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11 REASONS TO STOP CONSUMING MILK

Milk and dairy products are not the health foods weve been told they are.

Here are 11 reasons to stop consuming them:

1. Cows milk is intended for baby cows. Were the only species (other than those we are domesticating) that drinks milk after infancy. And, were definitely the only ones drinking the milk of a different species.

2. Hormones. Not only are the naturally-present hormones in cows milk stronger than human hormones, the animals are routinely given steroids and other hormones to plump them up and increase milk production. These hormones can negatively impact humans delicate hormonal balance.

3. Most cows are fed inappropriate food. Commercial feed for cows contains all sorts of ingredients that include: genetically-modified (GM) corn, GM soy, animal products, chicken manure, cottonseed, pesticides, and antibiotics.

4. Dairy products, when metabolized, are acid-forming. Our bodies are constantly striving for biochemical balance to keep our blood at 7.365 pH. Eating excessive acid-forming products can cause our bodies to overuse some of its acid-balancing mechanisms, one of which is the bones. Alkaline calcium is stored in the bones and released to combat excessive acidity in the body. Over time, bones can become fragile.

5. Research shows that the countries whose citizens consume the most dairy products have the HIGHEST incidence of osteoporosis.

6. Most dairy cows live in confined, inhumane conditions, never seeing the pastures of green grass they were intended to eat.

7. Most dairy products are pasteurized to kill potentially-harmful bacteria. During the pasteurization process, vitamins, proteins, and enzymes are destroyed. Enzymes assist with the digestion process. When they are destroyed through pasteurization, milk becomes harder to digest, therefore putting a strain on our bodies enzyme systems.

8. Dairy products are mucous-forming. They can contribute to respiratory disorders. When I remove dairy and sugar from the diets of my clients, they stop experiencing hay fever and seasonal allergies.

9. Research links dairy products with arthritis. In one study on rabbits, scientist Richard Panush was able to PRODUCE inflamed joints in the animals by switching their water to milk. In another study, scientists observed more than a 50% reduction in the pain and swelling of arthritis when participants eliminated milk and dairy products from their diet.

10 Most milk is homogenized, which denatures the milks proteins, making it harder to digest. Many peoples bodies react to these proteins as though they are foreign invaders causing their immune systems to overreact. Research also links homogenized milk to heart disease.

11. Pesticides in cow feed find their way into milk and dairy products that we consume. Check out my Dairy-Free Soft Cheese recipe for a delicious alternative to dairy cheese.

Dairy-Free Soft Cheese

This cheese is so delicious no one will know its a healthy, dairy-free option. Check out my article on 11 Reasons to Stop Eating Dairy to learn why you should forego dairy products. This recipe offers all the benefits of yogurt and helps to balance your bowel flora. While it requires time for fermentation, it only takes about 5 to 10 minutes of preparation time. Ingredients 2 cups of raw, unsalted cashews, soaked overnight or about 10 to 12 hours 1 teaspoon probiotics powder or 2 capsules of probiotics opened (available in most health food stores and is sometimes called L. acidophilus or flora) and dissolved in 1 cup of pure water 1 teaspoon of Celtic sea salt or Himalayan crystal salt (or more to taste if desired) 1 to 2 teaspoons of onion powder 1/4 teaspoon of ground nutmeg In a blender or food processor, blend the soaked cashews with the probiotic powder and water mixture. Place in a glass bowl, covered with a clean cloth and let rest for 10 to 14 hours to ferment. Then stir in the salt, onion powder, and nutmeg until well mixed. Form the cheese into a ball or press in a spring form pan and serve with crackers, pita bread, or vegetable crudite. Options You can add a teaspoon or two of herbs like herbes du Provence to flavor the cheese once it has fermented or to coat the outside of a cheeseball. You can serve the cheese coated with ground or chopped nuts like hazelnuts. You can serve drizzled with a balsamic vinegar reduction.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/dairy-free-soft-cheese.html#ixzz15oq6CS5g

