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Learn to Read Faster


Do you read fast or do you read slow? Do you have to reread a sentence sometimes to get its full meaning? If you read at less than 100 words per minute, you are reading below standard level. Now you can double or triple your reading speed with a new word recognition course. Whether you are a student, high school graduate, college graduate, or if you just want to read faster, you can do it. Even if you didnt finish high school, you can still learn to read faster on your own.

A Self-Teaching Course

To use this program for your school or learning center or to get a workbook for teaching your child, contact Dennis Brooks. Also, help improve the course, send your comments. Email: dennisbrookscontact@gmail.com Buy online: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/dennisbrooks Book Number: 543-2-09832-111-31 Copyright, Dennis Brooks, 2011, All Rights Reserved ISBN: 978-1-105-06998-7

Table of Contents
Introduction 4 4 6 6 7 8 17 34 91 100 101 104 107 108 110 110

Words With Syllable Stress

Lesson Groups

How to Study

Phonetic Speed Drills and Tests Common Study words Uncommon Words I Uncommon Words II

How to Push Yourself to Read Faster

Teach Yourself Phonics Learn Phonics

The schwa and Other Sounds The Phonetic Language Phonetic Reading Drills

Speed Reading

About the Author

Introduction
Learn to Read Faster does three things: It speeds up the process for people just learning how to read. It helps those who already know how to read learn to read faster. It is also for fast readers who want to improve their reading speed without having to take another class. This course teaches rapid reading through pronunciation, syllabification, visualization, and memorization. Students learn new words and advance to rapid reading quickly with this new multi-sensory learning process. Learn to Read Faster lets you read faster in spite of hearing loss, speech impediment, or other learning problems. It is also great for adults who are just learning to read.

Words With Syllable Stress Syllable stress:

The syllables with the highest stress will have a high mark () before them.

The syllables with the lowest stress will have a low mark (.) before them.

The syllables which are unstressed will have a dash (-) or no mark at all before them.

Lesson Groups
How to Study the Whole Word with Say-Spell-Say When you study, each word will be written in an expanded form and laid out for pronunciation, spelling, and syllabification. This lets you study and learn the whole word in all of its forms. This is how to study each word: nol.ij k n o w l e d g e know.ledge 1. Pronounce the word first: nol.ij 2. Read the spelling next: k n o w l e d g e 3. Say the word again: know.ledge

Each word will be registered in your memory for rapid reading recall when you can look away, pronounce, and spell it correctly. This happens automatically when practicing the say-spell-say drills. 4. Finally, to test yourself after studying a lesson, read down the list of alphabetic (bold) words letting their pronunciation come to you without saying them. Each time your eyes contact a word, its spelling and pronunciation should come to you automatically. If you cannot read each word in the test quickly and smoothly, simply restudy the lesson and try it again. Restudying the phonetic core of the words trains you to read them faster.

Common Study-words
Instruction: 1. Pronounce the word first: nol.ij 2. Read the spelling next: k n o w l e d g e 3. Say the word again: know.ledge Finally, read down the list of bold words letting their pronunciation come to you. Pronunciation: Highest stress (), lowest stress (.), unstressed syllables (-).

pri.te p r e t pret-ty

ol.most a l m o s t al.most pe.pel p e o p peo-ple

a.frad a f r a i afraid fa.ther f a t h fa-ther

fam.i.le f a m i l y fam-i-ly fa.mus f a m o fa-mous

per.son p e r s o per-son

ol.waz a l w a y s al.ways a.mount a m o amount

se.kond s e c o se-cond be kam b e c became

sis.ter s i s t e r sis-ter slo.le s l o w slow-ly be.kom b e c become

mo.ther m o t h mo-ther out.sid o u t s out-side

ol.re.de a l r e a d alrea-dy be.koz b e c a because

far.merz f a r m far-mers pik.chur p i c t pic-ture

te.cher t e a c h tea-cher no.thing n o t h i no-thing be.twen b e t w e between pro.blem p r o b pro-blem

som.wun s o m e o some.one

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bro.ther b r o t h bro-ther re.mem.ber r e m e m remem-ber en.e.thing a n y t h an-y.thing chil.dren c h i l chil-dren

too.ge.ther t o g e t toge-ther stoo.dents s t u d e stu-dents a.di.shon a d d i addi-tion

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som.thing s o m e t some.thing som.timz s o m e t some.times them.selvz t h e m s themselves grand.mo.ther g r a n d grand.mother

grand.fa.ther g r a n d f grand.fa-ther af.ter.noon a f t e r af-ter.noon skool.room s c h o o school.room

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byoo.ti.ful b e a u t beau-ti-ful un.der.stand u n d e r .un-derstand

dik.sho.na.re d i c t i o dic-tio.na-ry dif.rens d i f f e dif-ference ev.re.thing e v e r y eve-ry.thing

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Take the Test Instructions: When testing, scan and read each word silently before pronouncing it at a whisper. With enough practice, you will start using scanning automatically when you read out loud. For reading drills, read the words out loud as fast as you can.

