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ITEC 7430 Instructional Design Dr.

Randy Hollandsworth Instructional Design Project Assignment # 4 UBD Stage 3

Bobbie Keenan July 16, 2009

Learning Plan (Stage 3)


Where, Why & What

Goals: In addition to learning traditional literary skills, students will also independently work on finding fact in a historical fiction by utilizing various forms of resources including the internet and then compiling the information into a multimedia presentation. To understand essential questions in the unit: How can information on internet enhance a reading experience? Does history have an impact on literature? How can the truth be told through fiction? Why is historical fiction important? How accurate are facts used in historical fiction? What are some of the techniques authors of historical fiction use to make reading their stories feel authentic to the time period? What are some of the historical references made in, Bud, Not Buddy?

Expectations: To better understand these goals students will:

Read the historical fiction, Bud, Not Buddy.


(Aesthetic Entry Point)

(Narrative Entry Point)

Keep a double entry journal to reflect on ideas brought up in the readings. Use a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast the historical settings in the novel and the students life. (Logical Entry Point) Create a Body Biography (character analysis) paired with an aspect of the Great Depression that is associated with the character in the novel.
(Experiential Entry Point)

Create a PowerPoint presentation connecting the historical fiction of Bud, Not Buddy to factual, historical information found on the internet.
(Experiential Entry Point)

Complete assignments that further illustrate how literary devices are used by an author to enhance a reading experience. (Foundational Entry Point) Accurately cite resources off the internet. Access historical information.
(Logical Entry Point)

(Experiential Entry Point)

Relevance and Value: To appreciate literature and other creative expressions of information. Create products that capitalize on the various formats strengths. Demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts. Identifies and analyses sensory details and figurative language. Identifies the speaker and recognizes the differences between first and third narration. Relates a literary work to historical events of the period.

Prerequisite Skills: Students already do most of their daily work on personal lap tops and have adequate keyboarding skills, work with the program, Word, daily, and all have worked with PowerPoint in numerous other classes to present projects. Students have prior knowledge of literary devices (simile, metaphor, irony, imagery, etc.). The activities in this unit will be reinforcing that knowledge. Evaluate students knowledge of the Great Depression with a True or False questionnaire and KWL chart.

Hook & Hold As a result of the event of the Great Depression, over 250,000 children found themselves homeless. Many became nomads, traveling the highways and railways. While the character Bud, cant be labeled as a nomad, he is homeless early in the story and making his way across Michigan towards an uncertain future. Investigate the plight of children during the Great Depression and answer the following question in your journal. Do you think you could make it alone on your own? Why or why not? Include everything that you could carry that you would need to make it on your own.

Explore & Equip

Provide the students with agendas (see calendar) that include the assignments they will be expected to complete by the end of the unit. List of websites that are relevant to the aspects of the Great Depression that are mentioned in Bud, Not Buddy and even used as settings for investigation. Students are not limited to using only these websites for their assignments. Provide each student with a copy of Bud, Not Buddy Handout with MLA citation instructions for resources from the internet. Self-assessment rubrics for double journal entries and PowerPoint Presentation assignment. (see Stage 2) Have daily class discussions about readings. Have students do several homework assignments that focus on a particular aspect of the Great Depression mentioned in the story. Have students complete homework assignments and in class assignments that explain and clarify the use of various literary devices throughout the novel.

Rethinking, Reflections, & Revisions Students will write daily in their double entry journal. Specific topics or free writes in relation to the reading will be assigned. Students will be given a KWL chart two times during the unit to see what theyve learned as theyve progressed through the unit. Assignments, two quizzes and a final test will be given to monitor comprehension reading and grasp of various literary devices used in the novel. Continuous research will be conducted individually to enhance and build on the students knowledge of The Great Depression. Daily class discussion will be held to clarify any questions that might come up during the reading. Two final journal entries will be assigned asking the students to reflect on how reading Bud, Not Buddy helped them understand more about the impact of The Great Depression.

Encouraging Self-Evaluation Journal Entry Topics: Discuss your thoughts on the story Bud, Not Buddy. How did reading this book help you understand more about the Great Depression? Do you think that reading historical fiction can help you better understand historical events? Why or Why not? Double Journal Entry Rubric and PowerPoint Presentation Rubric will be provided to

guide students and give them the ability check their progress as they go through their assignments.

Tailor to Students Needs Two different handouts with websites that will be used as part of their research for several projects in this unit will be given to the students. One handout has websites with more in depth information. The second handout has websites, while the content is essentially the same as the more in depth websites, the information is more pared down for the learners that arent as advanced and lower readers. Bud, Not Buddy will be read as a class, with the exception of three chapters that will be read as homework. I chose to do this not only to facilitate discussion, but as a way to engage the lower readers in class that have been known to become frustrated with reading novels this length. Ample classroom time has been set aside to complete the final PowerPoint presentation so the teacher can assist all students with any help they may need. Several homework assignments (Chapter 4 Worksheet and All That Jazz Activity) will be adjusted to accommodate advanced and lower learners.

