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International Summer Schools 4 July – 14 August 2010
International Summer Schools 4 July – 14 August 2010

International Summer Schools

4 July – 14 August 2010

International Summer Schools 4 July – 14 August 2010

Contact us:

University of Cambridge International Programmes Institute of Continuing Education Greenwich House Madingley Rise Cambridge CB3 0TX UK

Telephone: +44 (0) 1223 760850 Fax: +44 (0) 1223 760848 Email: intenq@cont-ed.cam.ac.uk Website: www.cont-ed.cam.ac.uk/intsummer

Contents

Welcome

p2

About the University of Cambridge Summer Schools

p4

Our programmes

p6

Studying at Cambridge

p8

Our students

p10

Plenary lectures

p12

Living in Cambridge

p14

Social life

p16

Excursions

p18

Art History Practical

p19

Interdisciplinary Summer Schools

p20

International Summer School Term I

p22

International Summer School Term II

p28

Specialist Summer Schools

p34

Art History Summer School

p36

Science Summer School

p40

Literature Summer School

p46

History Summer School

p56

Shakespeare Summer School

p62

Medieval Studies Summer School

p68

English for Academic Purposes

p74

IELTS Preparation Course

p76

Teaching staff

p78

Accommodation

p84

Programme calendar

p88

Fees

p89

Booking terms and conditions

p90

How to apply and payment

p93

Image credits

p96

Map of Cambridge

p97

Welcome

800 and counting!

In July and August 2009, students from almost one third of the world’s countries joined the International Summer Schools in the University’s celebratory 800th anniversary year.

But the University of Cambridge does not rest on its laurels, and new ideas, new appointments, new discoveries, new research and new buildings continue to change the scope and scale of its activities. When you join us for our 2010 Summer Schools you will find that past, present and future jostle for attention in this vibrant place.

Our range of course offerings is wide and flexible: you can spend anything between one and six weeks with us. Fascinating special subject classes, intriguing plenary themes and exciting evening lectures bring groups of students together in many different configurations: you might find yourself sharing the opportunity to question, to enquire, to challenge your own interpretations with 19-, 49- and even 90-year-olds.

Be aware that these programmes are academically intensive and rigorous (you would expect nothing less!), but they are accessible and hugely enjoyable. You will quickly discover that we offer far more than an academic experience! Whatever you study with us, you might well find your stay proves to be a pivotal turning-point in your career, or a welcome diversion from it, or is just hugely important because – in the true Cambridge tradition – you will be encouraged to question and reason, to open your mind to the new ideas your lecturers and new-found friends bring to the classroom. The testimonies of our students confirm that this type of learning is very effective: it broadens knowledge and, in many cases, changes not only perspectives but careers – and lives!

Join us this summer, and find out what 801 years of preparation for your stay have done to make your time in Cambridge unforgettable!

for your stay have done to make your time in Cambridge unforgettable! Sarah J Ormrod Director,

Sarah J Ormrod Director, International Programmes

Step into Cambridge 3

Step into Cambridge

“I really enjoyed the Summer School in Cambridge and want to thank everyone for the

“I really enjoyed the Summer School in Cambridge and want to thank everyone for the brilliant organisation, the wonderful experiences and the friendly hospitality.”

Katja Rademacher, Germany

About the Summer Schools

The University of Cambridge is one of the world’s oldest universities; its reputation for outstanding academic achievement is known worldwide. For over eight hundred years the University has encouraged scholars as diverse as Isaac Newton, John Harvard, John Milton and Lord Byron to challenge their own ideas.

The community of Cambridge alumni includes an immense number of politicians and leaders from both the UK and overseas. The University has had more Nobel Prize winners than any other institution – 85 in total – and is the home of many scientific achievements, from the first splitting of the atom and the discovery of the structure of DNA to remarkable breakthroughs in nanotechnology and computing.

The Summer Schools are proof of the University’s commitment to opening its doors to the world.

Since 1923, the University of Cambridge International Summer Schools have been providing the opportunity for students from all over the world to study and experience the University’s great tradition of learning.

Taught by a mixture of leading Cambridge lecturers and guest subject specialists from beyond the University, the Summer Schools are a rare opportunity to experience Cambridge first-hand.

Renowned for the breadth of courses and quality of face-to-face tuition, our programmes attract over 1,000 students each year, creating a strong international community.

Set amidst the architectural splendour of the city of Cambridge, our courses transport you to an academic world where you can follow in the footsteps of world-leading figures who have studied at the University.

Our programmes

With a variety of subjects on offer, the University of Cambridge International Summer Schools give you the opportunity to explore a range of topics and disciplines. If you have a particular interest you may want to choose one of our Specialist Summer Schools, or for a more varied approach you can select a number of different subject areas from our interdisciplinary programmes.

Interdisciplinary Summer Schools If you are looking to study several different subject areas, International Summer Schools Term I and Term II would be the ideal programmes for you. Term I runs for four weeks, Term II for two weeks.

You can choose either two or three courses from a wide variety of subjects. You will attend classroom sessions each weekday, and daily plenary lectures on a range of general topics.

Specialist Summer Schools If you are looking for in-depth study of a particular subject then these programmes could be what you are looking for. We offer specialist programmes in Literature, History, Science, Art History, Shakespeare and Medieval Studies.

Our Specialist Summer Schools are two or four weeks in length. Those which run for four weeks are split into two terms, each of two weeks in length. You can therefore choose to complete one term or both. You can

combine different programmes in order to build an individual schedule that meets your needs and interests, building up study periods of two, four or six weeks. There is also the option of studying for one week of a specialist programme, allowing for one-, three- or five-week study periods.

We also run an English for Academic Purposes programme for second language students who are already proficient in English and are looking to perfect their skills. The programme includes a two-week intensive personalised language skills course which you can combine with either our Term II interdisciplinary programme, the Shakespeare Summer School or our Medieval Studies Summer School.

New for 2010 We will also be running an IELTS preparation course for students who are looking to improve their English language skills and test their abilities at the end of a three-week intensive programme.

“It was very nice to have small classes for discussion and opportunities to talk personally

“It was very nice to have small classes for discussion and opportunities to talk personally with the professor.”

Christine Winarko, United States of America

Studying at Cambridge

Studying at the University of Cambridge International Summer Schools is a unique experience, and one that we hope you will enjoy and remember fondly. You will be encouraged to discuss, debate and develop your own understanding of the issues raised in class with the guidance of your lecturer.

Teaching staff Our Course Directors and Plenary Lecturers are chosen from amongst the best communicators at Cambridge and beyond. Many have taught on our programmes before, and some return year after year, because our students have recommended them so highly and because they enjoy the experience.

Wherever possible, we use Course Directors currently teaching at Cambridge, with College, Faculty or other connections. We also invite experts from other universities and institutions. For more on our Course Directors please see p78.

Online resource area All course materials, such as lecture schedules and reading lists, can be downloaded from our online resource site before you arrive in Cambridge. In addition, useful information on travelling, living and studying is available for all participants.

Information on how to use the online resource area will be sent to students after registration is complete.

Attendance requirements To receive a certificate of attendance, you need to go to every one of your specialist subject classes. Plenary lecture attendance is also recorded on your certificate if you attend the number agreed for each programme.

Contact hours and credit Each programme offers a minimum number of contact hours (45+ for two- week programmes, 90+ for four-week programmes). For those who wish to earn credit from their home institution for their Summer School courses, we provide plenty of additional information to facilitate this.

Evaluation Many of our students choose to write an essay for evaluation by their Course Director – many do this so they can gain credit at their home university, others simply so that they

can be assessed against the Cambridge standard. Whatever reason students have for choosing to do this, it is a valuable way of responding to the courses you have taken and judging how much you have learned.

You may complete one essay per special subject course. The charge for evaluation is £35 per essay.

Honours programme Students of high academic standing who are planning to study in Cambridge for six weeks, by combining consecutive Summer Schools, may enquire about our intensive Honours programme, which includes one-on-one Cambridge-style supervisions. The fee for this programme is £425, in addition to

tuition and accommodation costs. Students must select this programme on their application form to register their interest, and send us their forms by 16 April 2010. Please note that places on the Honours programme are limited.

Library and computer access You will have access to a variety of faculty libraries, including a lending library set up for the exclusive use of Summer School students, and reading rights at the main University Library.

All students are given a University computer account in order to access email and write papers for evaluation. Depending on your accommodation, you may also have the option to connect your own laptop to the University network from your room.

on your accommodation, you may also have the option to connect your own laptop to the
“Meeting people from all over the world has been a highlight.” Britni Sitter, Canada 10

“Meeting people from all over the world has been a highlight.”

Britni Sitter, Canada

Our students

Whether you are a university student, a professional or are retired, you will find like-minded people at the International Summer Schools. Every year students from over 50 countries come to Cambridge to take part in the Summer Schools. Many come back year after year to relive the experience.

Students of all ages come to take part in the Summer Schools. Some are university students seeking extra credit and experience; others are professionals who want to do something different for their summer break; others still are retired and epitomise the values of ‘lifelong learning’.

We have students from all walks of life – from writers and scientists to book keepers, lawyers, home-makers, artists, teachers and doctors – all eager to expand their horizons and to learn something new.

What all our students share is the desire to gain new knowledge, to debate and to participate in the intellectual adventure that studying at the University of Cambridge Summer Schools provides.

Our programmes are academically rigorous. In addition to classroom contact hours we ask you to prepare for your experience by reading in advance. This preparation will increase your enjoyment and enhance your capacity for critical thinking.

All teaching for the Summer Schools is in English. All students must be able to understand and follow arguments presented in written and spoken English at university level. Further information on the language requirements can be found in the Booking terms and conditions section (p90) at the back of this brochure. Please contact us if you have any questions concerning this.

Plenary lectures

Most of our Summer School programmes have a course of morning plenary lectures, which aim to enhance your understanding and enjoyment of your programme. Speakers are experts in their field: senior figures from within the University, Course Directors, and Guest Lecturers.

Plenary lectures are held on weekday mornings; theme-related lectures

continuing the theme also take place on some evenings. All students are registered for the plenary lecture course in their own Summer School.

If you attend a minimum number, the

plenary course title will also appear on your certificate of attendance presented at the end of the programme. Watch the website from December through to May to see the plenary list expanding. Full details will appear in your timetable.

International Summer School Term I: Understanding

A truly interdisciplinary series of

lectures from invited specialists enhances your understanding of cancer cells, plants, art, world politics, government, human beings, economic crisis, evolution, language and meaning, climate change, and literature, as well as explaining more about the University itself.

Art History Summer School:

SSOJ01 Colour and Meaning Invited speakers – experts from our lecturing team and other guests

(including John Gage, Michael Peppiatt and Nicholas Cullinan) – extend the range of artists and subjects discussed in the special subject courses. Proposed topics include colour perception, Matisse: colour and form, William

Morris, pigments, Venetian art, illuminated manuscripts, colour theory and synaesthesia.

Science Summer School:

SSOP01 Innovation and Discovery Lectures focus largely (but not entirely) on current innovation and discovery, and draw on the immense wealth of practice and research in this University. Prominent Cambridge

scientists invited to contribute include Ron Laskey (cancer cells), Seth Grant (spinal injury and repair), Sir John Gurdon (stem cells), Richard Prager (medical imaging), Sir John Meurig Thomas (Michael Faraday), Daniel Wolpert (how the brain controls the body) and Simon Conway Morris (evolution).

Literature Summer School:

SSOGH0 Interpretations Is it helpful to think of works of literature as meaning something, or

does meaning emerge only when they are placed in some larger context? If different readers interpret a work in different ways, does this discredit the whole endeavour, or is it what gives the endeavour its point? When and why is ambiguity a good thing, rather than a confusion? How might other kinds of interpretation – derived from translation, or psychoanalysis, or simply trying to‘read’one another – help us think about how we interpret a literary work? This course of lectures will, naturally, offer interpretations of particular works or authors, but with an eye to exploring these larger questions.

Shakespeare Summer School:

SSORS0 Interpreting Shakespeare Invited contributors will include some of the most influential Shakespeare academics from the UK and beyond:

Paul Edmondson, Peter Holland, Russ McDonald, Ruth Morse, Stuart Sillars, Brian Vickers and Stanley Wells, as well as Catherine Alexander and other Course Directors.

History Summer School:

SSOLM0 Transitions of Power Historians Tim Blanning, Chris Clark, Simon Franklin, John Morrill, John Pollard, Richard Rex, Jonathan Steinberg and Betty Wood are amongst those being invited to contribute to the series, which will explore some of the different ways in which transitions of power have occurred during the course of world history, why they happened in the way they did, and the implications that they had for later events.

Medieval Studies Summer School:

SSOKN0 Saints and Sinners Prominent medieval scholars including Malcolm Barber, Caroline Barron, Joseph Canning, Jeremy Catto, Helen Cooper, John Maddicott, Philip Morgan, Jonathan Phillips, Nigel Saul, and Tony Spearing have been invited to speak, along with Rowena E Archer. Topics are likely to include St George, Simon de Montfort, Joan of Arc, Margery Kempe and Purgatory.

with Rowena E Archer. Topics are likely to include St George, Simon de Montfort, Joan of
“The courses were great; I really enjoyed meeting the other students and exploring the beautiful

“The courses were great; I really enjoyed meeting the other students and exploring the beautiful city.”

Angelika Rüger, Germany

Living in Cambridge

Cambridge is an ancient city, with its origins going back to Roman times. Every age has left its mark on this market town, from Medieval to Georgian to modern-day buildings. While studying at the University of Cambridge Summer Schools you will have the opportunity to stay in the historic colleges of Cambridge.

As a cosmopolitan university city, Cambridge has everything you would expect – coffee bars, shops, restaurants, pubs, clubs and internet cafés – but it also retains great beauty and charm. During the summer you will get to know the quiet backstreets, college courtyards and particular treasures, such as the Pepys Library, the Wren Library, and Kettle’s Yard, that day-tripping tourists to the city often only glimpse. As a student on the University of Cambridge Summer Schools you will become familiar with the city in a way that few are privileged to experience.