How to Get Your Kids to Eat More Vegetables

Ive met a few kids in my time who have never had more vegetables than a carrot stick and, if they had to guess what an artichoke is, would say its a karate move. But not my kids, of course. They eat their vegetables all the time. At least sometimes. I mean, they all go through phases of pickiness, but when its all said and done, they eat almost every vegetable there is. Whats my secret? Well, I have 10 of them Log your food habits online, and youre more likely to develop healthy eating habits. 1. Serve them raw. Seriously, have you ever eaten a raw pea? Its heaven on earth. No need for butter. Kids eat them like candy. I put a plate of raw cut-up veggies on the dinner table every nightyes, carrot sticks, but also sweet red peppers, celery, fresh peas. Cauliflower and tomatoes. 2. Let them have dip. Its not the end of the world if they have a bit of Hidden Valley Ranch dressing on their veggies (in fact, there is an organic version of Hidden Valley Ranch dressing). It does make a piece of raw broccoli really much more yummy. 3. Plant a garden. Studies show that kids who grow veggies themselves will eat almost anything. Ive seen it with my own eyes. If you are growing an organic garden, kids can eat stuff right out of the garden without rinsing. Unless its a carrot or potato or something like that (for you nongardeners, those veggies grow underground, so they are covered in dirt when you harvest them). 4. Just add butter. Organic butter, of course, but a little bit never hurt anyone. And some vegetables, like spinach or kale, need a bit of oil for their nutrients to be absorbed better into our bodies. Corn on the cobneed I say more? 5. Add them to soup. Its amazing what kids will eat when its submerged in a savory broth. If you suspect they wont like something, chop it up till its really tiny. After a half hour in the soup, it will magically disappear!

6. Make a chopped vegetable salad. Same principlecut up lots of raw veggies into cute little bits, add your familys favorite dressing (ours is a simple vinaigrette), and even add some toasted nuts, and you have a really crunchy festival of vegetables. 7. Roast them till they are crispy and golden. Take cauliflower, for instanceits a tough vegetable to love if youre a kid. But what I do is cut up a head of cauliflower, coat the tiny pieces liberally with olive oil, sprinkle with salt, and roast at 350 for about a half hour and you have little brown bits of deliciousness. You can do the same with carrots, asparagus, and lots of other good things. 8. Get them to help you prepare them. I learned this when I was shelling lima beans one day. Suddenly, kids wanted to help and they all sat on the counter and helped shell the limas. Funny, but not many ended up in the pot. Limas are surprisingly good raw. Put your kids to work. Theyll be glad you did. 9. Cover in cheese. After all, kids need calcium too. There is no harm in having a little bit of melted cheese with your veggiesespecially ones like broccoli, cauliflower, eggplant, and other unusuals. 10. Eat them yourself! Most kids Ive met who dont eat their veggies have parents who dont eat their veggiesbusted! Kids love to copy what we do, so we must do what is right for them. Turns out its right for us, too. What are your tips and tricks and techniques for getting kids to eat their vegetables?
10 Foods to Avoid if You Have an Overactive Bladder

By Paula Spencer, Caring.com senior editor

Decreasing fluids is often the first thing tried by someone seeking to control an overactive bladder. After all, if you drink less overall, you reduce the need to use the bathroom often or the chance of having an accident before you can get there. Right? Yes but if you drink too little (fewer than about eight cups a day), urine becomes concentrated, which can cause even more bladder irritation. Thats why equally important to managing bladder problems is what youre drinking and eating. Whether youre plagued by stress incontinence, prostate issues, urge incontinence, or some other form of overactive bladder syndrome (OBS), try eliminating some of the following foods and beverages. Keep a food diary to see if the change makes a difference. All of the following are known to exacerbate bladder problems in some people.

