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OUTLINE ANALYSIS

OF EACH ,OF

J. S BACH'S

(IN 'THE ''DAS WOHLTEMPERIBTE CLAVIER")

BY

BROOK SAMPSON,

Copyright.

MUS. RA.C., OXON.; F.R.C.O.

Price (Paper cov/er) lf6'net.

(Cloth cover) 21-

LONDON:

THE VINCENT MUSIC COMPANY, LIMITED,

60, BERNERS , STREET, W.

OUTLINE ANALYSIS

OF EACH OF

J. S. BACH'S

FORTY-EIGHT FUGUES

(IN THE "DAS WOHLTEMPERIRTE CLAVIER")

BY

BROOK SAMPSON,

Copyright.

MUS. BAG., OXON.; F.R.C.O.

Price (Paper cover) lj6 net.

(Cloth cover) 2j-

LONDON:

THE VINCENT MUSIC COMPANY, LIMITED,

60, BERNERS STREET, W.

PREFACE.

rpUE following outline analysis of each fugue is intended to provide the first stage upon

which a more or less

complete analysis, according to the requirements of each

student, can he worked out hy referring to " A Digest of the Analyses of J.

S. Bach's

Forty-eight Fugues." These fugues form

part of the collection of Preludes and Fugues so well known as

"the 48," and named Das Wohltemperirte Klavier (the Well-Tempered Clavier).

The term " Well Tempered," refers to a system of tuning the clavier and other keyed

instruments, which was in

opposition to

the

then prevailing system.

The musicians of

that time (eighteenth century) began to feel that changes of key must be more extended,

therefore they wished to

have their

claviers tuned on the " equal temperament system,"

which allowed

a performer to play in any key.

Bach thoroughly believed in this new

system, and composed a Prelude and Fugue in every major and minor key, forming the

first volume of twenty-four.

This first set was completed in 1722, and a second set of

twenty-four about the year 1744.

Sir Hubert Parry in his most interesting book entitled " The Story of the Development

of a Great Personality," says:

"The adoption of this name 'Das Wohltemperirte Clavier'

(Well Tempered Clavier)

by Bach, was a public

and deliberate recognition of a radical

change in the construction of European scales, of such pre-eminent importance, that it is

no exaggeration to impossible."

say,

that

without it modern musical art would have been absolutely

The following extract from the periodical named will be interesting to many :

" Old

readers of The Organist and Choirmaster will remember an article which appeared in our

columns some years ago, describing a visit of the (then) three Editors (with several other

professional friends) to Miss Eliza Wesley at Islington.

That

lady had in her possession

in those days Bach's own autograph of the Second Volume (with the exception of a few

pages).

This

MS. belonged to

her father, Samuel Wesley, one of the earliest English

editors

of the

48;

and

after

Miss Wesley's death, it was sent to the

British Museum,

where it can now be seen."

DEFINITIONS.

Some of these definitions are taken from articles in " Grove's Dictionary of Music," by the kind permission of the publishers (Messrs. Macmillan), or from "Fugue," by E. Prout (Augener), or "A Digest of the Analyses of J. S. Bach's Forty-Eigbt Fugues," by Brook-

Sampson (Vincent).

The technical terms. Subject and Answer, are used with a restricted meaning, because many of the tables, groups and lists in the Digest have special reference to them as representmg

something deiinite, viz. :

  • (a) Subjectthe phrase upon which the Fugue is founded, and as it appears in the

Exposition (the Tonic form of the phrase).

  • (b) Ans'nrerthe phrase as it appears in answer to the Subject in the Exposition (the

Dominant, sometimes the Subdominant, form of the phrase).

  • (c) Theme is the general term applied to the various forms which the phrase (Subject) afterwal-ds takes in the Fugue, such as entries on degrees of the scale other

than Tonic or Dominant ; entries in other kevs ; the phrase in augmentation

the phrase in diminution ; the phrase by inverse movement.

The technical names of the degrees of the scale are :

Degrees of the

Scale.

Technical

)

)

^

I Tonic.

