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PAINTERS & ALLIED TRADES


www.IUPAT.org

THE PAINTERS AND ALLIED TRADES JOURNAL (ISSN 1522-2241) is published quarterly for members of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades by IUPAT at 1750 New York Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20006. Periodicals postage paid at Washington, DC and additional mailing offices. Canadian publications mail agreement #41479512, return undelivereable Canadian addresses to B & M Mailing Services Limited 35 Vankirk Drive, Unit 15, Brampton, Ontario L7a1a5, e-mail: bmcomm@pathcom.com.

16 28 34 36 38 42
9 27 Job Corps 32 FCA 34 LMCI

Report of the Audit Committee


The IUPAT financial statement.

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Ask the GP

Your questions answered by General President James Williams.

COVER STORY: LMCI Contractor Spotlight


The Journal features IUPAT industry partner, Harrison Muir Inc.

News from the Finishing Trades Institute


Training, leadership meetings, graduates and more.

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IUPAT Government Affairs Report


Online campaign used to complement lobbying efforts.

IUPAT Pension Fund Defies the Age of New Normal


Positive news in an uncertain market.

D E P A R T M E N T S

Union News & Events

36 Finishing Trades Institute 38 Government Affairs 42 Retirement & Pension 46 In Memoriam

The Official Journal of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades, Organized March 15, 1887, and the Only Publication Issued Under Its Auspices. James A. Williams, Editor George Galis, Publisher

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POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE PAINTERS AND ALLIED TRADES JOURNAL 7234 Parkway Drive Hanover, MD 21076

48728

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AccountabilityintheDigitalAge
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IUPAT, its Pronto time. What is Pronto? The word itself comes from the Latin promptus, for quick or quickly. ager of my local in Philadelphia, I Again, you may say, thats interesting, but what does had a member who would walk that have to do with the IUPAT? Pronto is a business mobile phone app. An app, as up to me before every meeting and hand most of you know, is a tool that can be used on smartphones like Blackberrys, iPhones and Androids. If you me a piece of paper with addresses written have an iPhone, then youre probably a fan of apps in red ink on it. The paper had a list of job like Angry Birds or some other game that serves as a fun time killer. What you may not be as familiar with sites around town. He would then very are the business apps out there now. Were always looking for ways to do our jobs betrespectfully ask me if I knew about the proter and Pronto is an app for business that helps us genjects he listed and if they were union. erate job site reports like good, old Joe Albert used to give to me. Armed with a smartUsually, I knew about all of phone, our agents, representatives them, but there were occasions and organizers from throughout the where hed given me information I United States and Canada visit a didnt have yet. So, Id check them job site, fill out the form on the out and get back to him at the next phone and then hit a button to meeting where he had yet another file it in a database back at the list of jobs ready to give me to look IUPAT headquarters in Hanover, into. Maryland. It even gives the option The name of that member is Joe to take a picture of the job site. Albert. Hes an IUPAT life member I am so excited about this new today and I still get notes from him technology we now have at our finin that same red pen from time to gertips. Were up and running with time. I always appreciated an extra Pronto in nearly all of our 34 disset of eyes in the field to make certrict councils in North America with tain every single work opportunity over 1,000 men and women in the for our members was explored. field using this app. This new sysJAMES A. WILLIAMS True, we had agents in the field that tem will make us all better represenGENERAL PRESIDENT were assigned to report on current tatives for our members. Hour by jobs in the area, just as we do today, but too much hour, we are collecting information on job sites, geninformation was never a bad thing. Not to mention, eral contractors and sub-contractors (both union and Brother Alberts notes also let me know if someone had non-union), and merit shops or open shops (whichever to be prodded to be a bit more efficient at their job. If terminology youre familiar with). It all boils down to he was putting more job sites down on paper for me to one word for the membership and leadership; that check out than the person who was hired to do the word is accountability. same thing, then it was time for a closed-door meeting No more excuses and no more claims of not knowwith my staff. ing about a job, where it is or what it looks like. This Well, Im pleased to report that weve come a long system identifies everything about a job with a picture way from those notes with the red ink. Today, for the Continued on page 40

ack when I was the business man-

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IUPAT Launches New Program to Announce Job Alerts for Members on Their Mobile Phones
The International Union of Painters and Allied Trades (IUPAT) has just launched a new service that enables members in our core crafts to get job leads via text alerts on their mobile phones. Heres how it works: Members text the first letter of their craft from their mobile phone to 48728.*
Example: Painters (Industrial and Commercial) and Paper Hangers text the letter P to 48728. Glaziers text the letter G to 48728. Drywall workers text the letter D to 48728. Floor covering installers text the letter F to 48728. Trade show workers text the letter T to 48728. Sign and display workers text the letter S to 48728. Those who do so will get a confirmation message and instructions via text to finalize their registration. When local IUPAT leaders need workers in any of those crafts, a job alert will go out to those registered with contact information in the message. Until recently, members willing to travel for work could only register on the IUPAT Traveling Journey Worker web site with their trade, name, address, phone numbers and email address. However, when a call for workers to man jobs went out, the news often failed to reach a portion of the list because of incorrect information. People move, change email or home phones, and then fail to update it on the list. Because mobile phones and, more importantly, their mobile phone numbers typically remain active when someone moves, this text messaging program is expected to be far more successful in reaching those looking for work. Rest assured, those who register on the Traveling Journey Worker web site will still be contacted on the list. However, it is hoped that those with mobile phones will also be certain to register to receive job alerts via text, as well. Local IUPAT leaders often have only a 24-48 hour window to man the job. The text message alerts will better ensure a more timely response. Members with any questions about this new program can send their questions to gmcdonald@iupat.org.
*U.S. only.

EXECUTIVE GENERAL VICE PRESIDENTS REPORT

Labor,ConstituencyandCommunity
America hasnt been successful at turning jobs and implementing PLAs, it has. But how much better would against organized labor in our success rate be with a thriving partnership the public and private sectors between labor, constituency and community? One way to develop these types of relationships is across the country this year, it is unmistak- to continue to work within the structure of the AFL-CIOable that a key element in the continuing recognized constituency groups and related community groups. To understand the importance of effort by the IUPAT to remain relevant is relationships between labor, constituency and commustrong relationship building. Its been made nity, we need to refer to the current and former administrations of the AFL-CIO. Under the leadership of clear over and over again by the media former President John Sweeney and todays leader, that those who belong to a union are in the President Richard Trumka, these constituency groups became full participants on the minority within the workAFLCIO Executive Council with representational and voting rights force. at those meetings as well as at the Yet, the reaction to the attempts AFL-CIO conventions. to limit our right to organize clearly Each constituency group has its shows that, even though the public own charter, officers, governance may, on occasion, disagree with structure, etc., just as AFL-CIO conorganized labor, it stands squarely stitutionally mandated departments behind the right to be in a union if (like the Building and Construction one chooses to be. Trades Department) do. The AFLI played football in college and I CIOs recognized constituency can tell you first hand that having groupsthe A. Philip Randolph the crowd behind you and cheering Institute (APRI), AFL-CIO Union for you, especially when youre Veterans Council, Asian Pacific behind in the score, empowers you American Labor Alliance (APALA), beyond words. The public support Coalition of Black Trade Unionists labor received this year showed the (CBTU), Coalition of Labor Union KENNETH E. RIGMAIDEN world that we may be down, but EXECUTIVE GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT Women (CLUW), Labor Council for were not out. Latin American Advancement That support must serve as a constant reminder for (LCLAA) and Pride At Work (PAW)serve as orgaus that we are not only obligated to develop work nized labors bridge to diverse communities. These opportunities for our members, but to strengthen the partnerships enhance the standard of living for all communities in which we work and live as well. We workers and their families. must move forward for the mutual benefit of labor, These groups also promote the full participation of constituency and community. women and minorities in the union movement, and Why is this so important? When roughly three in ensure unions hear and respond to the concerns of the ten public sector employees are unionized and only communities they represent. seven percent of the private sector employees belong Many of the members of the groups I listed above to a union, we dont singly have the influence required are also members of our own union. The IUPAT is well to turn a project union for our trades or to gain a prorepresented on the Executive Committee of the Labor ject labor agreement (PLA) for a project in our commuCouncil for Latin American Advancement by District nities. Thats not to say that the hard work and effort of Council 36 (Southern California) Director of our district council leadership throughout North Continued on page 40

ith the events and attacks

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GENERAL SECRETARY-TREASURERS REPORT

LeadershipSeriesTrainingProvides HopeforaBrighterFuturefortheIUPAT I
have learned some things and have made some adjustments to the training. The group that began we train our new officers and field rep- training in 2011 will have two additional days of resentatives. We switched from our old instruction in marketing and innovative organizing approaches during the initial two weeks of the IUPAT system of two weeks of training broken in in-house program. For 2012, we are considering adding an additional week of organizing training in a to one or two hour increnew course offered by the National Labor College called ments on a variety of topics Organizing in Construction IV. to our current Leadership Currently, aside from the 40 students who just graduated, we have Series Training. 80 students enrolled at various stages of training. A new class will This system consists of two weeks be added for 2012. of training developed by the IUPAT The training is valuable and on topics ranging from communicagives new representatives the tools tion skills in bargaining and to perform their best for our memorganizing, to financial issues, organizing planning, legal issues, bers. However, another benefit has and basics like proper taking of been that these representatives minutes and the proper way to run a from all over North America spend union meeting, plus many others. six weeks together, day and night. Those two weeks are followed by They learn from each other and GEORGE GALIS an additional four weeks of classes G E N E R A L S E C R E T A R Y - T R E A S U R E R develop relationships that hopefully offered by the National Labor will last throughout their careers as College, which are geared specifically to the construc- IUPAT leaders. These relationships have already led to tion industry, covering construction organizing, labor networking to share information about employers, work law, marketing, and collective bargaining agreement opportunities, organizing campaigns, best practices, negotiations. All of these classes are held at the IUPAT and many more. This training has also served to instill campus in Hanover, Maryland. The six weeks of train- in these new leaders a passion and a determination to ing are spread out over a two-year period, so as not to better perform their jobs. take representatives away from their jobs for too long. I have taught portions of some of the classes and This spring, the group of new leaders that began speak to each class whenever possible. Seeing the training in 2009 graduated. The first group of 40 stu- enthusiasm of our new leaders gives me hope about dents completed the required courses over a two-year the future of our great union. As these men and women period. Exit interviews and feedback from this group are training and as they return home to represent our shows that all students feel better equipped to do their members, I pray God guides their path to a better jobs and represent our members. Along the way, we future for all IUPAT members.

n 2009, the IUPAT changed the way

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S. Frank Bud Raftery Scholarship


General President, March 1965 June 1984
At the 25th General Convention held in Washington, DC, in August 1984, to honor his service to the International Union all his adult life, and his accomplishments and progressive thinking, a resolution was passed creating the S. Frank Bud Raftery Scholarship Fund. At the 27th General Convention held in Washington, DC, in August 1994, General President A. L. Mike Monroe and the General Executive Board, who believe strongly in the principles for which the Scholarship Fund was created, and the need to continue and enhance this Convention theme of Organizing, Education and Training designed to bring all of our members and their families into the strategic planning and operation of our International Union through educational programs, passed a resolution to increase the S. Frank Bud Raftery Scholarship Fund to $20,000, allowing for (10) scholarships of $2,000.00 annually. This fine program is available to sons, daughters or legally adopted dependents of IUPAT members in good standing to apply for scholarships. THE SELECTED TOPIC FOR 2011 IS AS FOLLOWS
What education and information should the IUPAT provide its members to motivate them to become involved in the union and serve as activists when called upon?

The scholarship awards are contingent upon the student attending a certified college, university, voc. tech./trade or other such institutes of higher learning. Award winners must enroll in the school of their choice within a year of the award date or forfeit the award. Details and an application form are carried in a summer issue of the Painters and Allied Trades Journal. The deadline for essays to reach the International Union Headquarters is December 9, 2011 and winners will be announced in April, 2012.
Please note: Dependents of IUPAT International Staff, General Officers or Fund Administrators and Employees, previous scholarship winners of this award or the Monroe/Williams Sports Scholarship award are not eligible to apply.

A P P L I C A T I O N
SSN/SIN __________________________________________________ Name_____________________________________________________ Address ___________________________________________________ City/State/Zip _____________________________________________ Male ____________________ Female___________________________ Date of Birth _______________________________________________ Single/Married ____________________________________________ Date of Graduation _________________________________________ Mail to: IUPAT Scholarship Committee 7234 Parkway Drive Hanover, MD 21076

F O R M

(Must be submitted with the essay) List the college, university, voc. tech./school or other institution of higher learning you are attending or planning to attend. __________________________________________________________ Briefly describe the course of study you intend to pursue and the educational goals you have established for yourself. __________________________________________________________ IUPAT Local Union number of parent who is a member ___________ IUPAT Members Name ______________________________________ Members Signature _________________________________________ Members SSN/SIN _________________________________________ Date ___________________________________________________
SPECIAL NOTE: Dependents of IUPAT International Headquarters, Staff, General Officers, Employees and previous scholarship winners are not eligible for this scholarship program.

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I N T E R N A T I O N A L U N I O N O F P A I N T E R S A N D A L L I E D T R A D E S

DISTRICT COUNCIL 5 - WASHINGTON, OREGON

nora Technical Academy

By Dave OMeara, District Council 5 looring installers must not only work on their knees but stay on their toes when it comes to keeping up with the latest products and techniques in an industry that is as diverse as any. For every flooring material there are numerous manufacturers and each has specific requirements that must be met in order to satisfy their warranty. So not only does a floor layer know the basic mechanics to install carpet, vct, and vinyl sheeting, but also an array of other types of flooring materials such as rubber. One manufacturer of rubber flooring is nora systems, Inc. They are located in Germany where they develop, produce, and market resilient rubber floors worldwide. To add another feather in ones hat or another certificate in ones wallet, a floor installer needs to get approved by any number of manufacturers to be not

only valuable to ones self, but to the shop where one works. With this in mind, a nora Technical Academy workshop was held this past April 27th and 28th at our DC 5 Finishing Trades building in Seattle. Gary Bedrosian, a nora Technical Specialist, led the training of 11 journey floor coverers from Local 1238. Also in attendance were DC 5 West Flooring Coordinator, Bob Gratzer and Instructor, Paul Carter. In class, the attendees first learned about the product itself and then moved on to mock ups for the installation of the rubber flooring where they received hands-on instruction from Gary. The mock ups provided each installer an opportunity to cut in, seam cut, cold weld, flash cove, and dry fix the rubber flooring. If attendees meet or exceed standards they will receive an ID card as a nora Approved Installer.
In front row, from left to right is Benjamin Drake, Annie Haggenmiller, Jimmy Lynch, Jason Trevor, Joseph Simpson , Jamie Torres , Paul Carter, Bob Gratzer, and Gary Bedrosion. In back from left to right are Jeff Hamilton, Zack Cooper, Jay Norton, Mike Hanson and Charles Dannelley.

DISTRICT COUNCIL 7 - WISCONSIN THE RALLY STAYS ALIVE IN THE BADGER STATE
On Saturday, May 14, members of IUPAT District Council 7 joined tens of thousands of others in Madison, Wisconsin at the state capitol to protest Governor Scott Walker's budget proposal and his plan to strip government workers of their collective bargaining rights. The organized labor movement in Wisconsin is reminding us all of what solidarity truly looks like.

