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THE AMERICAN MINERALOGIST, VOL. 56, SEPTEMBER_OCTOBER, 1971 POIKILITIC ALBITE IN THE MICROCLINE OF GRANITIC
THE
AMERICAN
MINERALOGIST,
VOL. 56, SEPTEMBER_OCTOBER,
1971
POIKILITIC
ALBITE
IN
THE
MICROCLINE
OF GRANITIC
PEGMATITES1
D. Jenolm Frsunn, Departmentof Geology,Arizona
State University, Tempe,Arizona 85281
ABSTRACT
-small anhedrai crystals of albite occur as unoriented and apparently corroded units en-
closed in the large perthitic microcline crystals of some granite pegmatites. Such albite is
called loikiJitic albite (PA) because the resulting texture is clearly poikilitic; in similar
fashion one may speak ol the perth,i.tic albite that occurs
in microcline perthite. Textural
evidence demonstrates that the PA crystals formed more or less contemporaneously with
the host microcline crystals, and in some casesdefinitely earlier. In several deposits PA is
cut by later perthitic albite (vein type). Thus not all of the latter can have been formed b_v-
a simole, relatively static unmixing process; significant transportation of perthitic albite
material has occurred. These relationships deny the statement by Laves and Soldatos
(1963) that the PA is developed by the action of later Na-bearing solutions.
IrvrnooucrroN
From an extensivestudy of pegmatite perthites (27 out of 28 samples)
madeby single-crystal(precession)X-ray techniques,Laves and Soldatos
(1963)interpret the relation of the perthitic albite to the host K-feldspar.
This involves whether the latter was monoclinic or triclinic at the time of
exsolution or recrystallization. They arrive at the following sequenceof
five stages:
f. Formation of large monoclinic crystals containing Na-feldspar
dissolvedin K-feldspar.
II.
With sufficiently slow cooling, unmixing yields chiefly macro-
perthite (vein or braid) from the monoclinic sanidine host. The
growth surfacesof the albite are roughly parallel to [c]. It is pos-
sible that somemicroperthite (string) forms at this stage,and in
some casesas this continues to {orm it
may develop into vein
perthite.
III.
With more cooling,at about 500oC,the K-feldspar is converted to
"orthoclase," a submicroscopically-twinned material containing
triclinic domains. At this stage microperthite (film) is produced,
as well as Type I cryptoperthite (perthite from the monoclinic
state).
I This paper was submitted to another journal in August 1968while the writer was still
at the University of Chicago. It lay buried in Europe 22 months without efiective action
being taken on it. ft was finally returned to the writer only after the threat that extteme
measureswould be taken to recover it. I am grateful to Philip II. Abelson, Bditor
of Scimce,
for helping me.in this matter, and to Richa.rd H. Jahns, Stanford University,
for suggestions
Ieading to improvemenl" in this presentation.
,
:
t769
1770 D. JEROME FISHER IV. With continued cooling the K-feldspar becomes"more triclinic," and cryptoperthite
1770
D. JEROME FISHER
IV.
With continued cooling the K-feldspar becomes"more triclinic,"
and cryptoperthite Type II (perthite from the triclinic state) may
develop.
V.
In a final stage plate perthite (Laves and Soldatos, 1962) nay
form by recrystallization.
No attempt will be made here to repeat the arguments which Laves
and Soldatosuseto support their theory, but I admit that many of them
are cogent.They regard their five stagesas the "normal case"of perthite
development. But
they recognizethat replacementphenomenain many
casesmay modify the results of the unmixing describedby them. They
list two such possibilitiesregardedas limits or extremes:
(a)
Albitization by Na-ions, chiefly from outside sources,replacing the
K-ions with substantially no changein orientation of the AlSfuO8-
structure formed originally as described in Stage I. This process
leadsto patch perthite and so-calledchessboardalbite. Many inter-
mediate statesand degreesof replacementmay occur.