1. Avoid: Oranges, grapefruit, pineapple Citrus tends to irritate the bladder (even though, in general, its wise to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables for their healthy, vitamin-rich liquid and fiber). Beware especially of oranges, grapefruits, lemons, limes, and tangerines. Pineapple, not technically a citrus fruit (even though it often appears in the same tropical salads), is also a culprit because its highly acidic. Also avoid citrus in juice form (orange juice, grapefruit juice, lemon juice). Better: Substitute nonacidic whole fruits, such as bananas, apples, pears, and berries. 2. Avoid: Chocolate This one may be painful to chocoholics, but chocolate contains caffeine, a substance that annoys the bladder. Hot chocolate is especially counterproductive, since its in liquid form. Better: Go dark. Dark chocolate above 70 percent cocoa is more likely to satisfy a chocotooth in very small (one- to two-ounce) amounts. 3. Avoid: Coffee and black tea even decaf Most people with overactive bladder know to avoid coffee. Its a diuretic, which causes you to urinate more often, and it contains caffeine, which stimulates the bladder. The surprise: Even decaf versions have this effect. Thats because decaffeinated coffee and tea are seldom caffeinefree. (Avoid iced tea and coffee, as well as hot forms.) 4. Avoid: Hot sauce, chili peppers, wasabi Spicy nachos, hot peppers, jambalaya, kabobs, curries . . . some like it hot, hot, hot, but should not. Among the many physical effects super-spicy foods have on the body (like watering eyes and burning lips) is a tendency to irritate the lining of the bladder. Better: Choose cooled-down versions of favorite dishes, using herbs, garlic, and other strong flavors in place of spicy ones.

5. Avoid: Sugar and honey While its challenging to completely eliminate sweets, its worth cutting back, since sugars tend to stimulate the bladder. Leave the extra spoonfuls out of your cereal bowl or teacup, and read labels to avoid packaged goods that list simple sugars high in the ingredients list. Know that for some people, even artificial sweeteners (such as aspartame) irritate. Better: Try Stevia, a natural sweetener 100 times sweeter than table sugar. Or even better, aim to adapt over a couple of weeks of withdrawal to a less-sweet taste. 6. Avoid: Tomato products Tomatoes are acidic; hence their bladder-irritating quality. The effect varies by individual, but if youre vulnerable, try cutting out all tomato forms, including sauces, paste, juice, spaghetti sauce, taco sauce, and salsa. Better: Substitute mushrooms and other vegetables, a thin white sauce, beans, or other ingredients wherever youd use tomatoes or tomato sauce.

7. Avoid: Alcohol Whether in the form of wine, beer, champagne, or hard liquor, alcohol interferes with brain signals that tell you when to go. Its also a dehydrator that makes you need to go to the bathroom more. Better: Drink cranberry juice on the rocks (unless youre sensitive to cranberry; if so, you could try herbal tea on the rocks). 8. Avoid: Milk and cheese Different dairy products tend to affect people differently. For some, all dairy is a bladder-baddie. Others are bothered only by very rich and creamy milk products, such as cream cheese, sour cream, or aged cheeses. Better: Tinker to see which products you tolerate best. 9. Avoid: Energy drinks Youd think these powerhouse beverages would make you stronger and help you last longer but the source of their energy is usually caffeine, which bothers the bladder. Read labels carefully. Super Snacks: 5 Best Snacks for Energy Better: Get enough exercise and sleep to boost your energy naturally. 10. Avoid: Carbonated drinks Quenching your thirst with a carbonated beverage (colas, other flavors, fizzy water, seltzer) is counterproductive if you have an overactive bladder. The carbonation is a bladder trigger, an effect thats intensified if the drink also contains caffeine. Unfortunately, champagne must be

included in the list of carbonated drinks. In addition to the bubbles, bubbly contains alcohol, another overactive- bladder culprit. Better: Drink straight water on the rocks or flavored (flat) vitamin waters
10 Healthiest Breakfast Cereals

When I posted 10 Breakfast Cereals to Avoid I seemed to have suffered a sugar flashback; and the 1970s-swank, Henry Mancini jingle for Pink Panther Flakes has been stuck in my head ever since. The fuchsia frosted flakes were painfully pink and shamefully sweet, and thankfully, havent been seen for several decadesbut what an enduring testament to marketing for kids and the girl-pleasing power of pink sugar! Todays sock-it-to-you-with-the-sweet cereals arent much better, as evidenced by the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesitys report on cereal nutrition but at least some healthier options do exist. Reading the reports list of most nutritious cereals, I didnt expect to find products made by the same companies responsible for some of the shady cereals which ranked as most egregious, but sure enough, there they were. Which goes to show that some of these companies are indeed making healthier options, theyre just not pushing them as diligently. Cereal companies spend more money than any other packaged food category in marketing their products to children ($229 million in 2006), which is why we may be more familiar with Post Fruity Pebbles, one of the worst offenders, than Post Shredded Wheat Spoon Size Wheat n Bran, one of the best cereal choices. Although within each brand there is a wide range, Kashi ranks as the best brand overall in terms of ingredients, according to the report. If you dont see a cereal you eat in this list (number 1 being the healthiest), you can check the Rudd Centers database. 10. Natures Path: Synergy 8 Whole Grains Nutritional Score: 78 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No