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Common Words Test (69) p p f f a s s b o b p n p b r e a a l e i e u e i o r r e o t m w c s c t c c t o o t p h o a o t o s a t h b t t l e u y n e m i u u i l h y e r s s d r e d e s e r e n g e m e r m l o a o r f t e v t t o o u a a a f p a b s m a f t b s r l f a e m e l o l a e e o e m r m r o c o t r r a t m m o a i s u a w h e m c w e e s t i d l y o n n t m e l y e r a d e r h e e e o n m b e

y s r n e r

a n y t h i n g t o g e t h e r a d d i t i o n s t g g a s b u o h r r f c e n m e a a t h a d e m n n e o u e t s d d r o t r i e m f n l i s

c h i l d r e n s t u d e n t s s o m e t h i n g s e h h n o l n

s e r e r m d
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Uncommon Words I

in.fun.se simp.tom i n f a n c y s y m p t o m infan-cy symp-tom kwik.le mag.ni.fi q u i c k l y m a g n i f y quick-ly mag-ni.fy roo.ten r o u t i n routine bi.ol.o.je b i o l o g biol-o-gy em.pa.the e m p a t h em-pa-thy his.to.re h i s t o r his-to-ry ab.do.men e a b d o m e n ab-do-men y y adn.en a d e n i n e aden.ine che.ta c h e e t a h chee-tah

per.sent y p e r c e n t percent

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thi.a.min t h i a m i thi-a-min the.ra.pe t h e r a p ther-a-py sur.pas s u r p a surpass re.zults r e s u l results s t

n y s s

form.yu.la f o r m u l a form-u-la fed.e.ral f e d e r a l fed-er-al pa.shent p a t i e n t pa-tient av.er.ij a v e r a g e av-er-age

na.shon.al mul.ti.pel n a t i o n a l m u l t i p l e na-tion-al mul-ti-ple frend.le si.to.sen f r i e n d l y c y t o s i n e friend-ly cy-to.sine men.ta.le m e n t a l l y men-tal-ly sim.e.tre s y m m e t r y sym-me-try

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ri.bo.som r i b o s o m e ri-bo.some ro.ta.shon r o t a t i o n ro-tation ad.he.zhin a d h e s i o n adhe-sion ka.pas.i.te c a p a c i t y capac-i-ty su.pres s u p p r e s s suppress do.na.ting d o n a t i n g donat-ing

skan.ing s c a n n i n g scan-ning fed.bak f e e d b a c k feed.back si.lin.der c y l i n d e r cyl-in-der bra.kits b r a c k e t s brac-kets su.pe.re.or s u p e r i o r supe-ri-or e.val.yoo.at e v a l u a t e eval-u.ate

ho.lis.tik im.a.choor h o l i s t i c i m m a t u r e holis-tic .im-mature

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po.la.ri.te p o l a r i t y pola-ri-ty poz.i.tiv p o s i t i v e pos-i-tive ko.li.se.um c o l i s e u m .col-ise-um

pig.ments p i g m e n t s pig-ments at.i.tyood a t t i t u d e at-ti.tude hos.pi.tal h o s p i t a l hos.pi-tal

se.re.bral im.pak.ted c e r e b r a l i m p a c t e d cere-bral impac-ted with.dro ver.te.bra w i t h d r a w v e r t e b r a with-draw ver-te-bra tor.tos dom.i.nat t o r t o i s e d o m i n a t e tor-toise dom-i.nate chur.chez med.i.sin c h u r c h e s m e d i c i n e chur-ches med-i-cine

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kon.dens lem.on.ad c o n d e n s e l e m o n a d e condense .lem-onade par.ti.kel part.nerz p a r t i c l e p a r t n e r s par-ti-cle part.ners re.spons oint.ment r e s p o n s e o i n t m e n t response oint-ment in.ti.mit myoo.ta.shon i n t i m a t e m u t a t i o n in-ti-mate muta-tion kyoo.kum.ber ko.he.zhin c u c u m b e r c o h e s i o n cu.cum-ber cohe-sion i.myoo.ni.te he.red.i.te i m m u n i t y h e r e d i t y immu-ni-ty hered-i-ty is.o.la.ted e.pu.lep.se i s o l a t e d e p i l e p s y is-o.la-ted ep-i.lep-sy