(b)
Formation of "cleavelandite." While the albitization describedin
a) can proceedto varying degreeswithout the help of "solutions,"
the developmentof "cleavelandite" appearsto dependon the action
of Na-bearing solutions.Laves and Soldatosstate that this process
is impressively verified by the observationsof Fisher (1942, 1945),
Adamson (1942), and Andersen (1928).
Potrrr,rrrc
Arsrrn
The remarks in this paper are primarily concernedwith the statement
made in (b) above. First let me make clear that the use of the term
"cleavelandite" asemployedthere is not desirable.Typical cleavelandite,
which is so commonly presentin any but the simplestgranitic pegmatite,
consistsof albite growing in near-parallelplaty massesof definite mega-
scopicsize.It
according to
commonly showscurvedlamellaethat aregenerally twinned
the albite law (Fisher, 1968). Distinctly different are the
small, isolated, unoriented crystals called "cleavelandite" by Laves and
Soldatos; I prefer to designate thesepoikiliti,c al,bitet(PA), becausethe
resulting texture is clearly poikilitic (Fisher, 1945).Admittedly this is a
minor point, since these PA
crystals are commonly platy
or almost
acicular and generally shoy albite twinning; some occur in bunched-up
masses,but because they are unoriented rather than in near-parallel
growths even theseare really not the sameas typical cleavelandite.
r LavesandSoldatos(1963,p. 93)describetwo kindsof poikiliticalbite.I havenot
observedtleir "isometric poikilite."What they designateas "cleavelandite,"showing
albitetwinningasin theirFig.8,in thepresentpaperis translatedasPA (poikiliticalbite)
r771 POIKII.ITIC ALBITE The statement in (b) above cannot be properly attributed to the three
r771
POIKII.ITIC
ALBITE
The statement in (b) above cannot be properly attributed to the three
cited authors.2 None of these investigators considers the PA
to have
formed by the action of Na-bearing solutions,but instead they regard it
as a direct precipitate from the pegmatite "magma" in its early stages,
with many or all of the crystals antedating the formation of the vein
perthitic albite.
Crystals of PA up to about 5 mm in length are known in the K-feldspar
(microcline) crystals of granitic pegmatitesin three continents.Excellent
exampleshave been describedby Laves and Soldatos (1963) as well as
the three authors mentioned in paragraph (b) above. Photomicrographs
are given by Rogers and Kerr (1942, Fig. 209) and by Drescher-Kaden
(1948,Fig. 59; from Southbury, notLouthboury, Conn.; seeCameron el
al.,1954,p. 341). Drescher-Kadenstates (basep. 75):
Ebenso zweifelsfrei sind Teile des eingeschlossenenPlagioklasesvom
Bandperthit (odervon den ihm voraufgehendenLiisungen) angefressen
und abgelaugt.
And in the caption of his figurehe refersto the "older plagioclaseinclusion
in the microcline."
CnBssnolno Ar.nrru
What I regardasthe clinching argument in this matter is outlined in an
earlier report (Fischer, 1945).This publication is relatively inaccessible;
hence the gist of the pertinent statementsis ofiered here.
High up on the north wall of the High Climb mine in the Black Hills
(Fisher, 1942; Sheridan, 1955) cleavageblocks nearly 30 cm long have
been broken ofi from much larger single crystals of perthitic microcline.
These crystals are cut by coarse,veinlike massesof quartz-albite3rock.
Along contactswith suchveins the microclineis completely albitized for a
thickness of two to four cm. The albite and microcline are in parallel
position as shownby the continuity of the basal cleavageacrossthe faces
of specimens.A thin section7|X9
cm was prepared parallel to the basal
cleavageof such a specimen,and from it the photomacrograph shown as
Figure 1A was made. Four photomicrographs of selectedareas in this
section appear as Figures 1B-E. It should be realized that a vein-like
mass of quartz and albite formerly extended roughly parallel to (010)
just below the base (long side) of Figure 1A.
