance.

What next?

IBM UK has developed a volunteer extranet for its pensioner community, who number around 10,000 in the UK. IBM wrote to them in April 2004 and invited them to register on the new website in June. In the coming months it intends to review and consolidate the volunteer programme, developing new resources to add to what already is available on the intra and extranets.

7 Establishment of a sustainable agriculture initiative to secure a sustainable supply of raw materials

7

7 Establishment of a sustainable agriculture initiative to secure a sustainable supply of raw materials necessary

Establishment of a sustainable agriculture initiative to secure a sustainable supply of raw materials necessary to deliver the business and its brands.

The company

Unilever's origins in the UK date back to 1885, when the Lever brothers launched Sunlight, the world's first packaged laundry soap. The product's success in the UK was quickly emulated globally, resulting in Lever Brothers acquiring many businesses worldwide. In 1930, Lever Brothers agreed to a “merger of equals” with the Netherlands- based Margarine Union to form Unilever, thus creating the present company.

Through a series of acquisitions including Bestfoods, the second largest ever cash acquisition (in 2000), Birds Eye Foods (1943) and Ben & Jerry’s (2000) Unilever has become a global company with a portfolio of well-known brands including Dove, Persil, Lux, Knorr and Flora. Unilever manufactures and markets food and home and personal care products to consumers in approximately 150 countries. It employs 227,000 people worldwide.

Unilever is heavily influenced by its five-year strategic focus on leading brands, improving operating margins and increasing top-line growth, and by its mission ‘to add Vitality to life – meeting everyday needs for nutrition, hygiene and personal care with its

8 brands to help people feel good, look good and get more out of life’.

8

brands to help people feel good, look good and get more out of life’. The strategic plan and its mission seek to link the business and its brands shaping its future direction. This includes addressing concerns about the environment and wider sustainability issues.

Unilever’s approach to sustainability involves the implementation of its environmental strategy which includes three sustainability initiatives covering fish, water, and agriculture. These initiatives were chosen as they represent areas where Unilever can make a measurable difference.

This case study focuses on Unilever’s Sustainable Agriculture Initiative in recognition of the growing pressures placed by agriculture on natural resources.

The drivers

To understand the drivers that shaped the Sustainable Agriculture Initiative it is useful to recognise the current global context in which agriculture is under severe pressure. This is indicated by the following statistics: 40% of agricultural land suffers soil degradation, agriculture uses 70% of the world’s fresh water resources whilst 40% of the global population experience water scarcity. Within this context Unilever sources its raw materials from agriculture, so in purely business terms, it makes sense to ensure the supply is sustainable (providing continued availability of its products) and this was one of the drivers for the initiative. Unilever also wanted to extend its knowledge and insight beyond its ‘comfort zone’, exploring areas like biodiversity and soil health, which were becoming of increasing concern to society, politicians and regulators. In summary, Unilever wanted to understand better the current and emerging issues that may affect the business.

Taking action

The main aim of the Sustainable Agriculture Initiative, established in 1998, was to ‘ensure the continued availability of Unilever’s key crops by defining and adopting sustainable agriculture practices in the supply chain’. The Initiative sought to develop: a definition for sustainable agriculture; principles of purpose and intent; indicators to focus specific areas of work; parameters and guidelines that lead to measurable improvements. This was the first time that the company had attempted to consider these issues.

From the outset Unilever recognised the value of engaging with its various internal and external stakeholders to help shape the Initiative and invited them to participate in a

9 series of workshops and consultations. Through this consultation process, Unilever refined its definition of

9

series of workshops and consultations. Through this consultation process, Unilever refined its definition of sustainable agriculture to be one that ‘is productive, competitive and efficient while at the same time protecting and improving the natural environment and conditions of the local communities’.

The initiative focussed on five key crops; spinach, pea, tomato, tea and palm oil. These were selected because, for each crop, the company had a good understanding of its supply chain and had a strong association with the product, for example, the Birds Eye pea. They also represented a range of crops in which a variety of sustainability issues would be present, e.g. water conservation, energy and pesticide use.