Sugar Content: 13% Fiber Content: 17% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 0 9. Kashi: Shredded Wheat Autumn Wheat Nutritional Score: 78 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 13% Fiber Content: 11% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 0 8. General Mills: Fiber One Original (bran) Nutritional Score: 78 Artificial Sweeteners: Aspartame Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 0% Fiber Content: 47% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 350 7. Uncle Sam: Uncle Sam Nutritional Score: 78 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 2% Fiber Content: 18% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 2456. Kellogg: Mini-Wheats Unfrosted/Bite Size Nutritional Score: 82 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 2% Fiber Content: 10% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 17 5. Post: Shredded Wheat Spoon Size Wheat n Bran Nutritional Score: 82 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 2% Fiber Content: 14% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 0 4. Kashi: Puffs 7 Whole Grains Puffs Nutritional Score: 82 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No

Sugar Content: 0% Fiber Content: 5% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 0 3. Barbaras Bakery: Shredded Wheat Nutritional Score: 82 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 0% Fiber Content: 12% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 0 2. Post: Shredded Wheat Spoon Size Original Nutritional Score: 82 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 0% Fiber Content: 12% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 0 1. Post: Shredded Wheat Original Nutritional Score: 82 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 0% Fiber Content: 13% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 0 10. Natures Path: Synergy 8 Whole Grains Nutritional Score: 78 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 13% Fiber Content: 17% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 0 9. Kashi: Shredded Wheat Autumn Wheat Nutritional Score: 78 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 13% Fiber Content: 11% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 0

8. General Mills: Fiber One Original (bran) Nutritional Score: 78 Artificial Sweeteners: Aspartame Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 0% Fiber Content: 47% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 350 7. Uncle Sam: Uncle Sam Nutritional Score: 78 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 2% Fiber Content: 18% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 245 6. Kellogg: Mini-Wheats Unfrosted/Bite Size Nutritional Score: 82 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 2% Fiber Content: 10% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 17 5. Post: Shredded Wheat Spoon Size Wheat n Bran Nutritional Score: 82 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 2% Fiber Content: 14% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 0 4. Kashi: Puffs 7 Whole Grains Puffs Nutritional Score: 82 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 0% Fiber Content: 5% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 0 3. Barbaras Bakery: Shredded Wheat Nutritional Score: 82 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 0%

Fiber Content: 12% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 0 2. Post: Shredded Wheat Spoon Size Original Nutritional Score: 82 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 0% Fiber Content: 12% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 0 1. Post: Shredded Wheat Original Nutritional Score: 82 Artificial Sweeteners: No Artificial Food Dyes: No Sugar Content: 0% Fiber Content: 13% Sodium (Mg per 100g): 030 Ways to Detox Your Home & Body 30 Ways to Detox Your Home & Body 30-ways-to-detox-your-home-body. Imagine waking up without an ache or pain, cruising through your day with energy and ending it by enjoying a refreshing nights sleep. Then, imagine waking up to do it all over again. Think its impossible? Think again. The key is eliminating toxins from your body and your life. Toxins can leave you feeling sluggish, achy, heavy, and out-of-shape. They can also be a factor in the development of chronic diseases like cancer, arthritis, allergies, and many other serious conditions. Heres where to start: 1. Eat an organic diet as much as possible. Most foods contain harmful pesticides and genetically-modified organisms. 2. Try to make a large component of your diet raw vegetables and juices. Its easy when you eat a large salad daily and drink a freshly-made juice. 3. Engage in periodic cleanses or detox programs: one day a week, a weekend every month, or a longer detox in the spring and fall. 4. Sauna to help eliminate toxins through the skin in sweat. Of course, consult your physician prior to starting a sauna regime. 5. Stretch daily: yoga, tai chi, and qigong, are excellent. 6. Avoid chemical cleaning products in favor of natural cleaning ones. Baking soda, vinegar, or orange oil can replace almost any chemical cleaner.