It is abundantly clear from the field and thin-section evidencethat a
3
Fisher (1942).Howeverthisalbiteprob-
Earliertermedquartz-cleavelanditerockby
ablyshouldnot bereferredto ascleavelandite,Smsustrittu (Fisher,1968).

2 In givingad abstractof theLavesandSoldatos (1963)paper,thissameerroneous interpretationhasbeenpreservedin Tr<iger(1967).

1772 D. JEROME FISHER & €s ati s fi qf.
1772
D. JEROME FISHER
&
€s
ati
s
fi
qf.
"-i*'l -rl*
"-i*'l -rl*

r773

PO]KILITIC ALBITE U lEl
PO]KILITIC
ALBITE
U
lEl
1774 D. JEROME FISEER "Na-front" invaded the microcline, replaced its K, and yielded this beautiful
1774
D. JEROME FISEER
"Na-front" invaded the microcline, replaced its K, and yielded this
beautiful example of chessboardalbite This was simply a type of ion-
exchangereaction involving these two alkali metals, with at most only
very slight changesin the AlSiaO3-framework. Somemuscovite is present
(Fig. 1E), but there is no evidencethat it
the K releasedin this reaction; certainly
was producedwith the aid of
this specimen does not show
nearly enoughmuscovite to account for all this K.
The albitization took placestarting from the baseof Figure 1A and ex-
tending upward. rt proceeded along surfacesor incipient fissureswhose
traceswereapproximately the short sideof the figure,producing material
like vein perthite. As thesealbite laminae were extendedthey broadened
somewhat,and where closely-enoughspacedthey gradually coalescedto
form patch perthite. Along their surfacesof juncture the twinning la-
mellae are offset, giving the typical chessboardtexture.
The extremely sinuous character of the boundary between the chess-
board albite and the perthitic microclineis made clearin Figures1A, B,
and C. Theseviews also show how individual units of the chessboardal-
bite tend to becomecoarserwith increasingdistancefrom the microcline.
But the outstanding feature relative to the presentdiscussionis the pres-
enceof PA in all four of the photomicrographs. It is most pronounced
in Figure 1D, less so in Figures 18, E and only two small crystals are
visible along the left edge of Figure 1C. The PA has two outstanding
characteristics:1) the crystals are diversely oriented; i.e., poikilitic with-
in the host, with no tendency to line up with any other feldspar, and 2)
they are anhedral, and generally appear to be corroded or partially re-
sorbed.
The perthitic albite, the chessboardalbite, and the PA all appear to be
of essentiallythe samecomposition, An 0-5, which is as closeas one can
determine the composition of albite by optical (U-stage)work, according
to the data in Burri et al. (1967). f considerit highly unlikely that the
occurrenceof albite in thesethree different manifestationscan be related
to any significant compositionaldifferences.Albite which replacesmicro-
cline tends to exist in parallel orientation to it; in fact this is the main
criterion for assumingthat replacementhas occurred.Such albite should
not be confusedwith that PA, or with polycrystalline albite of a later
generation that may be fairly common asveins cutting
acrossthe perthi-
tic microcline. The relationships shown in Figure 1D indicate that
the
PA did not replace the chessboardalbite. Such PA is common in the
perthitic microcline of the pegmatities of the Black Hills and other re-
gions,as is documentedherein. A dozen or more PA crystals are present
in the upper part of Figure 1A completely surrounded by the perthitic
microcline,hencethey must have beenpresent in the perthitic microcline
POIKILIT]CALBITE 1775 which was replacedby the chessboardalbite. It must be concludedthat, contraryto the
POIKILIT]CALBITE
1775
which was replacedby the chessboardalbite. It must be concludedthat,
contraryto the ratherinvolvedexplanationof Lavesand Soldatos(1963),
suchcrystals representoneof the earliestof pegmatite minerals in the K-
feldsparunit. Sheridan(1955,p. 87) notes that while "the albite of the
matrix appears to replace microcline-perthite in some specimens, in
others the microcline replaces and veins the albite of the matrix and
poikilitically includes crystals of 'cleavelandite'," but he says nothing
regarding the time of formation of thesesmall poikilitic "cleavelandite"
crystals.