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DISTRICT COUNCIL 9 - NEW YORK CITY

Big Solidarity in the Big Apple!

n Saturday, April 9, 2011, members of District Council 9 stood in solidarity with 15,000 workers from the public sector, private sector and the NY Building Trades in New York Citys Times Square to say We Are One Respect Our Rights! The rally was held in response to unprecedented attacks on the rights of working men and women to organize, to engage in collective bargaining and to hold safe those benefits won at the bargaining table over the past 50 years. It was one of

more than 1,200 AFL-CIO Days of Action events rallies, teach-ins, faith services and town halls held throughout the week of April 4th.

Denis M. Hughes, President of the New York State AFL-CIO, stated, Working men and women across the country are under attack like never before. But as todays rally has shown, these attacks have only served to energize working people. Todays massive turnout is a testament to New York labors strength, solidarity and commitment to our shared sense of purpose. For anyone who doubts our resolve, our message today is clear: We are one movement, and we demand that our rights be respected.

DISTRICT COUNCIL 11 - CONNECTICUT, RHODE ISLAND MAY DAY IN RHODE ISLAND


On May 1, 2011, members of IUPAT District Council 11 joined fellow union members in Providence, Rhode Island to celebrate May Day. Known as the International Workers Holiday, May Day celebrations took place around the country and, as usual, the IUPAT was showing its colors at every rally.

DISTRICT COUNCIL 15 NEVADA, ARIZONA, NEW MEXICO, COLORADO LOCAL UNION 159 HONORS LONG AND DISTINGUISHED YEARS OF SERVICE IN LAS VEGAS
Local Union 159 President Gregory Calvin (right) is pictured here proudly presenting fellow member Charles O. Swift a pin for 65 years of service in the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades. Congratulations, Brother Swift, and thank you for all your years of service.

Proud members of IUPAT District Council 11 plus one from the UAW at May Day celebration in Providence. From left to right; Justin Kelley, Meredith Sidito from UAW, IUPAT Business Representative Scott Duhamel, Nate Anthony, Leo Rainville, Michael Rainville with his newborn Masen Rainville. In the front, IUPAT family members (left to right), Elijah Rainville, Jaiden Alvatado, Leo Rainville II.

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DISTRICT COUNCIL 16 NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

Rewards for Activism


by Mike West, District Council 16

he 2011 VAC Banquet was a great time for everyone. The food and the venue itself were outstanding. The Volunteer Activist Local Union of the year was Local 12. The Volunteer Activist of the year was Anthony Nuances of Local 12. The VAC continues to grow with more events and more participants each year. The Local Union VAC coordinators and their assistants are the backbone of the program and continue to inspire the membership to get involved and make a difference in their communities.

DISTRICT COUNCIL 26 - MICHIGAN ITS BACK TO DOW FOR THE IUPAT IN MIDLAND
After more than 25 years of using non-union painters, Dow Chemical will welcome back the proud crafts men and women of the IUPAT under a new maintenance contract in Midland, Michigan. In preparation, District Council 26 members completed their Scaffold Competent Person coursework thanks to curriculum and training provided by the IUPAT Finishing Trades Institute.

DISTRICT COUNCIL 35 - MASSACHUSETTS, NEW HAMPSHIRE, MAINE UNITED IUPAT ACTIVISM IN BOSTON AND BEYOND
There are many examples of strong membership activism in IUPAT district councils throughout the United States and Canada, and District Council 35 is one of the best. Recently, members of just a few of its many activist programs united to lead fellow union members in a demonstration in Boston to call for more assistance for Main Street instead of Wall Street. Thanks to the many members of DC 35 and our other district councils who have proudly shown our IUPAT colors and made their voices heard at rallies for working families all over North America.

Members of District Council 35 groups Women in Action, the Members Activist Program and the Young Lions at a recent rally for working families.

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DISTRICT COUNCIL 39 - ATLANTIC PROVINCES, CANADA

Local Food Bank Saved from Forced Closure


tlantic Provinces District Council 39 of Halifax-Dartmouth, Nova Scotia has successfully completed urgently required upgrades to the Marine Communities Food Bank in Chezzetcook, Nova Scotia. These upgrades have saved this important lifeline to many Eastern Shore communities from impending closure due to overwhelming heating costs and further problems with volunteer retention caused by disrepair and a lack of sufficient insulation. Community activist Edie Rossiter, president of the 100% volunteer funded and managed food bank, approached District Council 39 Business Manager/ Secretary-Treasurer Jonathan Gaul and retired IUPAT General Presidents Representative Michael McRae requesting assistance to upgrade their facilities to a state that would allow them to maintain their much needed assistance to many needy families and individuals. Heating and maintenance costs were exceeding income and another winter without remediation would force closure. Business Manager Gaul assigned

District Council 39 Business Representative Wilf Jarvis to coordinate donations of materials and labour from signatory employers and members and to liaise with Mike McRae with onsite applications and installations. The wooden floors, completely exposed to outside elements, were coated with 4 of spray foam insulation supplied by DC 39 multi-trade signatory employer, Parker Kaefer Inc.s General Manager Tom Fitzpatrick, and applied by member employees Vern MacGregor and Kevin Pineo. Heavy gauge sheet metal skirting was cut and supplied by signatory glazing contractor Roy Pennell, president of Markland Associates Ltd., and applied to the previously exposed exterior of the building. Volunteer members removed old drywall from non-insulated walls and proper insulation and new drywall was installed to an R20 factor. In addition, new electrical heating, fixtures and necessary wiring, etc. was purchased by DC 39 and installed by retired IBEW members. New shelving was installed on walls to facilitate the

storage and easy packing of food hampers for distribution. All repairs were completed prior to the onset of the winter heating season and the Food Bank resources are now dedicated to their primary purpose of assistance to those in need. In addition, they now have enough space to store and supply used clothing, furniture and appliances as required. Ms. Rossiter states, Our food bank is now warm and spacious, structures have been replaced, repaired and we now offer humane working conditions for our much needed volunteers. It has been a pleasurable experience to see what DC 39, their employers and members have accomplished for our communities and we remain forever appreciative and thankful of their commitment and efforts. BM/ST Gaul wishes to convey his sincere pride in the generosity and community spirit the members and contractor partners demonstrated in this effort to help those in less fortunate circumstances than ourselves.

Proud members of District Council 39 save the day for a local food bank in Chezzetcook, Nova Scotia. From left to right; Wilf Jarvis, Michael McRae, DC 39 Business Manager/ Secretary-Treasurer Jonathan Gaul, Marine Communities Food Bank Society President Edie Rossiter, Parker Kaefer General Manager Tom Fitzpatrick and Ryan Pennell of Markland Associates.

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DISTRICT COUNCIL 46 - TORONTO, CANADA

IUPAT Artists at Work in a Majestic Setting

asa Loma, or the "house on the hill," is a majestic castle that sits on a five acre estate in Toronto, Canada. Touting nearly 100 rooms with decorated suites, secret passages, towers, hunting lodge and stables. It took 300 men three years to build from start to finish beginning in 1911, with a price tag of $3.5 million. The castle was owned and built by financier Sir Henry Pellat. As in past classes, the January 2011 Advanced Level Painter Decorator apprentices of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades in Toronto were given the opportunity to complete some of their hands-on training at Casa Loma under the guidance of instructor Stuart McGovarin, assisting with the ongoing restoration of the Castle. Throughout the Castle, the apprentices handiwork is on display for thousands of visitors to view. We are very proud of the contribution of the apprentices to this most worthy cause and very grateful to Casa Loma for opening their doors and providing a real-life training experience to the apprentices. Congratulations to all involved (past and present) on a fantastic job!

Lady Pellatts Suite in Casa Loma.

Casa Loma Second Floor Hallway.

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DISTRICT COUNCIL 51 - MARYLAND, VIRGINIA, WASHINGTON, DC

IUPAT Members Protest to Maintain PLA on Local Project


t an April media event, Virginia Congressman Frank Wolf was greeted by union members protesting his call for Metropolitan Washington Airport Authority to reverse its decision to use a Project Labor Agreement (PLA) in the construction of an underground station at Dulles Airport in Chantilly, Virginia. As the April 18, 2011, HerndonPatch reported, the PLA will require construction contracts to be awarded to unionized firms. The agreement ensures fair wages and health care for workers and requires workers to be skilled and trained. Wolfs objection to the PLA was viewed by many as an attack against organized labor instead of budgetary concerns, as he publicly maintains.

DISTRICT COUNCIL 77 - ALABAMA, GEORGIA, TENNESSEE, NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA WHAT'S FOR DINNER?
Congratulations to Jonathon Hill, Eddie Hill and Ron McKenzie of District Council 77/Local Union 1756 - aka Papa Eddie and the Hoggy Bottom Boys - for winning first place in ribs and third place in pork at the Boss Hog Cook Off in Waynesboro, Georgia. When they're not working hard in their trade or for their local, they're perfecting their BBQ skills with great success!

UNION REPRESENTATION WINS BACK WAGES FOR MEMBERS


Late last year, members of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades in Charlotte, North Carolina were compensated for expenses and lost wages by their company after it was found that they were illegally terminated. The payment was thanks to the hard work of DC 77 Business Manager/SecretaryTreasurer Robert Kincaid and his staff in representing their rights in the workplace. Never forget that one of the main reasons you belong to a union is to ensure
In this photo: Robert L. Rivenbark Jr. (kneeling), David Armstrong Jr., Tim Lunsford, David Armstrong Sr. (holding check), Patrick Lay, DC 77 BM/ST Robert Kincaid, DC 77 Business Representative Ed Sturcken and Robert Rivenbark Sr.

your rights are protected in the workplace. Don't hesitate to contact your district council or local union if you think you've been wronged!

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DISTRICT COUNCIL 81 - IOWA, NEBRASKA, ILLINOIS

IUPAT Public Sector Employees Meet to Discuss Bargaining Rights

n April, the Executive Board of IUPAT Local Union 2003 met with District Council 81 Business Manager/Secretary-Treasurer Robert Gilmore to discuss internal organizing and issues surrounding the attacks on public employees throughout the country. LU 2003 represents public, professional and maintenance employees in Des Moines, Iowa. The hostile environment for public employees in many state and local governments inspired them to learn more about their right to choose a union to represent them in the workplace.

IUPAT BM/ST Robert Gilmore addresses members of Local Union 2003 in Des Moines, Iowa.

HIT WELCOMES NEW BOARD MEMBER KENNETH RIGMAIDEN, EGVP OF INTERNATIONAL UNION OF PAINTERS AND ALLIED TRADES
The Board of Trustees of the AFL-CIO Housing Investment Trust (HIT) recently welcomed Kenneth E. Rigmaiden, Executive General Vice President, International Union of Painters and Allied Trades (IUPAT) of the United States and Canada, as its newest member. The Painters have long been active supporters of the HIT, and we are very pleased that Ken Rigmaiden has been elected to serve as a trustee, said Board Chairman John Sweeney. He brings to the HIT board a deep commitment to improving the quality of life for our union brothers and sisters. Kenneth Rigmaiden became IUPAT Executive General Vice President in 2002. He had previously served as Assistant to the IUPAT General President, and as National Project Coordinator for the IUPAT Job Corps Program. He currently serves on the executive boards of several AFL-CIO recognized constituency groups and community organizations. A member of the IUPAT since 1977, Mr. Rigmaiden began his career with the union in
KENNETH E. RIGMAIDEN EXECUTIVE GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT

San Jose, California HIT Investor

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AUDITREPORT

Report of the Audit Committee


JANUARY 1, 2010 TO DECEMBER 31, 2010 INTERNATIONAL UNION OF PAINTERS AND ALLIED TRADES

In accordance with Section 22 of the Constitution of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades, the Audit Committee convened on May 17 and 18, 2011 for the purpose of auditing the accounts of the International Union for the year ended December 31, 2010. The Committee members were duly elected and consisted of Gregory Boone, District Council 6/Local Union 123, Philip Lindquist, District Council 5/Local Union 1238, and Philip Neforos, District Council 51/Local Union 368. The General Executive Board engaged the services of the independent certified public accounting firm of Novak Francella llc to act in conjunction with the Audit Committee. The Committee reviewed the consolidated financial statements of the International Union for the year ended December 31, 2010, including the detail of assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses. The Committee concludes that the transactions undertaken by the International Union were in accordance with established policies and the Constitution. The Committee had access to all of the International Unions records including bank statements, investment custody reports, receipts and disbursements. The Committee noted that a strong internal control system was in place for safeguarding the assets of the International Union. General Fund operating expenses exceeded revenue by $3.8 million during 2010. The total assets of the International Union were $78.5 million at December 31, 2010. The savings that were planned from increased efficiencies and cost controls have continued to be realized. More importantly, services have been expanded. Over $46 million was spent this year for the benefit and advancement of our members and affiliates. The reduction in net assets for the year 2010 was a direct result of the reduction in per capita received due to these difficult economic times. The per capita increases have been deferred in the past many years, but will now require an increase to maintain the stability of the Unions finances. The Audit Committee did note that the General Fund expenses were less in 2010 than in 2009. The new International Union Headquarters was opened and occupied during the summer of 2010. The exceptional campus is located in the Maryland suburbs of Washington, D.C. The campus has three buildings totaling 136,000 square feet. Occupying that space is the International Union, the National Pension Funds, the Labor Management Cooperation Initiative and the Finishing Trades Institute. The facilities include a 36 room residence hall. Since its

opening, the residence hall has provided 2536 room nights of occupancy. $5.8 million was returned to the affiliates during 2010. That amount is 28% of the per capita received from the affiliates during 2010. Over $15 million has been returned to the affiliates during the last three years. The Organizing Fund that began in 2004 provided $3.6 million in assistance again this year. The GO Fund that began in 2008 provided the remaining affiliate assistance. General Fund cash and investments at December 31, 2010 were $45.5 million. Even with the decrease in per capita the General Fund will maintain cash and investment reserves in excess of the target of 12 months. The Committee was informed that the IUPAT strives to maintain reserves at 12 months, as recommended by our independent accountants. We noted that the goal was maintained for 2010. The financial condition of our International Union is sound. We noted that the General Executive Board has worked to minimize the operating costs and maximize the investment performance in a difficult economic environment. These actions have provided, at the lowest cost to members, the financial strength and stability that is reflected in our net assets. We have found the accounts to be maintained in a careful and systematic manner. The independent auditor has provided an unqualified opinion on the consolidated financial statements. We, the Members of the Audit Committee, are in agreement as to the International Unions financial status for the year ended December 31, 2010.
MEMBERS OF THE AUDIT COMMITTEE:

May 18, 2011 Gregory Boone District Council 6/Local Union 123 Philip Lindquist District Council 5/Local Union 1238 Philip Neforos District Council 51/Local Union 368 Working in conjunction with the Audit Committee: NOVAK FRANCELLA, LLC Certified Public Accountants By: Peter F. Novak, CPA

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Report of Independent Auditors


Members of the General Executive Board International Union of Painters and Allied Trades We have audited the accompanying consolidated statement of financial position of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades (the International Union) as of December 31, 2010, and the related consolidated statements of activities and cash flows for the year then ended. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the International Unions management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by the International Unions management, as well as evaluating the overall consolidated financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the International Union as of December 31, 2010 and the changes in its net assets and its cash flows for the year then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

The 2011 Audit Committee (left to right): Peter Novak and Steve Mazur of Novak Francella, LLC, Assistant to the General SecretaryTreasurer Ron Kniess, General Secretary-Treasurer George Galis, Philip Lindquist - District Council 5/Local Union 1238, Gregory Boone District Council 6/Local Union 23 and Philip Neforos - District Council 51/Local Union 368