Abbreviations.

T.

2

Supertonic.

St.

3

Mediant.

M.

4

Subdominant.

Sd.

5

Dominant.

Dom.

6

Submediant.

Sm.

In a minor key, the key of the minor seventh of the scale, which is the dominant of the

Relative Major key, is abbreviated Mi. 7.

Exposition is that part of the Fugue during which the voices make their first entries in

succession, and which extends as far as the conclusion of the Subject or Answer (as the case may be), by the voice that enters last (E. Pbout, Fugue).

Counter-ExpositionThis is really a second Expositioii in the same two keys as the first,

but with imnortant differences.

For instance, the voices which before had the Subject

now have the Answer, and vice versa ,- and that frequently the Answer leads and the

Subject replies.

Sometimes the Counter-Exposition is only partial.

Figure is any short succession of notes, either as melody or a group of chords, which produces

a single, complete and distinct impression.

It is, in fact, the shortest complete idea

in

music ; example from Fugue 2 : (j ub'j, i the Fugue; example from Fugue 29 : @*t

go* j ' ^ *_i fl ,

which is used 50 times in

"'

r ,l

^^

T

ised 111 times

I

.

Phrase is one of the smallest items in the divisions which distinguish the form of a musical

work : example from Fugue 29 :

figure.

figure.

DEFINITIONS.

Counter-Subject.

Wten the Subject of a Fugue has been proposed by one voice, it is

usual for the Answer, which is taken up by another voice, io be accompanied by the

former with a Counterpoint sufficiently recognisable as a definite subject to take its part

in the development of the Fugue, and this is called the Counter- Subject :

Answer.

rw ,ri

c=z

from Fugue 2.

Counter-Subject (C.S.)

Inversion.

This word bears, in musical terminology, five different significations:

(I)

to

intervals;

(II) to chords;

(III) a Pedal Point is

described as inverted, when the

sustained note, instead of being placed in the Bass, is transferred to an upper part and

the characteristic note (whether sustained or reiterated) forms no part of the harmony,

which remains wholly unafi'ected, either by its presence or removal. (IV) Counterpoint is said to be inverted when the upper part is placed beneath the

lower, or vice versa ,-

for instance, the extract above, from Fugue 2, the C.S. is below

the Ans., whereas here the two phrases are inverted :

When two parts are invertible it is called double counterpoint, and the inversion

may take place at any interval, thus giving rise to fourteen different

species of Double

Counterpoint, viz., in the Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth,

Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth, either above or below. When three=part writing is so constructed as to be completely invertible, that is,

when each part in turn will make an effective Bass, while the other two standing above

it may still change places, the result is called triple

counterpoint.

Whereas double

counterpoint offers only two possibilitiesthe original and its inversion, triple has six

the original and five different inversions ;

and

obviously the addition

of a fourth

invertible partmaking quadruple counterpointwill give exactly four times the six

versions of triple, viz., twenty-four, etc. (V) In Counterpoint, the term inversion is also used to signify

the repetition of a

phrase or passage with reversed intervals, or, as it is sometimes called, by contrary

motion (see Examples, pp. 17-20, Section I).

N.B.When double, triple and quadruple counterpoint are referred to, it is to be under-

stood that transposition may or may not have taken place.

Coda is the Italian for a tail, and the term is applied, in a Fugue, to that portion of music

(variable in length and construction), which comes at the end to close the composition in a satisfactory manner.

Codetta is the diminutive of Coda, and is also variable in length and construction, but the

difference is, that it is applied, in a Fugue, to the portions of music which serve as links

between different entries, &c.

(PluralCodette).

Episodein a Fugue an Episode is a portion of the music in which the principal subject

does not appear in a complete form, or not even alluded to in many examples, but is

founded upon some material taken from the accompanying counterpoints, or from the Codette, &c.

Stretto--to draw close.

In

a Fugue a

Stretto is

two

(necessarily in different voices) in "

close

"

imitation.

or more

entries

of the

(Plural Stretti).