7. Avoid chemical pesticides at home. Use baking soda with sugar or peppermint oil. 8. Read labels on food products and avoid those with which you are unfamiliar. 9. Avoid synthetic chemicals in personal care products and cosmetics. Read labels and avoid those ingredients with which youre unfamiliar. No label? Avoid the product. Definitely avoid any containing: parabens, diethanolamine (DEA), or phthalates. 10. Drink an ounce of wheatgrass juice daily to supplement your diet. Wheatgrass juice is nutritionally equivalent to many vegetables. 11. Take chlorella or spirulina tablets daily to supplement your diet and help round out the nutrients you . 12. Exercise for 45 minutes daily. Brisk walking, rebounding, running, cycling, cross-country skiing are excellent choices. Be sure to consult a physician prior to beginning. 13. Eat at least three of the best detoxifying foods daily. Some of the best detoxifiers include: broccoli, garlic, spinach, cabbage, sprouts, blueberries, ginger, and turmeric. 14. Exchange massages with a partner. Massage improves circulation and helps move lymph (lymph picks up toxins throughout the body so it can be eliminated). 15. Kick the habit. If you smoke or are exposed to second-hand smoke, quit it. 16. Cut back on alcohol consumption. Alcohol must be filtered by the liver, which has over 500 other functions. Even moderate drinking increases the risk of conditions like breast cancer. 17. Toss out the toxins at home and in the garage. Of course, dispose of them properly based on your communitys guidelines. 18. Add a water filter to your tap water. Even a Brita will help remove some of the impurities in your water. 19. Toss the non-stick pans. Teflon, Silverstone and other coatings emit harmful perflourochemicals (PFCs). The EPA classifies them as carcinogens. 20. Choose no-VOC paints for your home. VOCs are volatile organic compounds, many of which are linked to cancer. 21. Stop microwaving your food. Microwaving changes the protein structure of food making it potentially-harmful to your body. Microwaves also emit radiation that can be damaging to people standing near them.

22. Install a carbon monoxide detector in your home if you heat your home with gas, oil, or other type of fuel. Carbon monoxide is odorless but can cause health problems like headaches, fatigue, and even death. 23. Eliminate mold. A few drops of tea tree oil can be used on a cloth to wipe down walls, floors, and other surfaces to help kill mold. 24. Switch from sponges to natural cloths for cleaning. Most sponges have been treated with a chemical called triclosan, which is toxic to the skin and immune system. 25. Turn the heat down on your stove. When your cooking oil starts to smoke, it has become toxic to your body. Choose only cold-pressed oils for cooking since most oils have been heated to high temperatures during processing and are already toxic to the body. 26. Stop eating baked goods with artificial colors. They may look pretty but research links food colors and artificial dyes to having toxic effects on the brain and nervous system, particularly among children. 27. Stop using fragrances. Most perfumes and colognes, scented candles, plug-in air fresheners, pot pourri, laundry soap, fabric softeners and dryer sheets are loaded with toxic ingredients that have been linked to hormonal imbalances, mood swings, fatigue, brain damage, and many other symptoms. 28. Dont heat food or store it in plastic. Most plastic contains bisphenol-A (BPA) that migrates into the food stored in these containers. BPA has been linked to thyroid and other hormonal problems. 29. Dont use mothballs. Mothballs contain paradichlorobenzene which is seriously toxic. Instead choose sachets made with natural herbs and essential oils like rosemary, lavender, thyme, and mint, which are natural moth-repellants. 30. Reduce the amount of meat in your diet.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/30-ways-to-detox-your-homebody.html#ixzz15otkENiK