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AUDITREPORT

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF PAINTERS AND ALLIED TRADES CONSOLIDATED IUPAT STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION DECEMBER 31, 2010

General Fund Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accrued interest receivable Per capita receivable Due from related funds Other receivable Intrafunds receivable (payable) Prepaid expenses Unexpended contract funds Investments Property and equipment, net Total assets $ 3,811,617 19,689 4,620,026 425,815 188,815 (1,623,583) 273,093 63,075 41,719,111 1,442,647 $

Organizing Fund

GO Fund

Building Fund

Elimination
$ (16,090,145) (16,090,145) $

Total Operating Funds


7,961,364 19,689 4,620,026 425,815 292,729 (14,641,442) 343,093 63,075 28,492,225 29,878,024

1,318,804 583,783 2,863,259 4,765,846

841,287 237,863 -

1,989,656 103,914 (13,839,505) 70,000 28,435,377

$ 50,940,305

1,079,150 # $ 16,759,442

$ 57,454,598

Liabilities and Net Assets Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued expenses Due to related funds Unexpended contract funds Prepaid per capita Total liabilities Net assets Total liabilities and net assets

2,146,950 11,822 63,075 470,901 2,692,748 48,247,557

99,737 99,737 4,666,109

33,155 33,155 1,045,995 $ 1,079,150

$ $

1,222,751 9,500 1,232,251 15,527,191

(16,090,145)

3,502,593 21,322 63,075 470,901 4,057,891 53,396,707

$ 50,940,305

4,765,846

$ 16,759,442

$ (16,090,145)

$ 57,454,598

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

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Disaster Convention Fund

Relief
Fund

Death Benefit Fund

Accidental Death Fund

IUPAT Unrestricted

PAT Unrestricted
$ 474,713 49,206 93,194 617,113

Temporarily Restricted
$ 2,612,389 150,983 2,763,372 $

Total
16,441,725 19,689 4,620,026 475,021 446,115 22,347 343,093 63,075 29,590,686 29,878,024 81,899,801

2,223,752 1,720 192,029 138 2,417,639

180,887 19,029 516,000 715,916

2,718,770 14,350,022 582,323 -

269,850 683 9,515 280,048

13,354,623 19,689 4,620,026 425,815 295,132 (70,847) 343,093 63,075 29,590,686 29,878,024 78,519,316

$ 17,651,115

2,417,639

$ -

71,982 71,982 17,579,133

10,000 10,000 270,048

3,584,577 21,322 63,075 470,901 4,139,875 74,379,441

355 355 616,758

23,719 23,719 2,739,653

3,608,651 21,322 63,075 470,901 4,163,949 77,735,852

2 715,914 $ 715,916

2,417,639

$ 17,651,115

280,048

78,519,316

617,113

2,763,372

81,899,801

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AUDITREPORT

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF PAINTERS AND ALLIED TRADES CONSOLIDATED IUPAT STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2010

General Fund Revenue Per capita Administrative processing, reinstatement and clearance card fees Benefit contributions Individual contributions Contributions and donations Investment income Administrative cost reimbursements Royalties and reimbursements Local union supplies and bond premiums Job Corps program Residence Hall Income Other Net assets released from restriction Total revenue Expenses Personnel costs Affiliation fees Benefits and awards Assistance to affiliates Communications (includes cost of IUPAT Journal) Conferences, committees and seminars Government affairs Financial assistance to affiliates Regional organizing efforts Legal and litigation Charitable contributions Local union supplies and bond premiums Job Corps program Residence Hall Expenses Administrative, office and general Office and computer equipment Occupancy Postage, printing and supplies Depreciation Currency translation Other Total expenses Change in net assets Intrafund transfers Net assets at beginning of year Net assets at end of year $ $ 13,679,527 383,644 65,751 3,319,485 280,602 18,989 6,796,843 974,851 25,519,692 25,519,692 $

Organizing Fund 3,488,279 71,473 3,032 3,562,784 3,562,784 $

Go Fund 1,453,449 2,980 1,456,429 1,456,429 $

Building Fund 817,058 1,747,068 289,744 431 2,854,301 2,854,301 $

Elimination $

Total Operating Funds 19,438,313 455,117 71,763 5,066,553 280,602 18,989 6,796,843 289,744 975,282 33,393,206 33,393,206

12,672,096 2,250,733 491,405 1,587,227 338,546 10,952 540,729 288,387 (65,075) 6,796,843 858,322 1,359,780 583,084 711,104 (16,669) 903,226 29,310,690 (3,790,998) 52,038,555 48,247,557 $

3,619,143 4,433 10,192 3,633,768 (70,984) 4,737,093 4,666,109 $

2,143,286 126,583 15,915 4,834 378 2,290,996 (834,567) 1,880,562 1,045,995 $

142,996 60,706 465,703 496,010 1,005,960 65,114 861,047 5,579 269,810 3,372,925 (518,624) 5,000,000 11,045,815 15,527,191

(5,000,000) (11,090,145) $ (16,090,145) $

12,815,092 2,250,733 5,762,429 491,405 1,587,227 338,546 137,535 601,435 288,387 (65,075) 6,796,843 465,703 1,370,247 2,365,740 648,198 1,572,151 (1,823) 1,183,606 38,608,379 (5,215,173) 58,611,880 53,396,707

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

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Convention Fund $ 1,133,104 23,954 3,794 15,374 1,176,226 1,176,226 500 10,044 128,617 3,539 288 142,988 1,033,238 1,384,401 $ 2,417,639 $ $

Disaster Relief Fund 116,316 147 1,600 118,063 118,063 55 127,263 350 372 128,040 (9,977) 725,891 715,914 $ $

Death Benefit Fund 2,342,329 787,690 14,929 3,144,948 3,144,948 1,892,259 446 (50,100) 37,591 1,880,196 1,264,752 16,314,381 17,579,133 $ $

Accidental Death Fund 58,138 530 3,683 62,351 62,351 30,000 2,104 (5,024) 27,080 35,271 234,777 270,048 $ $

IUPAT Unrestricted 20,571,417 479,071 2,400,467 116,316 863,924 5,066,553 280,602 18,989 6,796,843 289,744 1,010,868 37,894,794 37,894,794 12,815,592 2,250,733 1,922,259 5,762,429 501,449 1,587,227 338,546 137,535 601,490 415,650 (65,075) 6,796,843 465,703 1,372,351 2,365,740 777,261 1,572,151 (53,058) 1,221,857 40,786,683 (2,891,889) 77,271,330 74,379,441 $ $ Unrestricted 2,872,334 2,088 44,466 2,918,888 2,696,372 5,615,260 985,089 23,183 257,077 2,917,050 47,084 55,642 1,451,532 5,736,657

PAT Temporarily Restricted $ 2,123,119 6,985 2,130,104 (2,696,372) (566,268) (566,268) 3,305,921 $ 2,739,653 $ $ Total 23,443,751 479,071 2,400,467 2,123,119 116,316 872,997 5,066,553 280,602 18,989 6,796,843 289,744 1,055,334 42,943,786 42,943,786 13,800,681 2,250,733 1,922,259 5,762,429 524,632 1,844,304 2,917,050 338,546 137,535 601,490 415,650 (65,075) 6,796,843 465,703 1,372,351 2,412,824 832,903 1,572,151 (53,058) 2,673,389 46,523,340 (3,579,554) 81,315,406 77,735,852

(121,397) 738,155 616,758

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AUDITREPORT

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF PAINTERS AND ALLIED TRADES CONSOLIDATED IUPAT STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2010
IUPAT Cash ows provided by (used for) operating activities Cash received from District councils, local unions and members Investment income Other revenue and reimbursements Net cash received Cash disbursed For personnel costs To service providers, suppliers, vendors and others Net cash used Net cash provided by (used for) operating activities Cash ows used for investing activities Proceeds from sale or redemption of investments Purchase of investments Purchase of property and equipment Net cash used for investing activities Net increase (decrease) in cash Cash and cash equivalents Beginning of year End of year Reconciliation of change in net assets to net cash provided by (used for) operating activities Change in net assets Net appreciation of investments Depreciation and amortization expense (Increase) decrease in assets Receivables Intrafund receivables and payables Prepaid expenses Increase (decrease) in liabilities Accounts payable and accrued expenses Prepaid per capita Accrued pension costs Net cash provided by (used for) operating activites PAT Total

$ 23,661,419 593,980 18,547,647 42,803,046 (12,815,092) (25,758,105) (38,573,197) 4,229,849 99,555,968 (87,068,015) (14,912,872) (2,424,919) 1,804,930 11,549,693 $ 13,354,623

4,945,494 9,913 (23,831) 4,931,576 (985,089) (4,810,380) (5,795,469) (863,893) (863,893) 3,950,995

$ 28,606,913 603,893 18,523,816 47,734,622 (13,800,181) (30,568,485) (44,368,666) 3,365,956 99,555,968 (87,068,015) (14,912,872) (2,424,919) 941,037 15,500,688 $ 16,441,725

3,087,102

2,107,911 (276,956) 1,572,151 (704,234) (9,168,204) (53,057) 692,108 99,267 9,960,863

(687,665) (68,296) (39,085) (57,972) (10,875)

1,420,246 (276,956) 1,572,151 (772,530) (9,207,289) (53,057) 634,136 99,267 9,949,988

4,229,849

(863,893)

3,365,956

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

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INTERNATIONAL UNION OF PAINTERS AND ALLIED TRADES NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS DECEMBER 31, 2010

NOTE 1. NATURE OF OPERATIONS The International Union of Painters and Allied Trades (the International Union) is a labor organization representing painters and workers in allied trades throughout the United States and Canada. The primary source of revenue is per capita paid by local unions and district councils. NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES Method of Accounting - The financial statements have been prepared using the accrual basis of accounting in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Net assets are classified as unrestricted, temporarily restricted or permanently restricted based on the presence or absence of donor restrictions. Net assets are released from restriction when amounts are expended for the purpose specified. The International Union does not have any permanently restricted net assets. Consolidation and Fund Accounting - The consolidated financial statements include the accounts and activities of the International Union and related entities under the International Unions control. For purposes of presentation in the consolidated financial statements and in accordance with requirements set forth in its Constitution, the International Union reports its accounts and activities as follows: IUPAT - The funds of the IUPAT are the General, Convention, Accidental Death, Go, Disaster Relief, Death Benefit and Organizing. Per capita revenue is based on monthly billings to District Councils and Local Unions for membership activity reported through December each year. The allocation of per capita among the funds is in accordance with the International Unions Constitution. General Fund - Provides for the ongoing activities of the International Union not specifically carried out by any other fund. The General Fund also includes the activity of the Job Corps program which is a party to a U.S. Government agency contract as discussed in Note 5. Building Fund - The IUPAT Building Corp., LLC was formed on December 14, 2004 to acquire and hold title to the property to be used for the national training center. Currently, per capita tax in the amount of $.70 per member per month is allocated to the Building Fund. Convention Fund - This Fund accumulates allocated assessments received from affiliates to defray the costs of

the convention held every five years. Currently, an allocation of per capita tax in the amount of $1.04 per member per month is allocated to the Convention Fund. Accidental Death Fund - Provides accidental death benefits for all members in good standing. The benefit for eligible members is $10,000. This benefit is funded by allocating $.05 per member per month to this Fund. GO Fund (Growth and Opportunity) - This Fund was established to defray the cost of our District Councils engaging in new opportunities to expand the organization. Funding is provided by an allocation of per capita tax in the amount of $1.25 per member per month. Disaster Relief Fund - This Fund was established to provide assistance to areas affected by natural disaster. Funding sources include contributions from the General Fund, Local Unions, District Councils, members and others. This benefit is also funded by allocating per capita tax in the amount of $.10 per member per month. Death Benefit Fund - Provides a death benefit for eligible members. The benefits paid vary in amount depending upon the classification of the member. Most payments are for the normal death benefit which is $2,500. This benefit is funded by allocating $2.00 per member per month. Organizing Fund - This Fund was established to defray the costs of enhanced organizing activities. Funding sources include administrative processing fees and an allocation of per capita tax in the amount of $3.00 per member per month. PAT - The International Union has established two separate segregated entities for political, legislative and educational purposes. The Political Action Together - Legislative and Educational Fund (PAT-LEC) is financed through an allocation of per capita tax in the amount of $1.50 per member per month and payments from Local Unions and District Councils. The Political Action Together - Political Committee Fund (PATPC) directly receives voluntary contributions, including payroll check-offs, from members of the International Union. Cash and Cash Equivalents - Cash and cash equivalents consist of amounts held in demand deposit and money market accounts. Continued on next page

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AUDITREPORT

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT AUDITORS Continued from page 23 Investments - Securities are reported at their aggregate fair value. The fair value of investments in U.S. Government and Government Agency securities are determined by quoted market prices. The short-term investments and ULLICO stock are carried at cost which approximates fair value. Property and Equipment - Property and equipment are carried at cost. Major additions in excess of $10,000 are capitalized while replacements and repairs that do not improve or extend the lives of the respective assets are expensed. Depreciation and amortization expense is computed using the straight line method over the following estimated useful lives of the assets: Leasehold improvements 20 years Furniture and equipment 5 years Automobiles 4 years Computer equipment 5 years Depreciation and amortization expense totaled $1,572,151 for the year ended December 31, 2010. Canadian Currency - The International Union maintains checking and savings accounts in Canada as well as the United States. For financial statement purposes, all assets are expressed in U.S. dollar equivalents. Canadian currencies included in the consolidated statement of financial position are translated at the exchange rates in effect on the last day of the year. Unrealized increases and decreases due to fluctuations in exchange rates are included in the consolidated statement of activities. Funds received and disbursed in Canada are stated in U.S. dollars based on the average exchange rate in effect during the year when reported in the revenue and expenses included in the consolidated statement of activities. The average exchange rate for 2010 used to translate revenue and expenses was $.9671 per Canadian dollar. At December 31, 2010, the exchange rate was $1.0054 per Canadian dollar. Use of Estimates in the Preparation of Financial Statements - The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Financial Presentation - The International Unions financial statements present its net assets, revenues, expenses, gains and losses, classified between unrestricted, temporarily restricted, and permanently restricted based on the existence or absence of donor-imposed restrictions. NOTE 3. TAX STATUS The International Union is exempt from Federal income taxes under Section 501(c)(5) of the Internal Revenue Code. The financial statements include the activity of the PAT-LEC and PAT-PC. Section 527 of the Internal Revenue Code provides for the exemption from Federal income tax for exempt function income of a political committee that is a separate segregated fund of an exempt organization which is not a political organization. Contributions received are exempt function income provided that the receipts are primarily expended for an exempt function or for some or all of its administrative expenses. However, interest income will be taxed. Both the PAT-LEC and the PAT-PC file Internal Revenue Service Form 1120-POL to report financial activities. Income tax expense for 2010 totaled $7,137. The Disaster Relief Corp is exempt from Federal income taxes under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. NOTE 4. UNINSURED CASH BALANCES AND INVESTMENT CONCENTRATIONS The International Union maintains its cash accounts primarily with banks located in Washington, D.C. The total cash balances are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation up to $250,000 per bank. The International Union has cash balances on deposit at December 31, 2010 that exceeds the balance of FDIC insurance coverage by approximately $11,564,103. Subsequent to year end, a majority of the uninsured cash was deposited into a sweep account which is backed by U.S. Treasury Securities. The International Union also maintains cash at a Canadian financial institution, which is insured up to $100,000 in Canadian dollars. As of December 31, 2010, the International Unions cash in the Canadian financial institution in excess of insurance coverage totaled approximately $2,096,506 in Canadian dollars ($2,090,602 U.S. equivalent). NOTE 5. U.S. GOVERNMENT AGENCY CONTRACT The International Union is a party to a cost reimbursement contract with the U.S. Department of Labor Job Corps Program. The 2010 activity and unexpended contract funds at December 31, 2010 were as follows:
Unexpended Contract Funds at beginning of year U.S. Department of Labor Job Corps Program