Theme

OUTLINE ANALYSIS

OF EACH OF

J. S. BACH'S FORTY-EIGHT FUGUES.

(DAS WOHLTEMPERIRTE KLAVIER.)

BROOK SAMPSON.

FUGUE ^\

C major.

OUTLINE ANALYSIS.

Bars

1-7,

Exposition '.]-

1-2

Sub. (1), Alto.

2-4

Real Ans. (2), Treble.

Bars 7-10,

OocNTEE

Exposition h

7-8

Strbtto I-

(Sub. (5), Treble.

)

"1

Ans. (6), Tenor. ]

4-5

Ans. (3), Tenor.

Codetta I.

5-7

Snb. (4), Bass.

9-10

Ans. (7), Alto.

Bars:

10-12

StrettoII- jTh.(9),Alto.

bTRETTO

U

1

I

^^_ ^g^^ g^^g I

12-13

Th. (10), Tenor.

13-14

Codetta II.

Cadence in A minor.

Bars:

14-16

(

bTRBTTO iii—

Strbtto III-

Th. (14), part only. Treble.")

''''•(")' ^1*"-

j^^ ^j2), Tenor.

I

Th. (13), Bass.

Stretto IV

16-19

Sub. (15), Treble. Ans. (16), Alto.

'

Th. (17), Tenor.

Th. (18), Bass.

Bars :

Stketto V-

19-20

Th. (20), Alto.

Th. (19), Tenor,

part of Th. (21), Bass.

20-23

stretto VI

Stretto

VI- l*"S- (22), Treble.

I

Th. (23), Tenor.

Bars :-

23-24

Codetta III

(Cadence in C).

Strbtto VII-

(

24-26

Th. (25), Alto,

part of (26), Treble.

iSub. (24), Tenor.

26-27

Conclusion.

Over a Tonic Pedal.

KEYS OF ENTRIES OF THE THEME.

Themb.

I

1

Keys. | C

2

I

3

I

CtoGGtoO

4

i

6-6

ICtoG

Subject.

Ez

8-9

G

10

Ami.

11-141

C toG

15-18

to D mi.

I

19-21

D mi. to G

22-23

C

24-26

C

Answer.

^

£& \

I

I-

-a

There are two entries of the Answer in succession in the Exposition, which is somewhat

irregular, because the third voice to enter generally has the Subject.

no Episode, and only three short Codette.

There are seven Stretti

DETAILS IN THE DIGESTExposition, p. 91 ; Stretti, pp. 336-338; other entries of the Theme

(3, 4 and 7), p. 177; Codetta I, p. 200; II and III, p. 299; Tabulated Plans

pp. 870-373 ; 194-195.

Plan with two changes, p. 387.

of Construction, Keys, &c.,

OUTLINE ANALYSIS OF BiCHS FORTY-filGltt FtJGttES.

FUGUE 2^ C minor.

OUTLINE ANALYSIS OP BACh's FORTV-EtGHT FUQtJES.

^^

H=5^^

r^

Subject. fMsam^^ =F^^^ ^^;tirrx^:x^z

I

There is one extra entry of the Answer (4) after the Exposition, following which the

Submediant (Relative Minor) key is selected for the next entry of the Theme (5). two Counter-Subjects. No Stretto.

There are

DETAILS TN THE DIGEST.—Exposition, p. 36; Theme and Counter-Subjects, pp. 142-144; Episodes, pp. 225, 269, 270, 271 ; Coda, p. 864; Plans of Construction (tabulated), pp. 370-373; Tables of

Keys, pp. 194, 195.

Plan -with one change of key, p. 387.

/

iT

FUGUE 4^ C sharp minor.

OUTLINE ANALYSIS.

Bars 1-17,)

1-4

4-7

E,^„,o» 1 -1 »"M'»' 1 %i"i <^>'

7-10

1 '"iuf 1

10-12

12-14

14-17

.. 00

  • I. f "taVe"b1;.**'1 S^.

Bars:— 17-19

Cod jj

I

\

Bars:— 28-29

Cod. III.