7 Herbs for Indigestion

Common causes for indigestion include overeating, eating too quickly, fatty or greasy foods, too much caffeine, too much alcohol, too much chocolate, nervousness, and emotional trauma. Translation: The holidays. Indigestion, also known as dyspepsia, is a term used to describe one or more symptoms including a feeling of fullness during a meal, uncomfortable fullness after a meal, and burning or pain in the upper abdomen; it may cause bloating, belching and nausea. Woohoo! If that last wafer-thin mint has you cowering on the couch and emitting noises only a mommy hog could love, you may want to try one of these natural aids for indigestion. Herbs have been used for millennia to treat any matter of ailments, and indigestion seems to be one woe that is well-suited for natural remedies. Fennel/ Fennel Seed There is a reason Indian restaurants serve the fennel seed mix, Mukhwas, after dinner. Fennel seed has long been used to help fight gas, cramps, acid indigestion, and help ease spasms in the intestinal tract. Fennel has a long history of use in both food and medicine. Traditionally, it is said to act as a carminative, which means that it helps the body expel gas and sooth indigestion. Fennel is also a common ingredient in gripe water, a traditional (and very alcoholic, by the way) preparation used for treating infant colic. Fennel leaves can be used to make tea; NYU Langone Medical Center says that a typical dose of fennel is 11 1/2 teaspoons of seeds per day. Lemon Balm Lemon balm (commonly referred to as Melissa, how pretty) is a member of the mint family and has been a favorite since the Middle Ages for reducing stress and anxiety, abetting sleep, sparking appetite, and easing indigestion. These days, lemon balm is commonly mixed with other calming herbs to help promote relaxation. Evidence suggests that lemon balm, in combination with other herbs, may help treat indigestionalthough just soothing the stress alone can sometimes help with dyspepsia.

To reduce indigestion, flatulence, or bloating, the University of Maryland Medical Center recommends: Capsules: Take 300 500 mg dried lemon balm, 3 times daily or as needed. Tea: 1.5 4.5 grams (1/4 1 teaspoonful) of dried lemon balm herb in hot water. Steep and drink up to 4 times daily. Tincture: 2 3 mL (40 90 drops), 3 times daily Turmeric Turmeric is the little minx of the spice drawer; super bright, spicy, and boasting a broad array of health claims. You may know it as the main spice in curry and the one which imparts that intense golden glow, but turmeric is also used for health remedies. In traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric has been used to aid digestion and liver function, relieve arthritis pain, and regulate menstruation; it has also traditionally been used for heartburn, stomach pain, diarrhea, intestinal gas, and stomach bloating. According to the NYU Langone Medical Center, turmerics superpower comes in the form of the substance, curcumin, which, among other properties, may stimulate gallbladder contractions. One double-blind, placebo-controlled study showed that 87% percent of the curcumin group experienced full or partial symptom relief from dyspepsia as compared to 53% of the placebo group. The National Institutes of Health recommends a dosage of 500 mg of turmeric four times daily for dyspepsia. Ginger Ginger has long been used as a medicine in Asian, Indian, and Arabic herbal traditions. In China, ginger has been used to aid all types of digestion disorders for more than 2,000 years. Fast forward to modern medicine, and health care professionals still commonly recommend ginger to help prevent or treat nausea and vomiting. It is also used as a digestive aid for mild stomach upset. Germanys Commission E has approved ginger as a treatment for indigestion and motion sickness. Curiously, while most antinausea drugs work on the brain and the inner ear, ginger seems to act directly on the stomach. For most purposes, the standard dosage of powdered ginger is 1 to 4 g daily, divided into 2 to 4 doses per day. (To prevent motion sickness, you should aim to begin treatment 1 or 2 days before the trip and continue it throughout the period of travel.) Artichoke Leaf If you have ever wondered what in the world were those Italians thinking when they invented the artichoke apritif liqueur, Cynar, heres you answer. In traditional European medicine, the leaves of the artichoke plant (not the leaves of the bud, which is the part that we eat) were used as a diuretic to stimulate the kidneys and as well as the flow of bile from the liver and gallbladder; which plays a starring role in digestion. Over the past century much research has been done looking into the traditional medicinal uses of the artichoke plant; conclusions suggest that the plant does indeed stimulate the kidney and