Accommodation is normally in basic, single bed-sitting rooms with washbasins: the rooms used are those normally occupied by Cambridge undergraduates during the academic year. Some colleges have en-suite facilities available at an additional cost.

Your accommodation fee pays for a single college room, breakfast and evening meals, unless otherwise stated.

Some accommodation is available on a room-only or bed and breakfast basis. Couples or friends can request adjacent rooms.

Please turn to the Accommodation section (p84) for more information on the different housing options.

Resident Tutors All Summer School students are supported by our network of Resident Tutors. These are University of Cambridge students who live alongside you in college and assist you with any queries you may have during your stay. They are your first point of contact in case of any difficulties, and are there to make sure that your summer is enjoyable and hassle-free.

Social life

Whilst you are in Cambridge you will have the opportunity to meet a wide variety of people of all ages and nationalities. Many of our students leave the Summer Schools having made new friends from across the world. Some are keen to come back the following year to relive the experience together.

Cambridge is host to a number of evening and weekend activities during the summer, including University-run events, music festivals, exhibitions and a season of Shakespeare plays performed in college gardens.

In addition, we arrange a variety of activities in which all students enrolled in the Summer Schools can participate.

Evening events In addition to our exciting evening lecture series, we also organise a number of evening events to give you the opportunity to spend a relaxed summer evening with your fellow students in the beautiful surroundings of Cambridge colleges.

In 2010 these will include Ceilidhs (folk dances), concerts and readings.

These evening events are free to students participating in the Summer Schools.

Online resource and social networks All registered students can take advantage of our online resource and social networking site. Once you have applied you will receive more information about how to use the online resource area and will be able to start communicating with fellow students even before you arrive in Cambridge!

“It’s been a lot of fun.” Nader Ghassemi, United Kingdom 17

“It’s been a lot of fun.”

Nader Ghassemi, United Kingdom

Excursions

We offer an extensive programme of optional weekend excursions in order for you to make the most of your time in England. These range from castle visits to theatre trips.

Every year we offer a programme of optional weekend excursions. These include visits to castles, cathedrals and places of interest in southern England. The themes for these excursions often complement the subjects that you will be studying in your academic programme and are a good way to meet new people and learn more about British culture.

In 2010 students can choose from a range of visits and events which will include:

Warwick Castle, Windsor, Oxford, Leeds Castle, as well as local walking tours to explore the hidden secrets of Cambridge, and many more.

Students can also book theatre tickets to see the RSC productions of Julius Caesar and As you like it in Stratford-upon-Avon.

The cost of excursions ranges from £17 for a walking tour and £37 for a short trip to £50 for a full day trip – the latter includes the price of a theatre ticket. All include travel.

You will be asked to book your excursions in advance of the start of the Summer Schools and full details of our calendar of events, along with the booking forms can be found on our online resource site once you have registered.

of our calendar of events, along with the booking forms can be found on our online

Art History Practical

For Art History Summer School participants only

Practical workshop: Pure colour as artistic expression Friday 9 July, 2.00pm – 4.30pm and Saturday 10 July, 9.30am – 12.30pm

John Myatt returns to run one of his ever-popular practical workshops. Beginners and experienced painters are welcome, and the workshop is limited to 15 places. John Myatt demonstrates his skill, and introduces you to the materials provided. The practical session will focus on the exciting early work of pioneering Fauvists André Derain and Henri Matisse, and the expressive use of exaggerated and heightened colours. You will be encouraged to interpret and understand colour as meaning and language.

John Myatt guides you through the creation of a painting, to show just how far you can go in a limited time

towards producing colourful images

of your own.

John Myatt is a painter and founder

of ‘Genuine Fakes’. He has presented

the Sky Arts series, ‘Mastering the Art’,

and more recently ‘Brush with Fame’.

A biography of his colourful life so

far is due to be published shortly and he is the subject of a forthcoming Hollywood film.

See: www.JohnMyatt.com

15 places are available; the cost is £60 for the two-part practical, including materials.

Further details and booking forms can be found on our online resource site once you have registered.

including materials. Further details and booking forms can be found on our online resource site once

Interdisciplinary Summer Schools

ISS Term I: 5 – 30 July ISS Term II: 1 – 14 August

Programme Director: Sarah J Ormrod Director of International Programmes

International Summer School Terms I and II are our interdisciplinary programmes, with courses covering a wide variety of subjects, including archaeology, politics, philosophy, economics, literature, history and international relations.

The two terms are independent: you may enrol for either or both. You are welcome to concentrate your studies on two or three courses in the same discipline or to study more widely by choosing courses in differing subject fields. There is a constant exchange of ideas between participants and lecturers across the interdisciplinary curriculum in each term.

The academic programme

• Major plenary lecture series (Term I only): Understanding

• Two or three special subject courses

• Evening lectures

Plenary lectures The theme for our major morning plenary series this year is Understanding, and lectures will

interpret this theme widely, with proposed lectures on meaning, language, art, literature, cutting-edge science and global issues ranging from politics to climate change.

Evening lectures Invited speakers and members of the University will give a varied evening lecture programme, covering a wide range of subjects of current interest.

Special subject courses Central to your academic programme is a range of special subject courses. Each course consists of classroom sessions which are held on every weekday of the Summer School and most are limited to 25 participants. You choose either two or three special

subject courses, each from a different group (those with A, B, C in the course

code for Term I; or with D, E, F in the

course code for Term II). Please note:

Term I courses are 17 sessions in length – there are no teaching sessions on Friday 16 July. Term II courses are 10 sessions in length.

“A wonderful place where academics and an international social life meet.” Razvan Balaban, Romania 21

“A wonderful place where academics and an international social life meet.”

Razvan Balaban, Romania

International Summer School Term I

Special Subject Courses

Classes are held from Tuesday 6 to Thursday 29 July, at the times shown, with the exception of Friday 16 July, when there are no classes. Participants may choose two or three courses, one from each group (SSOA, SSOB, SSOC).

Group SSOA: 9.00am – 10.15am

SSOA01

International politics in a global age Various speakers

Experts from the University’s Centre of International Studies and elsewhere help students to understand a complex and ever-changing world. The course considers problems of international security after the Cold War, the international politics and political economy of regionalism and globalisation, and the legal and institutional framework of international society. Particular attention is given to the ways in which political, strategic, economic and legal aspects of international politics interact and reinforce one another.

Please note: Course SSOA01 can only be taken with courses SSOB01 and SSOC01. This combination of sessions, led by specialists in a range of topics, forms a ‘programme within a programme’. Enrolment for this option is capped at 50.

SSOA02

Education from Empire to globalisation John Howlett

The Education Act of 1870 permitted the State to fill the gaps in schooling provision throughout England and Wales. By analysing the impact of war, economics, science, technology, class, gender and race, this course investigates the role of the State in the transformation of educational provision in England and Wales from the age of Empire to the era of globalisation.

SSOA03

Four plays of Shakespeare:

The Merchant of Venice, Measure for Measure, Othello and King Lear Simon Browne

Shakespeare is fascinated by the way his characters manipulate each other, betray their loved ones, play games, and in pursuing dreams, create nightmares. We shall follow the characters in four of his plays:

The Merchant of Venice, Measure for Measure, Othello and King Lear.

SSOA04

Socialism in the twentieth century:

Russia and Britain Jonathan Davis

This course explores the different interpretations of the idea of socialism and traces its development in Russia and Britain. We assess the challenges to the British Labour party’s working class crown and their impact on Labour’s politics; we explore the nature of socialism in a USSR where a socialist government was apparently in power. A key theme is how far the Soviet Union influenced socialism in Britain, and in what ways.

SSOA05

Revolutions: art, society and gender from Reynolds to the Pre-Raphaelites Elizabeth McKellar

We examine how painting, from late Reynolds, Gainsborough, Wright of Derby through to Blake, Constable, Turner and the Pre-Raphaelites, reveals changing attitudes to pleasure, sexuality, morals and religion. We explore the way artists responded to the industrial revolution, their links to the philosophic and scientific culture of the period, their changing status and their art’s contribution to evolving ideas about the self, the individual and society.

SSOA06

Henry VIII: prince, king, emperor Siân Griffiths

Out-wrestled by Francis I, out- manoeuvred by Charles V, ignored by the Pope. Attempting but never gaining control of Europe, Henry VIII turned to home affairs. In divorcing Catherine of Aragon and breaking with the Roman Catholic Church, he opened a Pandora’s Box. The country itself was left littered with the debris: wives divorced and executed, noblemen and servants beheaded, buildings destroyed, Protestants clamouring for reform. What price power?

SSOA07

A history of science to the early Middle Ages Piers Bursill-Hall

Beginning with the Greeks’invention of the ideas of ‘philosophy’and reasoned knowledge of nature, we assess how various philosophers of nature tried to understand the animate and inanimate world around them, the microcosm and the large scale structure of the nature of the world. This is one of the most remarkable periods in history: the ultimate origins of modern Western science and of Western civilisation. (The course assumes no particular background in either classics or science.)

science and of Western civilisation. ( The course assumes no particular background in either classics or

Group SSOB: 11.45am – 1.00pm

SSOA08

Wordsworth, Keats, Blake and Byron:

the mind of the English Romantics John Gilroy

The Romantic period in Britain, one of the richest in literary history, presented as many strange and exciting ways of seeing the world as there were individuals to see it. We examine, in context, work by Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats, and some lesser-known Romantic writers of fiction (Walpole, Beckford, Hogg), to discover what visions they shared, and what made them all different from each other.

SSOA09

A history of British political thought:

from 1651 to the present Graham McCann

This course introduces the most significant ideas, issues and individuals associated with the history of British political thought. Political thinkers featured include Hobbes and Locke; Hume and Smith; Burke and Paine; the Fabians; Mary Wollstonecraft; J S Mill and Walter Bagehot; Oakshott and Berlin. Figures will be discussed in their own right and in the context of their times, but the course also explores common concerns that unite them.

SSOB01

International politics in a global age Various speakers

This is a three-part course which can only be taken with SSOA01 and SSOC01.

SSOB02

Political and moral authority in Shakespeare’s plays Paul Suttie

By what right – or by what wrong – do rulers exercise power over their subjects and pass judgement on their transgressions? Can the people, in return, ever legitimately rise up and pass judgement on their rulers? We explore five plays in which Shakespeare throws light on such perilously pertinent questions:

Richard II, Henry V, Julius Caesar, Measure for Measure, and The Tempest.

SSOB03

‘Off with their heads!’ Childhood in literature from Shakespeare to Alice Simon Browne

For more than a hundred years, writers have given us images that shape our idea of what it means to be a child. Characters such as Peter Pan grow out of debates going back to Shakespeare and the Romantic era. The course examines these and culminates with the bursting onto the scene of our first modern child, Alice.

SSOB04

Anglo-Saxon England: rural life and culture Debby Banham and Susan Oosthuizen

This fascinating course explores the contributions of landscape, archaeology, documents and other artefacts to an understanding of the origins and development of Anglo- Saxon England from the end of Roman Britain in AD400 to the Norman Conquest in AD1066: new and dynamic innovation, or steady evolution from prehistoric and Roman society?

SSOB05

Crises in world politics since 1945 Various speakers

This course asks why crises happen in international relations, how they are managed, and what, if anything, they have in common. This is done by examining a series of cases since 1945. The list includes some, like the Cuban missile crisis, that did not lead to war and others, like the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait or the Argentine occupation of the Falkland Islands, which did.

SSOB06

Elizabeth I: fact and fiction Siân Griffiths

She fought off death from axeman, disease and assassin. She made some of the most memorable speeches in all of English history. She wrote some of the most impenetrable prose ever conceived. She defied time and gender. She loved but did not marry:

exalted her dynasty but left no heir. A woman who led her country to its greatest victory. A Protestant who prayed like a Catholic. A contradiction? Elizabeth. (Not to be taken with SSOD06 in ISS Term II.)

SSOB07

The origins of modern science: the scientific revolution Piers Bursill-Hall

This course is a brief (and non- technical) examination of the seminal period that is the origin of modern science; the origins of the revolution, the often wild debates and disagreements amongst scientists, the fluctuating and incompatible scientific theories, and the changing domain and social status of science and scientists from the late fifteenth century to the early eighteenth century.

domain and social status of science and scientists from the late fifteenth century to the early

SSOB08

Faith, doubt and disbelief: English poetry, Shakespeare to the present John Gilroy

Extremes of religious fundamentalism and militant atheism characterised the end of the last century and continue to cause debate. Urgent matters of faith and doubt have always found expression in English poetry. We examine such issues in the work of Shakespeare, the Metaphysical poets, Milton, Shelley, Byron, Hopkins, Hardy and Larkin. How significant is their work in our own vivid and apocalyptic times?

SSOB09

Politics, society and architecture in seventeenth-century Britain Andrew Lacey and John Sutton

The seventeenth century was one of the most eventful periods in British history. In all areas of social, political and intellectual life it was a time of ferment: from the architecture of Sir Christopher Wren to the political vision of the Levellers; from the execution of Charles I to the Glorious Revolution. This course provides an introduction to this fascinating period and includes a walk around seventeenth-century Cambridge.

SSOB10

Imperialism in the ancient world Nicholas James

Imperialism has taken various forms. We investigate the earliest, archaic imperialism. How and why did imperialism develop, what were its goals and how were they justified? What varieties of ancient imperialism were there? What was the role of archaic imperialism in world history? We compare Mesopotamia, China, India, Rome, the Incas and the Aztecs.

Group SSOC: 2.00pm – 3.15pm

SSOC01

International politics in a global age Various speakers

This is a three-part course which can only be taken with SSOA01 and SSOB01.

SSOC02

Milton the revolutionary: Paradise Lost and the foundations of the modern world Paul Suttie

One of the greatest poets in English, one of the great shapers of modern thought, an eloquent defender of the English revolution, scourge of unaccountable government and advocate of civil and religious freedom, Milton remains astonishingly contemporary in the twenty-first century world of threatened civil liberties and fears of religious fanaticism. We examine the key works in which Milton’s vision takes shape, concluding with his masterpiece, Paradise Lost.