Specific programmes of work were conducted on each of the crops. The work was guided by a set of principles for the Initiatives developed through consultation with stakeholders (e.g. farmers, food retailers, academics, government, processing companies, civil society groups, consumer groups and trade associations). The biggest challenge was coping with the diversity of the crops and the countries involved in the programme of work: from peas in England, spinach in Germany and Italy, to tea in Kenya, India and Tanzania and tomatoes in Australia, Brazil and the USA. This meant that the areas of focus might change with country whilst the crop did not. This diversity generated a number of issues to address, e.g. water conservation in Australia and lapwing management in pea farming in the UK.

The consultation with stakeholders was worthwhile as it provided insight into issues and perspectives, but it did take time to get their input and consensus on improvements. Particularly hard was translating the concept of sustainability into a set of indicators. Ten indicators were identified covering amongst others: soil loss, pest management, product value, water and local economy. Right from the start the Initiative sought the buy-in from the management of the company through presentations. This resulted both in their support and in the Initiative reporting directly to the board with regular updates of its progress.

An example of the types of projects conducted within the Initiative was the work on peas in England. In developing ten sustainability indicators, 450 pea growers were consulted. Unilever’s independent partners in the Initiative ran experiments with 20 farmers to trial the indicators. One of the indicators was used to assess how pea farming affected biodiversity. A key part of this work included the development of management guidelines for effective management of farmland birds. Both the skylark and lapwing thrive on pea farms. The research focussed on how these birds use the pea fields. It revealed that the pea crop provides critical (feeding and breeding) access for these birds due to its open and low structure, compared to other crops in the countryside like wheat and barley. “The combination of available food and breeding areas meant that these birds were able to rear an average of two broods per year” said Jos van-Oostrum, Unilever’s Sustainable Agriculture Research Manager. The research informed Unilever and pea growers how best to manage nest sites whilst the pea fields are being harvested so that breeding attempts are not disturbed.

Maintaining

Maintaining 10 momentum… Since inception the Initiative has continued to collect data on the indicators. It

10

momentum…

Since inception the Initiative has continued to collect data on the indicators. It has also produced good practice guidelines for farmers in all the 5 key crops. Various communication materials have also been produced to share knowledge and learn with others. These include information booklets and videos for various audiences – farmers, smallholders and the general public. These materials have been widely used and the feedback received suggests that they are making a difference in changing production methods and opinions about the nature of farming.

The business benefits

Through the Initiative Unilever has increased its understanding of the issues surrounding sustainable agriculture. This has led to the primary business benefit of securing the sustainable supply of the company’s raw materials. An additional benefit has been the trust and reputation gained for Unilever from its partnerships with a wide range of people involved in the Initiative. The Initiative has also led to the development of others such as the Sustainable Agriculture Initiative Platform and the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil.

Why is it CSR?

The initiative demonstrates CSR as it goes beyond compliance and is a voluntary response, albeit enlightened self interest as it is seeking the long term security of natural resources that contribute to the protection of the business and its brands.

What next?

Unilever has taken the first steps to extend the Initiative beyond the five crops, to include all major vegetable oils, dairy, meat, paper and pulp. They recognise it will take time to transfer the knowledge to other crops. Unilever will also continue to share the initiative’s outputs amongst competitors and other interested parties in an effort to get more companies to participate in the issue of sustainability. This will have the benefit of securing standards across the board, not just on one crop. It is also hoped that this will lead to the promotion of market mechanisms that favour sustainable agriculture.

11 FedEx - EarthSmart - sustainability strategy Communicating environmental sustainability performance and building a

11

11 FedEx - EarthSmart - sustainability strategy Communicating environmental sustainability performance and building a

FedEx - EarthSmart - sustainability strategy

Communicating environmental sustainability performance and building a sustainable culture through a platform of EarthSmart initiatives

The company

FedEx is a worldwide network of companies, providing a broad range of logistical services. United under FedEx Corporation, the company has a team of more than 285,000 team members, and serves more than 220 countries and territories worldwide.

FedEx has been implementing a sustainability programme for the last decade and has, from its inception, focused on innovation.