Receipts

Expenditures

Unexpended Contract Funds at end of year $( 63,075)

$( 196,491) $6,796,843 $6,663,427

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The base period of the contract expired on December 31, 2009 but has been extended at the option of the Department of Labor for 2010 and may be further extended for two additional one year periods. NOTE 6. INVESTMENTS The cost and fair value of investments held by the International Union at December 31, 2010 is summarized below:
Cost United States Government and Government Agency obligations ULLICO stock Short-term investments $10,000,000 39,826 19,569,679 $29,609,505 Fair Value $ 9,981,180 39,826 19,569,679 $29,590,685

The International Union maintains a 401(k) plan. The International Union contributes 6% of salary for eligible employees. These contributions totaled $346,725 for the year ended December 31, 2010. NOTE 9. AFFILIATIONS PER CAPITA During the year ended December 31, 2010, the International Union incurred per capita expenses to affiliated organizations as follows:
AFL-CIO AFL-CIO - State (Full Affiliation Program) Building & Construction Trades Dept., AFL-CIO Maritime Trades Dept., AFL-CIO Union Label Trades Dept., AFL-CIO Metal Trades Department, AFL-CIO Professional Employees Dept., AFL-CIO IUPAT Canadian Organizing Fund (U.S. Dollars) National Heavy & Highway Canadian Provincial Federation of Labour (U.S. dollars) $ 735,502 604,751 572,693 4,320 6,000 96,788 1,080 108,166 60,000 61,433 $ 2,250,733

Investment income for the year ended December 31, 2010 consisted of the following:
Interest and dividends Net realized and unrealized gain on investments $ 596,041 276,956 $ 872,997

NOTE 7. PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT At December 31, 2010, property and equipment consisted of the following:
Land Furniture and equipment National Training Facility Headquarters Residence Hall Automobiles $ 859,428 4,941,931 11,180,141 12,480,802 4,936,092 120,914 34,519,308 ( 4,641,284) $ 29,878,024

Less accumulated depreciation and amortization Net property and equipment

NOTE 8. PENSION PLANS The International Painters and Allied Trades Industry Pension Plan (the Plan), a multiemployer, defined benefit pension plan, provides defined benefits to substantially all of the International Unions employees. Effective April 2009, the contribution rate to the Plan is 18.97% of employees salaries. Contributions to the Plan for the year ended December 31, 2010 totaled $986,273.

NOTE 10. RELATED ENTITIES The International Union currently subleases a portion of its leased space to the International Painters and Allied Trades Industry Pension Plan, Political Action Together, and Painters and Allied Trades Labor-Management Cooperation Initiative. The International Union also leases office space in the national training center to Job Corps, International Union of Painters and Allied Trades Finishing Trades Institute and Painters and Allied Trades LaborManagement Cooperation Initiative. The International Union received $1,826,459 in rent from these entities for the year ended December 31, 2010. The International Union incurred $764,974 in information technology expenditures for the year 2010. During the year ended December 31, 2010, $180,497 was reimbursed from International Painters and Allied Trades Industry Pension Plan, International Union of Painters and Allied Trades Finishing Trades Institute, Painters and Allied Trades Labor-Management Cooperation Initiative, Political Action Together, Job Corp, and Painters and Allied Trades for Childrens Hope Foundation. On October 31, 2005, the Death Benefit Fund loaned $4,500,000 to the IUPAT Building Corp, LLC to be used for renovating the national training facility. The loan is secured by national training facility property. On June 22, 2010, the Death Benefit Fund loaned an additional Continued on next page

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AUDITREPORT

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT AUDITORS Continued from page 25 $9,922,800 to the IUPAT Building Corp, LLC to make the loan $14,000,000 to be used to pay for the new headquarters and Residence Hall. The new loan is payable in monthly installments of $75,248 beginning August 1, 2010 including interest at the annual rate of 5.00%. Final payment is due July 2040. Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2010 for this loan totaled $426,673. As of December 31, 2010 the future principal maturities of this loan are as follows:
Year Ended December 31, 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Thereafter Death Benefit Fund $ 211,150 221,953 233,309 245,245 257,792 12,762,894 $13,932,343 Fair Value Measurements at December 31, 2010 Total Level 1 U.S. Government and agency obligations $ 9,981,180 $ 9,981,180 Ullico stock 39,826 Short-term investments 19,569,679 19,569,679 $29,690,685 $29,550,859 Level 3 Fair Value Measurements Total $ 39,826 $ 39,826 ULLICO stock $ 39,826 $ 39,826

Level 2

Level 3

$ $ 39,826 $ - $ 39,826

Beginning balance Realized gains (losses) Unrealized gains (losses) Purchases Sales Transfers into (out of) Level 3 Ending balance

NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES The International Union is involved in litigation arising in the normal course of operations. Some of the litigation involves matters common to any organization of comparable size, including personnel, employment, contract, and trademark issues. None of this litigation involves any substantial potential liability on the part of the International Union. NOTE 12. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures establishes a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value. The three levels of the fair value hierarchy under Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures are described below: Basis of Fair Value Measurement Level 1 - Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets that are accessible at the measurement date. Level 2 - Quoted prices in markets that are not considered active or investments for which all significant inputs are observable. Level 3 - Prices or valuations that require inputs that are both significant to the fair value measurement and unobservable.

We evaluated the significance of transfers between levels based upon the nature of the financial instrument and size of the transfer relative to total net assets available for benefits. For the year ended December 31, 2010, there were no transfers in or out of levels 1, 2 or 3. NOTE 13. RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES The International Union invests in various investments. Investments are exposed to various risks such as economic, interest rate, market and sector risks. Due to the level of risk associated with certain investments, it is at least reasonably possible that changes in the values of investments will occur in the near term and that such changes could materially affect the amounts reported in the Statement of Financial Position. NOTE 14. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS The Executive Board and management have evaluated subsequent events through May 18, 2011, the date the financial statements were available to be issued, and they have been evaluated in accordance with relevant accounting standards.

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www.IUPAT.org

I N T E R N A T I O N A L U N I O N O F P A I N T E R S A N D A L L I E D T R A D E S

The Hard Work of Gainesville Students Shines on National Television

f youre a fan of the ABC hit show Extreme Makeover: Home Edition, then you just might have seen some of the great work of International Union of Painters and Allied Trades Job Corps students from Gainesville, Florida. On Mothers Day, May 8, 2011, the show featured work done for Carrie Prewitt, a high school volleyball coach in Middleburg, Florida. Ms. Prewitt is often described as a coach who treats her players like daughters. She recently made that role a reality when she took in one of her players, Ashley Brewer, and her two sisters when their parents died. Although Prewitt offered them a stable home life, the small house they were living in could barely accommodate her and the three girls. Enter Ty Pennington and his crew from Extreme Makeover. In just seven days, local workers built a new home for the family. The young men and women from the Gainesville Job Corps Center supported the work crews and have been

credited with being a key reason the project stayed on schedule. Our students do a lot of work for the good of the community throughout the country, says Andrew Larson, national project coordinator for the IUPAT Job Corps Program. But we dont often get to show their great work off on television. Many thanks to our students in Gainesville for doing the IUPAT proud with all of your hard work!
You can see and learn more about the Prewitt family and the project onwww.NorthFloridaExtremeMakeover.com.

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More than 70 percent of the Ask the GP questions we receive are not signed and don't include a return address. Please include that information when you send a question in so that we may answer them. We do listen, and we have just instituted a new rapid response system on the Ask the GP questions. I hope that we can better serve you with this new system.

Q A

I completely disagree with your support of unionized government employees while we get laid off. We still have to pay for their expensive negotiated payback packages through taxes. They NEVER get laid off. Read the US Constitution about the limits of government. -Anonymous When we all joined the union, we took an oath of membership. It might do us all some justice to revisit that oath. I have copied it below. You have a right to disagree, but what unions were built on was to support one another. Of my own free will and accord, I do now covenant to keep the affairs of this International Union strictly private, unless empowered to reveal the same. I will abide by its laws, both general and local, and will use all honorable means to procure employment for brother or sister members. I will honor and abide our International Unions commitment to organize the unorganized and will support and participate in our Unions efforts and programs relating to organizing, training, education and support for other labor and worker-related causes. I will make all possible effort to attend the meetings, and will pay all dues and assessments levied in accordance with the laws. I further agree that, should it be hereafter discovered that I have made

any misstatements as to my qualifications for membership, I be debarred from all benefits provided by this International Union. I will be obedient to authority, orderly in its meetings, respectful in words and actions, charitable in judgment of my brother or sister members and will never, from selfish motives, wrong a brother or sister, or see him or her wronged, if in my power to prevent it. I will render full allegiance to this International Union, and never consent to subordinate its interests to those of any other organization of which I am now or may, hereafter, become a member. I further promise, that whenever and wherever possible, I will purchase only strictly Union made goods, that I will use my best endeavors to influence others to do the same.

When you spoke to me on Wednesday morning, much of what you said came home with me I will never speak in full representation of the IUPAT, but I will speak for what they have done for me, my life and my community. I will stand united and in support with all union brothers and sisters. I just hope everyone who needed to hear your firm stance on this matter made it to breakfast that day! - Laura Fort Wayne, Indiana Thanks. I am glad that you enjoyed your time at the hotel, and I am encouraged by your remarks. It feels good sometimes to get an atta boy!

Dear Jimmy Williams, I want to take this time to thank you and the IUPAT for your hospitality at the Building Trades Legislative Conference in Washington, DC on April 4-7, 2011. The [Embassy Suites] was beautiful and the staff was the friendliest staff I have ever seen. I am also grateful for the hospitality and education from the other great IUPAT members. The young couple from Wisconsin empowered me to fight this fight AS LONG AS IT TAKES!

Q A

Thumbs up for the Democratic senators in Wisconsin! - Charles Springfield, Massachusetts Yes, it's time to hold all politicians responsible. Both the senators from Wisconsin and the representatives from Indiana are truly our friends. Lets not forget that when they need our support in the future. James, How does one get the credit applied from the apprentiship classes to our college credits to

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A Q

earn an AA degree? Is there a form to fill out? - Josh Altoona, Iowa Contact your business manager, Bob Gilmore, he will make sure that ATR John Burcaw will get you that information. Hello Jimmy, I would love to know how merging locals 1107, 426, 587 and 1159 will help us be ONE UNION. When the whole full merger process started back in the late 80s, we were all supposed to be in our own local for our own area. Merging these locals puts us right back where we started all those years ago. This merger wont save any costs on overhead and now we have different contracts with different end-dates within the same local. Its not clear

to me or others on what this solves. The new local, Local Union 2011, will soon have its first meeting and I hope that either you or our vice president will be attending. Ive always agreed with you and the IUPAT General Executive Board that what is good for one is good for all. Jimmy, you have been a great GP, but this merger is not what we started out to do. THIS IS NOT ONE UNION. IT IS A DIVIDED UNION. -Chuck Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Jimmy, thanks for getting back to me, it means a lot to me. You were right, Billy [Candelori, general vice president of the Eastern Region] and Jimmy [Williams Jr., director of organizing] did a great job at the meeting. I got all the right

information straight from the top. You know I would go to war for you and Billy, and I will do the same for our great union. Thanks once again and I hope to see you around the union hall! - Chuck Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

am glad for my friend Chuck that he likes the outcome of our decision on the mergers. I am also glad that he likes the attendance at his new local union meeting now. Chuck, lets motivate those in attendance to help your council on organizing new members and contractors, in political action and all the volunteer work that our IUPAT members do for the commuity. Thanks for the questions, Chuck.

These comments arrived at IUPAT headquarters within four days of one another. I

Yes, it's time to hold all politicians responsible. Both the senators from Wisconsin and the representatives from Indiana are truly our friends. Let's not forget that when they need our support in the future.
JAMES A. WILLIAMS
GENERAL PRESIDENT

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Union Plus Hospital Care Grant Helps IUPAT Family Ease the Pain of High Hospital Bills
$1,000 Grants Available from the Union Plus Credit Card
As a third-generation member of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades (IUPAT) Local 1778, Duane Metcalf, of Burnet, TX, has long appreciated the job security and benefits particularly health insurance enjoyed by union members. But the $1,000 Union Plus Hospital Care Grant he recently received was a lifesaver in dealing with unexpected hospital bills.
Both Metcalf and his wife of 20 years, Debbie, agree that after months of his being out of work due to an illness, mounting hospital bills were taking a toll on the familys budget. We are thankful that we learned about Union Plus benefits when we did, says Debbie Metcalf. We have always been grateful to be part of a union and everything it stands for, but it was truly a blessing to be able to get some additional help from Union Plus when we needed it most. The Hospital Care Grants of $1,000 are designed to provide quick financial relief. To apply for a grant, a union member must have had a Union Plus Credit Card, Union Plus Mortgage, or Union Plus Insurance Policy for one year and face out-of-pocket hospital expenses (after insurance) that are at least 10 percent of the household income for a hospitalization of the member, spouse, or dependent within the last 12 months. Its difficult when youre trying to concentrate on getting healthy and back to work while youre getting hit with bills, says Debbie. Even though we have good h e a l t h insurance, the expenses added up in no time. Fortunately, the grant was easy to get and the financial assistance came fast. The Metcalf family is now on the mend, both physically and financially. Duane, who for years has installed storefronts for Apple Computer stores throughout the country, is now back to work and Debbie continues to work full-time at a local dental practice. The return to being a dual-income family comes at an optimal time, as the Metcalfs youngest child will be attending college next fall. At the same time we learned of the Union Plus Hospital Care Grants, we became familiar with all the other Union Plus programs and benefits that are available to union members. Thanks to Union Plus, we now save 15 percent on our monthly AT&T phone bill and were going to apply for a Union Plus college scholarship, says Debbie. Union members may visit UnionPlus.org/UnionSAFE for more information on layoff, disability and education grants available to Union Plus program participants. In addition to the Union Plus Hospital Care Grants, Union Plus offers a variety of other healthrelated programs, including: I Medical Bill Negotiating Servicefree assistance to union members and union retirees who seek help in lowering medical expenses and setting up payment plans. Experienced negotiators work directly with physicians, hospitals and other medical providers to lower the amount of medical debt owed by union members. I Health Savings Programsdiscount programs to help union families save money on prescriptions, vision, dental, physician and hospital costs. Though not an insurance program, the health savings are designed to help union households cope with the rising cost of health services. I Health Club Discountsunion families can enjoy significant savings when joining Curves, Gold Gyms, Sport and Health, Ballys and other national health clubs. To learn about the 40 Union Plus programs available to IUPAT members including discounts on AT&T wireless service, college test preparation, car rentals, legal services, health savings and much more, visit UnionPlus.org.

$1,000 grant from Union Plus helps Duane and Debbie Metcalf deal with unexpected hospital bills.