SSOC03

The English landscape, 1350–2000:

transformation or tradition? Nicholas James

Recent developments across England in employment, housing, leisure and transport look radical. A closer look reveals principles for these changes that are centuries old and that the country is shaped by ancient patterns of resources and boundaries. Does England remain fundamentally medieval? Does the landscape provide a sustainable framework for the future? (Not to be taken with SSOF03 in ISS Term II.)

SSOC04

Britain and the world since 1900 Jonathan Davis

This course explores Britain’s place in world history in the twentieth century. We consider both the imperial and post-imperial periods in an attempt to show how major decisions were made, what has altered and what has stayed the same. We assess how Britain changed from a leading global power to a key local power with global connections.

SSOC05

A history of medicine, from the Ancients to anaesthesia Piers Bursill-Hall

We explore early medical ideas, the social and intellectual context of the practice of medicine alongside theories of life, physiology, and disease. We consider medical thinking in the pre-Classical world, Ancient Greece and Rome, the Arabic and Western Middle Ages, and from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment, with a very brief look at the beginnings of modern medical thinking in the nineteenth century. (The course is not a technical treatment of medicine, and no scientific or medical background is needed.)

SSOC06

Democracy and dictatorship in the Third World Charlie Nurse

After 1980 democracy replaced dictatorship in many ‘third world’ countries. This course considers the reasons for this change before examining why democracy has proved a disappointment in so many countries. These themes will be supported by looking at specific African and Latin American countries.

in so many countries. These themes will be supported by looking at specific African and Latin

International Summer School Term II

Special Subject Courses

Classes are held from Monday 2 to Friday 13 August, inclusive, at the times shown. Participants may choose two or three courses, each from a different group (SSOD, SSOE, SSOF).

Group SSOD: 9.00am – 10.30am

SSOD01

Ends of Empire: European decolonisation 1945–1980 Charlie Nurse

One of the most important changes in international relations after 1945 was the end of the European empires and the establishment of new independent states in the ‘third world’. Focusing especially on examples from Asia and Africa, this course looks at some of the contrasting roads to independence of former British, French and Portuguese colonies.

SSOD02

The quest for truth: the philosophies of Plato, Descartes and Nietzsche Jon Phelan

Nietzsche famously declared that ‘there is no truth only lies’. But what did he mean by this and was he right? This introduction to philosophy compares and contrasts three accounts of truth: from Plato, Descartes and Nietzsche. We shall also examine the role played by truth in other epistemological issues.

SSOD03

The rise of civilisation Nicholas James

Ancient pyramids and ziggurats prompt big questions. Did civilisation arise gradually, or was it forged through conflict? How stable was it? How fundamental were geographical, technological, sociological or ethical differences between civilisations? Comparing Egypt, Iraq, Peru, and Mexico and the Maya, we appraise a range of theories in these age-old issues – and can perhaps predict our future.

SSOD04

Introducing psychology: mind, mental process and behaviour John Lawson

Somewhere beyond the intuitive abilities that most of us have when dealing with other people lies the science known as psychology. In its relatively short history, psychology has changed direction, focus and approach several times. From introspection and psychoanalysis,

through the ‘cognitive revolution’to fMRI scanning, psychology remains one of the most fascinating areas of science.

SSOD05

Revolutions: art, society and gender from Impressionism to Surrealism Elizabeth McKellar

The course sets radical movements such as Impressionism, Cubism and Surrealism against the background of the wars, revolutions, migrations and social struggles of the period. Gender and gender roles within art and society are debated. The exciting contribution of women artists like Mary Cassatt, Käthe Kollwitz and Frida Kahlo will be studied closely alongside that of their male contemporaries such as Monet, Picasso and Dalí.

SSOD06

Elizabeth I: fact and fiction Siân Griffiths

She fought off death from axeman, disease and assassin. She made some of the most memorable speeches in all of English history. She wrote some of the most impenetrable prose ever conceived. She defied time and gender. She loved but did not marry:

exalted her dynasty but left no heir. A woman who led her country to its greatest victory. A Protestant who prayed like a Catholic. A contradiction? Elizabeth. (Not to be taken with SSOB06 in ISS Term I.)

SSOD07

Renaissance science and engineering Piers Bursill-Hall

The Renaissance wasn’t just about great art; it was also about wild and wonderful developments in science and technology. Leonardo da Vinci and Copernicus are well known, but there were many equally radical thinkers. This course charts the changes and innovations in sciences and technical crafts like engineering, architecture, and warfare; this is the story of the real Renaissance: rough, argumentative, and very‘in-your-face’.

SSOD08

An introduction to twentieth- century British theatre Rex Walford

This course will seek to provide a comprehensive overview of many aspects of British drama through the twentieth century. It will identify key phases and movements, and consider both well-known and lesser-known plays and playwrights. It will also indicate significant British contributions to musical theatre and religious drama.

SSOD09

The British Empire in literature and film Seán Lang

From the imperial background tales to be found in Jane Austen and Charlotte Brontë to the films of David Lean, from the imperial gung-ho spirit of Rider Haggard and the Boy’s Own

Paper to the postcolonial imagery of Zadie Smith and Benjamin Zephaniah, this course will look at the way the Empire has featured in literature, film and television, over the last two hundred years of its existence.

Group SSOE: 11.00am – 12.30pm

SSOE01

Lest we forget: studies in modern British military history Diana Henderson

This course, where questions and debate are encouraged, offers a diverse insight into the fascinating topic of modern British military history. After setting the scene, we take key themes and events as examples and move through strategic, national, international and intelligence issues to the individual battle experience, culminating in a retrospective study of operations in Afghanistan.

SSOE02

Thinking about thinking: an introduction to the philosophy of mind Jon Phelan

What is a thought? Where is a thought? This introduction to the philosophy of mind will look at the canonical positions and problems posed by philosophers interested in the nature of consciousness. We shall examine: the mind-body problem, the problem of other minds, personal identity, AI (artificial intelligence) and free will.

SSOE03

The collapse of civilisation Nicholas James

Is decay inevitable? Do all civilisations

bear the seeds of their own destruction or is it only enemy action or environmental change that bring them down? Hindsight offers perspective; and comparing unrelated cases – ancient Rome, the ancient Maya, and medieval England – should show whether generalisation (and

prediction) is feasible.

SSOE04

Economics of public policy Nigel Miller

We consider how simple economic analysis can guide the formulation and evaluation of public policy, and

provide a toolkit for the evaluation of future policy issues. The course is relevant to anyone wishing to pursue

a career in policy development, in

government, academia or consultancy. It applies microeconomic

principles and concepts but the emphasis is on application.

SSOE05

For King or Parliament? Britain’s Civil Wars 1625–1662 Andrew Lacey

The Civil Wars which swept over the British Isles in the seventeenth century saw fathers fighting sons and brother killing brother, it was for many a ‘world turned upside down’. This course explores the causes, conduct and implications of the Civil Wars, concentrating on the experiences of ordinary people caught up in momentous events.

SSOE06

Art and the collector Siân Griffiths

We will look at how standards of collectability have been shaped by social, economic, philosophical, cultural and political factors. We will see how these standards have changed over the centuries and how artists, art schools, dealers and states have acted to lead or follow collectors’ tastes and value judgements.

SSOE07

The other Middle Ages: the Islamic world and the Latin debt to Islam Piers Bursill-Hall

This course examines the history of early Islamic culture and its absorption and development of scientific ideas, and why Islamic science (natural philosophy, mathematics, medicine and engineering technology) developed as it did. We then look at the transmission of Ancient and Islamic science to the Latin west, and how Islamic ideas shaped much of medieval Latin thinking. (This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOF07.)

SSOE08

Key twentieth-century British plays and playwrights Rex Walford

This course will provide an in-depth examination of some major twentieth-century British playwrights, including Coward, Priestley, Rattigan, Osborne, Pinter, Stoppard, Ayckbourn and Hare. Portions of particular texts will be explored and analysed and plays will be put in the context of the author’s life and other work.

particular texts will be explored and analysed and plays will be put in the context of

SSOE09

The Victorians and their world Seán Lang

Why did they dress their boys as girls? Why did they build railway stations to look like cathedrals? Did they really ‘lie back and think of England’? Why were they so obsessed with who had the vote? Should we think of them as the first Mrs Rochester, embarrassing relatives best forgotten, or more like Jane Eyre, shining when cherished? We all have our own picture of the Victorians, often wrong. Just how wrong it is we will find out.

SSOE10

The abnormal mind: an introduction to psychopathology John Lawson

This course introduces a variety of clinical conditions including schizophrenia, autism, depression, and anxiety. It also aims to contrast differing models of explanation that in turn lead to differing approaches in treatment. Overall, the hope is to encourage a more critical conception of what constitutes abnormality.

Group SSOF: 2.00pm – 3.30pm

SSOF01

Still life, landscape, figure:

continuity and change in art, 1600s to the present Joanne Rhymer

This course explores how the subjects of still life, landscape and representations of the figure have developed in art from c1650 to the

present. Exploring paintings, photography and installation pieces by artists including Claude Lorrain, Picasso and Cindy Sherman we will discover the fascinating continuities and changes in genre and artistic practice.

SSOF02

Children, teachers and education:

contemporary issues, historical perspectives John Howlett

Studying the processes of change over time helps us towards a deeper understanding of children, teachers and education in the present. This investigation into educational change during the twentieth century will focus on childhood; scientific understandings; special needs; teaching methods; formal curriculum; the role and status of teachers; and alternatives to traditional schooling.

SSOF03

The English landscape, 1350–2000:

transformation or tradition? Nicholas James

Recent developments across England in employment, housing, leisure and transport look radical. A closer look reveals principles for these changes that are centuries old and that the country is shaped by ancient patterns of resources and boundaries. Does England remain fundamentally medieval? Does the landscape provide a sustainable framework for the future? (Not to be taken with SSOC03 in ISS Term I.)

SSOF04

An introduction to macroeconomics Nigel Miller

This course will develop simple macroeconomic models and use them to understand significant macroeconomic events, past and present. Students will develop an understanding of the causes and consequences of recessions, inflation, economic growth, unemployment and financial crises.

SSOF05

British houses and gardens Caroline Holmes

We explore how architecture, need, fashion and fantasy have shaped and linked houses and gardens. We examine medieval castles and monasteries, palaces, colleges and eighteenth-century masterpieces, as well as family mansions and modernist houses. We compare high formality with the naturalistic, and the work of such influential figures as Kent, Adam, ‘Capability’Brown, Jekyll, Lutyens and Sackville-West.

SSOF06

Criminals and gentlemen: the Victorian underworld in Dickens’s Oliver Twist and Great Expectations Ulrike Horstmann-Guthrie

Arguably the most popular novelist of his day, Dickens was also a man of contradictions. Complexity and ambiguity inform much of his fiction. This course considers Oliver Twist and Great Expectations in particular, placing these novels in their social, biographical and literary context.

SSOF07

The other Middle Ages: the Islamic world and the Latin debt to Islam Piers Bursill-Hall

This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOE07.

SSOF08

Threats and challenges in contemporary Britain Richard Yates

We analyse key social and political challenges in Britain today and assess their impact upon British society. Issues considered include terrorism, national security, ethnic tensions, changing external relations, crime, civil liberties and challenges to traditional perceptions of the role of governmental authority.

relations, crime, civil liberties and challenges to traditional perceptions of the role of governmental authority.

Specialist Summer Schools

Choose from our wide range of specialist programmes which offer the opportunity to study your favourite subjects in greater depth than our interdisciplinary programmes.

The University of Cambridge Summer Schools currently run six specialist schools. These programmes are offered over a six-week period.

Weeks 1 and 2: 4 – 17 July Art History, Science Term I, Literature Term I

Weeks 3 and 4: 18 – 31 July History, Science Term II, Literature Term II

Weeks 5 and 6: 1 – 14 August Shakespeare, Medieval Studies

Combining programmes Each of our Specialist Summer School programmes is two or four weeks in length, you can decide how many weeks you would like to attend. You can also choose to combine two or three different programmes to build your own schedule of one, two, three or more weeks. If you are a current undergraduate or graduate student, by building together programmes you may be able to earn additional credit to put towards your studies at your home institution.

We also have an English for Academic Purposes programme for second language students who are already proficient in English. The first two weeks (18 – 31 July) allow for intensive study at the University of Cambridge Language Centre, while the second two weeks are spent participating in one of three academic programmes, International Summer School Term II, Shakespeare Summer School or Medieval Studies Summer School (1 – 14 August).

We will also be running an IELTS preparation course for participants looking to become more proficient in the English language.

Academic content Courses are led by experts from within the University of Cambridge and beyond. Each class meets daily, with schedules varying between programmes.

Your Course Directors will guide you in close study of your chosen topics giving you the opportunity to expand your knowledge.

All courses are limited to 25 participants. The specialist subject courses are complemented by daily

All courses are limited to 25 participants.

The specialist subject courses are complemented by daily plenary lectures which expand on the topics taught in the classroom or introduce new ideas and themes.

Additional general interest evening lectures are also scheduled throughout the programme. The cumulative knowledge gained by attending the special subject courses and plenary lectures will enhance your appreciation and knowledge of your field.

“The Art History programme is really something special. The lectures were interesting and entertaining to

“The Art History programme is really something special. The lectures were interesting and entertaining to the last; I can’t wait to come back.”

Kathryn Henderson, Ireland

Art History Summer School

4 – 17 July

Programme Director: Nicholas Friend Director, Inscape Fine Art Study Tours; Queens’College

“There is nothing comparable to the University of Cambridge Art History Summer School. The genius of the programme lies firstly in the links that can be forged between lecturers and classes, and secondly in the ability of each lecturer not only to teach with erudition and communicative excitement, but to engage with each member of the class, no matter how experienced or inexperienced they are in art history.”Nicholas Friend

The Art History Summer School has a reputation for lively discussion and exchange of ideas, which continue far beyond the scheduled sessions, extending across the programme’s residential community.

The academic programme

• Plenary course SSOJ01: Colour and Meaning

• One special subject course per week

• Evening lectures

• Practical sessions

• Specialist-led excursions to Cambridge and London galleries

Special subject courses and plenary lectures During the Art History Summer School you will be guided in close, specialised study of your chosen topics. In addition, you are automatically registered for the plenary lecture and discussion course

SSOJ01 Colour and Meaning, running for the duration of the two-week programme. The courses and plenary programme offer you a unique opportunity to learn with recognised experts from galleries and the world of art historical research, both in and outside universities. You will be able to build up a considerable understanding of specific areas.