This CSR case study focuses on the three key initiatives that make up FedEx's EarthSmart programme, which is helping the company work towards is environmental sustainability goals.

The drivers

FedEx holds the central belief that the success of the business and the wellbeing of the environment are inextricably linked. The company recognises the services it provides as having a wider impact, not only on the individuals who work for the company but also the environment and communities in which it works. FedEx places an emphasis on the importance of gaining and maintaining the trust of team members, customers, shareholders and communities.

12 The company has noted that its stakeholders are increasingly interested in understanding what the

12

The company has noted that its stakeholders are increasingly interested in understanding what the company is actually doing. As a result, it published its first global citizenship report in November 2008.

Taking action

The EarthSmart initiatives are a core element in the company’s environmental sustainability strategy. Specifically, EarthSmart provides a platform to communicate the company’s actions and “create a culture”, providing an umbrella to bring together/align global programmes and initiatives.

The initiatives are designed to benefit the planet, customers and the business.

EarthSmart Solutions:

EarthSmart Solutions addresses the sustainability performance of the company’s services and physical assets, i.e. aeroplanes, trucks and facilities. It requires the services or assets to meet stringent, quantifiable standards for environmental sustainability that go beyond industry standards. It also requires them to deliver benefits not only to the business but also to the environment and stakeholders.

In order to achieve this, FedEx places a strong emphasis on the importance of innovation. Examples include FedEx being the first US-based company to purchase a Boeing 777F in 2009 (with the intention of owning a fleet of 40 by 2019); this has provided increased freight capacity whilst reducing fuel consumption by 18%. The replacement of narrow- bodied planes has resulted in fuel consumption being reduced by 47% overall. Further considerations such as flying direct between Asia and the US also reduce the demand on fuel.

FedEx also has the largest fleet of hybrid electric parcel delivery vehicles in the industry, achieved by investing in new vehicles and by converting traditional trucks. These measures extend the life of vehicles, whilst simultaneously making them more environmentally friendly. At present, FedEx is testing fuel cell and hydraulic hybrid vehicles and investing in zero emissions all-electric vehicles and hybrid-electrics vehicles. These initiatives contribute to the company’s “20 by 20” goal of reducing plane emissions by 20% and increasing vehicle efficiency by 20% by the year 2020.

In relation to its facilities, FedEx has been installing solar rooftop installations in an increasing number of its buildings. One such installation currently stands as the largest in the US. FedEx had a total of five solar arrays running as of the end of 2010.

EarthSmart Outreach:

13 EarthSmart Outreach aligns business priorities with community needs, such as investment in sustainable transport

13

EarthSmart Outreach aligns business priorities with community needs, such as investment in sustainable transport solutions for developing countries.

FedEx has worked in collaboration with EMBARQ – The WRI Centre for Sustainable Transport – in order to develop the transport network throughout Mexico. By supporting development of efficient public bus networks, FedEx contributes to a reduction in the number of cars on the road, and therefore also lower carbon emissions.

FedEx has also been working to increase child pedestrian safety, find ways to protect valuable ecosystems and provide disaster relief. The company provides this assistance using its core business strengths, such as logistical capacity to ensure that relief supplies reach the locations where they are most needed.

Coinciding with its “people first” philosophy, FedEx has been developing a strategy to support and enable the volunteering efforts of its employees. This has included the creation of a platform to engage individuals in volunteering opportunities. This volunteer management system has been integrated with the United Way giving campaign and FedEx Cares week – an annual event in which more than 16,000 hours of employee time was donated in 2010.

EarthSmart @ Work:

EarthSmart @ Work aims to engage FedEx employees actively in the company’s environmental sustainability goals and efforts.

The initiative is divided into three areas:

1. Inform – the sharing of information and ideas (i.e. internal circulation of best practice and information on relevant topics), and enabling employees to contribute their own thoughts (e.g. using social media).

2. Involve – enabling employees to share ideas and learn from one another; in addition, the company develops volunteering opportunities for staff to use their skills to assist in the wider community; and

3. Innovate – integrates the ideas of FedEx employees into a formal submission process to help inform the review of strategic sustainability goals and strategies.