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IUPAT

FINISHING CONTRACTORS A S S O C I A T I O N

The Industrial Contractor

the planet. We apply coatings (paint) and linings for the primary purpose of asset preservation; i.e., keeping steel from rusting, concrete from crumbling, and protecting other surfaces from sometimes very aggressive chemicals that would otherwise destroy a tank or vessel.
That is the basic definition. When you take a closer look at the complex nature of our projects it gets really interesting and complicated. First, you need to understand many, if not most of the structures we paint are complex, complicated, and hard to get to. Often, we work at great heights where we must gain access to structures that require complex rigging and staging equipment. We must be able to figure out a way to stage our equipment and materials in order to get our crews in a position to perform the task of surface preparation and application of industrial coatings. We perform work in places where people do not ordinarily go. This takes careful thought and extraordinary attention to detail. Experience is generally the best teacher, and I learned this lesson the hard way. Years ago, when I first got into the business of bidding industrial type work, I received a phone call from a guy who wanted me to give him a price to paint an 80-foot flag pole. No big deal, right? I knew one of our painters could easily paint an 80-foot flag pole in one day. I gave the man a bid and he said, When can you start? Next week? Done deal. The flagpole was in the city.

e are contractors who are willing to tackle some of the most difficult, challenging, and complex coatings and linings projects on

Ed Smith, chairman, Board of Directors, Finishing Contractors Association.

Thats all I knew and I didnt ask for further details. Big mistake. As it turned out, the flagpole was mounted at the corner on the top floor of one of the tallest buildings in the city of St. Louis. To make matters worse, the flagpole leaned out over one of the busiest intersections in town. When I finally learned the details, it made a huge difference in the price. The difficulty of getting to the flagpole and setting up took longer than it did to paint it! When I ultimately did what I should have done in the first place, which was to check out the details, I called the customer and said, Sir, I made a mistake. I didnt ask enough questions and failed to take the time to drive to the jobsite to be sure I knew all of the site conditions. I will paint your flagpole for the price I quoted you, but when my boss finds out what I have done, first he is going to kill me and then he will fire me. It turned out the customer knew I bid the job too low and was kind enough to allow me to raise my price. He became a real friend and I did other maintenance work at that 20story building for many years to come.

Ed Smith is chairman of the Finishing Contractors Association (FCA), the only international trade association devoted exclusively to serving the unique needs of U.S. and Canadian union contractors in the drywall finishing, glass and glazing, floor covering, painting and decorating, and signs and display trades. All FCA members are signatory to collective bargaining agreements with the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades. To learn more about the FCA, go to www.finishingcontractors.org, or call 301-215-7026.

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The fact is, details are important in all aspects of the finishing trades. However, the need for close attention to details is magnified tremendously in the industrial sector. And to be successful as an industrial painting contractor you cannot afford to miss critical details that could cause catastrophic problems. Details missed in the estimating phase of a project can result in an enormous loss of money and put you out of business really fast. Mistakes in the approach and details in mobilization, rigging, and staging of equipment and materials will cause inefficacies that will result in a bad job. By the way, a bad job translates

to an unhappy customer, unhappy workforce, a very unhappy contractor, and life as we know it isnt fun. Many times we work with customer representatives who are pretty smart people and some of them engineers by education. I have actually had one engineer ask me, How in the world do you ever get these jobs done? Isnt it is too hot, too cold, or too humid? He was right. It isnt easy and the tolerances built into industrial coatings specifications are tight. My answer to him was It isnt easy. But I promise you this -- we have read the specification and paint manufacturers instructions and will follow them to the T. Then, we do what we say we are going to do.

Above all else, the most critical detail is managing a safe jobsite. The most important details are those that surround the safety of our workforce. We cannot miss a single training requirement or safety procedure. We cannot ever send our crews to a jobsite without the proper skills, tools, and training to do the job right and leave the jobsite to safely return home. So who in their right mind would want to be an industrial painting contractor? What we do isnt easy and it has to be taken seriously. But if you are willing to pay extraordinary attention to the details that will produce a good, safe job, industrial construction can be exciting and rewarding.

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P A I N T E R S & A L L I E D T R A D E S L A B O R M A N A G E M E N T C O O P E R A T I O N I N I T I A T I V E

LMCI Contractor Spotlight: Harrison Muir Inc.

n January 31, 2011, International Union of Painters and Allied Trades (IUPAT) industry partner Harrison Muir Inc. was presented with the George Campbell Award by the SSPC. According to the SSPC, this award recognizes outstanding achievement in

the completion of a difficult or complex industrial or commercial coatings project.


[Read more about the award and the project at http://bit.ly/paintsquare]
HARRISON MUIR INC.

The long-time IUPAT industrial painting contractor, based in Ajax, Ontario, Canada, won the honor for its work on the La Salle Causeway Bridge which spans over the southern end of the Rideau Canal in Kingston, Ontario. Originally built in 1917, the bridge still had nearly 80 percent of its original coating with only minimal maintenance touch-ups applied sporadically over the last nearly 40 years. The IUPAT painters of Harrison Muir were tasked with prepping, blasting and coating 60,000 square feet of steel in Canadian winter temperatures ranging from an average of low 20s (F) during the day to a low of 0 (F) at night.

Founded in 1962, Harrison Muir began its successful run in business as a commercial and industrial painting contractor. When HM [Harrison Muir] started under part of the present management team in 1964, the company did commercial and industrial work, said HM President Dan Orrett. In 1978, the company started concentrating solely on industrial work for economic reasons as the principals had come to the conclusion that it was too difficult to try and do both categories

of work and make a reasonable return on investment. Recently, Orrett took some time to speak to the Journal about Harrison Muir and its industry: What prompted your company to make the switch to primarily industrial painting? Commercial work primarily involves working for general contractors, and the company decided that as much as possible they wanted to control their own destiny by working directly for various government agencies (bridges & tanks) and industry owners. Commercial and Industrial work requires different crews, who do not integrate well, which was another big factor in the decision. The company also had made a large investment in their own equipment for abrasive blasting and access, which meant additional overhead costs that are not chargeable in the commercial market. These are the main factors that influenced this decision. Is such diversification required for success in this industry? We operate our services in Canada. Remember, we have a relatively small market compared to the more densely populated United States. A company operating in the Detroit area can succeed just painting bridges locally. We cant do that in Canada as there just isnt a big enough market to survive. We have to be ready and able to do a wide range of projects. Our

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services include metalizing, plural component spray applications, all types of protective coatings, and trowel applied coating. For surface preparation, we may use walnut shells, mineral abrasives, steel grit and/or specialty sponge jet blast media. Our projects involve protective coatings work for bridges, tanks, conventional and hydro power plants, transformer stations, ships, process manufacturing plants or other steel structures. There is no set pattern for the type of work that may come up year to year. That fact pushes our workers to be able to adapt well to meet the challenges of these projects. How many painters to you typically have on payroll? We operate seasonally, so our workforce ranges from 20 to 40 workers. You mentioned that the need for diversification in your projects requires more skills to be utilized in performing the work. What corporate strategy do you follow to make certain your employees are well adapted to meet the diversity of skills? We certainly strive to invest in new technology in our field but, more importantly, we invest in our people as well. We take full advantage of the training sessions and programs provided by OIFSC, LMCI and FTI. Thats important because all of the state-of-the-art technology in the world wont do a bit of good in enabling us to be successful on our projects if our workers dont know how to use the equipment. The other thing we put a lot of effort into is retaining our workforce. The specialty nature of our equipment, safe work procedures and applications requires our crew to have day-to-day familiarity to safely and proficiently per-

We certainly strive to invest in new technology in our field but, more importantly, we invest in our people as well.
Dan Orrett President, Harrison Muir Inc.

form the work. It is of utmost importance that our crew knows our procedures from day one on a project instead of learning on the job. The IUPAT, our labour partner, understands this requirement and assists us where they can with mobility of our specialized workforce. The continuity of our workforce is a strategy that not only leans itself to project success, but also builds culture and positive relationships with our employees. You cant treat those who work for you like a tool where you use them and put them back on a shelf after a project is done. Its about keeping people working, fine-tuned for production, and making certain were constantly improving ourselves. We also incorporate new apprentices into our crews and provide mentorship for the next generation of painters. The SSPC [The Society for Protective Coatings] gave you the George Campbell Award this year for the La Salle Causeway Bridge project. Was

the strategy you describe above a key to your success and the honors that followed? Without a doubt. This project presented multiple challenges for our painters - weather, traffic, schedule and extremely tough inspections, to name a few. The specification called for workmanship well above industry standards to the point of perfection. It was extremely difficult for our crew to perform to these expectations under the harsh conditions. Yet, the discipline of this crew, drawn from their excellent training and the leadership support of Bill Mogavero, our Vice President, Operations Manager and fellow IUPAT member, contributed to our crew overcoming all obstacles in performing the successful project. Thanks to Dan Orrett, president of Harrison Muir Inc., for his time. To learn more about Harrison Muir Inc. and their award-winning projects, go to www.harrisonmuir.com.

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I N S T I T U T E

FTI BOT Meeting, March 11-12, 2011

T R A D E S

F I N I S H I N G

he Finishing Trades Institute (FTI) Board of Trustees met this past March to conduct their annual winter meetings. This meeting was probably one of the toughest meetings because of the downturn in economy and the reduced contributions coming into the training funds locally and nationally. The trustees were very determined to continue services to IUPAT affiliates more than ever.
day-to-day dedication of the FTI staff and the efforts they put in. He commented on the need for more Train-the-Trainer classes, to rededicate our efforts to get those bodies into the FTI Training Center, and to get those trainers back to the local training centers to continue the progress that we have made. After reviewing the history to show how far the FTI has come, he noted that the challenge will be to take it to the next level. GP Williams stressed to the trustees that training, now more than ever, should be taking place at the International Training Center. Mr. Williams also stressed that the FTI should continue all services to our affiliates even if it means tapping into the reserves of the fund.

The meeting started off by CoChairman Rigmaiden seating new FTI trustee, Mr. Joe Keipp. Mr. Keipp is from River City Drywall and Painting Inc. located in OFallon, Missouri. Co-Chairman Rigmaiden then called on General President James Williams for his comments. General President Williams thanked the trustees for the outstanding job that they have done for the last three years. He reviewed some of the history of the FTI and the tremendous progress that has been made, particularly under the leadership of the current co-chairs. He noted that when he sees the FTI resources in house and around the country, it makes him extremely proud. He stated that he has seen the

During the meeting, the FTI trustees unanimously approved grant funding of $1 million dollars to be distributed throughout the 4 regions of the IUPAT to move their training programs forward. The FTI trustees also approved funding to supply the training centers that have participated in the Super Sky Train-the-Trainer course at the International Training Center with skylight material so that those centers can now instruct and prepare our membership with the skills they need to be proficient in the installation of skylights.
SKYLIGHT TRAINING

This past May 15, instructors attended the Super Sky Train-the-Trainer course offered in Hanover, Maryland at the International Training Center. Participation was well attended from all regions of the IUPAT. Dave Schultz from DC 3 (Kansas City) and Brian Hagberg from DC 82 (Minnesota) did an outstanding job in the classroom and in the training lab to prepare our instructors so they can go back to their training centers and train our membership.

Back row (left to right): Allan DeLange, Raymond Price, Thomas Corbett; third row (left to right): Robert Kucheran, Charles Fogell, Joe Keipp, William Candelori; second row (left to right): Peter Cafiero, Raymond Sesma, Charles Anderson, David Johnson; front row (left to right): Terry Webb (Co-Chairman), Kenneth Rigmaiden (CoChairman). Absent from photo: Rick Kraus.

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In May, instructors attended the Super Sky Train-the-Trainer course offered in Hanover, Maryland at the International Training Center.

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INDUSTRIAL PAINTING

In June 2011, 16 Industrial painters from the 4 regions of the IUPAT will be traveling to the International Training Center to partake in the SSPC Coating Application Specialist (CAS) Level II certification exam. Each participant will have to take a 100 question written exam covering the topics of safety, surface preparation, coating application and equipment. The participants will also have to demonstrate their knowledge of abrasive blasting safety, equipment operation and QC prior to blasting. Moving forward, the participants will demonstrate their blasting skills by properly preparing a prepainted ASTM D4228 test panel to specifications. Prior to the application of the coating, participants have to demonstrate their knowledge of quality control, safety, and equipment operation. Once completed, the tester must properly coat an ASTM test panel to specifications. Safety and clean up is the next step followed by the inspection of the test panel for visual defects and dry film readings as per the CAS program Quality Manual by a qualified proctor. SSPC grades all of the examinations and supplies the FTI with the results and certifica-

tions for the participants who received a 70% or better on the written exam and a 90% or better on the hands-on exam.
TOOLS DONATIONS

The Finishing Trades Institute would like to acknowledge Als Taping Tools and Spray Equipment for their generous donation of taping tools. Over 1,100 tools were shipped to FTI headquarters in Hanover, MD. The shipment included an assortment of drywall knives ranging in size from 8 to 24. In these hard economic times, any donations from our manufacture partners to the FTI are welcome and certainly appreciated. The FTI distributed these tools to our district council training centers to utilize with the drywall curriculum and training. Again, the FTI thanks Als Taping Tools and Spray Equipment for their generosity and support of the IUPAT and our affiliated training programs.
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Congratulations to DC 91 Instructor Bobby Baugh and new journey worker Jason Moore for their dedication and hard work on completing their Associates Degree.

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I N T E R N A T I O N A L U N I O N O F P A I N T E R S A N D A L L I E D T R A D E S

IUPAT Uses Online Campaign to Lobby Issues During Annual Legislative Conference

n April 3-6, 2011, the AFL-CIO Building and Construction Trades Department (BCTD) once again held its annual Legislative Conference in Washington, D.C. There, delegates for the BCTD unions from throughout the United States gathered

to hear union and pro-working family political leaders rally the assembled activists to action.
The conference was on the heels of the demonstrations against Wisconsin Governor Scott Walkers plan to repeal collective bargaining rights for public workers. Those on the dais and in the audience arrived in Washington energized and moved by the solidarity seen in Wisconsin and other states. We convene this conference during what is arguably the most critical moment in history for Americas Building Trades Unions and for all of organized labor, said BCTD President Mark Ayers. Not only are we continuing to struggle against an enduring economic downturn that has devastated our ranks, but, to add insult to injury, we are also fighting against what can only be labeled as an all-out assault by the radical rightwing against unions across America. These are difficult times. Yet, they are also times of great opportunity, Ayers reminded the delegates. One of the best parts about this yearly conference is that it isnt all talk, theres plenty of action, too. In addition to the speeches and workshops delegates attend at this meeting, there is a personal visit to Congress as well, says Chris Sloan, IUPAT Government Affairs director. After being briefed on the facts regarding issues important to labor and working families, union delegates rode by bus to Capitol Hill to meet with elected leaders and bring a Main Street perspective to Washington politics, says Jim Brewer, international legislative representative for the IUPAT. The IUPAT has been a part of this lobbying effort since it began at the conference. Although its always been viewed as a highly successful and worthwhile effort since nothing replaces a face-to-face meeting, the IUPAT Government Affairs Department decided to add a 21st Century twist to the day. Beginning on their day of arrival, delegates saw an internet campaign sponsored by the IUPAT in POLITICO, a leading online and print publication heavily read by lawmakers and their staff. The campaign also appeared in Google and Facebook ads as well. When someone clicked on the ad, they were taken to a new web site that introduced the IUPAT and explained the issues important to working families [see it for yourself at www.IUPAT.org/jobs]. By the time we visited the Hill to lobby for the labor movement, a large number of staffers and congressional leaders had seen our ads, read about

The IUPAT Government Affairs department took to social media marketing to communicate labor's message to Capitol Hill during the BCTD Legislative Conference in Washington, D.C.