Exaupr-Bs
Becausethe large thin-sectionfrom which Figure 1A wasmade is neces-
sarily of greater than standard thickness, a normal thin section was
ground from the samesampleand from it the photomicrographs of Fig-
ures2-4 wereprepared.The PA crystalsshownin Figures28 and 38 were
studied on the U-stage and found to be of composition An 0-5. The
crystal shown in Figure 28 is a dual twin after the Carlsbad A law, and
that in Figure 38 is polysynthetic according to the albite law. These
photomicrographsreveal the anhedral, even corroded,borders of the PA
crystals. The discontinuity of individual units of the chessboardalbite
twins at their contacts with the PA or the perthitic microcline is clearly
shownin Figures3B and 4, fortifying the thesisthat the chessboardalbite
is younger than either of the other two feldspars. The relationships
shownin Figure 28 arehighly incompatible with the notion that the PA
was formed by replacementof the perthitic microcline: why should the
introduction of Na (or indeed of all the componentsof albite) causethe
replacementof the microcline Iattice in every possibleorientation except
the one that would involve a minimum rearrangement of the AISLO8-
groups?
Figure 3 showsthe only observedcasewhere a PA crystal is cut in two
by the chessboardalbite. Note that the Iarger remnant (on the right) is
entirely surroundedby chessboardalbite, with the traces of the respec-
tive (010) planesnearly perpendicular to eachother, whereasthe smaller
remnant projects into the perthitic microcline. It is clear that the indi-
vidual units of the chessboardalbite are interrupted at the PA except
along the tiny tip at the left end of the larger PA remnant. This kind of
discontinuity, indicating that the chessboardalbite on oppositesidesof a
remnant of PA or of perthitic microclinegrewfrom different directionsand
sofrom different seeds,alsois very clearin Figure 4. The lower sideof the
PA crystal in Figure 48 is spangledwith shredsof muscovite, and to the
right of this crystal are two linear areas of muscovite shreds that may
mark the locations of former PA individuals. However it should be em-
t776 D, JEROME FISHER Frc. 2. Photomicrographs at two scales (A and B) from a
t776
D, JEROME
FISHER
Frc. 2. Photomicrographs at two scales (A and B) from a standard-size thin-section
ground from the same sample as used for Fig. 1. Shows a poikilitic albite (PA) crystal
Iargely in a microcline remnant, but with perthitic albite cutting across its left end. The
black band along the lower rim of the PA crystal in Fig. 28 seemsto be apatite.
POIKILITIC ALBITE I'rc. 3. Photomicrographs at two scales (A and B) from a standard-size thin-section
POIKILITIC
ALBITE
I'rc.
3. Photomicrographs
at
two scales (A and B)
from
a standard-size thin-section
ground from the same sample as used for Fig. 1. Shows a PA crystal cut in two by chess-
board aibite; see text for detailed information.
1778 D. JEROME F]SHER (b) Frc. 4. Two photomicrographs from a stanrlard-size thin section ground
1778
D. JEROME F]SHER
(b)
Frc. 4. Two photomicrographs from a stanrlard-size thin section ground from the same
sample as used for l-ig. 1. Fig. 4a shows a remnant of perthitic microcline in chessboard
albite. Along the middle of the bottom edge appears the right end of the PA crystal rvhich
is shown in the left-center of Fig. 4b. In this view note how the individuals of the chess-
board albite are interrupted bv the PA. Seefurther discussion in the text.