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hi.dra.ted ep.i.dem.ik h y d r a t e d e p i d e m i c hy.dra-ted .ep-idem-ic en.tha.lpe in.som.ne.a e n t h a l p y i n s o m n i a en.tha-lpy insom-ni-a ma.nyoo.ver stim.yoo.lus m a n e u v e r s t i m u l u s maneu-ver stim-u-lus in.fyoo.zhin in.fe.ri.or i n f u s i o n i n f e r i o r infu-sion infe-ri-or pa.ra.noid o.di.to.re p a r a n o i d a u d i t o r y para.noid au-di.to-ry ser.vi.kal c e r v i c a l cer-vi-cal sed.i.ment s e d i m e n t sed-i-ment e.kwa.zhin e q u a t i o n equa-tion di.no.sar d i n o s a u r di-no.saur

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par.a.ket p a r a k e e t par-a.keet pro.found p r o f o u n d profound

par.a.sit p a r a s i t e par-a.site dis.a.beld d i s a b l e d disa-bled

swel.ing far.ma.se s w e l l i n g p h a r m a c y swell.ing phar-ma-cy mol.e.kyool skel.e.tin m o l e c u l e s k e l e t o n mol-e.cule skel-e-ton i.de.ol.o.je nyoo.tre.ent i d e o l o g y n u t r i e n t .i-deol-o-gy nu-tri-ent spe.sif.ik e.fyoo.zhin s p e c i f i c e f f u s i o n specif-ic effu-sion kil.o.gram sik.li.kal k i l o g r a m c y c l i c a l kilo.gram cy.cli-cal

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de.men.sha froi.de.an d e m e n t i a F r e u d i a n demen.tia Freud-i-an re.tar.ded r e t a r d e d retar.ded o.ton.o.me a u t o n o m y auton-o-my eks.po.zhur e x p o s u r e expo-sure de.loo.zhin d e l u s i o n de.lu-sion be.hav.yor b e h a v i o r behav-ior fez.ant p h e a s a n t pheas-ant

fiz.i.kal be.lit.el p h y s i c a l b e l i t t l e phys-i-cal belit-tle be.trad glou.ko.ma b e t r a y e d g l a u c o m a betrayed glauco-ma di.nam.iks frak.chur d y n a m i c s f r a c t u r e dynam-ics frac-ture

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je.no.tip klav.i.kel g e n o t y p e c l a v i c l e ge-no.type clav-i-cle a.fer.ent i.loo.zhin a f f e r e n t i l l u s i o n af-fer-ent illu-sion vol.a.til den.drit v o l a t i l e d e n d r i t e vol-a-tile den-drite sin.drom punk.choo.ul s y n d r o m e p u n c t u a l syn.drome punc-tu-al kwa.drant kwa.le.te q u a d r a n t q u a l i t y quad-rant qual-i-ty loud.nes l o u d n e loud-ness bak.bon b a c k b o back.bone flek.si.bel s s f l e x i b l e flex-i-ble kat.a.list n e c a t a l y s t cat-a-lyst

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mak.a.ro.ni kat.a.rakt m a c a r o n i c a t a r a c t .mac-aro-ni ca-ta.ract am.pyoo.tat o.ver.dos a m p u t a t e o v e r d o s e am-pu.tate o-ver.dose tem.po.rul de.men.ted t e m p o r a l d e m e n t e d tem-po-ral demen-ted di.am.e.ter an.te.ri.or d i a m e t e r a n t e r i o r diam-e-ter ante-ri-or di.a.re.a ter.mi.nal d i a r r h e a t e r m i n a l .di-arrhe-a ter-mi-nal thal.a.mus an.ti.bod.e t h a l a m u s a n t i b o d y thal-a-mus an-ti.bod-y bak.te.re.a mo.ti.vat b a c t e r i a m o t i v a t e bacte-ri-a mo-ti.vate

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trans.mit rek.les t r a n s m i t r e c k l e s s transmit reck-less a.kwird mon.o.ton a c q u i r e d m o n o t o n e acquired mon-o.tone noo.ro.sis mo.ral.i.te n e u r o s i s m o r a l i t y neuro-sis moral-i-ty do.nut do.na.shon d o u g h n u t d o n a t i o n dough.nut dona-tion pre.shur dis.purs p r e s s u r e d i s p e r s e pres-sure disperse re.kov.er.e kon.stant r e c o v e r y c o n s t a n t recov-er-y con-stant dres.ing e.lek.tron d r e s s i n g e l e c t r o n dress-ing elec.tron