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our issues and certainly recognized our signature black and gold colors when we showed up at their offices, says Sloan. This was an innovative campaign that put pressure on Congress to focus on jobs at a time when the government was about to suffer a shutdown. The shutdown Sloan refers to nearly occurred at the end of the week of the BCTD Legislative Conference. During that week, there was a budget showdown between the president, the Senate and the House. Washington, DC was heading for a shutdown if an agreement on the budget wasnt met. Fortunately, for thousands of trades men and women working on federal funded construction projects, and thousands more public employees, including IUPAT members, the parties did come together and the government shutdown was avoided.

Williams. Hopefully the delegates there that week took that spirit home with them and continue to fight the fight! Take a moment to learn more about the issues well be talking about this year by visiting www.IUPAT.org/ jobs.

It was a politica l l y c h a r g e d week on all fronts and Im pleased that, once again, the IUPAT was front and center, fighting for working families, says IUPAT General President James

Every year at the BCTD Legislative Conference, the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades hosts a reception for members of Congress and other Washington, DC notables from the Hill. Its an excellent opportunity for IUPAT members from throughout the United States to personally meet their representative or senator.

Congressman Mario DiazBalart (R-FL), left, talks Florida working family issues with IUPAT District Council 78 members.

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GENERAL PRESIDENTS REPORT Continued from page 4 which we can then use to send to our contractors for bid and put our members to work. Is this Big Brother checking on the day-to-day of our reps in the field? No. This is a system where we can track the work of general contractors, identify the major players in each area and then put our good subcontractors with those companies and hopefully increase our market share (i.e. amount of work we have in an area). So, what does this mean for the rank and file members? Well, its an opportunity for you to be a modern day version of Joe Albert. How many times while driving home from work or going to the store do you see a job site and wonder if our members are currently or due to be working on it? Well, with your smartphone, you can send a job for us to check out by emailing the address of the job (and a picture if you can) to jobscout@iupat.org. Or, text JobScout to 48728 and youll be prompted for the location of the job. Remember to include the city and state or province with the address. Well send that information to the appropriate district council and theyll enter it into their system. If they havent checked that job already, they now have a lead thanks to you. So, the next time you are talking to your agent, organizer or business manager, ask them how this new system is working. Request reports at your next council meeting on what weve learned so far. Pronto is just one example of how the IUPAT is striving to lead in this 21st Century world. Theres more ahead.

EXECUTIVE GENERAL VICE PRESIDENTS REPORT Continued from page 6 Organizing Mike Gutierrez and District Council 82 (Minnesota and North Dakota) Organizer Francisco Altamirano. Additionally, District Council 14 (Chicago) Representative Larry Thomas and I are on the Executive Committee of the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists. Francisco, Mike, Larry and I are on these committees because of the high regard for our union within the AFL-CIO and these groups. Our reputation as a full participant in all programs and policies of the AFL-CIO and those organizations is what has placed us there. I also serve on the Board of Directors of the Partnership for Working Families (PWF), a national organization dedicated to reshaping the economy and urban environment for workers and communities. Our movement shares a commitment to expanding and connecting community with organizing for quality jobs, affordable housing, shared prosperity, and a healthy environment. Under the leadership of your BM/STs, working relationships with PWF-affiliate organizations, such as the Syracuse Alliance for a New Economy (SANE), Georgia Strategic Alliance for New Directions and Unified Policies (Georgia Stand-UP), Good Jobs and Livable Neighborhoods (GJLN) and Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy (LAANE), have had a positive impact in not only recognizing the IUPAT as a community partner, but being a part of the development of Community Benefit Agreements. These relationships have opened doors for training and job opportunities for our members, as well as for those community residents who have an interest in our trades. We need to know that these working relationships with the above-mentioned groups, church groups (such as the National Baptist Convention) and other community groups (such as Operation PUSH) can lead to effective participation in the political process where the jobs we seek for our members in infrastructure, commercial, residential and industrial development are considered and acted upon by your local and state governments. As constituents of these governments, we can have more influence as a community on those decisions, especially when those opportunities become opportunities for all. We have done a great job in mobilizing to fight off the efforts of those who want to suppress us as union members, community members and voters. That was defensive. In the days when I was a football player, I always liked playing offense, moving downfield. With this effort and partnership, we can move downfield and score with the opportunities for growth in membership, contractor base and community.

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A. L. Mike Monroe/Ralph D. Williams, III Sports Scholarship Awards Program


At the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades Convention in 1999, the A. L. Mike Monroe and Ralph D. Williams, III, Sports Scholarship was introduced and ratified into the Unions Constitution. This groundbreaking program was created to offer student athletes the opportunity to pursue their athletic ambitions while earning an advanced educational degree at the academic institution of their choosing. The namesakes of this new scholarship program were both accomplished boxers as teenagers. In fact, Williams was elected into the Pennsylvania State Boxing Hall of Fame as well as being an avid football player. Yet, despite their athletic talent, neither man had the resources to attend college and instead joined the trades at a young age. This scholarship, named in their honor, will give IUPAT members sons and daughters the chance for the education they never attained. Scholarship applications must be submitted and received by December 9, 2011. A four-member committee consisting of a representative from each region will review the applications. One applicant will be chosen from each region to receive the scholarship (a committee member will not vote on his/her own region). One grant of $5,000.00 will be awarded to each successful candidate for his/her education. Those who received the scholarship awards are not eligible to apply for additional gifts under this program. All applicants must meet the following requirements to be considered: I He/she must be a legal dependant of an IUPAT member in good standing. Please provide the members Local Union Number and the last four digits of the SSN/SIN Number. I The award is contingent upon the student enrolling in the school of their choice within one year of the award date or the award is forfeited. I Applicants must supply an official high school transcript. I Applicants must supply a complete history of athletic participation and special recognition in high school. I Applicants must be registered with the NCAA Clearing House and declare the athletic program in which he/she will be participating. I A letter of recommendation must be submitted from the coach or athletic director of the institution the applicant has been accepted and has chosen to attend. I A complete record of additional financial aid the student is receiving must also be submitted. Please submit your applications to the: IUPAT - A. L. Mike Monroe/ Ralph D. Williams, III, Sports Scholarship, 7234 Parkway Drive, Hanover, MD 21076.
Special note: Dependents of IUPAT International Staff, General Officers, Fund Administrators and Employees, previous winners and winners of the S. Frank Bud Raftery Scholarship awards are not eligible to apply.

As a parent, I know how each of us wants our sons and daughters to have the opportunity to pursue their dreams. I also know it is important that students with a gift for a particular sport be recognized for their hard work. I cannot think of a better reward than an advanced education.
General President Williams

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A N D A L L I E D T R A D E S P E N S I O N F U N D

IUPAT Pension Plan Defies the Age of New Normal

P A I N T E R S I N D U S T R Y

n March 2011, the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) released its annual Retirement Confidence Survey. The survey showed, among other things, that ...Americans

confidence in their ability to afford a comfortable retirement has plunged to a new low....

Now, you might think that this is one of those studies that make everyone scratch their head and ask if someone had to actually conduct a survey to learn this, but it does make a valuable point about the financial world we all now live in. You see, the report explains that this new low in confidence exists even though other retirement confidence indicators appear to be stabilizing. In other words, no matter what seems to be getting better in the financial market or otherwise, people remain highly skeptical about being able to retire in a manner they expected and saved for, so they rein in spending, struggle to save more and delay their retirement. This way of thinking about retirement and personal finances has been referred to as the New Normal; a term that was coined a year ago by a financial analyst who used it to describe his companys vision of Americas seemingly sluggish economic future. A poll released in April this year by Gallup reinforces the EBRI findings. The Gallup study found: A majority of non-retired Americans [53%] do not think they will have enough money to live comfortably in retirement, up sharply from about a third who felt this way in 2002. Non-retired Americans now project they will retire at age 66, up from age 60 in 1995. These fears remain even though, as the AP recently reported, nine in 10 of

the popular retirement plans are at least back to where they were in October 2007, the peak of the stock market. Since the bull market began in March 2009, stocks have almost doubled. Clearly, this latest stock market crash must have been what seemed like the final straw for those with retirement on their minds, says Gary Meyers, IUPAT Industry Pension Fund administrator. In the last 12 years we saw the dot.com bubble pop, 9/11 and then the housing market bubble explode and collapse the market yet again, Meyers says. After all that, I think its understandable that people are nervous about their financial future.
IUPAT INDUSTRY PENSION FUND STANDS STRONG

Fortunately, for the men and women in the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades (IUPAT) in the United States and Canada, initial data suggests that the IUPAT Industry Pension Funds in both countries are on a financial path to continue to offer a secure retirement for their participants and beneficiaries. Meyers is cautiously optimistic that the trustees plan to counter the negative market conditions that rattled the world seems to be increasingly successful in growing the Fund. Cautiously is the key word here, Meyers is quick to remind anyone who will listen. Nobody knows what the future holds for our economy, but what we can be certain of is that the trustees who manage the pension

funds for the U.S. and Canada are going to act in the best interest of our participants. Theyre not afraid to make some unpopular decisions to ensure the fund remains financially hale and hearty. The unpopular decisions Meyers refers to was the implementation of a Funding Improvement Plan (FIP) for the pension funds in both countries after the 2008 crash. An FIP is required by U.S. law under the 2006 Pension Protection Act when a pension fund drops below 80 percent funded. (The term funded describes how much money a pension fund has compared to what it needs to meet all of its future pension obligations). In January 2008, before the market crashed, the IUPAT Industry Pension Fund in the U.S. was well over 80 percent funded and considered to be in what the 2006 PPA deemed the Green Zone. As a result of the crash later that year, the Pension Fund suffered a nearly 24 percent loss in assets. Those losses put the funding level of the Fund at just over 72 percent which moved the status of the Fund from Green to Yellow. The trustees of the Fund moved extremely quickly to put a plan in place and immediately execute it, says Meyers. Our priority was not only to recover our losses and increase our funding level beyond 82 percent (as mandated by the PPA when a fund is in Yellow status), but ensure that all secondary benefits, like early retirement, stay intact. In March 2009, IUPAT General President James Williams held a conference call with all district council business manager/secretary-treasurers (BM/ST) in the U.S. and Canada to outline the trustees plan to strengthen the Funds in both countries. In the U.S., the FIP entailed reducing the accrual

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rate (the rate at which new contributions earn interest) from 1 percent to percent and implementing a required 35 percent supplemental contribution to the Fund in addition to the normal contributions made for participants.
THE FIGURES TELL THE STORY

Now, over two years later, the U.S.

Fund made better than expected gains of $200 million and is now estimated to be 75.5 percent funded. In Canada, the Fund made better than expected gains of $8 million and is now estimated to be 89 percent funded. We have made some significant changes to the Funds over the last two

years and all indications are that we are moving steadily forward in a positive direction, says Meyers. Again, its an unpredictable world out there, but participants and beneficiaries of the IUPAT Industry Pension Fund can rest assured that the trustees will remain diligent in protecting a secure retirement for them and our future retirees.

OURRETIREES
Listed below are the pensioners awarded a pension benefit through the International Painters and Allied Trades Industry Pension Fund from February 1, through May 31, 2011. On behalf of the Board of Trustees, please join us in wishing them the best of luck, and a long and fruitful retirement. GEORGE BARBALIOS . . . .LU 921 GRAHAM CADWALLADER . .LU 27 JOHN CAGKLER . . . . . . . .LU 226 PEDRO CAIMARES . . . . . . .LU 18 LEONARD DAVIS . . . . . . .LU 930 DONALD BARNES . . . . . . . .LU 53 MARK BARTEL . . . . . . . . . . .LU 61 RICHARD BATCHELOR . . .LU 1136 ANGUS BEATON ANTHONY BELL . . . . . .LU 1824 . . . . . . . . .LU 79 . .LU 831 MICHAEL DAVIS . . . . . . .LU 1915 TIMOTHY DE BARTELO . . .LU 934

DENNIS CALDWELL . . . . . .LU 112 STEVEN CALDWELL . . . . . .LU 249 MARK CAMPBELL . . . . . . . .LU 95

DANIEL DE VOTO . . . . . . .LU 169 RICKY DEAN . . . . . . . . . .LU 178

DIMITRIOS DEDES . . . . . . .LU 677 GARY DEFRIES . . . . . . . . . .LU 80 . . . .LU 1118

VALENTE BENAVIDEZ JR

JOSEPH CAMPO . . . . . . .LU 2001 LUIS CARDONA . . . . . . .LU 1339 . . . . .LU 728

MICHAEL BENNETT . . . . . .LU 257 DONALD ADAMS . . . . . . . LU 604 SUZANNE ADAMS . . . . . LU 1937 THOMAS ADAMS . . . . . . . . LU 61 KWABENA ADU-KUSI . . . LU 8A28 PERCY AGAWA . . . . . . .LU 1904 SALVATORE BERGANTINO LU 1891 DARWIN BERGHORST . . . . .LU 95 LESTER BETTCHER . . . . . . .LU 693 HAROLD BEYER . . . . . . . . .LU 694 GERALD BICKHAM . . . . . .LU 728

KENNETH DEMPSEY

ALFRED CARPENTER

VASIL DENEV . . . . . . . . . . LU 557 VALERIE DENT . . . . . . . . .LU 604

MARK CARR . . . . . . . . . .LU 1165 WILLIAM CASABURI JAIME CASTANEDA . . . .LU 1486 . . . .LU 2001

ANDREW DERGANCE . . . .LU 465 ROCK DIEHL . . . . . . . . . . .LU 156 MICHAEL DILIBERTI JEFF DOBERNECKI . . . . . . . .LU 1 . . . . .LU 1778

ALFRED CASTILLO . . . . . . .LU 130 STEVEN CHANDLER CURTIS CHEREEK . . . . .LU 300

MICKEY ALEXANDER . . . . . LU 193 ROSS ALLAN . . . . . . . . . LU 1333 ALEX ALLEN . . . . . . . . . . . . LU 27 GLENN ALLEN . . . . . . . .LU 1527

STEVEN BIDDLE . . . . . . . .LU 1036 BRUCE BIGGINS . . . . . . . .LU 365 RICHARD BLACK . . . . . . . .LU 456 GEORGE BLACKWELL . . .LU 1976 . .LU 288

. . . . . .LU 1293

STANLEY DOLINSKI . . . . . .LU 481 ROY DONOVAN . . . . . .LU 1165

EARL CHRISTIAN . . . . . . . .LU 890 TERRY CLINGER . . . . . . . .LU 427

OTIS DORSEY . . . . . . . . . . .LU 90 THOMAS DOWNING . . . .LU 490 PETER DRAGOS . . . . . . . . .LU 20

DANIEL ANGEL . . . . . . . . . LU 718 GREGG ANTCLIFF . . . . . . .LU 106 ARISTOTLE ANTHONY . . . LU 1281 BRIAN AOCHOA . . . . . . LU 1005 ROBERT ARCHER . . . . . . . .LU 765 PHILLIP ARRINGTON WILLIAM ASBURY RON ATKINS . . . . .LU 159

MICHAEL BLANKENSHIP

RONALD COCHRAN . . . .LU 1165 JAMES CODAY . . . . . . . . .LU 676 DANNY COLLINS . . . . . . .LU 643 JOHNNY COLLINS . . . . .LU 1244