Organize (See Student Agenda Calendars)

Week One Student Agenda

Activity
Journal

Monday
Entry: Do you think you could make it alone on your own? Why or Why not? Include everything that you could carry that you would need to make it alone.

Tuesday
Entry: Describe the character, Bud (appearance, age, personality) and the setting of the book. Include examples from the book and cite pages. Response: Also can you relate to the character, Bud? Why or why not? Introduce the novel, Bud, Not Buddy. Read Chapters 1 & 2 as a class. Discuss from whose point of view the story is told.

Wednesd ay
Entry: Give an example of a flashback in this chapter and cite the page. Response: Describe one of your own memories. Be as detailed as possible.

Thursda y
Entry: After reading Chapter 5, describe what you think Buds mother was like. Explain why and use quotes from the book to support your thoughts.

Friday
Entry: At this point in the story, which character do you relate to the most, and why?

Classroom Activity

Computer Activity Homework

Introduce the unit and give out student agendas. Have students fill out a KWL chart on the Great Depression. Ask students six questions pertaining to their knowledge of events of the Great Depression. Choose two of the six, question topics to research. Review how to cite information from the internet. Research two chosen topics. Journal. In a Word Document, write five facts (can

Read Chapters 3 & 4 as a class. Discuss the use of the literary devices, flashbacks and imagery in this chapter.

Read Chapters 5 & 6 as a class. Discuss the use of irony. Irony exercise.

Literary Device/Story Quiz. Read Chapter 7 as a class.

Journal

Journal

Journal

Journal

In a Word Document, retell the events of

Imagery chart and Figurative Language Chart.

Study for Quiz

include pictures) about your two topics that either confirm or disprove your original True or False answer. Your findings must be properly cited.

Chapter 2 from Todds point of view or in third person.

Week Two Student Agenda

Activity Journal

Monday
Entry: What do you think the rocks with numbers on them mean and why?

Tuesday
Entry: Free Journal. Write about events or characters that stood out to you in this chapter, and respond.

Wednesd ay
Entry: Free Journal. Write about events or characters that stood out to you in this chapter, and respond.

Thursda y
Entry: Do you think riding the rails would have been a fun way to travel? Why or why not? Include quotes from the book to support your reasons. Read Chapters 13 & 14 as a class. Literary Device/Story Quiz

Friday
Entry: Free Journal. Write about events or characters that stood out to you in this chapter, and respond.

Classroo m Activity

Computer Activity

Homewor k

Have class fill out a second KWL chart. Read Chapter 8 as a class. Divide into groups of 2 (including the teacher) and use the Venn Diagram to compare and contrast Hoovervilles and their residents with your own family and neighborhood. Share your findings with the class. The billboard mentioned in Chapter 8 is in a famous photo from the Great Depression. Find the photo on the internet and insert it into a word document. Include the name of the photographer and the title of the photo. Cite your sources. Journal. Billboard activity.

Read Chapters 9 & 10 as a class. Discuss the use of extended metaphor (activity) and Onomatopoeia.

Read Chapters 11 & 12 as a class. Discuss the authors use of direct and indirect characterization .

Read Chapter 16 as a class. Discuss Internal and External Conflict in the story.

Journal

Journal. Do a search on Pullman Porters. In a Word Document, explain why being a Pullman Porter was a good job to have during the Depression. Include a picture and a job description. Cite sources. Study for Quiz. Pullman Porter activity.

Journal

Journal

Find 5 examples of onomatopoeia in Chapter 10. In a word document list the sentence each word appears in and underline the word. Cite the page the word

Read Chapter 15

Read Chapter 17

is on, and tell how it is used in the story for effect.

Week 3 Student Agenda

Activity Journal

Monday
Entry: Free Journal. Write about events or characters that stood out to you in this chapter, and respond.

Tuesday
Entry: Free Journal. Write about events or characters that stood out to you in this chapter, and respond.

Wednesd ay
Entry: Discuss your thoughts on the story Bud, Not Buddy. How did reading this book help you understand more about the Great Depression? Finalize the character analysis and save to file.

Thursda y
Entry: Do you think that reading historical fiction can help you understand historical events? Why or Why not? Create a five slide PowerPoint Presentation on your character and an aspect of the Great Depression that affected that character directly.

Friday

Classroo m Activity

Read Chapter 19 as a class. Discuss the use of extended metaphor on pages 200202. Jazz Band activity.

Final Literary Device/Story Test. Begin work on character analysis and PowerPoint presentation.

Compute r Activity

Journal. Explore the PBS.org Jazz website. Create your own band after exploring the PBS.org website.

Journal

Character Analysis and PowerPoint Presentation

Homewor k

Character Analysis Draw Character or find graphics that represent the chosen character. Make note of all your sources.

Create a five slide PowerPoint Presentation on your character and an aspect of the Great Depression that affected that character directly.

Create a five slide PowerPoint Presentation on your character and an aspect of the Great Depression that affected that character directly. Create a five slide PowerPoint Presentation on your character and an aspect of the Great Depression that affected that

Have students fill out a final KWL chart. Five slide PowerPoint Presentation on your character and an aspect of the Great Depression that affected that character directly is due. Five slide PowerPoint Presentation on your character and an aspect of the Great Depression that affected that character directly is due. Turn in Jump Drive for Final Grades.

character directly.