Practical workshop and visits An optional practical workshop shows you the artist in action and gives you the chance to try out techniques. Workshop information will be sent to accepted students. (See page 19.)

The tuition fee includes one programme-related field trip each Wednesday to see some of the

fascinating collections that London and Cambridge have to offer.

Students will be accompanied by

their Course Directors.

The SSOJ01 plenary lecture course, the special subject courses, the practical session and the field-trips have a cumulative value: you will find yourself drawing upon newly- acquired knowledge to enhance your appreciation of each new special subject course and subsequent plenary lecture.

Art History Summer School

Special Subject Courses

Each course meets on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Participants choose one special subject course per week.

Week 1 (4 – 10 July)

SSOJ02

Colour and the Renaissance court Richard Williams

Colour formed a language all of its own in the Renaissance courts of Europe. It could carry religious symbolism, denote political loyalties and define social status. By contrasting Northern and Italian art, this course addresses these cultural issues, as well as the practical use of colour by artists to create perspective and other effects.

SSOJ03

Coloured matter as subject matter Spike Bucklow

Colour is delivered to us by light shining on matter. This course looks at the meaning of particularly colourful matter – gold, lapis lazuli, other metals and stones, plant and even animal matter. It explores how such matter colours the meaning of art up to the seventeenth century.

SSOJ04

Colour and meaning in Spanish art Gail Turner

The dramatic contrasts of sol y sombra – sunlight and shadow – have been one of several major influences on Spanish arts, producing startling variety and some unexpected imagery:

Velázquez’rich court portraits, Murillo’s street urchins, Goya’s vibrant designs and portraits, the dazzling impressionist colour of Sorolla’s beach scenes and the energy of twentieth- century artists Picasso, Miro and Dalí.

SSOJ05

Colour matters in modern art Joanne Rhymer

This course focuses on colour’s pivotal role in the development of modern art. In exploring works made in the middle of the nineteenth century through to the present by artists including Van Gogh, the Fauves and Cornelia Parker, we will discover how the use and meaning of colour is vital to avant-garde practice.

Week 2 (11 – 17 July)

SSOJ06

The rediscovery of colour: from Delacroix to the Pre-Raphaelites Nicholas Friend

Around 1800, in both France and England, colour in painting was rarely taught, little understood, and viewed with suspicion. Even the great revolutionary Gericault employed sombre colouring. From the 1820s, attitudes to colour changed radically. Delacroix realised how adjacent colours intensify one another; Constable realised the power of green, Turner the mystery of yellow. By the 1850s Pre-Raphaelites, Millais, Holman Hunt and Rossetti, found relationships between colour and truth.

SSOJ07

Contemporary colour Joanne Rhymer

This course will explore how the dynamic use of colour, or sometimes its negation, can be an important component in the production and reception of contemporary art. We discover the use of ‘found objects’ and the appropriation of modern technologies in installation work, and consider paintings and photography by artists including Mona Hatoum, David Batchelor and Jenny Saville.

SSOJ08

German Expressionism: liberating colour 1906–1926 James Malpas

In 1906, Die Brücke (The Bridge) group members Schmidt-Rottluff, Kirchner, Pechstein and others were inspired by Van Gogh’s works and by Les Fauves (Wild Beasts, including Matisse and Derain). In Munich, “Blue Rider”artists (Kandinsky, Marc, Jawlensky, Muenter and Klee) were also experimenting with colour. In Vienna, Kokoschka and Schiele adapted Klimt’s opulent style. We examine the visual, technical and philosophical achievements of these groups.

SSOJ09

The colours of landscape Timothy Wilcox

Film, photography and our own experience, colour our ideas of what landscape‘looks like’. Hardly ever do paintings correspond to our individual perception, despite the pursuit of ‘realism’in landscape painting over four centuries. Focusing on Turner, Constable and other British Romantics, but ranging from the Renaissance to the Impressionists, we ask: why are Rembrandt’s landscapes brown, Constable’s green and Monet’s pink?

Renaissance to the Impressionists, we ask: why are Rembrandt’s landscapes brown, Constable’s green and Monet’s pink?
“I met so many nice people and gained new knowledge in the field of science.”

“I met so many nice people and gained new knowledge in the field of science.”

Jovana Petrović, Serbia

Science Summer School

Term I: 4 – 17 July, Term II: 18 – 31 July

Programme Director: Rob Wallach University Senior Lecturer in Materials Science and Metallurgy; Fellow of King’s College

The University of Cambridge is renowned globally for the quality of its scientific research and education. Science at Cambridge combines the benefits of breadth and flexibility with the opportunity to study in depth at the frontiers of science.

The programme acknowledges that there is now no hard boundary between the different sciences: exciting discoveries and innovations are being made by interdisciplinary approaches. We draw on the expertise of a range of senior academic advisors across a variety of scientific fields in assembling this unique and exciting programme.

The Science Summer School is aimed at a broad audience. Undergraduates and graduates in sciences as well as teachers and other professionals are well catered for. For those of you with a strong interest in science but little formal science training, we advise that you carefully read the books and articles suggested by the Course Directors.

The academic programme

• Plenary course SSOP01: Innovation and Discovery

• One special subject course per week

• A choice of workshops and visits

• Evening lectures

Plenary lectures All participants will be registered for a course of plenary lectures collectively entitled Innovation and Discovery. These lectures constitute a wonderful opportunity to hear about current developments from acknowledged experts in their field and to learn about the discoveries of great scientific figures of the past.

Special subject courses You choose one course for each week from the wide range of options. Each course meets five times during the week.

Workshops and visits We plan a number of workshops and visits to the Botanic Garden, to museums, and to institutes and laboratories in Cambridge. Workshops and visits may offer an insight into ‘cutting edge’research, or a chance to reassess subjects and scientists you know a little about. Details will be sent to registered students.

Evening lectures A series of evening lectures extends

the plenary series, providing introductions to additional aspects of

science at Cambridge and beyond.

Science Summer School Term I

4 – 17 July Special Subject Courses

Each course meets on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. Participants choose one special subject course in each of the two weeks.

Week 1 (4 – 10 July)

SSOP02

Material matters or materials matter:

an overview of materials science Rob Wallach

The behaviour and limitations of different materials affects us all. Knowledge and understanding of materials’behaviour allows us to live more efficiently by optimising natural resources, more effectively by facilitating innovation and change, or just more effortlessly, by improving living standards. The course shows how diverse materials are tailored for practical applications by introducing the background to atomic structure, mechanical and physical properties, anisotropy and degradation. Computer software is included to reinforce many of the topics.

SSOP03

From atoms to galaxies: the astronomer’s view Robin Catchpole

First, we meet the stars, galaxies, dark matter and vacuum energy that make up our Universe and then discover how everything was created out of hydrogen that emerged from the Big Bang. Finally, we take a closer look at

our Sun and Solar System and consider if we are alone in the Universe.

SSOP04

Spectroscopy

Peter Wothers

This course explores the interaction of light with matter and how this may be used to reveal information from what’s inside our bodies, to what’s inside a distant galaxy. The course introduces the basic ideas from Quantum Mechanics but assumes very little mathematical background and is not aimed at students currently specialising in physics.

SSOP05

Palaeoclimate: climate changes through the ages Luke Skinner

One of the most pressing challenges facing our society is that of anthropogenic climate change. Understanding our climate system depends crucially on reconstructions of past environments, making palaeoclimatology central to our environmental predictions. This course looks back at how our environment has changed and how geologists are able to chart its history.

Week 2 (11 – 17 July)

SSOP06

Introduction to social psychology John Lawson

Within the realm of psychology, social psychology is concerned with how the behaviour and thoughts of an individual are influenced by the social context, ie other people around them. This course explores a number of differing contexts (small groups, crowds, authority figures) and examines the evidence that seeks to explain how this context shapes what we do and how we think.

SSOP07

The dynamics of spin Hugh Hunt

There are few things stranger than gyroscopes. Spinning tops, bicycle wheels, rolling coins and boomerangs are some examples of every-day objects that exhibit gyroscopic effects. We examine their behaviour and endeavour to understand the maths and physics behind them all. One practical aspect of the course will be to build your own indoor boomerang. We also examine the claims that gyroscopes can be used to propel spacecraft deep into space.

SSOP08

Understanding infinity Imre Leader

In the late nineteenth century, Georg Cantor shocked the mathematical world with the first attempt to understand the nature of infinite sets. His ideas were controversial at the time, but have since become an essential part of modern mathematics. In the course we will investigate how to reason with infinite objects and how to get a feeling for them. (A basic understanding of mathematics would be helpful for this course.)

SSOP09

Keeping up with the Universe Lisa Jardine-Wright

In 1929 Edwin Hubble concluded that our Universe was not static but expanding. After a brief history of cosmology, students will be presented with a number of current extragalactic observations and will need to take measurements and draw conclusions via computer analysis. Considering current technological advancements, we will delve deeper into our Universe to discover our potential fate.

Considering current technological advancements, we will delve deeper into our Universe to discover our potential fate.

Science Summer School Term II

18 – 31 July Special Subject Courses

Each course meets on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. Participants choose one special subject course in each of the two weeks.

Week 3 (18 – 24 July)

SSOP10

The high energy frontier – the Large Hadron Collider Val Gibson

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN near Geneva is used to study the smallest known particles (the fundamental building blocks of nature) and the forces between them. It will revolutionise our understanding, from the minuscule world deep within atoms to the vastness of the Universe. This course reviews the pre-LHC status of particle physics, describes the LHC accelerator and related experiments, and explains results from the first data.

SSOP11

Living with climate change Stephen Peake

This course will develop your scientific ‘eco-literacy’. You will grasp the essential scientific evidence of climate change, get your hands on some real climate models, analyse and debate options for decarbonisation of our economic systems, scientifically explore adaptation for survival, and design your own eco-innovation through a ‘lifestyle lab’activity.

SSOP12

The life, death, immortality and criminality of cells Andrew Wyllie

These lectures will outline the processes that explain how all the tissues of our bodies derive from a single cell, and how, when these processes go wrong, major diseases including cancer result.

SSOP13

Extreme Astrophysics Rosie Bolton

In this self-contained course we explore how the Universe looks in two extreme wavelength regimes: Radio waves and X-Rays. Through examples, diagrams and discussions, we will learn how radio and X-Ray telescopes work and meet some of the dramatic objects that inhabit this world of ‘Extreme Astrophysics’.

Week 4 (25 – 31 July)

SSOP14

An introduction to cryptography James Grime

This course on the mathematics of cryptography introduces some of the most important codes and ciphers. Topics range from simple substitution ciphers and the enigma machine of WWII, to modern cryptography such as RSA used in internet encryption.

SSOP15

Infectious disease and the immune system Dan Neill

The development of antibiotics and vaccination strategies has revolutionised modern medicine. However, the emergence of multi- drug resistant bacteria and rapidly evolving strains of viruses brings new challenges. We examine how a better understanding of the interactions between pathogens and the mammalian immune system can advance medicine and healthcare.

SSOP16

Autism: a modern epidemic? John Lawson

Despite sixty years of research, autism remains a puzzle: many people remain unclear about what it actually is. Even a leading researcher in the field has called it‘the enigma’. This course provides an introduction to autism and Asperger syndrome, examining the diagnostic features that define the condition, some of the research currently taking place and, finally, the interventions and treatments available.

SSOP17

Materials science, energy generation and sustainability Rob Wallach

Sustainable development is essential if the earth is not to be damaged irreversibly. While attitudes have to change, technology must also provide solutions and materials science has a pivotal role. We investigate materials issues associated with renewable energy sources (solar power, geothermal, wind, and wave), the more controversial nuclear power, and conventional power. The course concludes with a brief look at energy storage and the hydrogen economy.

nuclear power, and conventional power. The course concludes with a brief look at energy storage and
“I found the whole Summer School programme to be most stimulating intellectually.” Pauline Zidlick, United

“I found the whole Summer School programme to be most stimulating intellectually.”

Pauline Zidlick, United States of America

Literature Summer School

Term I: 4 – 17 July, Term II: 18 – 31 July

Programme Director: G Frederick Parker Senior University Lecturer in English; Fellow of Clare College

The University has run the specialist Literature Summer School since 1986. Designed to meet the needs of graduate and undergraduate students, professional teachers and passionate lovers of literature, it remains one of our most popular programmes. Those teaching on the course are committed to sharing their expertise and communicating their enthusiasm. The range of backgrounds and interests among participants further adds to what we are often told has been an extraordinarily stimulating and enriching experience.

The Literature Summer School offers an opportunity to live and study in surroundings which have sustained a long and distinguished literary tradition. Former students at Cambridge include poets, playwrights and novelists such as Marlowe, Milton, Byron, Tennyson, and Rupert Brooke, and more recently Ted Hughes, Sylvia Plath, and Salman Rushdie. Both I A Richards and F R Leavis studied and taught at Cambridge, which continues to be an important centre of literary creativity and forum for critical debate.

‘Cambridge English’is distinguished by detailed attention to the text and students should expect the discipline of close reading to be the foundation

of all work in the classes. However widely discussion ranges during classes, lecturers and students will normally have texts open for continual reference, illustration and analysis.

The academic programme

• Plenary course SSOGH0: Interpretations

• Four special subject courses (two for each week)

• General evening lectures

Plenary lectures Daily plenary lectures are given by distinguished guest speakers. The lectures draw on writing of many different kinds and periods, and offer you a rich variety of voices, approaches, and models of critical thought. Plenary lectures will bring fresh perspectives to familiar masterpieces and encourage exploration in new directions.

Special subject courses The core of your programme will be your chosen special subject courses, each meeting five times. (Double courses meet ten times.) Classes allow for close and continuing discussion, and you will be expected to have done substantial preparatory reading before you arrive in Cambridge. For those keen to do more intensive study by choosing double courses, please note the majority of these take place in Term II.