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floo.i.di.te mo.bil.i.te f l u i d i t y m o b i l i t y flui-di-ty mobil-i-ty ke.mi.kal mo.di.fid c h e m i c a l m o d i f i e d chem-i-cal modi.fied no.ta.shon yoo.ro.pe.an n o t a t i o n E u r o p e a n nota-tion .Eu-ropean mod.er.at ret.i.kyool m o d e r a t e r e t i c u l e mod-er-ate ret-i.cule jap.a.nes ab.nor.mal J a p a n e s e a b n o r m a l .Jap-anese abnor-mal for.mer.le ad.vansd f o r m e r l y a d v a n c e d for-mer-ly advanced moov.ment kom.bak m o v e m e n t c o m e b a c k move.ment come.back

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re.ak.shon in.ti.ma.se r e a c t i o n i n t i m a c y reac-tion in-ti-ma-cy e.mo.shon.al nyoo.mon.ya e m o t i o n a l p n e u m o n i a emo-tion-al pneumon-ia ek.sten.shon a.bun.dans e x t e n s i o n a b u n d a n c e exten.sion abun-dance en.do.pla-zum cham.pan e n d o p l a s m c h a m p a g n e en-do.plasm champagne

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Uncommon Words I, Test (174)


Take the Test Instructions: When testing, scan and read each word silently before pronouncing it at a whisper. With enough practice, you will start using scanning automatically when you read out loud. For reading drills, read the words out loud as fast as you can.

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i q r b e h t t s r n f m r r a c s d h p p c c w t c c p

n u o i m i h h u e a r e i o d a u o o o o o e i o h o a

f i u o p s i e r s t i n b t h p p n l l s l r t r u n r

a c t l a t a r p u i e t o a e a p a i a i i e h t r d t

n k i o t o m a a l o n a s t s c r t s r t s b d o c e i

c l n g h r i p s t n d l o i i i e i t i i e r r i h n c

y y e y y y n y s s a l l y l y m e o n o n t y s s n g i c t y v e u m a l a w s e e s s e l e

s m a a c p f f p a m c s s f c b s e i p a h i v d m l p

y a b d h e o e a v u y y c e y r u v m i t o m e o e e a

m g d e e r r d t e l t m a e l a p a m g t s p r m d m r

p n o n e c m e i r t o m n d i c e l a m i p a t i i o t

t i m i t e u r e a i s e n b n k r u t e t i c e n c n n

o f e n a n l a n g p i t i a d e i a u n u t t b a i a e

m y n e h t a l t e l e n e r y n g c k e r t s o r t e r e t s d e a l e d r a t e n e d e r s
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r i c i i h e m i p c s p p s m i s k d r a e p b d g a v

e n u m s y n a n a e e a r w o d p i e e u x h e y e f o

s t c m o d t n f r r d r o e l e e l m t t p y t n n f l

p i u u l r h e u a v i a f l e o c o e a o o s r a o e a

o m m n a a a u s n i m k o l c l i g n r n s i a m t r t

n a b i t t l v i o c e e u i u o f r t d o u c y i y e i

s t e t e e p e o i a n e n n l g i a i e m r a e c p n l

e e r y d d y r n d l t t d g e y c m a d y e l d s e t e

o m c h e e i s i a e d p d p s n e c F d b p b g f c i d

i u o e p p n t n u q i a i h k u f y r e e h e l r l l e

n t h r i i s i f d u n r s a e t f c e l h e l a a a l n

t a e e l d o m e i a o a a r l r u l u u a a i u c v u d

m t s d e e m u r t t s s b m e i s i d s v s t c t i s r

e i i i p m n l i o i a i l a t e i c i i i a t o u c i i

n o o t s i i u o r o u t e c o n o a a o o n l m r l o t

t n n y y c a s r y n r e d y n t n l n n r t e a e e n e
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s q l b m a t d d t b t a n d p r d f c n m J f m r e e e