KWL Chart

Topic: The Great Depression


What I Know What I Want to Know What I Learned

What Do You Know About The Great Depression?


Circle whether you think these statements are true or false and then briefly write why you think its either true or false.

1. In the 1930s, riding the rails was a fun and efficient way to travel. True or False

______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________

2. Hoovervilles were named in honor of President Herbert Hoover. True or False ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________

3. Being a Pullman Porter was a good job to have in the Great Depression. True or False ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________

4. Jazz musicians played country music in the 1930s. True or False ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________

5. It was easy to find a job in the Great Depression. True or False ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________

Great Depression Websites


the handout.

(Advanced)

*The word advanced wouldnt appear on

Youre not limited to use just these websites for your assignments. America in the 1930s http://xroads.virginia.edu/~1930s/front.html Riding the Rails http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/rails/index.html Herbert Hoovers Reaction to the Great Depression http://www.hoover.archives.gov/exhibits/Hooverstory/gallery06/gallery06.html The New Deal Network http://newdeal.feri.org/ The Great Depression and New Deal 1929-1940s http://iws.ccccd.edu/kwilkison/Online1302home/20th%20Century/DepressionNewDeal.html Digital History http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/learning_history/children_depression/human_meaning.cfm Photos of the Great Depression http://history1900s.about.com/library/photos/blyindexdepression.htm Photo Essay of the Great Depression http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/depression/photoessay.htm African-Americans in the Great Depression http://mtungsten.freeservers.com/ Hoovervilles http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1642.html Hooverville photos http://newdeal.feri.org/ron/ab02info.htm City Life During the Great Depression

http://middle.usm.k12.wi.us/faculty/taft/Unit7/citylife.htm Jazz http://www.pbs.org/jazz/time/time_depression.htm PBSkids.org Jazz http://pbskids.org/jazz/ The Great Depression http://library.thinkquest.org/03oct/01794/pictures_page.htm

Great Depression Websites


Youre not limited to use just these websites for your assignments.

The Depression News http://www.sos.state.mi.us/history/museum/explore/museums/hismus/1900-75/depressn/index.html How the Depression Affected Children http://newdeal.feri.org/eleanor/er2a.htm America in the 1930s http://xroads.virginia.edu/~1930s/front.html Riding the Rails Easy http://www.erroluys.com/RidingtheRails.htm Riding the Rails Easy http://web.olivet.edu/gradusers/nhenric1/Riding.html Photos of the Great Depression http://history1900s.about.com/library/photos/blyindexdepression.htm Photo Essay of the Great Depression http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/depression/photoessay.htm Hooverville photos http://newdeal.feri.org/ron/ab02info.htm PBSkids.org Jazz http://pbskids.org/jazz/ The Great Depression http://library.thinkquest.org/03oct/01794/pictures_page.htm

Bud, Not Buddy Chapter 4 Worksheet

Use the following chart to analyze the figurative language in this chapter. In the box labeled My Own, write your own sentence using this type of figurative language.

Passage

Type of Figurative Language

What is being compared or what does this mean?

My own

then I was inside the Amos house crouched down like a cat burglar. (p. 31) My heart started jumping around in my stomach as soon as I reached out for the shotgun. (p. 32) Todds bed stayed as dry as the desert. (p. 34) If J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI saw me now Id be in some real serious

hot water!

(p. 35)

Discussion:

*The worksheet for the lower students would have the Discussion question omitted.

Bud says that his favorite saying in the whole world is He who laughs last laughs the best. Do you agree with this saying? Explain what this statement means and do you agree or disagree with it. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________

All That Jazz Activity (Advanced Student Version)


* Advanced Student Version wouldnt appear on the handout.

After exploring the PBS.org website, Jazz, create your own band. Write a paper with a minimum of three paragraphs. Include the following in your paper: Create a name for your band. Identify the members and the instruments they play. Talk about your travels and what kind of jazz your band plays. Finally, create a poster for your band using a single PowerPoint slide.

All That Jazz Activity After exploring the PBS.org website, Jazz, create your own band. Write a brief summary of your band. Include the following in your summary: Your bands name. The names of the members and the instruments they play. Where are some of the places your would play. Finally, create a poster for your band using a single PowerPoint slide.

References
Capotosto, Lauren, Evan Howard and Jennifer Baribault, Bud, Not Buddy. http://faculty.salisbury.edu/~elbond/budnotbuddy2.html#Evaluation (July 12, 2009) Fox, Debbie, Families-Then And Now Venn Diagram. http://alpha.learnnc.org/lp/media/lessons/DebbieFox2112003991/VennDia gram1.JPG (July 16, 2009) Hamilton, Joan and Cheryl Klausner, Making Adolescent Literature Matter eWorkshop. http://www.literacymatters.org/lessons/budnotbuddy.htm (July 5, 2009) Sutherland, Tammy D. and Shannon B. Temple, Teaching Unit: Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis. United States: S&T Publications, 2008. Page 8. Sandtpublications.com. Web. July 11, 2009