Literature Summer School Term I

4 – 17 July Special Subject Courses

Classes are held from Monday to Friday. Participants choose two courses per week, one from Group SSOG and one from Group SSOH.

Week 1 (4 – 10 July)

Group SSOGa: 9.15am – 10.45am

SSOGa1

Wordsworth versus Byron? G Frederick Parker

The two towering figures of English Romantic poetry claimed to despise one another’s work; recent criticism has suggested that there is a crucial choice to be made here between two divergent tendencies in Romanticism, and two ways of understanding poetry’s relation to the world. This course introduces both poets, and considers what is at stake in preferring one to the other.

SSOGa2

Jane Austen I: Northanger Abbey and Sense and Sensibility Alexander Lindsay

This is the first of three complementary courses, which nevertheless may be taken independently. It will be shown how these earliest completed novels originated as responses to contemporary literary movements, the Gothic and Sensibility, but also begin

the novelist’s exploration of the inner life and social relationships of young women.

SSOGa3

Hardy’s Wessex in an age of transitions: Far From the Madding Crowd and Tess of the d’Urbervilles Ulrike Horstmann-Guthrie

In Far From the Madding Crowd (1874), Hardy used the term‘Wessex’for the first time to signify his geographical territory and his preferred subject matter: country people in a rural landscape living“between custom and education, between work and ideas, between love of place and experience of change”(Raymond Williams). We explore this further in Tess of the d’Urbervilles (1891).

SSOGa4

Romance and anti-Romance in medieval literature Jacqueline Tasioulas

This course will explore the great medieval genre of Romance, in which knights battle monsters, rescue ladies and fall in love. It will also explore medieval romances where the knight

is the villain, the lady must do the saving, and falling in love might be the most monstrous thing of all …

Group SSOHa: 2.00pm – 3.30pm

SSOHa1

Milton, Marvell, and the poetry of crisis G Frederick Parker

John Milton and Andrew Marvell wrote their finest poetry in the shadow of a civil war that expressed a time of political and spiritual crisis. We explore Milton’s extraordinary achievement in Paradise Lost by focusing on central passages in Books 1, 4, 9 and 10, and compare it with the visions of a pastoral paradise (under threat or fallen) that appear in Marvell’s strange, cool, elusive poems.

SSOHa2

Expelling the Renaissance myth:

François Rabelais’ grotesque epic Edward Wilson-Lee

This course serves as an introduction to François Rabelais’extraordinary masterpiece, Gargantua and Pantagruel. A hilariously bawdy carnival of folk tales, religious satire and fantastic traveller’s tales, Rabelais’work documents the difficult birthing-pangs of the Renaissance and the death-

throes of medieval scholasticism. This is the dark twin of More’s Utopia: a secret epic which documents the bodily cost of remaking the world.

SSOHa3

Charlotte Brontë: Jane Eyre and Villette Ulrike Horstmann-Guthrie

Like her sisters in their fiction, Charlotte Brontë tackled controversial subjects in unconventional ways. This course places her novels Jane Eyre (1847) and Villette (1853) in their historical and social context, and discusses the issue of gender, which so greatly influenced their reception, as well as different critical approaches to reading them today.

SSOHa4

An introduction to James Joyce’s Ulysses: text and context Mark Sutton

This course focuses exclusively on Joyce’s controversial and highly influential masterpiece Ulysses. The location of Joyce’s novel both at the centre of modernism and within the historical and cultural context of his time is supported by close textual study facilitating an informed group reading of selected passages.

context of his time is supported by close textual study facilitating an informed group reading of

Week 2 (11 – 17 July)

Group SSOGb: 9.15am – 10.45am

SSOGb1

To ‘make it new’: the modernist revolution in literature from the 1890s to the 1920s Mark Sutton

This course will look at the form, context, and development of literary modernism from the 1890s through to the 1920s via consideration of key writers of the period such as Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, T S Eliot, Ezra Pound, and Virginia Woolf.

SSOGb2

Jane Austen II: Pride and Prejudice and Mansfield Park Alexander Lindsay

Pride and Prejudice develops the design and themes of Sense and Sensibility in a social comedy which is witty, but more critical and less light-hearted than at first apparent. Mansfield Park, with its serious-minded, avowedly Christian heroine, may never have enjoyed the same popularity, but is arguably the finer achievement.

SSOGb3

Elizabethan love poetry Paul Suttie

The so-called Golden Age of the English Sonnet has left us some of literature’s most enduring and thought-provoking explorations of the experience of desire. We will focus on the outstanding sonnet sequences

of Sidney and Shakespeare, and on Marlowe’s radically different poems on the theme of love.

SSOGb4

Sophocles’ tragic heroes and tragic cosmos Jan Parker

Daemonic heroes (Ajax, Oedipus at Colonus); challenging women (Electra, Antigone); tragic transitions – from boyhood to manhood, isolation to healing (Philoctetes); autonomy or flaw? (Oedipus the King); women’s ways of knowing and suppressing (Women of Trachis); tragic closure, chance, decision-making, bonds, cosmos, passion, pathos. Sophocles’ plays ask questions about issues that still trouble audiences, dramatists and theorists. Discussions will be framed by various responsive translators, literal and creative, including Richard Strauss and Jean Anouilh.

Group SSOHb: 2.00pm – 3.30pm

SSOHb1

Variations on the tragic G Frederick Parker

We explore what happens to core elements in classic tragedy – heroes, gods, fate, ritual, sacrifice – in modern dramas when times, it would seem, have changed. We look in particular at landmark works by Ibsen, Chekhov, Lorca, Miller, and Beckett. Did tragedy die, or just change its form? Does its ghost still walk?

SSOHb2

Don Quixote and Renaissance cultural crisis Edward Wilson-Lee

This course provides a framework for reading this masterpiece of European literature by Shakespeare’s contemporary, highlighting the ideological conflicts inside the comedy. Don Quixote, often considered the first novel, is rife with discord between Christianity and Islam, feudalism and capitalism, and the choice between hopeless idealism and cynical compromise.

SSOHb3

E M Forster and Cambridge Adrian Barlow

Forster’s classic novel Howards End was published 100 years ago. Together with The Longest Journey it will form the core of this course examining the influence of Forster on Cambridge and

Cambridge on Forster. Forster’s literary legacy to writers such as David Lodge and Zadie Smith will also be explored.

SSOHb4

Questions of belief: the poetry of Philip Larkin and Gerard Manley Hopkins John Gilroy

On an issue of much current relevance, questions of belief are brought into sharp conflict in the extraordinary and original work of Gerard Manley Hopkins, nineteenth-century Jesuit priest and poet, and that of one of the most popular and controversial twentieth-century poets, Philip Larkin. We close-read a range of the poetry of each in the context of their times.

twentieth-century poets, Philip Larkin. We close-read a range of the poetry of each in the context

Literature Summer School Term II

18 – 31 July Special Subject Courses

Classes are held from Monday to Friday. Participants choose two courses per week, one from Group SSOG and one from Group SSOH.

Week 3 (18 – 24 July)

Group SSOGc: 9.15am – 10.45am

SSOGc1

The other Victorians: British Victorian novelists Alison Hennegan

By the end of the nineteenth century the novel had become Britain’s predominant literary form. Subgenres such as science fiction, the detective novel, the psychological thriller, the historical and the regional novel, were already well established by then. This course charts the novel’s progress. It will move beyond the Brontës and Dickens to explore a range of other writers, some well known (Kingsley, Thackeray, Trollope and H G Wells) others perhaps less familiar, including Mrs Oliphant, George MacDonald, Samuel Butler, and the Irish women cousins who wrote together as Somerville and Ross. (This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOHc1.)

SSOGc2

Jane Austen III: Emma and Persuasion Alexander Lindsay

With Emma, Jane Austen offers once more the emotional education of a handsome and witty heroine, but this time enjoying a unique financial independence. In the posthumous Persuasion the moral decisions of the heroine are set against the background of social changes arising from the Napoleonic wars.

SSOGc3

The trouble with Keats Stephen Logan

If any poet of the Romantic period can be described as ‘popular’, that poet is probably Keats. Yet perhaps this new consensus is the result of cultural amnesia. This course will argue that a true appreciation of Keats’s virtues depends on considering seriously why he divided opinion among his contemporaries.

SSOGc4

Poetry and the self Clive Wilmer

How do we read poems, respond to them, understand them? Each class will be devoted to one, or two, poems; the emphasis will be on close reading and intensive discussion, rather than on literary history. We shall specifically look at the role played by the self in the poems: the poet’s own self, the persona created by the poem, the relation between the reader’s self and the self in the poem. (This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOGd4.)

Group SSOHc: 2.00pm – 3.30pm

SSOHc1

The other Victorians: British Victorian novelists Alison Hennegan

This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOGc1.

SSOHc2

Making sense of poetry Stephen Logan

Referring to a wide range of poems, this course will examine what good poets have traditionally wanted their readers to know about such things as metre, diction, syntax, rhyme, other sound-effects and figurative language. We will explore what sensitive, historically-informed and imaginative reading is like and identify the kinds of literary competence needed to make it more fully possible. (This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOHd2.)

SSOHc3

His ‘scrupulous meanness’: style, text and context in James Joyce’s Dubliners Mark Sutton

Joyce identified the style of his short story collection as one of ‘scrupulous meanness’. The book’s diminished subject matter, along with its deliberate lack of evident authorial intrusion which allows its characters inadvertently to reveal their truths, marked the beginning of a new style

in twentieth-century literature. The

course will consider Dubliners’ innovations of style and substance, studying the individual stories partly through the historical and cultural context of Joyce’s time.

SSOHc4

The English elegy Clive Wilmer

A grief-stricken shepherd laments the

death of a fellow shepherd in their common language of pastoral song.

In the first week we will consider

poems which grow from this classical tradition by Spenser, Milton, Gray, Shelley and Arnold. In the second, our main subject will be Tennyson’s In Memoriam AHH, and the course will conclude with some more recent elegies. (This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOHd4.)

Week 4 (25 – 31 July)

Group SSOGd: 9.15am – 10.45am

SSOGd1

Comedy in Shakespeare G Frederick Parker

What is happening when we enjoy great comedy? Is comedy meaningful? Is it cruel? Is it even (surely not) a serious matter? While doubtless failing to answer any of these questions conclusively, we shall explore Shakespeare’s genius for comedy at various stages in his career, from the pure comedy of A Midsummer Night’s Dream through the great Sir John Falstaff to its strong residual presence in the tragedies.

SSOGd2

King Lear and Macbeth Alexander Lindsay

Written within a year of each other, these are widely regarded as Shakespeare’s most profound tragedies. This course will consider them not only as studies in moral evil, but also as tragedies of state with a particular relevance to the Jacobean period.

SSOGd3

Poems and the unconscious Stephen Logan

That we have an ‘unconscious’mind is now widely assumed, though the concept does not seem to have been fully formulated until the beginning of the twentieth century. Some such notion, however, is obviously manifest in (for example) the medieval preoccupation with dreams, which in turn has antecedents in the Bible and in classical antiquity. We investigate the concept of the unconscious as promoted by Freud and developed by later psychoanalysts. We focus, however, on how Coleridge, Eliot and Heaney engage in discovering what they (and we) might know.

SSOGd4

Poetry and the self Clive Wilmer

This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOGc4.

(and we) might know. SSOGd4 Poetry and the self Clive Wilmer This is a double course

Group SSOHd: 2.00pm – 3.30pm

SSOHd1

Happiness in eighteenth-century literature and thought Rowan Boyson

This course will use the concept of happiness – currently a hot topic in economics, neuroscience, and history – as an introduction to eighteenth- century writing. We will analyse short novels, poetry and prose (including works by Johnson, Rousseau, Blake and Wordsworth), and discuss happiness as a personal, ethical and philosophical conundrum.

SSOHd2

Making sense of poetry Stephen Logan

This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOHc2.

SSOHd3

Ecopoetics: literature and the Wild Michael Hrebeniak

With scientific evidence presenting a compelling vision of ecological emergency, the relationship between humanity and the natural world stands as the major enquiry of our age. But this understanding has long been a literary concern, and this course will map a field stretching from Han Shan and Wordsworth to D H Lawrence and Gary Snyder, in order to examine representations of nature as beauty, habitat, shamanic agency and resource.

SSOHd4

The English elegy Clive Wilmer

This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOHc4.

agency and resource. SSOHd4 The English elegy Clive Wilmer This is a double course which can
“I explored the beautiful surroundings of Cambridge and had the possibility of experiencing famous Cambridge

“I explored the beautiful surroundings of Cambridge and had the possibility of experiencing famous Cambridge college life.”

Izabela Prager, Poland

History Summer School

18 – 31 July

Programme Director: David Smith Fellow, Director of Studies in History, Tutor for Graduate Students, Selwyn College; Affiliated Lecturer, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge

The History Summer School, now in its twentieth year, is intended primarily for those who are currently students or teachers of history, or who have been engaged in historical study at some stage. However, applications are welcome from anyone with a real commitment to the subject. The programme offers scope for detailed study of specific historical topics, from Roman times to the present day. There is a marked emphasis on British history, but analysis of a wider European and global context plays an important part in the programme.

The academic programme

• Plenary lecture course SSOLM0:

The theme of this year’s morning plenary lectures is Transitions of Power. Collectively, the speakers explore this theme in different historical periods and in various parts of the world. The talks are designed to extend your knowledge into areas not covered by the special subject courses, and will develop your knowledge and understanding of many historical figures and broader areas of history.

Special subject courses Much of the teaching is given in special subject classes, led by members of the University’s Faculty of History and visiting academics. The

core of your programme will be your chosen special subject courses, each

of which meets five times.

The format of the programme allows

a wide choice of subject area: you may wish to attend courses which most obviously complement one another or you may opt to make a selection which covers the broadest historical period possible.

Transitions of Power

• Four special subject courses (two for each week)

• Evening lectures

Plenary lectures and evening talks Each year, eminent historians from this University and beyond are invited to contribute plenary lectures related to a chosen theme.

History Summer School

Special Subject Courses

Classes are held from Monday to Friday at the times shown. Participants choose two courses per week, one from Group SSOL and one from Group SSOM.