19-22

Real Ans. (6), Tenor

(First extra entry).

1

J

22-25

Sabdom.

Ans. (7), Tenor

I. Ai

(Second

id 6

extra entry).

]

)

25-28

Sub. (8), Alto

(Third extra entry).

29-32

Th. (9), Bass.

32-35

Sub. (10), Alto.

/

35-38

Sub. (11), Tenor.

38-41

Ans. (12), Alto.

Bars:— 41-44

Ep. 1.

44-47

Snb. (13), 2nd Treble.

47-48

Cod. IV.

48-51

Ans. (14), 1st Treble.

51-^4

Ans. (15), Tenor.

Bars:—

54-57

Th. (16), 2nd Treble.

57-58

Cod. V.

Bars: 68-73

Ep. III.

73-76

Sub. (19), Bass.

59-62

Sub. (17), Ist Treble.

76-79

Sub. (20), Ist Treble.

62-65

Ep. II.

66-68

Th. (18), Ist Treble.

79-80.

Cod. VI.

8r-84

Sub. (21), Tenor.

Bars:-

Bars:

84-85^

Cod. VII.

Stretto -{

85-88

Ans. (22), Alto.

89-92

Sub. (23), 1st Treble.

92-93

Cod. VIII.

94-100

Th. (24), 1st Treble;

also (26).

Th. (25), 2nd Treble. Th. (27), Bass.

100-103

Sub. (28), Tenor.

Bars:—103-106

107-109

110-115

Ep. IV. Sub. (29), 1st Treble (on Dominant Pedal). Part of Th. in 2nd Treble (on Tonic Pedal).

KEYS OF ENTRIES OF THE THEME.

Theme.

1

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Keys.

C#mi.

Gf mi., C| mi.

C t mi.

P# mi.

C t mi.

G# mi.

Pf mi.

Of mi.

B

Theme.

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

I

18

19-21

Keys. ,

E

C$ mi.

G#mi.

Ctmi.

P# mi.

Ft mi A

A

C# mi.

I

DI mi.

I

$ mi.

Theme.

22

  • 23 Stretto I.

28

29

30

Keys.

F# mi.

C$ mi.

C#mi., E, B, C*mi.

C#mi.

Ctmi.

on Tonic Pedal.

 

OUTLINE ANALYSIS OF BACh's FORTY-EIGHT FUGtmS.

HS^ili^

Subject.

Real Answer.

-ft-

fa.

iti

J.

A

Snbdominant Ans.

12 1^

13

orJ

14

Two Counter-Subjects, introduced after the Exposition, are prominent features in this fugue :

First Counter-Subject enters in bar 35.

^-iA=^

Second Counter-Subject enters in bar 48.

mu.

.«_

.^.

.^.

|,.

-si-

48

49

50

This Fugue is one of the two fugues in five parts forming part of the 48.

Answer are used (see above).

Two forms of

DETAILS IN THE DIGEST.—Exposition, p. 93, also the three extra entries. The four portions into which the fugue may be divided are shown on pp. 163-167 ; Theme and Counter-Subjects, pp. 164-167 Stretto, p. 167, also p. 352; Codetta and Episodes, pp. 242- 5, 262. Plan with three changes of key, p. 387.

FUGUE 5*,

D major.

OUTLINE ANALYSIS.

Bars 1-6, \ ._

Exposition)

1-2

Sub. (1), Bass.

2-3

Real Ans. (2) Tenor.

3-4

Cod. I.

4-0

Sub. (3), Alto.

Bars ;

6-7

Cod II.

7-8

Sub. (6) Bass (extra entry).

8-9

Th. (6), Treble.

9-11

Ep. I.

Bars :-

12-13

Sub. (8), Alto.

13-14

Th. (9), Treble.

14-15

Th. (10), Tenor.

Bars :

Cod.

16-17

Ill (Cadence in E minor).

17-27.

Episode and Coda.

5-6

Ans. (4) Treble.

11-12

Th. (7), Treble.

15-16

Th. (11) Bass.

KEYS OF ENTRIES OF THE THEME.