Challenges

One of the key challenges for FedEx was to be specific about the usage of EarthSmart, to ensure all the initiatives were thoroughly vetted and to ensure that internal and external stakeholders understood the platform. Similarly there was the challenge and desire to ensure that all the programmes under the EarthSmart platform demonstrated customer, business and environment benefits.

14 Business benefits The EarthSmart strategy is designed to provide not only environmental and social

14

Business benefits

The EarthSmart strategy is designed to provide not only environmental and social benefits, but also feeds back to FedEx’s business objectives. For example, efficiency measures have allowed the company to cut emissions by reducing fuel usage, which in turn has led to cutting costs, providing direct financial benefits.

Additionally, given the growing pressure for global emissions reductions and the translation of this into many national policies, the initiatives undertaken by FedEx to integrate cutting edge innovations into its operations are likely to enable them to remain sector leaders.

FedEx’s approach to environmental protection, international aid and philanthropic investment all work to enhance the company’s reputation and further assist in ensuring the company’s future operation and expansion.

Importantly, the activities also encourage the growth of stakeholder trust in the company – something of growing importance in an increasingly competitive market where corporate activities are coming under growing public scrutiny. In addition, suppliers are now approaching FedEx, with requests to participate in the programmes.

The incorporation of employee opinion into its strategy allows its approach to not only benefit from diverse ideas and therefore become more innovative, but also to make the

company

The company has received a number of international awards and rankings for its work including the 2009 W3 Awards’ Gold Award in the business category for its Citizenship Blog; Newsweek Greenest Companies Ranking Top 100; the FORTUNE Magazine’s “100 Best Companies to Work For”; the Ruben d’Honneur award for outstanding customer focus, considered one of the foremost corporate awards in Europe; and the 2009 Mohammed Bin Al Rashid Al Maktoum Business Award for Corporate Social Responsibility. This recognition enhances both community relations and support, and more broadly the reputation of the company.

preference.

an

employer

of

Why is it CSR?

The EarthSmart programme provides both business and social benefits – namely it allows the company to realise efficiency savings and encourage sustained support and growth of business activities. In demonstrating leadership on matters of sustainability in the industry, FedEx hopes to stimulate the spread of good corporate citizenship, making the industry as a whole more sustainable.

Similarly, the programme has led to increased engagement and enthusiasm within local teams all leading to a stronger corporate culture.

15 London City Airport - "Take Off Into Work" }}}} An employment initiative that means

15

15 London City Airport - "Take Off Into Work" }}}} An employment initiative that means better

London City Airport - "Take Off Into Work"

}}}}

An

employment

initiative

that

means

better

skilled

recruits

for

the

airport

and

improvements to the local community of Newham.

The company

London City Airport plays a key role in supporting the activity and growth of London’s economy. Located in East London, it is the UK’s leading business airport and it makes a significant contribution to the economy of the local area, providing more than 2,000 jobs through its own operations and the 55 employers based onsite.

Since setting up a dedicated Community Relations Team in 1995, the company has developed a structured programme of community relations, which focuses on the areas of consultation and communication; local employment; education excellence; health and wellbeing for work and charity. These community engagement activities are delivered within a specific geographical area to ensure the social and economic benefits of the Airport are shared with those who are most affected by its operation.

This CSR case study focuses on one aspect of London City Airport's community engagement strategy, "Take Off Into Work", an initiative that is designed to improve the transferable and job seeking skills of Newham residents, whilst also improving the quality of local candidates available for recruitment.

The drivers

London City Airport is the only airport located within the city itself. This increases the potential of negative ramifications for local residents, making it essential for the company to ensure that the local population actually benefits from its presence.

16 The Airport is located in Newham, a comparatively deprived borough of East London; in

16

The Airport is located in Newham, a comparatively deprived borough of East London; in 2008 it had an unemployment rate of 10.1% – nearly double the national average. The Airport recognised that its operations could be utilised to reduce the unemployment rate by taking practical steps to enable local residents to gain access to work.