POIKILITIC ALBITE 1779 phasizedthat the associationof shreddymuscovitewith the bordersof the PA crystals (note for
POIKILITIC ALBITE
1779
phasizedthat the associationof shreddymuscovitewith the bordersof the
PA crystals (note for example the two crystals crossingthe upper right
and lower left cornersof Fig. 28; seeFig. 2A) is the exceptional,not the
ordinary, occurrence.
Figure 5A showsthe only observedcasewhere a PA individual (nearly
horizontal acrossthe middle of the view) is divided into two units through
partial replacementby microcline. Here one of the PA remnants is very
slightly turned from parallel orientation with the other, but the twinning
matchesup sonicely that there is no doubt that they onceconstituted a
single (twinned) crystal. When looking at this picture one is strongly re-
minded of Adamson (1942,Fig. 2 on PI. IV). The Iower of the two nearly
parallel crystals of PA that extend horizontally acrossthe middle of Fig-
ure 58 containsfour vein-like stringersof perthitic albite projecting half-
way acrossit,
Figure 6 shows corrosion and veining of PA by perthitic albite. This
PA is unusual in that it is twinned according to three laws: albite (the
polysynthetic twinning in the lower half of the crystal shownon the right
sideof Fig. 68), Roc Tourn6 (the two units shown on the left sideof Fig.
6B), and Carlsbad (ttre ligtrt unit in the lower part
of the right end of the
crystal of Fig. 68 along with its upper part). Both Figure 6 and Figure 7
representa sampleof perthitic feldsparfrom the BeecherNo. 2 pegmatite
(Longview mine) in the Black Hills (Fisher , 1942;Pageet ol. 1953).The
PA crystal in Figure 7, twinned on the albite law, is not only cut sub-
stantially in two by perthitic albite, but its right-hand part is slightly ro-
tated from parallelism with the main left-hand portion. The right
edgeof
the remnant on the right is corroded by another perthitic albite vein.
I have six photomicrographsof microclinesfrom the Custer Mt. Lode
(Fisher, 1945; Page et aI., 1953) all showing excellent examplesof an-
hedralPA cut by perthitic albite, but hereonly oneis reproducedasFigure
8. This PA is a polysynthetic twin (albite law) that hasbeencorrodedand
completely severedby the perthitic albite. Clearly the crystal was not
broken in two and the two parts shovedaway from eachother, because
the adjacent ends of the two parts do not match. Further, there is no
indication of bending or other deformation in the PA. And it seems
hardly reasonableto assume that microcline first
cut through the PA
unit, and that it was later completely replacedby perthitic albite. The
perthitic albite cutting the upper part of the PA crystal comprisestwo
units, and the two sets of albite twins are offset from
each other as is
typical of chessboardalbite.
Andersen(1928,p. 153)notesthat very often the PA is penetratedby
albite of the vein perthite; thus the vein perthite cannot have been
formed by exsolutionin the solid state, but must have grown from circu-
1780 D. JEROME FISEER Frc. 5. Photomicrographs from a perthitic microciine crystal from the lIigh
1780
D. JEROME FISEER
Frc. 5. Photomicrographs from a perthitic microciine crystal from the lIigh Climb
Lode. Fig. 5a shows a PA crystal split into two corroded units by the microcline. The PA
crystal
of Fig.
5b
is cut
by four
veinlike
masses of perthitic albite extending from the
perthitic microcline.
POIKILITIC ALBITE (b) Frc. 6a. Microcline (light gray) with its perthitic albite (white) cutting across
POIKILITIC
ALBITE
(b)
Frc.
6a. Microcline
(light
gray)
with
its perthitic
albite
(white)
cutting
across an
anhedral crystal of PA twinned according to albite, Carlsbad, and Roc Tourn6 laws. Fig.
6b shows the enlarged right center part of Fig. 6A Beecher no. 2 pegmatite, Black Hills.
1782 D. TEROME FISHER (b) I-rc. 7. Photomicrographs at fir'o scales (a and b) showing
1782
D. TEROME FISHER
(b)
I-rc.
