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A new twist on the use of ALIBATA

Boni Comandante Jr, Ph.D.

http://www.baybayin360.org/

The use of ALIBATA in reference to the Baybayin Script has found a new twist. This should redeem Paul Versoza (1914) from his lapses 1 .

We start with what can be found in one of the early dictionaries printed in Pinamahayan, Pila (now Victoria) Laguna.

printed in Pinamahayan, Pila (now Victoria) Laguna. The Tagala language was referred to as Baybayin as
printed in Pinamahayan, Pila (now Victoria) Laguna. The Tagala language was referred to as Baybayin as

The Tagala language was referred to as Baybayin as differentiated to the Spanish orthography or Castillian a. b. c. It starts with the letter “A “and compares it with Hebrew, Greek and Arabic. A quick comparison of the name-word meanings gives us some revealing insights:

compares it with Hebrew, Greek and Arabic. A quick comparison of the name-word meanings gives us

While “aleph” connotes the animal ox (rightfully the call of an ox), Baybayin script “aa” means a call (buffalo call sound). Beth-“bâbâ” gets even closer. A native Visayan would understand the meaning of “bâbâ” as the mouth while Tagalogs would say it’s the chin. We clearly see that aa baba is just the equivalent of aleph beth.

see that aa baba is just the equivalent of aleph beth. © Comandante 2011 1

©Comandante 2011

1 http://www.baybayin.com/paul-r-verzosas-pangbansang-titik-nang-pilipinas-how-baybayin-was- named-alibata/