London City Airport positions itself as a key business airport, with one of the fastest check-in times of any in London. In order to maintain its operations the company requires a high level of reliability and flexibility from its staff, which it feels can be enhanced through employment of local people. This is particularly pertinent in an industry which often demands unusual working hours.

Taking action

In 2009, London City Airport launched the “Take Off into Work” scheme for long-term unemployed Newham residents as part of the Airport’s wider community engagement strategy. The programme has been developed and is delivered in collaboration with some of the Airport’s onsite employers, such as caterers and retailers.

Specifically the programme aims to address some of the problems encountered by airport employers when trying to recruit more local people, such as ‘soft skills’, lack of preparation and understanding of the airport work environment.

Additionally, the programme helps the company to reach its aspiration of employing 70% of its staff from within 5 miles of the site, with 35% of these from the Borough of Newham.

The “Take Off into Work” programme works to help local people into employment both within and outside of the company by developing their job skills and confidence, and raising their aspirations. The programme is run five times a year.

The programme consists of multiple components:

Training: Candidates enrolled in the programme begin by completing two weeks of London City Airport specific employability workshops to equip them with general competencies, as well as role specific skills necessary to begin work successfully at the Airport. This training covers everything required for candidates to obtain a full airside security pass, through to the skills necessary to be successful in the placement which follows. This is of particular importance when taking into account that 5% have never been employed, and 78% have been unemployed for six months or more.

Placement: After the initial training period, participants undertake a two to nine week long placement with one of the 55 employers based at the Airport. This enables candidates to develop skills and also to understand the specific demands of an airport environment, thereby increasing their chances of gaining employment at later stages. In

17 addition, it allows participants to demonstrate their professional capacity, and gain a valuable reference

17

addition, it allows participants to demonstrate their professional capacity, and gain a valuable reference from a respected employer.

Interview training and experience: During the programme, participants receive mentoring and support, including CV and interview preparation. Participants also undertake team volunteering challenges, which provide a unique opportunity to learn about the importance of working in a team in the airport environment while contributing to local community organisations through voluntary work.

Interviews at London City Airport: Following completion of the programme, participants are offered interview opportunities with London City Airport and the various employers onsite. Employment opportunities have been expanded through development of an Employers’ Forum for the diverse range of companies onsite.

Expanding opportunities: By completing the programme, participants increase their prospects and aspirations, even if unsuccessful at the final interview stage. The “Take Off into Work” scheme – although specifically developing skills relevant to the demands of an airport environment – builds the capacity, transferable skills and general confidence of individuals in a way that makes participants more eligible and comfortable in pursuing new and alternative employment opportunities.

Business benefits

The “Take Off into Work” programme has multiple corporate benefits.

Smooth running of the airport is essential to its success as a business service, and by employing locally London City Airport is better able to ensure the continuity of its operations in the event of issues such as traffic congestion or poor weather. By providing relevant training to local people, London City Airport also ensures that the skills it requires are available locally as the business grows and the workforce expands.

In 2009, 62 Newham residents from the programme gained employment (some at the airport and some in other local businesses). 45% of these candidates had been unemployed for a year or longer and 4% had never worked. Through the programme, more than 130 previously unemployed Newham residents have now gained employment and recruitment costs (estimated to be in excess of £1,000 per position) have been significantly reduced.

The company has received a number of awards for its work, including the Lord Mayors Dragon Award, and a Business Alliance Annual Volunteers Employment Champion Award. This recognition enhances both community relations and support, and more broadly the reputation of the company.

18 The programme also provides a further opportunity for the Airport to engage with its

18

The programme also provides a further opportunity for the Airport to engage with its onsite businesses, as part of its Employers’ Forum (which meets quarterly to discuss employment, sustainability and other initiatives).

Why is it CSR?

The “Take Off into Work” programme provides both business and social benefits – namely it provides the airport and its onsite businesses local and flexible staff, adds to the wellbeing of the local area and provides employment for local people. In doing so, it contributes to the wider sustainability of London City Airport’s operations within East London.