gallbladder. In the mid-twentieth century, Italian scientists isolated a compound from artichoke leaf called cynarin, which appeared to duplicate many of the effects of whole artichoke. Salute! In 2003, a large study evaluated artichoke leaf as a treatment for dyspepsia; artichoke leaf extract proved significantly more effective than placebo for alleviating symptoms of functional dyspepsia. Germanys Commission E has authorized the use of artichoke leaf use for dyspeptic problemsthey recommend 6 grams of the dried herb or its equivalent per day, usually divided into 3 doses. Artichoke leaf extracts should be taken according to label instructions. Peppermint Peppermint is often used to soothe an upset stomach or to aid in digestion. Because of its subtle numbing effect, it has been used to treat everything from headaches, skin irritations, and anxiety to nausea, diarrhea, menstrual cramps, and flatulence. Peppermint oil seems to be helpful for a variety of conditions that involve spasm of the intestinal tract. Most studies have involved irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), for which peppermint oil has shown considerable promise. Peppermint relaxes the muscles that struggle with digestive gas and improve the flow of bile, which the body uses to digest fats. In studies on using peppermint to treat IBS, there seems to be a trend indicating mild effectiveness in the reduction of some symptoms, especially flatulence and abdominal pain and distension. However, if your symptoms of indigestion are related to a condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD, peppermint should not be used. Cayenne Okay, this one is confusing: doesnt spicy food cause stomach aches? According to the folks at NYU, evidence suggests that oral use of cayenne can reduce the pain of dyspepsia! Counterintuitive, at best, but apparently hot peppers dont actually inflame the tissues they contact; in fact, hot peppers arent even harmful for ulcers. Rather, they merely produce sensations similar to those caused by actual damage. Oral use of capsaicin seems to reduce discomfort in the stomach. In a double-blind study, individuals with dyspepsia were given either 2.5 g daily of red pepper powder (divided up and taken prior to meals) or placebo for 5 weeks. 21 By the third week of treatment, individuals taking red pepper were experiencing significant improvements in pain, bloating, and nausea as compared to placebo, and these relative improvements lasted through the end of the study. For treatment of dyspepsia, cayenne may be taken at a dosage of 0.5 to 1.0 g three times daily (prior to meals).

Common causes for indigestion include overeating, eating too quickly, fatty or greasy foods, too much caffeine, too much alcohol, too much chocolate, nervousness, and emotional trauma. Translation: The holidays. Indigestion, also known as dyspepsia, is a term used to describe one or more symptoms including a feeling of fullness during a meal, uncomfortable fullness after a

meal, and burning or pain in the upper abdomen; it may cause bloating, belching and nausea. Woohoo! If that last wafer-thin mint has you cowering on the couch and emitting noises only a mommy hog could love, you may want to try one of these natural aids for indigestion. Herbs have been used for millennia to treat any matter of ailments, and indigestion seems to be one woe that is well-suited for natural remedies. Fennel/ Fennel Seed There is a reason Indian restaurants serve the fennel seed mix, Mukhwas, after dinner. Fennel seed has long been used to help fight gas, cramps, acid indigestion, and help ease spasms in the intestinal tract. Fennel has a long history of use in both food and medicine. Traditionally, it is said to act as a carminative, which means that it helps the body expel gas and sooth indigestion. Fennel is also a common ingredient in gripe water, a traditional (and highly alcoholic) preparation used for treating infant colic. Fennel leaves can be used to make tea; NYU Langone Medical Center says that a typical dose of fennel is 11 1/2 teaspoons of seeds per day. Lemon Balm Lemon balm (commonly referred to as Melissa, how pretty) is a member of the mint family and has been a favorite since the Middle Ages for reducing stress and anxiety, abetting sleep, sparking appetite, and easing indigestion. These days, lemon balm is commonly mixed with other calming herbs to help promote relaxation. Evidence suggests that lemon balm, in combination with other herbs, may help treat indigestionalthough just soothing the stress alone can sometimes help with dyspepsia. To reduce indigestion, flatulence, or bloating, the University of Maryland Medical Center recommends: Capsules: Take 300 500 mg dried lemon balm, 3 times daily or as needed. Tea: 1.5 4.5 grams (1/4 1 teaspoonful) of dried lemon balm herb in hot water. Steep and drink up to 4 times daily. Tincture: 2 3 mL (40 90 drops), 3 times daily Turmeric Turmeric is the little minx of the spice drawer; super bright, spicy, and boasting a broad array of health claims. You may know it as the main spice in curry and the one which imparts that intense golden glow, but turmeric is also used for health remedies. In traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric has been used to aid digestion and liver function, relieve arthritis pain, and regulate menstruation; it has also traditionally been used for heartburn, stomach pain, diarrhea, intestinal gas, and stomach bloating. According to the NYU Langone Medical Center, turmerics superpower comes in the form of the substance, curcumin, which, among other properties, may stimulate gallbladder contractions. One double-blind, placebo-controlled study showed that 87% percent of the curcumin group