Theme.

Keys.

1

D

1

i

2

A

3

DVTLlNE ANALYSIS OF BACh's FORTY-EtGHT FUGUES.

FUGUE 6^

D minor.

OUTLINE ANALYSIS.

Bars 1-8, ) ._

Exposition;

1-2

Sub. (1), Treble.

3_5

Real Ans. (2), Alto.

5_6

Cod. I.

6-8

Sub. (3), Bass.

Bars :

8-10

Th. (4), Treble.

10-12

Ep. I.

Bars:—

16-17

C

...

n.

17-20

Sx.II-l,,TJ.(8XA

..

o.j

I-

OTRETTo 1

Stretto

13-16

fTh. (5), Treble.

^

j^

^g^^ inverted, Alto.

20-21

21-25

<,., ,,.„,_(^^Tt.(IO,>v.«d,T.b, ..

Bars :—

B ars :-

Bars :

25-27

Ep. II.

27-31

Th. (12), inverted. Treble.

Stretto IV-

Th. (13), direct, Alto.

Th. (14), inverted, Bass.

31-33

Ep. III.

33-34

Th. (15) part only,) in Alto.

)

g.^^^^

STRETTO

y __

V

.(

^^^

34-36

Th. (17), inverted, part only in Alto. \

^jg^^ ^^^^

j

36-39

^„

Ep. IV.

39-42

Stretto VI- i

&TRBTT0

VI

'"'''• (18),' Alto.

|^jj_ ^^^^^ g^gg

I

42-44

Coda.

KEYS OF ENTRIES OF THE THEME.

Theme.

Keys.

1

D mi.

j

2

A mi.

D mi.

4

i

D mi.

I

6-6

On Dom. chord of D mi.

I

|

7-8

I

9-11

A mi. | On Dom. chord of D mi.

TfiEME.

Keys.

Subject.

12-13

Dmi.

14

D mi., G mi.

I

I

15

D ml.

16

G mi.

17-18

I

D mi.

I

ii l^^3^ -3^3=^ ^1

The Theme is used in the direct form (as above), and inverted:

^^^^^m

Bars

12,

13.

Bars 14-16.

E3E

J^--

1—

^—

I-

5^5^^

^^Vt^-^^""^^'

DETAILS IN THE DIGEST.—Exposition, p. 32; bars 11-22 with the inversion, bars 32-41 on

pp. 137, 138;

Stretti, pp. 328, 329:

the Plans of Construction of the 48 are tabulated on pp. y70-373;

Tables of Keys, pp. 194, 195 ; Plan with two changes of Key, p. 387.

OUTLINE ANALYSIS OF BACH'S FORTY-EIGHT FUGUES.

Bars 1-7, )

.

'

Exposition)

FUGUE T,

E flat major.

OUTLINE ANALYSIS.

OtJTLlNE ANALYSIS OP BACh's FORTY -EIGHT FUGUES.

Bars :-

Bars :

Bars :

Bars .

Bars :

47-50

50-62

StrettoV j^jjTh.(18)^,Jreble.j ^^^ y

62-54

Strbtto VI

Th. (21), Treble, Th. (20), Alto. iTh. (19), BasB.

part of

Th.

Stretto VII

54-56

Th. (24), Treble. Th. (23), Alto. [Th. (22), BasB.

part of Th.

56-57

Cod VI.

57-60

Sub. (25), Treble.

60-61

Cod VII.

Stretto VIII-

61-67

Th. (28), Treble. Th. (26), Alto.

Th. (27), Bass (in augmentation).

5TRETT0 IX

67-72

Th. (31), Treble. Th. (30), Alto (in augmentation).

iTh. (29), Bass.

72-75

Th. (32), Alto.

75-77

OtJTLtNE ANALYSIS OP BACH*S FORTV-ETGHl' FtJGtlES.

Bars 1-5, | Exposition J

Bars:

Bars :

Bars :

Bars :

FUGUE 9^

E major.

outliine analysis.

 

1-2

2-3

3-5

Sub. (1), Alto.