Week 1 (18 – 24 July)

Group SSOLa: 11.00am – 12.30pm

SSOLa1

King James VI and I David Smith

James VI and I is one of the most interesting and controversial of British monarchs. He was a philosopher-king, an intellectual in politics, whose historical reputation has been rehabilitated in recent decades. This course will investigate James’s personality, beliefs and policies through a range of primary sources. It will focus particularly on his personality, his career as King, the use that he made of his powers, and the nature of his achievements.

SSOLa2

Revolution and dictatorship in Latin America 1952–1980 Charlie Nurse

Many people expected the Cuban Revolution of 1959–1961 would be followed by similar events elsewhere in Latin America. This course looks at why the hopes of revolutionaries such as Che Guevara were not realised and why, instead, the continent experienced repressive military dictatorships in the 1960s and 1970s.

SSOLa3

Ancient Rome: society and popular culture Jeremy Toner

This course studies the culture of the non-elite in the Roman world. It looks at how a whole host of different social groups – peasants, craftsmen, labourers, slaves, fortune-tellers, beggars and entertainers – coped with the problems of living in a harsh, hierarchical society. We will see how the people managed risk, maintained health and sanity, related to competitors and superiors, had some fun and, on occasion, spoke truth to power.

SSOLa4

Winston Churchill – the greatest Briton? Mark Goldie

Recently the British voted Churchill the greatest Briton. Why? Was he the colossus of the twentieth century, or is his status a measure of Britain’s nostalgic fixation on Second World War glories? Churchill’s career spanned the century: he took part in the last cavalry charge in British

history and lived to authorise the atomic bomb. A child of aristocracy, ‘the people’s Winston’is a mass of contradictions: the saviour of his country in 1940; a defender of a declining Empire; a radical liberal; a reactionary conservative. He epitomised Britain’s confused identity in the modern world, her triumphs and her decline.

Group SSOMa: 2.00pm – 3.30pm

SSOMa1

The French Revolution and its enemies Seán Lang

No event so shook history as the revolution that burst over France in 1789. It began as a bold attempt to reshape an ancient kingdom along the lines of reason; it quickly sank into bloody hysteria – or so its opponents claimed. Why were the high hopes of 1789 so quickly dashed, and why did the Revolution provoke such bitter hatred both at home and abroad? What happened when the French spread their ideals of liberty and equality to the rest of Europe – by force? (This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOMb1.)

SSOMa2

The reign of Charles I, 1625–49 David Smith

This course will investigate the personality, beliefs and policies of Charles I, the only King in English

history to have been put on trial and publicly executed. In particular, it will explore the extent of his responsibility for the outbreak of the English Civil War, and consider how far he brought his own fate upon himself. The classes will make use of an extensive selection of primary sources.

SSOMa3

Whatever happened to Fascism? Neo-Fascism, neo-Nazism and the Far Right since 1945 John Pollard

This course will trace the history of the Far Right in Europe since 1945. In particular, it will look at explicitly neo-Fascist and neo-Nazi movements in the last thirty years, with a focus on Britain and Italy, against the background of the development of the broader Far Right in that period.

SSOMa4

No picnic: insights into modern British military history Diana Henderson

In this course we set the scene in the Victorian period, we examine in detail a battle experience of World War I, we survey the impact on the nation of World War II including intelligence and deception, we study the last set piece attack in Europe and its consequences in the Cold War and we see in stark relief how history really does repeat itself.

Week 2 (25 – 31 July)

Group SSOLb: 11.00am – 12.30pm

SSOLb1

Oliver Cromwell and the English Revolution David Smith

Oliver Cromwell remains one of the most controversial and complex figures in British History. Was he driven by consistent principles or by ambition and self-interest? How did he attain such extraordinary power? What was his impact on his times and what legacy did he leave behind? This course will explore these and other questions relating to Cromwell and the English Revolution by examining a range of documents, especially his own letters and speeches.

SSOLb2

The Spanish Civil War, 1936–1939 Charlie Nurse

Although the Civil War was an important conflict in inter-war Europe, it is frequently overlooked in histories of the period or seen merely as part of the wider struggles of the 1930s. This course examines the war and its causes, seeing it as a Spanish conflict with Spanish origins and with consequences which are still controversial in Spain today.

SSOLb3

Uneasy heads, unsettled bodies:

the Tudors and their dominion Richard Rex

Few dynasties have caught the imagination more than the Tudors:

Henry VIII and Elizabeth I are two of the most easily recognised English Monarchs of all time. We consider the realities behind the reputations of five of the most influential rulers England ever had.

SSOLb4

Making and breaking the Soviet Union Jonathan Davis

During its 74 year history, the Soviet Union went through various stages. This course assesses how Lenin and Stalin made the Soviet system, the ‘stable’era of Khrushchev and Brezhnev, and Gorbachev’s breaking of the Soviet Union.

Group SSOMb: 2.00pm – 3.30pm

SSOMb1

The French Revolution and its enemies Seán Lang

This is a double course which can only be taken with course SSOMa1.

SSOMb2

Romantics, Radicals and Republicans in France 1820–1880 Tom Stammers

This course will examine the secret societies and subcultures from 1820–1880 that were committed to overthrowing the status quo and restructuring the social order in line with bold new conceptions of community, class and gender. Artisans and intellectuals, exiles and feminists, the course will look at the proliferation of socialist and revolutionary thought across this formative period.

SSOMb3

Victorian ideas: life, death and the future Michael Ledger-Lomas

Victorians were modern people who liked to meditate on ancient questions. Does God exist and if not why is life worth living? Is there life

after death? Should we fear or embrace the future? Taking in theology, literature and art, this course catches the Victorians in the act of framing their answers, which were by turns bizarre and profound, grotesque and deeply moving.

SSOMb4

The British rediscovery of the Ancient World David Gange

The nations of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europe developed a host of techniques for rediscovering the ancient Mediterranean and Near East: the rise of travel, emergence of the museum, decipherment of scripts, the birth of archaeology. This course will explore how knowledge of Egypt, Assyria, and Homeric Greece was integrated into British society and fuelled competition between nascent European nationalisms.

and Homeric Greece was integrated into British society and fuelled competition between nascent European nationalisms.
“I could not be happier with all my classes and lectures in the Shakespeare Summer

“I could not be happier with all my classes and lectures in the Shakespeare Summer School.”

Jacquielynn Wolff, United States of America

Shakespeare Summer School

1 – 14 August

Programme Director: Catherine Alexander Fellow of the Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham

The Shakespeare Summer School was first held in 1994. This programme has proved hugely popular with students and Shakespeare enthusiasts from around the world. Leading scholars, editors, researchers and practitioners contribute to the Summer School, providing a unique academic experience and offering you the exposure to the latest developments in Shakespeare studies. Cambridge has a reputation for radical and innovative Shakespeare scholarship and interpretation, and many prominent actors and directors have studied here.

The academic programme

• Plenary course SSORS0:

Interpreting Shakespeare

• Four special subject courses (two for each week)

• Evening lectures

Plenary lectures All participants attend the plenary lecture course SSORS0 on each teaching day. This programme of lectures on Interpreting Shakespeare offers a unique opportunity to learn with recognised experts from this University and beyond.

It is important to note that the benefit of this series of lectures lies in its

diversity of critical and historical approaches to Shakespeare on page and stage and its cumulative force. You will be able to build up a considerable understanding of different areas of scholarship and issues raised in the lecture course will inform the special subject classes you are attending.

Special subject courses The core of your programme will be your chosen special subject courses, led by members of the University’s Faculty of English and visiting academics.

You may wish to attend courses which most obviously complement one another or to make a selection which

covers the broadest range of

Shakespearean study possible.

You will be expected to have done

substantial preparatory reading before you arrive in Cambridge. It cannot be emphasised too strongly that the benefit to be derived from the classes is directly proportional to the amount of preliminary reading which has been done.

Evening lectures A varied programme of evening talks enhances your Cambridge experience and extends the topics for debate and discussion.

Shakespeare Summer School

Special Subject Courses

Classes are held from Monday to Friday at the times shown. Participants choose two courses per week, one from Group SSOR and one from Group SSOS.

Week 1 (1 – 7 August)

Group SSORa: 9.15am – 10.45am

SSORa1

Shakespeare’s Roman tragedies Alexander Lindsay

This two-week course will explore Shakespeare’s four Roman plays, beginning with the early Titus Andronicus, through Julius Caesar to the late masterpieces Antony and Cleopatra and Coriolanus. A central theme will be how the characteristic Roman virtues work against the protagonists, and Ben Jonson’s Sejanus will be used as a term of comparison. (This is a double course which can only be taken with SSORb1.)

SSORa2

Guilt and ambition in Macbeth Vivien Heilbron

In a series of practical workshops, you will work with a professional actor and director on key scenes and speeches, exploring Shakespeare’s dramatic language. We will focus on the complex relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth.

SSORa3

Shakespeare and ‘the problem play’:

Measure for Measure, All’s Well that Ends Well and The Merchant of Venice John Lennard

‘Problem plays’persists as a category, but which plays are meant, and why, is wildly variant. This course starts with a hard look at the term, a Victorian coinage, and considers three plays to ask what the problem is, exactly, and why it does – or does not – deserve a label of its own.

SSORa4

Shakespearean justice Paul Suttie

Some of Shakespeare’s most memorable characters are driven by the desire for justice. But what is justice? And are we right to expect it from our rulers, or from the world, or from a play? These questions are probed deeply, and often painfully, in The Merchant of Venice and King Lear.

Group SSOSa: 2.00pm – 3.30pm

SSOSa1

SSOSa3

Shakespeare’s lovers

Interpreting Macbeth Catherine Alexander

Clive Wilmer

In his youthful drama Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare projected the world of Renaissance love poetry on to the stage. Some years later, in Troilus and Cressida, he subjected the same language, ideals and conventions to bitterly comic irony. Then, at the height of his powers, he turned to the tragedy of middle-aged love in Antony and Cleopatra. This trajectory is also, in some ways, the trajectory of his whole career. (This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOSb1.)

This course will take a chronological approach to the afterlife of Shakespeare’s Macbeth beginning with the comic presentation of the witches and the political appropriations of the eighteenth century then considering the subsequent performance history of the play – on stage and screen – with a focus on Lady Macbeth and the presentation of the supernatural.

SSOSa4

 

Twelfth Night and ‘the picture of

SSOSa2

Shakespeare, Marlowe and the English history play Alexander Lindsay

The course will explore how these two great contemporaries responded to, and learned from, each other’s political dramas, in particular the handling of the stage-Machiavel. Consideration will be given to the impact of Marlowe’s versification, and comparisons drawn between The Jew of Malta and King Richard III, and between Edward II and King Richard II.

“we three”‘ Stewart Eames

This course on Shakespeare’s (arguably) greatest comedy will investigate the play’s engagement and manipulation of its audience. Some knowledge of early performance conditions will be assumed.

the play’s engagement and manipulation of its audience. Some knowledge of early performance conditions will be

Week 2 (8 – 14 August)

Group SSORb: 9.15am – 10.45am

SSORb1

SSORb4

Shakespeare’s Roman tragedies Alexander Lindsay

Interpreting Othello

Catherine Alexander

This is a double course which can only be taken with SSORa1.

This course will consider key moments in the life of Shakespeare’s Othello, beginning with the composition of the play (how did the playwright manipulate his source material?) and progressing through significant performances on stage and screen, influential pieces of criticism, and the reception of the play.

Group SSOSb: 2.00pm – 3.30pm

SSORb2

Letting the words do the work:

Shakespeare directs the actor Vivien Heilbron

In this workshop course we explore key speeches from several plays, discovering how Shakespeare’s dramatic language can help the actor to make specific choices about the characters’thoughts, emotions and objectives. Participants will actively explore the physical and vocal possibilities for actors interpreting these speeches.

SSOSb1

Shakespeare’s lovers

Clive Wilmer

This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOSa1.

 

SSOSb2

SSORb3

What happens in Hamlet Clive Wilmer

Experience and innocence in Othello Vivien Heilbron

Hamlet is Shakespeare’s longest and most famous play. It is often said to be something of a puzzle. This course simply studies the text, one session for each of the five acts, and asks what sort of conclusions can be reached. There will be some discussion of differences of text and a minimum of essential contextualisation; otherwise, we shall focus exclusively on Shakespeare’s words.

In a series of practical workshops, you will work with a professional actor and director on key scenes and speeches, focusing especially on the complex relationship between Iago and Othello and the marriage of Othello and Desdemona. We will “let the words do the work”and look for ways in which Shakespeare helps the actor to make choices.

SSOSb3

Shakespeare’s indecorum: Titus Andronicus, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Cymbeline John Lennard

Voltaire thought Shakespeare a barbarian for mixing tragedy and comedy, but genre-bending is close to the heart of his greatness. This course looks at three highly indecorous plays (early, middle, and late) where the muddles of‘comical-historical-tragical- pastoral’become superb fusions, and asks how he found such strength in generic hybridity.

SSOSb4

King Lear and ‘the murmuring surge’ Stewart Eames

This course on Shakespeare’s most painful and eclectic tragedy will investigate the play’s engagement and manipulation of its audience. Some knowledge of early performance conditions will be assumed.

the play’s engagement and manipulation of its audience. Some knowledge of early performance conditions will be
“[A] fantastic experience!” Helle Trolle Nordentoft-Christensen, Denmark 68

“[A] fantastic experience!”

Helle Trolle Nordentoft-Christensen, Denmark

Medieval Studies Summer School

1 – 14 August

Programme Director: Rowena E Archer Fellow of Brasenose College, University of Oxford; Lecturer for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education

“The University of Cambridge Medieval Studies programme has no competitor; it offers a unique opportunity for students to work with the greatest British medievalists who are on hand to discuss their area of expertise in a way that is at once challenging yet accessible. The tutors are with us on the programme to help you form your own arguments about big historical issues but also to help you to understand the complexities of your chosen topic.”Dr Rowena E Archer

The Medieval Studies Summer School, established in 1997, is intended primarily for current undergraduate or graduate students, and college or university teachers. It presents a valuable opportunity for anyone with a primary interest in any one area of medieval studies to undertake interdisciplinary study. Others with knowledge or genuine interest in any related discipline are also welcome.