JAMES BOEHRET . . . . . . . .LU 641 VAN BOGLEV . . . . . . . . . .LU 515 VALERIO BONANNO . . . . . .LU 9

RONALD DRAKE . . . . . . . .LU 677 FRANK DUDKIEWICZ . . . .LU 549

DAVID BOND . . . . . . . . . .LU 277 NANCY BOODY . . . . . . . . .LU 43 SALVADOR BORRELL . . . . .LU 365 WILLIAM BOWDEN . . . . . .LU 476 ROBERT BOWYER . . . . . .LU 1195 WILLIAM BRANNEN ROY BRAUNDMEIER . . . . . .LU 53 . . . . .LU 471 . .LU 1891

RICK CONANT . . . . . . . .LU 1136 EDWARD CONGER . . . . .LU 1719 GUMARO CONTRERAS . . .LU 636 GREGORY COORDS . . . . . .LU 25 ROBERT COPPOLA . . . . . .LU 476

WILLIAM DUNLEAVY . . . .LU 1136 NORM DUNSTONE PATRICK DUTROW JURE DZIDA . . . . .LU 300 . . . . . .LU 169

. . . . . . .LU 970

. . . . . . . . .LU 1786

. . . . . . . . . . .LU 806

GASTON ATKINSON . . . LU 1293 JAMES ATTILIO . . . . . . . . .LU 587 MICHAEL AUGUSTINE . . . .LU 357 REGINALD AUSTIN . . . . . LU 1773 SALVADOR AYALA . . . . . LU 1798 JESSE BABB . . . . . . . . . . .LU 728

KENNETH EARLEY . . . . . .LU 1595 ANTHONY EPPERSON JAMES ERIKSEN . . . .LU 47

VINCENT COSGROVE . . .LU 1439 JOSE COSTA . . . . . . . . . .LU 195

. . . . . . .LU 1136

RAYMOND BREWSTER

VITTORIO COTELLESO . . . .LU 157 CLARENCE CRAIG . . . . . .LU 555

RICHARD ERNST . . . . . . . . .LU 53 JAVIER ESTRADA . . . . . . .LU 8A28 MARCOS EVORA . . . . . . LU 1891 WILLIAM FALKENSTEIN . . .LU 669 CHARLES FELKER . . . . . . . .LU 178 EDWARD FENNELLY . . . . .LU 201

CHARLES BRINK . . . . . . . .LU 820 RICHARD BROOKS . . . . . .LU 156

GLENN CRIPPS . . . . . . . . . .LU 79 BOBBY CRUCE . . . . . . . . . .LU 38 BRYAN CRUMP . . . . . . . .LU 1237 JOHN CURTIS . . . . . . . . . .LU 386 JOSEPH DANIEL . . . . . . . .LU 427

JAMES BAILEY . . . . . . . . . .LU 181 KONSTANTINOS BAKAS . .LU 155 DENNIS BAKER . . . . . . . . .LU 530 THOMAS BAKER . . . . . . .LU 2006 FRANCIS BANKS, JR . . . .LU 1009

KENNETH BROWN . . . . .LU 1165 ERNEST BROWN JR. . . . . . .LU 47 GREGORY BUTLER . . . . . . .LU 707 ROBERTO CABAUATAN .LU 1176

CALVIN FERDERER . . . . . .LU 1236

FERNANDO CABRAL . . . .LU 1175

BRYAN DAVIDSON . . . . . .LU 557

Continued on next page

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(Continued from previous page)


MARK FISCHER . . . . . . . . .LU 707 JAMES FLEMING . . . . . . . .LU 963 RUBEN FLORES . . . . . . . . . .LU 52 STEVEN FREDENBURG . . . .LU 159 SCOTT FRIES NICK FRITH . . . . . . . . . .LU 688 . . . . . . . . . . .LU 477 PEDRO HERNANDEZ . . . . LU 1008 CHARLES HIGGINS . . . . . . LU 567 WALTER HODDER . . . . . .LU 1891 BRIAN HOGARTH . . . . . .LU 1527 WILLIAM HOGG . . . . . . . .LU 997 HENRY HOLLAND . . . . . .LU 1100 DENNIS HOOTEN . . . . .LU 1118 GARRETT LAVANDER . . . . .LU 357 CHARLES LEPLER . . . . . . . .LU 130 ALLEN LEVINE . . . . . . . . . . .LU 28 JOHN LEWANDOWSKY . .LU 364 MICHAEL MINCH . . . . . . . LU 963 CONNIE MITCHELL . . . . . LU 1937 DAVID MOAK . . . . . . . . . .LU 741 LUCIJAN MODRUSAN . . . . .LU 20 RONALD MOORE . . . . . . .LU 804 WESLEY MORRELL . . . . . . .LU 567 JAMES MORRICAL . . . . . . . .LU 47 GLEN MOSS . . . . . . . . . . LU 669 RONALD MUELLER LEROY MULLINS . . . . . . .LU 61 . . . . . . .LU 1275

P A I N T E R S I N D U S T R Y

ROBERT LEWIS . . . . . . . . .LU 114 ALBERT LIMOGES . . . . . . .LU 177

DONALD FRITZ . . . . . . . . .LU 639 WILLIAM GALLAGER . . . . .LU 756

JAMES LING . . . . . . . . . . .LU 156 JOSEPH LIONTI . . . . . . . .LU 1976 RANDY LITTLE . . . . . . . . .LU 1940 ALFRED LIVINGSTON . . . .LU 1175 DOYLE LOHMAN . . . . . .LU 1778 . . .LU 775

DALE HOPKINS . . . . . . . . .LU 831 LESLIE HOUGHTON . . . .LU 1010

CLIFFORD GALLEY . . . . . . . . .LU 9 LEONARD GASKINS, JR. . . LU 460 SELWYN GEORGE MANUEL GHEEN . . . . .LU 1773 . . . . . . .LU 970 . . . .LU 1940

MICHAEL HOWARD . . . . . LU 669 WILLIAM HUBERTY . . . . . .LU 106

TYRONE MUMMEY . . . . . .LU 159 WILLIAM MURPHY . . . . . .LU 1138 GEORGE MURRAY ALEX NARVAEZ FRANK NERONE . . . . . .LU 934

BERT HUFF . . . . . . . . . . .LU 1265 DENNIS HUGHES . . . . . . .LU 807 STEVEN HUGHES . . . . . . . .LU 95 FREDERICK HURST . . . . . .LU 1009 JIM HUTCHINGS . . . . . . . .LU 502 JAMES HYLAND . . . . . . .LU 1955

CLEYON LOONSFOOT ROBERT LONGMAN

RICHARD GIBBONS

. . . . .LU 739

PHYLLIS GIFFORD . . . . . . . .DC 35 GARY GIONET . . . . . . . .LU 1439 LLOYD GILSTRAP . . . . . . . .LU 636 ALVIN GINES . . . . . . . . . . .LU 77 KENNETH GIRTZ . . . . . . . .LU 740 MELVIN GOMEZ . . . . . . . . .LU 24 ANDRES GONZALEZ . . . .LU 1595 NOLEN GRANDERSON . . . .LU 27 CHARLES GREER . . . . . . .LU 1955 EDWARD GRENDYS JAMES GRIESINGER . . . .LU 1590 . . . . . .LU 48

SUSAN LOSH . . . . . . . . . .LU 513 HOWARD LOWRY LARRY LUTHER . . . . .LU 1185

. . . . . . . .LU 775 . . . . . . .LU 277

. . . . . . . . .LU 118 . . . . .LU 364

RICHARD NICASTRO . . . . . .LU 24 DAVID NILSON . . . . . . . . .LU 277 WALTER NOLAN . . . . . .LU 1159

JAMES MACMILLAN

ERNESTO IBARRA . . . . . . .LU 169 IVOL ISON . . . . . . . . . . . .LU 249 EDWIN JACKSON, JR . . .LU 1244

LAWRENCE MACMONAGALE . . . . . . .LU 1982 MICHAEL MAGEE . . . . . . .LU 277 WILLIAM MAJEWSKI . . . .LU 1165 GARY MAMAY . . . . . . . .LU 2006 MICHAEL MANACCHIO . .LU 186

ROBERT NUGENT . . . . . . .LU 252 WALTER NULL . . . . . . . . . . .LU 33 DOMINGO NUNEZ CHARLES O`NEIL JAMES OLIVE . . . .LU 1991

GERALDINE JACQUES . . . .LU 823 BRUCE JAMES . . . . . . . . .LU 300 . . . . . . . .LU 33

. . . . . . .LU 159

JACK JENNINGS ALBERT JESTER

. . . . . . . . . .LU 847

. . . . . . . . .LU 308 . . . . . . .LU 364

OSVALDO MARCHAN . . .LU 1456 STANLEY MARTIN . . . . . .LU 1094 RUDY MARTINEZ . . . . . . . .LU 79

MARKO OMAZIC . . . . . .LU 1891 CHARLIE ORTIZ . . . . . . . .LU 1008 LEONARDO ORTIZ . . . . .LU 1778

THOMAS GRIFFIN . . . . . . .LU 681 JOHN GRIGGS . . . . . . . .LU 1010 JOSEPH GROSS . . . . . . . . .LU 27

THOMAS JEWELL

EMILIO JIMENES . . . . . . . . .LU 19 DAVID JOHNSON . . . . . . . .LU 48 MICHAEL JOHNSON . . . . . .LU 48 WILLIAM JOHNSON . . . .LU 1399 WILLIAM JOHNSON . . . .LU 1889 JAMES JONES . . . . . . . . . .LU 86 .LU 502

JOE MARVEL . . . . . . . . . .LU 1034 FRANK MARZELLI . . . . . . .LU 159

REYES OSUNA . . . . . . . .LU 1136 GEORGE PADILLA . . . . . .LU 1621 CARLO PASTORE JOHN PAUL . . . . . . . .LU 31

GREGORY GROSSO . . . . .LU 963 GRISHA GRUP . . . . . . . . .LU 557

GARY MATTHEWS . . . . . . LU 256 JOHN MATTHEWS . . . . .LU 1778

MARTIN GUAJARDO . . . . .LU 460 JESSE GUERRA . . . . . . . . .LU 636 MICHAEL GUZA . . . . . . . .LU 260 JAMES E. HABICH . . . . . . . .LU 27 JAMES HACHEY . . . . . . . .LU 114 BILLY HAILEY . . . . . . . . . .LU 1940 BARBARA HAMER . . . . . . .LU 386 ROBERT HARMON . . . . . .LU 479

. . . . . . . . . . .LU 829

MARK MAULER . . . . . . . . .LU 930 WILLIAM MAYFIELD . . . . . .LU 288 BILLY MAYNARD . . . . . . .LU 1275 DAVID MCCABE . . . . . . . .LU 558 EDWARD MCDONALD ELDON MCGRAW . .LU 1331

IVAN PAVIC . . . . . . . . . .LU 1891 KENNETH PAYNE . . . . . .LU 1346 RONALD PEASE . . . . . . .LU 1052

JACKLYN KALLENBERGER

MICHAEL KANOPA . . . . .LU 8A28 GENE M. KAPPLER . . . . . . .LU 46

DEBRA PENNINGTON . . .LU 1072 CORNELL PENTSA . . . . . . .LU 707 THOMAS PESTER . . . . . . .LU 386

TED KARES . . . . . . . . . . . .LU 156 STEFANOS KAVOURIAS GARY KELLER . .LU 707

. . . . .LU 1936

. . . . . . . . .LU 1020

RANDELL MCKEEMAN . . . . .LU 47 RICARDO MEDIANO . . . . .LU 256 RICHARD MELANCON . . . .LU 43

MICHAEL PETERKE . . . . . .LU 1819 DAVID PFEIFER . . . . . . . . .LU 364 . . . . . .LU 2009

DAVID HANSEN . . . . . . .LU 2009 BENSON HAYES . . . . . . . . .LU 6

DOUGLAS KENT . . . . . . .LU 1819 RICHARD KISH RONALD KLEMM . . . . . . . . .LU 639 . . . . . . .LU 277

GARRY PHINNEY

JOHN HAYES . . . . . . . . .LU 1795 WILLIAM HAZEL . . . . . . . .LU 312

RICHARD MENARD . . . . . . .LU 27 TONY MERCHAIN . . . . .LU 1348

CHARLES PIRSCHEL . . . . . .LU 636 ADELINO PONTE WESLEY POYNTER . . . . . . .LU 138 . . . . . . .LU 61

STEVEN KONCZAKOWSKI . .LU 481 NICK KOTSATOS . . . . . . .LU 476

SANDY HEATH . . . . . . . .LU 1964 STEPHEN HEBERT . . . . . . .LU 728

JAMES MEREDITH . . . . . . .LU 437 JOSEPH MEYER . . . . . . . . .LU 156 SANTE MICHIELIN . . . . . . .LU 138 ALLEN MILLER . . . . . . . . .LU 1165 DONALD MILLER . . . . . . . .LU 848

CALVIN LABBE SR . . . . . . .LU 130 GISELE LAFITTE . . . . . . . .LU 1008 JIMMY LANE . . . . . . . . . .LU 1281 PATRICK LANE . . . . . . . . .LU 567

RAMON PRADO . . . . . . . . .LU 33 DAVID PRESCOTT . . . . . . .LU 995 CARL PUGH . . . . . . . . . . .LU 246

WILLIAM HEBERT . . . . . . .LU 1527 KEITH HECKELMAN . . . . . .LU 880 GONZOLAS HEIDELBERG . .LU 61

DONALD PURDIN . . . . . . .LU 427

44

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JESUS QUIJANO . . . . . . .LU 1005 MARGARETO QUINTANA LU 2001 PATRICIA RANDOLPH . . . .LU 452

RICHARD SKINNER . . . . . .LU 460 EDWARD SLACK . . . . . . . .LU 641 WILLIAM SLAVIN . . . . . . . .LU 703 CONNIE SMITH . . . . . . .LU 1165

JOHN TURNER . . . . . . . . .LU 820 WAYNE TURNER . . . . . .LU 2009

TERRY WALTON . . . . . . . .LU 437 WILLIAM WARDEN . . . . . .LU 159 TONY WARDRUP . . . . . . .LU 756

AUGUSTINE TYSON . . . .LU 1281 JOHN URBANSKI . . . . . . . .LU 61 . . .LU 707

GARY RANKIN . . . . . . . . .LU 159 LARRY RASCHELLA . . . . . .LU 804

DENNIS SMITH . . . . . . . .LU 1964 TERRY SMITH . . . . . . . . .LU 1275

THOMAS VALANTASIS LEONARD VALDEZ

ROBERT WARNER . . . . . . .LU 788 CAROL WARREN DELROY WATSON JAMES WATTE . . . . . .LU 2006 . . . . . .LU 365

PERRY RATLIFF . . . . . . . . . .LU 555 WILLIAM RICHARDS . . . .LU 1244

. . . . . .LU 823 . . .LU 1456

JOHN SNYDER . . . . . . . . .LU 277 MURRAY SOMERS . . . . . . .LU 138 ANTONIO SOTO . . . . . .LU 1175

HECTOR VELAZQUEZ JOAO VIEIRA

ROBERT RINALDO . . . . . . .LU 831 GIOACCHINO RIPEPE . . . . . LU 28 JAMES ROACH . . . . . . . . .LU 424 DUANE ROCHE . . . . . . .LU 1331