Real Ans. (2), Treble.

Sub. (3), Bass.

6-6

6-8

7-9

9-10

9-11

Bp. I.

Sub. (4), Treble.

Ans. (5), Alto.

Cod. II.

Ans. (6), Bass.

11-12

12-13

13-16

16-17

Ep. II.

Th. (7), Treble.

Ep. III.

Th. (8), Alto.

17-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

Ep. IV.

Sub. (9), Bass.

Th. (10), Treble.

Sub. (11), Alto.

22-26

25-26

26-29

Ep. V.

Sub. (12), Treble.

Coda

KEYS OF ENTRIES OF THE THEME.

Theme.

Keys.

1

E

2

B

3

E

4

E

5

B

Subject.

life

E, C|mi.

C$ mi. I C # mi.

i^E^E '-*-• azt:

E

10

B

II

E

12

E

DETAILS IN THE DIGKST.—Exposition, p. 62; Theme and Counter-Subject, pp. 139, 140; Codetta and Episodes, pp. 252-254; Plans, pp. 370-373 ; Tables of Keys, pp. 194, 195; included in Plan with one

change of Key, p. 387.

No Stretto.

FUGUE 10^ E minor.

OUTLINE ANALYSIS.

Bars 1-6,

Exposition]

Bars :-

Bars :-

 

1-3

3-6

}

._

'

 

Sub. (1), Treble.

Real Ans. (2), Bass.

 
 

5-11

11-13

13-15

16-20

20-22

22-24

Ep. I.

Th. (3), Treble.

Th. (4), Bass.

Ep. II.

Th. (5), Bass.

Th. (6), Treble.

24-30

30-32

32-34

34-38

39-42

Bp. III.

Th. (7), Bass.

Th. (8), Treble.

Ep. IV.

Coda (reference to Sub.).

KEYS OF ENTRIES OF THE THEME.

Theme.

OUTLINE ANALYSIS OF BACH's FORTY-EIGHT FUGUES.

FUGUE 113, F major

OUTLINE ANALYSIS.

Bars 1-13, Exposition ]-
Bars 1-13,
Exposition ]-

1-4

Sub. (1) Alto,

4-8

Tonal Ans. (2) Treble.

Bars 13-31,

]

Counter Exposition J

13-17

17-21

Ep. I.

Sub. (4) Treble.

21-25

Ans. (5) Alto.

8-9

Cod. II.

9-13

Sub. (3) Bass.

Strbtto I

25-31

Sub. (7) Alto, Sub. (6) Bass.

Bars:

Bars

31-36

Ep. II.

Strbtto II

36-44

fTh. (8) Treble.

Th. (9) Alto,

I

Th. (10) Bass.

44-46

Cod. V.

Stretto III-

54-56

Cod VI.

56-65

Ep.

III.

Stretto IV-

64-68

(Th. (14)

14)

Tn

Treble.

1

Th. (15)

Th.

(15) Alto,

Alto.

46-54

Th. (i3)Treble.

Th. (12) Alto.

iTh. (11) Bass.

1

J

68-72

Coda.

KEYS OF ENTRIES OF THE THEME.

Thbub.

Keys.

1

F

2

3

P

4

F

5

F,

6,7

F

St. II.

Dmi.

St. III.

G mi.

St. IV.

BP, F

There are three entries of the Theme in St. II in D minor, and three iu St. Ill in G minor.

Subject, i^j ¥^ il^^iiil^^ill

There are four extra entries following the Exposition.

DETAILS IN THE DIGESTExposition, p. 60 ; four extra eutries, p. 60 ; Stretti, pp. 332-333

Codette, pp. 227 and 302.

Episodes, p. 256 and pp. 227, 228; Plans, pp. 370-373;

pp. 194, 195.

Included in the Plan with one change of key, p. 387.

Tables of Keys,

^

FUGUE ^2\ F minor.

OUTLINE ANALYSIS.

Bars 1-16.

Exposition ) "

ExPOSITI

1-4

Sub. (1), Tenor.