7. Photomicrographs
at
fir'o
scales (a and
b)
showing
relationships
microcline and two generations of albite. Beecher no. 2 pegmatite, Black Hills.
POIKILTTIC ALBITE r783 Frc. 8. Perthitic microcline enclosing a corroded crystal of PA that has
POIKILTTIC ALBITE
r783
Frc. 8. Perthitic
microcline enclosing a corroded crystal of PA that has been cut in two b-v
perthitic albite. Custer Mt. Lode, Black Hills.
Iating solutions. Adamson (1942,p. 31) agrees.However it is clear that
while this perthitic albite asa result of exsolutionmay developinitially as
tiny
specksevenly distrjbuted throughout the microcline, such a condi-
tion is not observedduring thin-section study. fnstead the perthitic al-
bite has aggregatedinto sheetsor vein-like massesthrough diffusion in
the solid state. Thus presumably sometransportation of the materlal of
the perthitic albite must have taken place. When perthites which have
beenhomogenizedby heating as dry melts are allowed to cool, no exsolu-
tion is observed.But accordingto Richard H. Jahns (personalcommuni-
cation) subsolidusdifiusion can occur rapidly over large domains under
Iaboratory conditions if water under pressureis present. Relationships
very similar to thosehere describedhave beenachievedexperimentally in
only five days.
In the description of the Hugo pegmatite (Norton et al., 1962), the
presenceof PA in perthite is noted for intermediate zones3 and 5 (see
their fig. 30), and possibly in 6. There also appearsto be a crystal of PA
in the center of the photomicrograph from zone 5 perthite shown by Or-
ville (1967,Fig. 1).
Through the kindnessof ProfessorT. F. W. Barth, I was able to study
one of Andersen'sthin sections (A 23-714a)from which he
prepared the
photomicrograph shown as his Plate VI, Figure 1 (Andersen, 1928E.An
1784 D. TEROME FIS]IER Frc. 9 Perthitic albite invading a corroded crystal of PA in
1784
D. TEROME FIS]IER
Frc.
9
Perthitic
albite invading
a corroded crystal of PA
in microcline. Tangen, Norway.
Frc
10. Corroded poikiiitic albite crystal surrounded
by microcline. Tangen, Nonvay.
POIKILITIC ALBITE enlargedview of the PA crystal that appearsabovethe center of his figure is shown
POIKILITIC
ALBITE
enlargedview of the PA crystal that appearsabovethe center of his figure
is shown here as Figure 9. This corroded crystal (a dual albite twin) lies
within microcline and has been invaded by a mass of perthitic albite.
Similar relationships appear elsewherein this same thin-section, which
also yielded the photomicrograph reproduced as Figure 10. Here a cor-
roded PA crystal of unusual appearanceis completely surrounded by
microcline which Iacks pericliae twinning in the lower part of the view.
The lower two-thirds of the PA crystal is a polysynthetic albite twin,
whereasthe two major parts in its upper half constitute a Carlsbadtwin.
The dark portion at the top of the crystal and the nearly parallel dark
portions in its lower half form a Roc Tourn6 twin.
CoNcr,usroxs
In summary, the explanation by Laves and Soldatos (1963) that the
PA in granitic pegmatites was introduced by late-stageNa-bearing solu-
tions is here regarded as untenable. They
state:
"Na-bearing solutions may enter into the perthitic microcline leading
to the solution of K-feldspar and the deposition of Na-feldspar. Since
the-.K-feldspar is especially unstable in the presenceof Na-bearing
solutions, it is replaced, whereas there is no particular driving force
present to causethe replacement of the Na-feldspar of the vein per-
thite by the Na-feldspar of the PA. Therefore the PA will advancein
the microcline, in placesgrowing around the vein perthite present.and
the latter will only locally recrystallize in the new PA orientation."
Each of these three sentencescontains statements open to question.