The academic programme

• Plenary course SSOKN0:

Saints and Sinners

• Four special subject courses (two for each week)

• Evening lectures

Special subject courses At the core of your programme of study are your four chosen specialist- taught courses, concentrating on particular aspects of medieval art, architecture, history, literature or politics. These special subject classes are led by recognised experts from the University of Cambridge and other British universities.

Plenary lectures All participants attend the series of plenary lectures focusing on Saints and Sinners, and offering a unique opportunity to learn with recognised experts from this University and beyond. You will be able to build up a considerable understanding of specific areas and gain a broader perspective from lectures examining many different facets of the medieval world.

Evening lectures Additional evening lectures extend the range of subjects addressed, and

some – such as introductions to weekend excursion venues or plays –

are open to participants in other Summer Schools.

Medieval Studies Summer School

Special Subject Courses

Classes are held from Monday to Friday at the times shown. Participants choose two courses per week, one from Group SSOK and one from Group SSON.

Week 1 (1 – 7 August)

Group SSOKa: 11.00am – 12.30pm

SSOKa1

Scandal, glamour and politics: courts and courtiers in late medieval Europe Nigel Saul

The course will examine the origins, character and physical setting of the princely courts of late medieval Europe, concentrating especially on the courts of England, France and Burgundy. Particular attention will be given to the role of the court as a political centre, a forum for the display of majesty and a community of polite living. (This is a double course which can only be taken with SSONa1.)

SSOKa2

Nasty, brutish and short: rethinking the lives of medieval peasants Benjamin Dodds

Peasants are often depicted as helpless victims of exploitative lords, backward technology and their own stubborn boorishness. Over recent years much has been done to revise this understanding, revealing the complexity of peasant society. This course will explore the lives and outlooks of peasants in medieval England.

SSOKa3

The Norman Conquest John Maddicott

How was a small band of military adventurers able to conquer and colonise one of the richest and best organised states in Europe? We consider the origins of the Conquest in the reign of Edward the Confessor; its course and resistance to it; changes brought by the imposition of a foreign ruler, a new military aristocracy and a colonial settlement of local lords; and – importantly – continuity from the English past.

SSOKa4

Religion, romance, satire and sex in The Canterbury Tales Colin Wilcockson

Geoffrey Chaucer (1340–1400) was a poet of remarkable emotional and poetic range from high romance, to social satire, to explicit confession, to hilarious obscenity, to the mocking of academic pomposity, to tragic suffering. These five classes will attempt to indicate something of the versatility of one of the greatest

English poets, and to set the works in their literary and social contexts.

Group SSONa: 2.00pm – 3.30pm

SSONa1

Scandal, glamour and politics: courts and courtiers in late medieval Europe Nigel Saul

This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOKa1.

SSONa2

The Black Death Benjamin Dodds

The Black Death was the worst disaster in recorded history: it is likely that around half the population of Europe perished. Its origins remain mysterious and its effects debatable. On this course, students will examine both issues and reach their own conclusions using the most recent historical research and contemporary sources.

SSONa3

King, barons and people: the making and meaning of Magna Carta John Maddicott

Magna Carta (1215) is traditionally seen as the foundation-stone of English political liberty. This course examines the circumstances which brought it into being – in particular, the oppressive government of King

John. The Charter itself will be then analysed to show the remedies which it offered to the various groups in the political community. Finally, its legacy to John’s successors will be assessed.

SSONa4

Depicting saints (and sinners) Spike Bucklow

This course takes as read that medieval artists’materials were inherently meaningful. It explores how artists used those meanings to sanctify the painting process and add a hidden layer of meaning to the painted object. It focuses on the making of English manuscripts and panel paintings.

Week 2 (8 – 14 August)

Group SSOKb: 11.00am – 12.30pm

SSOKb1

Politics and society during the Wars of the Roses, c1450–1485 Rowena E Archer

Mid fifteenth-century England was wracked by civil war. France was lost, the king was mad, nobility and gentry resorted to violence, yet somehow most folk managed to carry on relatively normal lives. We shall explore the war but also how ordinary people flourished despite the instability. (This is a double course which can only be taken with SSONb1.)

how ordinary people flourished despite the instability. (This is a double course which can only be

SSOKb2

The Arthurian legend in the Middle Ages Elizabeth Archibald

The Arthurian legend was hugely popular in the Middle Ages. Texts to be read will include Geoffrey of Monmouth, Marie de France, Chrétien de Troyes, Chaucer, and Malory. Topics for discussion will include the conflict of love and chivalry, the importance of religion and magic, and the representation of women.

SSOKb3

The Crusade of Richard the Lionheart Malcolm Barber

Saladin’s victory over the Christian army at the battle of Hattin in 1187 was followed by his capture of Jerusalem and the rapid conquest of most of the crusader states. This course analyses the role of King Richard of England in the Third Crusade between 1187 and 1192 during which he helped to recapture Acre and defeated Saladin in battle, but ultimately failed to regain Jerusalem.

SSOKb4

Medieval houses: rich and poor (un)alike Frank Woodman

Medieval houses survive in surprising numbers and in a variety of materials. The obvious division of major and minor must be supplemented by urban and rural. We shall examine the basic needs of all domestic households, the manor, urban living, palaces/castles and the late medieval phenomenon – the Trophy House.

Group SSONb: 2.00pm – 3.30pm

SSONb1

Politics and society during the Wars of the Roses, c1450–1485 Rowena E Archer

This is a double course which can only be taken with SSOKb1.

SSONb2

Crusade, heresy and inquisition Jonathan Phillips

In southern France at the start of the thirteenth century there emerged a profound new threat to the Christian Church: the Cathar heresy. When, in 1208, a churchman was murdered, Pope Innocent III unleashed the full force of the crusade. We shall explore the brutal outcome through a wide range of contemporary documents.

SSONb3

Medieval political ideas: power, authority and consent Joseph Canning

Medieval political ideas were important in their own period but also as sources of early modern conceptions. Political authority was understood to derive both from God and human action. This course studies:

kingship by divine grace; conflicts between the powers of emperor and pope; city-republicanism; and the godly ruler.

SSONb4

Edward II: an unsuitable king? Philip Morgan

In the celebrity version Edward II started out his rule with a boyfriend, but lost his throne to a conspiracy led by his wife and her lover. More importantly his twenty-year reign (1307–27) was marked by political murders, wars for Scottish independence, European famine and the highest achievements of English architecture.

political murders, wars for Scottish independence, European famine and the highest achievements of English architecture.
“I attended lessons by interesting and helpful teachers, made a lot of new friends and

“I attended lessons by interesting and helpful teachers, made a lot of new friends and improved my English. It was a great experience.”

Giulia Cantarini, Italy

English for Academic Purposes (EAP)

18 July – 14 August

This programme is for second language students already proficient in English who wish to develop their language skills further. Participants should have achieved an English level equivalent to 6.0-6.5 on the IELTS scale (speaking/listening).

The first two weeks of the programme are spent taking the English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course for students who wish to improve their English at an advanced level in the intensive, personalised programme offered by the Language Centre of the University of Cambridge.

The course is designed around learners’specific needs and is delivered through a flexible combination of face- to-face and online learning. The focus is on learner support, helping them to cope effectively with academic English. The primary goal of this two-week course will be on the listening process; the secondary focus of the course will be on speaking.

In weeks three and four of the programme you take academic courses as a member of the University of Cambridge International Summer Schools. You can choose one of:

International Summer School Term II, the Medieval Studies Summer School or the Shakespeare Summer School.

These courses provide the opportunity for putting into action some of the skills learned in the previous two weeks, as well as the chance for rigorous academic study at the University of Cambridge.

Please note – you can only opt to take courses from one of the Summer Schools listed above and cannot mix courses from other programmes.

During the programme you will also be able to attend evening lectures given by leading academics and experts in a variety of subjects.

Accommodation for the English for Academic Purposes programme is available in Selwyn College (Cripps Court and Ann’s Court), Newnham College (standard rooms) and Gonville and Caius College (see pages 85 and 86). You will be living alongside EAP students as well as participants in other Summer School programmes.

If you wish, you can also write papers

for the courses that you take – these

will be graded by the Course Directors and you will be given a narrative report,

a percentage mark, a grade report and

certificate of attendance. If you are attending a degree course in your home country, it is possible that your home university may award you credit towards your degree for these courses.

“Our IELTS course aims to combine the University’s expertise both in the globally recognised exam

“Our IELTS course aims to combine the University’s expertise both in the globally recognised exam as well as in the provision of bespoke EAP support.”

Karen Ottewell, EAP Director

IELTS Preparation Course

11 July – 1 August

The University of Cambridge will be

offering an exciting new alternative to its successful English for Academic Purposes Summer School this year –

a three-week intensive IELTS

preparation course taught at the University’s Language Centre.

The IELTS course draws upon many successful factors of the EAP programme, but is aimed towards those who have not yet achieved the 6.0-6.5 level required.

It is hoped that IELTS students will return to participate in the EAP programme next year.

The course is designed to prepare

candidates for the Academic Training Module in the IELTS examination.

It is aimed at students who already

hold an overall score of at least 5.5 and who wish to upgrade their score in order to gain admission to a British university.

The primary focus of the course is to prepare participants for the IELTS examination – and will include a full mock IELTS examination at the end of the second week of the course.

At the end of the three-week course, participants who wish to can sit the actual IELTS examination in Cambridge.

The secondary focus of the course,

but in many ways the far more important one, is the strengthening and development of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) and the associated key transferable skills, such as presentation skills, academic authoring, which are the abilities required of any student going into UK

Higher Education. This aspect of the course will be drawn from the Language Centre’s own English for Academic Purposes (EAP) programmes which are tailored to the needs of Cambridge undergraduate and postgraduate students.

The course will be restricted to 20 participants. Successful applicants will be invited to join the course on the basis of an assessment.

Teaching staff

International Summer Schools Term I & Term II

Deborah Banham – Affiliated Research Scholar, Department of History and Philosophy of Science and Honorary Research Associate, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, University of Cambridge

Simon Browne – Lecturer for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education

Piers Bursill-Hall – Lecturer for the Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics, University of Cambridge

Jonathan Davis – Principal Lecturer in Soviet and Modern History, Anglia Ruskin University

John Gilroy – Lecturer for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education; Former Lecturer in English, Anglia Ruskin University

Siân Griffiths – Lecturer for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education

Diana Henderson – Alumni and Development Director, Queens’College

Caroline Holmes – Garden Historian, Broadcaster, Lecturer and Writer; Part-time Tutor, University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education

Ulrike Horstmann-Guthrie – Lecturer for the Institute of Continuing Education and the Department of German, University of Cambridge

John Howlett – Graduate Researcher, Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge

Nicholas James – Consultant; Affiliated Scholar in Archaeology, University of Cambridge; Lecturer for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education

Andrew Lacey – Lecturer for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education; Former Member of the Faculty of Architecture and History of Art, University of Cambridge

Seán Lang – Senior Lecturer in History, Anglia Ruskin University

John Lawson – Research Associate, Autism Research Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge; Director of Studies in Social and Political Sciences, Girton College; Senior Lecturer in Psychology, Oxford Brookes University

Graham McCann – Former Lecturer in Social and Political Sciences, University of Cambridge; King’s College

Elizabeth McKellar – Lecturer for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education

Nigel Miller – Lecturer, Royal Holloway and Birkbeck College, University of London; Economic Advisor to Defra UK (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)

Charlie Nurse – Research Associate, Centre of Latin American Studies, University of Cambridge; Associate Lecturer in History, Open University

Susan Oosthuizen – University Senior Lecturer for Landscape and Field Archaeology, Institute of Continuing Education, University of Cambridge; Affiliated Scholar, Department of Archaeology; Fellow of Wolfson College

Jon Phelan – Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education

Joanne Rhymer – Independent Art Historian

Paul Suttie – Former Fellow of Robinson College

John Sutton – Former Senior Lecturer in History, Anglia Ruskin University

Rex Walford – Former Head of the Department of Education, University of Cambridge; Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College

Richard Yates – Former Senior Lecturer, Anglia Ruskin University

Art History Summer School

Spike Bucklow – Senior Research Scientist and Teacher of Theory at the Hamilton Kerr Institute, Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge

Nicholas Friend – Programme Director, Art History Summer School; Director, Inscape Fine Art Study Tours; Queens’College

James Malpas – Tutor at Sotheby’s Institute

Joanne Rhymer – Independent Art Historian

Gail Turner – Independent Lecturer and Art Historian

Timothy Wilcox – Associate Lecturer, University of Surrey

Richard Williams – Independent Art Historian

Science Summer School

Rosie Bolton – Research Associate in Astrophysics, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge

Robin Catchpole – Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge

Val Gibson – Professor of High Energy Physics; Senior Lecturer of Trinity College

James Grime – Enigma Project Officer, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge

Hugh Hunt – Senior Lecturer in Engineering, University of Cambridge; Fellow of Trinity College

Lisa Jardine-Wright – Astrophysicist and Educational Outreach Officer at Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge

John Lawson – Research Associate, Autism Research Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge; Director of Studies in Social and Political Sciences, Girton College; Senior Lecturer in Psychology, Oxford Brookes University

Imre Leader – Professor of Pure Mathematics, Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics, University of Cambridge; Fellow of Trinity College

Dan Neill – Division of Protein and Nucleic Acid Chemistry, Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology; Darwin College

Stephen Peake – Teaching Fellow, Judge Business School, University of Cambridge; Senior Lecturer in Environmental Technology, Open University

Luke Skinner – Royal Society Research Fellow at the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge; Fellow of Christ’s College

Rob Wallach – University Senior Lecturer in Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge; Fellow of King’s College

Peter Wothers – Teaching Fellow, Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge; Fellow of St Catharine’s College

Andrew Wyllie – Professor of Pathology and Head of Department; Fellow of St John’s College

Literature Summer School

Adrian Barlow – Director of Public and Professional Programmes and University Lecturer in Literature, University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education; Senior Member, Wolfson College