4-7

Tonal Ans. (2), Alto.

7-10

Sub. (3), Bass,

10-13

Cod. I.

13-16

Sub. (4), Treble.

Bars :

Bars :

16-19

Ep. I.

37-40

Ep. IV.

19-22

Ans. (5), Tenor.

22-27

Ep. II.

27-30

Sub. (6), Baas.

30-34

Ep. III.

34-37

Th. (7), Alto.

40-43

Th. (8), Tenor.

43-47

Ep. V.

47-49

Ans. (9), Treble.

50-53

Ep. VI.

63-56

Sub. (10), Bass.

56-58

Coda.

KEYS OF ENTRIES OF THE THEME.

Thbme.

Keys.

1

Fmi.

Subject.

2

Omi.

3

Fmi.

4

]

F mi.

5

mi.

illoEE ^^

^ --P

6

Fmi.

7

Afe

^i-

^J ^1

^

9

Cmi.

10

Fmi.

This fugue and No. 14 are the two fugues in

which the Subject appears twice in succession

in the Exposition.

There are two extra entries. Answer and Subject before the entry of the

Theme (7) in the Relative Major key.

DETAILS IN THE DIGEST.—Exposition, p. 88; Theme and Counter-Subjects, pp. 145-147, also

p. 174;

Codette, p. 255 ;

Episodes, pp. 265, 256, 263, 264 ;

Keys, pp. 194, 195; Plan with one change of Key, p. 387.

Coda, p. 364;

No Stretto.

Plans, pp. 370-373;

Tables of

10

OUTLINE ANALYSIS OF BACn's FORTY-BIGHT FUGUES.

Bars 1-7,

1

Exposition f

Bars :

Bars :

Bars :

FUGUE 13',

F sharp major.

OUTLINE ANALYSIS.

1-3

Sub. (1), Treble.

3-5

Tonal Ans. (2), Alto.

7-11

Bp. I.

11-13

Sub. (4), Treble.

18-15

Ep. II.

17-20

Ep. III.

20-22

Th. (6), Bass.

22-28

Ep. IV.

30-31

Ep. V.

31-33

Sub. (8), Treble.

KEYS OF ENTRIES OF THE THEME.

Theme.

D$mi.

OUTLINE ANALYSIS OF BAOH's FOBTT-BIGHT FUGUES.

11

This fague and No. 12 are the two fugues in which the Subject appears twice in succession

in the Exposition.

The Theme inverted is used twice.

No Stretto.

DETAILS IN THE DIGEST.—Exposition, p. 90; Theme and Counter-Subject, pp. 110-111; Codette^ pp. 228, 229 ; Episodes, pp. 229, 256; Plans, pp. S70-373; Tables of Keys, pp. 194-195.

FUGUE 15^ G major.

OUTLINE ANALYSIS.

Bars 1-15, ] .

Exposition

1-

1-5

Sub. (1), Treble.

5—9

Real Ans. (2), Alto.

9—11

Cod. I.

11-15

Snb. (3), Bass.

Bars :

15-20

Ep. 1.

20-24

Th. (4) inverted, Alto.

24r-28

Th. (5) inverted. Treble.

28-31

Th. (6) inverted,

Bass.

Bars:

31-38

Kf. II.

88-42

Th. (7), Treble.

42^8

Cod. II.

43-46

Th. (8) inverted, Alto.

Bars:

47-51

Ep. III.

Bars:— 64-69

Ep. V.

51-54

Sx.I-{Th.^9)A

Treble;

Treble

(10), Bass, iucomplete

54-60

Ep. IV.

St. II-

60-64

f

Th.

li.(12),'

(12),

Treble.

Th. (11), Alto.

"IT

69-73

(Th. (13) inverted,

78-77

Ep. VI.

St. Ill

77-82

Th. (16), Treble. Th. (14) inverted, Alto Th. (15), Bass.

82-86

Coda.

KEYS OF ENTKIES OP THE THEME.

Theme.

Keys.

1

G

2

D

I

3

G

4

G

5

D

6