Why must "solution of K-feldspar" be inferred? Why not postulate
simply an ion-exchangetype of reaction with Na replacing K? Regarding
the last part of the secondsentence,Na-feldspar apparently doesreplace
Na-feldspar,or at leastcausesit to assumea new orientation, asshownby
veins of perthitic albite transectingPA, and by chessboardalbite cutting
acrossPA (Fig. 3). But I take particular exception to the final sentence.
What actually happens when Na-bearing solutions enter microcline is
shown in Figure 1. Not only doesthe K-feldspar changeto Na-feldspar,
but the result is non-poikilitic albite-in
fact albite in parallel growth, in
this casechessboardalbite.Emmonsand Mann (1953,p. 47) note that in
Wisconsingranites where microcline is replacedby plagioclase "it is nor-
mal for the ensuingplagioclaseto inherit the albite twin lamellae of the
microcline almost lamella for lamella."
Laves and Soldatos(1963)go on to say:
"Andersen noted that the PA crystals are often not bounded by
sharp crystal faces,but rather appear to be eaten into or corroded

1785

1786 D. TEROMEFISHER by the microcline.To this it shouldbestatedthat onecannotunder- stand how, during the albitization
1786
D. TEROMEFISHER
by the microcline.To this it shouldbestatedthat onecannotunder-
stand how, during the albitization by vein perthite postulated by
Andersen, a development of microcline at the expenseof the PA
could have taken place."
I would add here that I have never seena crystal of true PA that was
euhedral or even definitely subhedral. If, during the consolidation of a
"pegmatite magma", one of the first things to happen during the major
microcline stagewas the formation of a "shower" of tiny albites (an en-
tirely reasonablehypothesis in terms of what is now known of the physi-
cal chemistry of such a system), then
these crystals would become en-
gulfed during the development of the much larger microcline crystals.
Under
these conditions these tiny albites could be expected to
1) suffer
somecorrosion,and 2) be swallowedpoikilitically by the growingmicro-
cline.AII of this must have occurredwhile the temperature was such that
little or none of the perthitic albite had as yet becomeunmixed. If Na-
solutionswere replacingmicroclinewith albite,why should they deposit
a little Na-feldspar here and there at widely-spaceddistances (consider-
ing the tiny sizesof the PA crystals),and with new AlSLOe-structure
orientations,rather than building up a non-poikilitic massnear the place
of entrance?Andersen'sviewsarenot in agreementwith the statementin
the last sentenceof the foregoing quotation.
Laves and Soldatos(1963)continue:
"W'e are rather inclined to considerthe'corroded'edges of the PA
crystals to be merely apparent, and we think they can be better ex-
plained asfollows: the growth of the PA proceededmost easilywhere
the microcline wasmost disturbed. The latter was especiallythe case
wherethe microclineshows 'diffuse' extinction;that is, wherethere
are diffuse twin boundaries;i.e., regionswhere a disorderedand
therefore unstable condition existed with respect to the AI/Si dis-
tribution."
The corrodednature of the PA crystals seemsobvious to me, and this
characteristic is well shown by the photomicrographs. It also should be
noted that if the PA crystals were engulfedby growing giant microcline
crystals,thesehostsmay have sufferedminor and local attacks of indiges-
tion resulting in disturbed border areas.While they may have resorbed
some of the PA crystals, clearly there were many that they couldn't
finish offl
RrrnntNcns
Aortusox, O. J. Q942) Minerals of the Varutriisk pegmatiteXXXI.
GeoI.tr'iir.Fiirh.64, 19-54.
The feldspargroup.
POIKILITIC ALBITI' 1781 AunnnseN, O. (1928) 'fhe genesisof some types of feldspar from granite pegmatites.
POIKILITIC
ALBITI'
1781
AunnnseN, O. (1928) 'fhe genesisof some types of feldspar from granite pegmatites. /forsft
Ceol,.Tid.s.l0, 113-206.
Bunu, C., R. L. Panxrn, E WnNr (1967) Die
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