. . . . . . . . .LU 1891

. . . . . . . . .LU 184

EDWARD VIETH . . . . . . . . LU 427 MAX VINCENT . . . . . . . . . .LU 57 JOSEPH VITIELLO . . . . . . . . .LU 25 JAY VOORHIES . . . . . . . . .LU 720 JERRY WAGNER . . . . . . . . .LU 47 DANNIE WALDEN . . . . . .LU 193

GARRY WEAVER . . . . . . . .LU 256 FRANCIS WHITE . . . . . . .LU 1159 JESSE WIGGINS . . . . . . . .LU 164 ALLAN WILLIAMS . . . . . . .LU 163

MICHAEL SPARKS . . . . . . .LU 639 MICHAEL SPARKS . . . . . . .LU 770 SALVATORE SPATARO . . . . .LU 24 SCOTT SPRADLING . . . . . .LU 123 ROBERT STADLER . . . . . . . .LU 61

JAVIER RODRIGUEZ . . . . . .LU 130 RAFAEL RODRIGUEZ ROBERTO ROMERO . . . . .LU 159 . . . . . .LU 20

JAMES WILLIS . . . . . . . . . .LU 169 DANIEL WILSON . . . . . .LU 1036

RUDY ROMO . . . . . . . . . LU 9254 JOHN ROSE . . . . . . . . . . .LU 300 MICHIAL ROUSE . . . . . . . . .LU 47 MARCUS RUFF . . . . . . . . . .LU 38 . . . . . . .LU 934 . . . . . .LU 159

JOSEPH STEARNS . . . . . . .LU 269 HARRY STEWART . . . . . . .LU 970

MELVIN R. WALKER . . . . . .LU 437 ROY WALKER . . . . . . . . .LU 1595 THOMAS WALKER DAVID WALLACE . . . . . .LU 639 . . . . . .LU 1778

MARK STEWART . . . . . . .LU 1136 ALVIN STILLWELL . . . . . . . . .LU 91 SHELDON STRAMAGLIA . .LU 169

KIRK WILSON . . . . . . . . .LU 1008 CHARLES WOODWARD . . LU 164 FRANCISCO ZELADA . . .LU 1595

ALBERT RUFFALO FLORENTINO RUIZ JOE RUIZ JOSE RUIZ

TERRY WALLACE . . . . . . . .LU 205

MICHAEL STRAUBINGER . . . LU 48 STEVE WARD STRONG . . .LU 178 MICHAEL STRUNK . . . . . . .LU 238 WILLIAM SUGGS . . . . . .LU 1756

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .LU 48 . . . . . . . . . . . . .LU 18 . . . . . . . . .LU 437

GARY RUSSELL

MIKE RUSSELL . . . . . . . . .LU 1959 DANIEL SADEK . . . . . . . . . .LU 27 JESSE SAMRA . . . . . . . . . . .LU 95 JORGE SANCHEZ . . . . . .LU 1891 BRUCE SANDSTROM . . . . .LU 106 CHRISTOPHER SAWYER . . .LU 471 STANLEY SCHEVIS . . . . . LU 1486 ROBERT J SCHILLING . . . .LU 1007 JEAN SCHIPPERT . . . . . . . .LU 476 RICHARD SCHRIENER JOHN SCHULTZ . . . .LU 781

ALFONSA SULLIVAN . . . .LU 1165 TROY SURLES . . . . . . . . .LU 1175 PETE SWEARENGEN . . . . . .LU 65 RAYMOND SWENSON . . .LU 159 GASTON TAGLE . . . . . . . . .LU 18 LUCIEN TALBOT . . . . . . . .LU 200

JAMES TARLTON . . . . . . . . .DC 5 PANAGIOTIS TASOPOULOS ALBERT TAYLOR . . . . . . . .LU 1107 . . . . . . . .LU 357

JAMES TAYLOR . . . . . . . . .LU 427 WILLIAM TAYLOR . . . . . . .LU 707

. . . . . . . . .LU 61

JAN SEALY . . . . . . . . . . .LU 1895 MIRKO SEGOVIC JAMES SELF . . . . . .LU 1527

PRESTON TEMPLETON . . .LU 1118 LONNIE TINDER . . . . . . . . .LU 86 VASILIOS TOPTSIDIS . . . . .LU 707

. . . . . . . . . .LU 1778 . . . . . . . . . .LU 24 . . . . . . . . . .LU 775

BUJAR SEZAIRI CECIL SHAW

KEN TORKISH . . . . . . . . .LU 2006 STEVEN TRAPP . . . . . . . .LU 1165 . . . . . . . .LU 54

LARRY SHAW . . . . . . . . .LU 1185 WILLIAM SHERLOCK RONALD SHIRK . . . .LU 1527

MARTIN TREFFRY

ANTONIO TRENTADUE . .LU 1439 NICK TRIPODIS . . . . . . . . .LU 147 STYLIANOS TSAHAS . . . . . LU 460 JAMES TUBBS . . . . . . . . . .LU 333 DENNIS TUCKER . . . . . . . . .LU 61

. . . . . . . .LU 249

WILLIAM SIEGEL . . . . . . .LU 1486 JAMES SIESSER . . . . . . . .LU 1955 PHONH SIMMA . . . . . . .LU 1595

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January 1, 2011 March 31, 2011


LOCAL NAME AMOUNT LOCAL NAME AMOUNT LOCAL NAME AMOUNT LOCAL NAME AMOUNT

0003 Phillip E. Howell ....................$2,500.00 0003 James H. Smith ....................$2,500.00 0006 Lucian F. Costabile ................$2,500.00 0006 Robert Ambrose ....................$2,500.00 0007 Clarence L. Crist ....................$2,500.00 0010 Michael Myers ......................$2,500.00 0010 John M. Walter......................$2,500.00 0012 Loren H. Kerr ........................$2,500.00 0012 Lorraine M. Serrano ..............$2,500.00 0018 Robert G. Glasser ..................$2,500.00 0018 Joseph A. Sislay ....................$1,000.00 0019 Frank A. Dinoia......................$2,500.00 0019 Henry F. Villega ....................$2,500.00 0020 Joachim Pfenning ..................$2,500.00 0027 Gilbert Morava ......................$2,500.00 0028 Herman Lerner ......................$1,250.00 0031 Richard Noeller, Sr. ................$2,500.00 0031 Thomas G. Ponzi....................$2,500.00 0032 James E. Cloud......................$2,500.00 0032 Harry W. Liska ......................$2,500.00 0037 Glenn H. Staley ....................$2,500.00 0041 John F. Walters ....................$2,500.00 0043 Roger F. Genson ....................$2,500.00 0046 George R. Zingrich..................$2,500.00 0047 Berdeen Bruce ......................$2,500.00 0047 Raymond Parks ....................$2,500.00 0047 Jack M. Lee ..........................$2,500.00 0049 William H. Youree..................$2,500.00 0053 Frank L. Horak ......................$2,500.00 0057 Richard P. Oberst ..................$2,500.00 0061 Leroy Zakzaska ....................$2,500.00 0079 Clifford H. Daughtery..............$2,500.00 0079 John R. Richards ....................$2,500.00 0083 John Rezanage......................$2,500.00 0086 Gordon A. Moir......................$2,500.00 0086 Raymond J. Morelli ................$2,500.00 0086 Ronald S. Taylor ....................$2,500.00 0088 Donald L. Biggs ....................$2,500.00 0090 Donald H. Meyer ..................$2,500.00 0095 Joseph A. Bakonis..................$2,500.00 0106 Robert Hadel ........................$2,500.00 0106 Marshall Nelson ....................$2,500.00 0113 John Amelio..........................$2,500.00 0113 Catello Caracciola ..................$2,500.00 0115 Wilbert Gildehaus ..................$2,500.00 0118 John Holder ..........................$2,500.00 0123 George F. Herbold..................$2,500.00 0123 Howard Ginandt ....................$2,500.00 0130 Lee H. Brister ........................$2,500.00

0130 Vance C. Fridye ....................$2,500.00 0130 George W. Henderson ............$2,500.00 0138 Laszlo Somogyi ....................$2,500.00 0156 Donald E. Roberts ..................$2,500.00 0157 Chancie W. Munson ..............$2,500.00 0159 Emiliano Cordejo....................$2,500.00 0159 Robert H. Kramer, Jr...............$2,500.00 0163 Maurice Baclawski ................$2,500.00 0169 Benjamin J. Keeling................$2,500.00 0177 Carlos A. Amorin ....................$2,500.00 0177 James L. Colpitts....................$2,500.00 0178 Elmer V. Andrews ..................$2,500.00 0180 Donald Hanson......................$2,500.00 0191 Lauren E. Ellsworth ................$2,500.00 0191 Kenneth J. Karpinski ..............$2,500.00 0191 Matthew J. Ucho ..................$2,500.00 0193 Ray B. Knowles ....................$2,500.00 0194 Jeffrey C. Heydecker ..............$2,500.00 0213 Harry Jagoda ........................$2,500.00 0213 William J. Miller ....................$2,500.00 0252 Joseph M. Konnick ................$2,500.00 0252 William F. Hildebrand, II ........$2,500.00 0256 Robert Holzinger....................$2,500.00 0256 Milton Riegel ........................$2,500.00 0257 Mitchell J. Popkowski ............$2,500.00 0265 Harold S. Conrad ..................$2,500.00 0265 James D. Belk ......................$2,500.00 0265 Josef Nemeth........................$2,500.00 0265 John McDonald......................$2,500.00 0275 Leonard E. Schillen ................$2,500.00 0300 Dawn Murphy ......................$2,500.00 0300 Jon D. Harmon ......................$2,500.00 0365 Thomas Twark ......................$2,500.00 0365 Guirino V. Proia ....................$2,500.00 0386 Donald C. Farrell....................$2,500.00 0409 Herbert M. Stolz....................$2,500.00 0427 Carl D. Scott..........................$2,500.00 0427 Jack L. Whelchel....................$2,500.00 0427 Kurt G. Hicks ........................$2,500.00 0427 Donald Gumenberg ................$2,500.00 0437 Eric S. Adams........................$2,500.00 0452 Herman H. Rohman ..............$2,500.00 0456 Gerald W. Thacker ................$2,500.00 0460 Richard C. Swan ....................$2,500.00 0481 Rocco F. Toce........................$2,500.00 0487 Carl R. Gustafson ..................$2,500.00 0487 Ivan King..............................$2,500.00 0487 Edward W. Simunek ..............$1,000.00 0507 George A. Sanchez, Jr. ..........$2,500.00

0510 Pete Guerrero........................$2,500.00 0510 Edwin L. Haas ......................$2,500.00 0513 James C. Ferrenbach ..............$2,500.00 0514 James W. Durham ................$2,500.00 0549 John L. Ulland ......................$2,500.00 0557 Rudolf Blumenau ..................$2,500.00 0581 Leo Barber............................$2,500.00 0607 Ronald Magnuson ..................$2,500.00 0636 Coleman A. Matthews ............$2,500.00 0675 John H. Bovair, Sr. ................$2,500.00 0677 Michael T. Hauck ..................$2,500.00 0707 Tony Arnt..............................$2,500.00 0718 Steven M. Ballas ..................$2,500.00 0718 Ramon R. Gracia....................$2,500.00 0767 James D. Chandler ................$2,500.00 0767 Frank A. Cole ........................$2,500.00 0775 Charles R. Price ....................$2,500.00 0781 John K. Madison....................$2,500.00 0781 Robert N. Naftzger ................$2,500.00 0781 David A. Pionek ....................$2,500.00 0781 Eugene Erdtmann ..................$2,500.00 0781 Knneth M. Wimmer................$2,500.00 0802 Richard J. Haley ....................$2,500.00 0807 Louis W. Hanna ....................$2,500.00 0807 George E. Harbolt ..................$2,500.00 0807 Kenneth D. Bone ..................$2,500.00 0823 John Brewer..........................$2,500.00 0831 William J. Briggs....................$2,500.00 0831 Jackie D. Dennis ....................$2,500.00 0831 Hazen O. Barker....................$2,500.00 0831 Glenn H. Adkins ....................$2,500.00 0831 John L. Kennedy ....................$2,500.00 0831 Patrick V. Malak ....................$2,500.00 0831 David T. Patterson..................$2,500.00 0913 Charles N. Bell ......................$2,500.00 0921 Vassilios Strantzalis................$2,500.00 0930 Richard S. Jackson ................$2,500.00 0970 Homer E. Johnson..................$2,500.00 1004 Robert Uibelhoer....................$2,500.00 1004 Fred Hurewitz ......................$2,500.00 1005 Robert J. Szewczyk, Sr...........$2,500.00 1007 John Fila ..............................$2,500.00 1010 Anthony Maysonet ................$2,500.00 1010 William Perks........................$2,500.00 1036 Russell R. Drake ....................$2,500.00 1036 Thomas E. Fudge ..................$2,500.00 1100 George H. Kidd ......................$2,500.00 1136 Isaac Enriquez ......................$2,500.00 1144 Thomas R. Seevers ................$2,500.00

1156 David Randolph ....................$2,500.00 1162 Clarence Meffert ....................$2,500.00 1165 Gary N. Singleton ..................$2,500.00 1165 Charles Tarrant ......................$2,500.00 1176 Floyd Murray ........................$2,500.00 1185 Harold R. Sweet ....................$2,500.00 1238 Robert D. Sieg ......................$2,500.00 1244 Frank R. Parlipiano ................$2,500.00 1247 James M. Humber, Jr. ............$2,500.00 1247 William J. Nitzer ....................$2,500.00 1247 Edward C. Wright ..................$2,500.00 1247 Cloyce M. Koch......................$2,500.00 1247 Kenneth C. McCune................$2,500.00 1269 Maurice A. Garber ..................$1,000.00 1281 Max Weine ..........................$2,500.00 1324 Richard Gilbert ......................$2,500.00 1324 Harold J. Hegg ......................$2,500.00 1324 Robert E. Hulbert ..................$2,500.00 1324 Roland M. Hames ..................$2,500.00 1333 Albert Ceprano ......................$2,500.00 1399 Seibert Buck ........................$2,500.00 1401 Hubert Rajala ........................$2,500.00 1486 Irvin Louis Bunning ................$2,500.00 1486 Frank D. DiGirolamo ..............$2,500.00 1494 Jean-Paul Gelinas ..................$2,500.00 1594 LeVergne G. Hammond ..........$2,500.00 1719 Andrew Kerestury ..................$2,500.00 1719 Randall T. Sotaski ..................$2,500.00 1756 Charles Everhart ....................$2,500.00 1778 James D. Kurtz......................$2,500.00 1778 Gary L. Gill............................$2,500.00 1791 Edwin T. Tokifuji ....................$2,500.00 1803 Freddie E. Overly ..................$2,500.00 1891 Tadija Vidovic ........................$2,500.00 1891 Philip L. Hodder ....................$2,500.00 1937 Dung Nguyen ........................$2,500.00 1940 Jimmie Jones, Jr. ..................$2,500.00 1940 Wayne E. Patterson................$2,500.00 1955 Albert J. Wernery ..................$2,500.00 1955 Roy W. Thaxton ....................$2,500.00 2001 Bobby L. Scarbrough ..............$2,500.00 2001 Michael G. Smith ..................$2,500.00 2001 Patrick Thompson ..................$2,500.00 2001 Charles A. Widner, Sr. ............$2,500.00 2006 Joseph L. Gallo ......................$2,500.00 2341 Berry De Bres........................$2,500.00 2341 Gary M. Capobianco ..............$2,500.00 8A28 Abraham Rosenblum ..............$1,250.00

46 A P R I L - J U N E

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