y u o a a m e i i h a r c e o r e r l h o o a o o e m x n

n a u c c p m a a a c a q u u e c e u e t d p r v a o t d

d d d k a u p m r l t n u r g s o s i m a e a m e c t e o

r r n b r t o e r a e s i o h s v s d i t r n e m t i n p

o a e o o a r t h m r m r s n u e i i c i a e r e i o s l

m n s n n t a e e u i i e i u r r n t a o t s l n o n i a

e t s e i e l r a s a t d s t e y g y l n e e y t n a l o n s m

p q f c c o d a t a m r m m d d c e m m E r a a c i p a c

u u l a a v e n e n o e o o o i o l o o u e b d o n n b h

n a e t t e m t r t t c n r n s n e b d r t n v m t e u a

c l x a a r e e m i i k o a a p s c i i o i o a e i u n m

t i i l r d n r i b v l t l t e t t l f p c r n b m m d p

u t b y a o t i n o a e o i i r a r i i e u m c a a o a a

a y l s c s e o a d t s n t o s n o t e a l a e c c n n g

l e t t e d r l y e s e y n e t n y d n e l d k y i a c e n e
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Uncommon Words II arm.a.di.lo a r m a d i l l o .ar-madil-lo hi.er.ar.ke h i e r a r c h y hi-er.ar-chy im.po.tens i m p o t e n c e im-po-tence kon.tin.yood c o n t i n u e d contin-ued ma.ri.wo.na m a r i j u a n a .ma-rijua-na ev.o.loo.shon e v o l u t i o n .ev-olu-tion kon.tan.er c o n t a i n e r contain-er
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About the Author Dennis Brooks was a senior instructor and curriculum developer for the US army. After retiring, he attended college while working as an assistant teacher. After a while, he was put in charge of a third-grade reading program, which had eighteen students. The workbooks used for teaching reading at the time, taught reading with phonics using diacritical marks, which were confusing for both the teachers and students. Also, the students had to refer to a pronunciation key in the back of the book to match the sounds to the words before they could pronounce them correctly. This was a slow learning process but it worked for the majority of the students and they made regular progress. Classroom teachers usually scheduled reading on Wednesdays when they were meeting with the principal. That is when Dennis usually taught reading. Several of the students needed additional remedial reading, which took place in the back of the classroom. Using his experience as a curriculum developer, Dennis began writing special lessons for those students. Using the dictionary, he carefully wrote out a list of troublesome words with their phonetic versions next to them. This gave the student a ready reference for pronouncing the troublesome words. After a while, the students were tested without the phonetic clues. eight = at great = grat though = tho high = hi

As time went by, they learned to read all the single syllable words. Then Dennis made lists of common multisyllable words with their phonetic forms next to them. This helped the students learn to sound out the common words that made up their speaking vocabulary. knowledge=nolij community=komyoonite secretary=skeretere Some students were still having trouble sounding out multisyllable words that they understood but did not use in their speaking vocabulary. To solve this problem, Dennis

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divided the words into syllables and included them as a third form. en.e.thing = an-y-thing = anything chil.dren = chil-dren = children Dennis taught reading for six years, while continuing to develop and expand his reading program. After moving to Hawaii, he started working as a private tutor, teaching children with various reading problems including those who spoke English as a second language. When higher functioning second language learners had trouble sounding out both common and uncommon multi-syllable words, he had to find a solution to the problem. Since the students had no way of knowing how to vary the tones of the syllables to make the words easier to pronounce correctly, they generally read the syllable with a flat even tone. To solve this problem, Dennis included the stress marks for each syllable in the multi-syllable words and explained how to use them. Note: The high mark () is for syllables with high tones, the low mark (.) is for low tones, and the dash (-) is for even tones. too.ge.ther = yes.tur.da = stoo.dents = toge-ther = together yes-ter.day = yesterday stu-dents = students

This completed the program for both English speakers and English language learners. For teaching early reading skills, Dennis also translated nursery rhymes and short stories into pure phonics. This let the students practice their reading with phonics first so they could sound out and read unfamiliar words. After they learn the phonetic version of a short story, they could use the phonetic clues as references to help pronounce the alphabetic words in the regular versions of the stories.

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Litl Boi Bloo Litl Boi Bloo, kum blo yor horn. The sheps in the me.do, the kouz in the korn; Hwarz the litl boi hoo minz the shep? Hez un.der the ha.stak, fast a.slep! Little Boy Blue Little Boy Blue, come blow your horn. The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn; Where's the little boy who minds the sheep? He's under the haystack, fast asleep! Dennis put all study-words on lists and arranged them from smallest to largest and did the same thing with the poems and short stories. This made the reading program a selfteaching course for most students. Those who have a high aptitude for languages, regardless of their age, can now teach themselves to read without constant one-to-one tutoring. Those who struggle with learning to read simply need basic instructions and reading assignments, which can be given as homework. At some point, students will learn to recognize the phonetic core of the common words and use those skills to sound out and read many of the 600,000 words that make up the English language. Dennis has dyslexia and has used the program to improve his reading skills as well. Since dyslexia hindered his ability to read, write, and spell; developing, teaching, and testing this program took place over a span of 20 years. Nevertheless, since developing and testing the program, he has more than quadrupled his reading speed.

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