experienced full or partial symptom relief from dyspepsia as compared to 53% of the placebo group. The National Institutes of Health recommends a dosage of 500 mg of turmeric four times daily for dyspepsia. Ginger Ginger has long been used as a medicine in Asian, Indian, and Arabic herbal traditions. In China, ginger has been used to aid all types of digestion disorders for more than 2,000 years. Fast forward to modern medicine, and health care professionals still commonly recommend ginger to help prevent or treat nausea and vomiting. It is also used as a digestive aid for mild stomach upset. Germanys Commission E has approved ginger as a treatment for indigestion and motion sickness. Curiously, while most antinausea drugs work on the brain and the inner ear, ginger seems to act directly on the stomach. For most purposes, the standard dosage of powdered ginger is 1 to 4 g daily, divided into 2 to 4 doses per day. (To prevent motion sickness, you should aim to begin treatment 1 or 2 days before the trip and continue it throughout the period of travel.) Artichoke Leaf If you have ever wondered what in the world were those Italians thinking when they invented the artichoke apritif liqueur, Cynar, heres you answer. In traditional European medicine, the leaves of the artichoke plant (not the leaves of the bud, which is the part that we eat) were used as a diuretic to stimulate the kidneys and as well as the flow of bile from the liver and gallbladder; which plays a starring role in digestion. Over the past century much research has been done looking into the traditional medicinal uses of the artichoke plant; conclusions suggest that the plant does indeed stimulate the kidney and gallbladder. In the mid-twentieth century, Italian scientists isolated a compound from artichoke leaf called cynarin, which appeared to duplicate many of the effects of whole artichoke. Salute! In 2003, a large study evaluated artichoke leaf as a treatment for dyspepsia; artichoke leaf extract proved significantly more effective than placebo for alleviating symptoms of functional dyspepsia. Germanys Commission E has authorized the use of artichoke leaf use for dyspeptic problemsthey recommend 6 grams of the dried herb or its equivalent per day, usually divided into 3 doses. Artichoke leaf extracts should be taken according to label instructions. Peppermint Peppermint is often used to soothe an upset stomach or to aid in digestion. Because of its subtle numbing effect, it has been used to treat everything from headaches, skin irritations, and anxiety to nausea, diarrhea, menstrual cramps, and flatulence. Peppermint oil seems to be helpful for a variety of conditions that involve spasm of the intestinal tract. Most studies have involved irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), for which peppermint oil has shown considerable promise.

Peppermint relaxes the muscles that struggle with digestive gas and improve the flow of bile, which the body uses to digest fats. In studies on using peppermint to treat IBS, there seems to be a trend indicating mild effectiveness in the reduction of some symptoms, especially flatulence and abdominal pain and distension. However, if your symptoms of indigestion are related to a condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD, peppermint should not be used. Cayenne Okay, this one is confusing: doesnt spicy food cause stomach aches? According to the folks at NYU, evidence suggests that oral use of cayenne can reduce the pain of dyspepsia! Counterintuitive, at best, but apparently hot peppers dont actually inflame the tissues they contact; in fact, hot peppers arent even harmful for ulcers. Rather, they merely produce sensations similar to those caused by actual damage. Oral use of capsaicin seems to reduce discomfort in the stomach. In a double-blind study, individuals with dyspepsia were given either 2.5 g daily of red pepper powder (divided up and taken prior to meals) or placebo for 5 weeks. 21 By the third week of treatment, individuals taking red pepper were experiencing significant improvements in pain, bloating, and nausea as compared to placebo, and these relative improvements lasted through the end of the study. For treatment of dyspepsia, cayenne may be taken at a dosage of 0.5 to 1.0 g three times daily (prior to meals). For these and all herbs, do not exceed dosage recommendations; and be sure to consult with your doctor if you are pregnant, nursing, or taking any medication.

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