Rowan Boyson – Research Fellow in English at King’s College

John Gilroy – Lecturer for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education; Former Lecturer in English, Anglia Ruskin University

Alison Hennegan – Member of the Faculty of English, University of Cambridge; Supernumerary Fellow and Director of Studies in English, Trinity Hall

Ulrike Horstmann-Guthrie – Lecturer for the Institute of Continuing Education and the Department of German, University of Cambridge

Michael Hrebeniak – Fellow, Admissions Tutor and Director of Studies in English, Wolfson College

Alexander Lindsay – Associate Lecturer, Open University

Stephen Logan – University Lecturer, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge; Principal Supervisor in English, Clare College

G Frederick Parker – Senior Lecturer in English, University of Cambridge; Fellow and Director of Studies in English, Clare College

Jan Parker – Senior Member of the Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge; Senior Research Fellow, Open University

Paul Suttie – Former Fellow of Robinson College

Mark Sutton – Associate Lecturer, Open University

Jacqueline Tasioulas – Senior Lecturer in English, Clare College

Clive Wilmer – Affiliated Lecturer, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge; Fellow of Sidney Sussex College

Edward Wilson-Lee – Affiliated College Lecturer and Director of Studies in English, Sidney Sussex College

History Summer School

Jonathan Davis – Principal Lecturer in Soviet and Modern History, Anglia Ruskin University

David Gange – Research Fellow, Cambridge University Victorian Studies Group; Faculty of History, University of Cambridge; Junior Research Fellow, Wolfson College

Mark Goldie – Reader in Intellectual History, University of Cambridge; Fellow of Churchill College

Diana Henderson – Alumni and Development Director, Queens’College

Seán Lang – Senior Lecturer in History, Anglia Ruskin University

Michael Ledger-Lomas – Research Associate, Cambridge University Victorian Studies Group; Faculty of History, University of Cambridge; Fellow of Selwyn College

Charlie Nurse – Research Associate, Centre of Latin American Studies, University of Cambridge; Associate Lecturer in History, Open University

John Pollard – Fellow in History, Trinity Hall; Fellow of the Royal Historical Society; Emeritus Professor of Modern European History, Anglia Ruskin University

Richard Rex – Reader in Reformation History, Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge; Fellow and Tutor, Queens’College

David Smith – Fellow, Director of Studies in History, Tutor for Graduate Students, Selwyn College; Affiliated Lecturer, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge

Tom Stammers – Junior Research Fellow, Gonville and Caius College

Jeremy Toner – Director of Studies in Classics, Hughes Hall

Shakespeare Summer School

Catherine Alexander – Fellow of the Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham

Stewart Eames – Former Member of the Faculty of English, University of Cambridge

Vivien Heilbron – Actor; Director

John Lennard – Former Professor of British and American Literature, University of the West Indies, Mona; Former Newton Trust Lecturer in Practical Criticism, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge; Former Fellow and Director of Studies in English, Trinity Hall

Alexander Lindsay – Associate Lecturer, Open University

Paul Suttie – Former Fellow of Robinson College

Clive Wilmer – Affiliated Lecturer, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge; Fellow of Sidney Sussex College

Medieval Studies Summer School

Rowena E Archer – Fellow of Brasenose College, University of Oxford; Lecturer for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education

Elizabeth Archibald – Professor of Medieval Studies, Department of English, University of Bristol

Malcolm Barber – Emeritus Professor of History, University of Reading

Spike Bucklow – Senior Research Scientist and Teacher of Theory at the Hamilton Kerr Institute, Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge

Joseph Canning – Affiliated Lecturer, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge; Former Reader in History, School of History, Welsh History and Archaeology, Bangor University

Benjamin Dodds – Senior Lecturer, Department of History, Durham University

John R Maddicott – Former Fellow and Tutor in Medieval History, Exeter College, Oxford

Philip Morgan – Senior Lecturer, University of Keele

Jonathan Phillips – Professor of Crusading History, Royal Holloway, University of London

Nigel Saul – Professor of Medieval History, University of London

Colin Wilcockson – Emeritus Fellow and Former Director of Studies in English and in Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, Pembroke College

Frank Woodman – University Lecturer in History of Art and Architecture, University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education

Accommodation

All students on the University of Cambridge International Summer

Schools have the opportunity to live in Cambridge college accommodation. The colleges available to you depend on the programme you are attending. Participants from more than one Summer School might be housed in the same college – this gives you the chance to meet fellow students from

a wide range of backgrounds.

Various options are available, depending on programme choice, from simple room only accommodation through to comfortable en-suite rooms including breakfast and evening meals. Each college varies in character and history, and we hope that the information below helps you make the choice of where to stay if multiple options are available to you on your programme.

Please remember: accommodation is in very basic, single bed-sitting rooms with washbasins: the rooms used are those normally occupied by

Cambridge undergraduates during the academic year, so you will be living like

a Cambridge student. Couples are

normally housed in adjacent rooms.

The colleges are not like hotels:

normally it is not possible to accommodate you if you arrive early (before the programme starts) or want to stay after the end of the programme. Further information about early arrival and late departure is available on our website and in the student handbook you will receive after registration. Those attending

two consecutive programmes and intending to stay for the night(s) between Summer Schools may book accommodation for an additional charge.

Non-residential attendance at the Summer Schools is possible if you prefer to find your own accommodation. Information on guesthouses and lodgings in Cambridge is available from the tourist office. The University can accept no responsibility for finding accommodation for those applying for non-residential places.

You can find information about the individual colleges overleaf and further details can be found on

our website:

www.cont-ed.cam.ac.uk/intsummer

about the individual colleges overleaf and further details can be found on our website: www.cont-ed.cam.ac.uk/intsummer

Gonville and Caius Stephen Hawking Building

Accommodation available for: ISS Term I, ISS Term II, Literature, History, Science, Shakespeare, Medieval Studies and EAP

Facilities include: Wireless internet access; Telephones (public – only within Old Court); Laundry room; Bar; Gardens

Location on map: E/G

Gonville Hall was founded in 1348 by a Norfolk priest, Edmund Gonville. It was enlarged by John Caius, an eminent physician, and the new College of Gonville and Caius received its charter from Mary I in 1557.

This summer, students will be staying in the Stephen Hawking building, officially opened by the Duke of Edinburgh in April 2007. Ten minutes walk from the Old Courts, this state-of-art facility is named after the college’s most celebrated living Fellow, who lived and wrote his bestseller A Brief History of Time in an older building on this site.

Please note: Harvey Court (part of Caius) is being renovated on one side of this new building, and a brand new teaching faculty building is going up on the other side, next to the English Faculty. Parts of the gardens will be inaccessible because there will be a construction crane above them. There will be some building noise during the daytime. You will need to walk to Gonville and Caius Old Court for your breakfast and evening meals.

All of the rooms are en-suite and are offered at a once-in-a-lifetime price, right next door to the Sidgwick Site, where some (but not all) of the teaching takes place.

Wolfson Court

Accommodation available for:

Art History

Facilities include: Wired laptop connections in room; Computer room; Public telephones; Laundry room; Bar/Common room; Courtyards

Location on map: A

Wolfson Court is part of Girton College. In 1869 the educational reformer Emily Davies set up a female establishment on the Cambridge collegiate model, to prepare students for the Cambridge tripos. In 1924 Girton received its formal college charter. In the 1960s and 70s Girton started to admit men, who now account for over half of its student numbers. Its Wolfson Court site was built in 1969. Situated around six inner courts, it provides a pleasant and relaxed setting for studying. The college is a 10–20 minute walk from the main teaching site where classes are held during the day and 15 minutes’walk from the town centre. Evening lectures are held after dinner at Wolfson Court.

Please note that there are no en-suite rooms available within Wolfson Court for the Art History Summer School.

Newnham College

Accommodation available for:

ISS Term I, ISS Term II, EAP

Facilities include: Wireless internet access (in some areas); Computer room; Telephones (public); Laundry room; Gardens

Location on map: F

Newnham College is one of the most important and influential Oxbridge college foundations since the sixteenth century, contributing greatly to feminist reform and producing many leading women writers, scientists and intellectuals. Founded in 1871, its early mentors were Henry Sidgwick, the moral philosopher and promoter of women’s education and Anne Jemima Clough, its first principal. Newnham received a College charter in 1917 and in 1948 its women finally received University degrees. The original series of buildings were designed by Basil Champneys and built in the graceful Queen Anne style with Dutch red-brick gables and white woodwork, well suited to its setting around extensive lawns and flower beds. A number of the student rooms are in more modern buildings which blend well with their older counterparts alongside. Please note: the en-suite rooms available are not on the ground floor.

Selwyn College Old Court, Cripps Court and Ann’s Court

Accommodation available for:

ISS Term I, ISS Term II, EAP IELTS (Cripps Court only)

Facilities include: Wired laptop connections in room; Telephone (public); Laundry room; Bar/Common room; Chapel/Prayer room; Gardens

Location on map: D (Old Court); B (Ann’s Court); C (Cripps Court)

Selwyn College was founded in 1882 in memory of George Augustus Selwyn, the first Bishop of New Zealand. It became a favourite college for the sons of clergymen and to this day maintains strong connections with the Church of England. Selwyn’s Old Court architecture is in the red-brick neo- Tudor style of the 1880s, with a turreted gate-tower and a chapel reminiscent in shape of King’s College chapel built 400 years earlier. Old Court is set in large secluded gardens very close to the teaching rooms and not far from the town centre. Cripps Court is the more modern residential accommodation situated close to Old Court. Ann’s Court is a newly-built facility offering en-suite rooms. Students living in Cripps Court and Ann’s Court take their meals in the main dining hall in Old Court.

en-suite rooms. Students living in Cripps Court and Ann’s Court take their meals in the main
en-suite rooms. Students living in Cripps Court and Ann’s Court take their meals in the main

St Catharine’s College

Accommodation available for: Science, Literature, History, Shakespeare, Medieval Studies

Facilities include: Wireless internet access; Computer room; Telephones (public); Laundry room; Chapel/Prayer room; Gardens; Sports facilities

Location on map: H

St Catharine’s College was founded in 1473 by Robert Woodlark, former Chancellor of the University. Originally established for the study of ‘philosophy and sacred theology’, Woodlark also left elaborate instructions with regard to the prayers to be said for the benefit of his soul following his death. The College was rebuilt in the seventeenth century with work on the main court beginning in 1674 and the chapel completed thirty years later. Today the College is an intriguing mix of the old and the new and is set in the heart of the ancient city of Cambridge only a few minutes’walk from both teaching sites.

We have been advised that there may be some building works at the College, during the period of the Summer Schools, but that any building noise should be limited to day time, when you will be in lectures (at least until mid-afternoon).

Clare College

Accommodation available for: Science, Literature, History, Shakespeare, Medieval Studies

Facilities include: Wireless internet access; Computer room; Wired laptop connections in room; Telephones (public); Laundry room; Bar/Common room; Chapel/Prayer room; Gardens

Location on map: J/K

Founded in 1326 as University Hall and re-founded in 1338 as Clare Hall, this is the second oldest Cambridge College. The College takes its name from Lady Elizabeth de Clare, a wealthy granddaughter of Edward I who endowed the foundation of 1338. The present main court was built by local architects, Grumbold and son, between 1638 and 1715; Grumbold also built the unique bridge, now the oldest on the Cam. The imposing Memorial Court, where you will be living, was designed by Gilbert Scott in the 1920s and helped to accommodate women undergraduates when Clare became one of the first colleges to become co-residential in 1972.

Breakfast and dinner will be a five-minute walk away in Old Court, reached by crossing Thomas Grumbold’s famous bridge.

Breakfast and dinner will be a five-minute walk away in Old Court, reached by crossing Thomas
Breakfast and dinner will be a five-minute walk away in Old Court, reached by crossing Thomas

Programme calendar

Sun

4 Jul

         

Mon 5 Jul Tues 6 Jul Wed 7 Jul

 

Thur 8 Jul

Fri

9 Jul

Science

Literature

Sat

10 Jul

Summer

Summer

Art History

Summer

Sun

11 Jul

School

School

School

   

Mon 12 Jul

Term I

Term I

Tues 13 Jul Wed 14 Jul Thur 15 Jul

Fri

16 Jul

International

Sat

17 Jul

Summer

Sun

18 Jul

School

       

Mon 19 Jul Tues 20 Jul Wed 21 Jul

Term I

Thur 22 Jul

IELTS

Fri

23 Jul

Science

Literature

Sat

24 Jul

Summer

Summer

History

Summer

School

Sun

25 Jul

School

School

Mon 26 Jul

Term II

Term II

 

Tues 27 Jul Wed 28 Jul Thur 29 Jul

Fri

30 Jul

Sat

31 Jul

 

EAP

Sun

1 Aug

       

Mon 2 Aug Tues 3 Aug Wed 4 Aug

   

Thur 5 Aug

Fri

6 Aug

International

Medieval

Sat

7 Aug

Summer

Shakespeare

Summer

School

Studies

Sun

8 Aug

School

Summer

Mon 9 Aug Tues 10 Aug Wed 11 Aug

Term II

 

School

Thur 12 Aug

Fri

13 Aug

Sat

14 Aug

Fees

Selwyn College Ann’s Court En-suite

Selwyn College Old Court En-suite

Selwyn College Old Court Standard

Selwyn College Cripps Court Standard

Newnham College

 

Newnham College

 

Newnham College Standard (Room only)

Gonville and Caius En-suite

Interdisciplinary Summer Schools, EAP and IELTS Preparation Course

En-suite

Standard

ISS Term I

£3,180

£3,030

£2,780

£2,535

£3,020

£2,720

£2,135

£2,500

ISS Term II

£1,860

£1,785

£1,655

£1,520

£1,775

£1,610

£1,310

£1,495

EAP

£3,825

   

£3,130

 

£3,330

 

£3,095

IELTS Preparation Course

     

£2,485

       

Extra nights between programmes*

£74

£68

£58

£48

£68

£55

£32

£46

Specialist

Wolfson Court

 

St Catharine’s College En-suite

St Catharine’s College Standard

Clare College En-suite

Clare College

 

Clare College Standard (Bed & Breakfast only)

Gonville and Caius En-suite