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Prof. A.

Meher Prasad
Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Madras email: prasadam@iitm.ac.in

Dynamic - Loads change with time Nonlinear - Loaded beyond Elastic Limit

Type Linear Static

Usual Name Equivalent Static

Dynamic Effects No Yes No Yes

Material Nonlinearity No No Yes Yes

Linear Dynamic Response Spectrum Nonlinear Static Nonlinear Dynamic Pushover Analysis Time History

Overview

What is pushover analysis? What are its fundamental techniques? What tools can be used? Common pitfalls in pushover analysis Example of pushover analysis application

Why Push-Over Analysis?


Static Nonlinear Analysis technique, also known as sequential yield analysis, or simply "push-over" analysis has gained significant importance during the past few years. It is one of the three analysis techniques recommended by FEMA 273/274 and a main component of the Capacity Spectrum Method (ATC-40). Proper application can provide valuable insights into the expected performance of structural systems and components Misuse can lead to an erroneous understanding of the performance characteristics.

What is Push-Over Analysis?

Push-over analysis is a technique by which a computer model of the building is subjected to a lateral load of a certain shape (i.e., parabolic, inverted triangular or uniform). The intensity of the lateral load is slowly increased and the sequence of cracks, yielding, plastic hinge formations, and failure of various structural components is recorded. Push-over analysis can provide a significant insight into the weak links in seismic performance of a structure.

What is Push-Over Analysis?

A series of iterations are usually required during which, the structural deficiencies observed in one iteration, are rectified and followed by another. This iterative analysis and design process continues until the design satisfies a pre-established performance criteria. The performance criteria for push-over analysis is generally established as the desired state of the building given a roof-top or spectral displacement amplitude.

Objectives of Push-Over Analysis

To obtain the maximum shear strength of the structure, Vb, and the mechanism of collapse. To evaluate if the structure can achieve the collapse mechanism without exhausting the plastic rotation capacity of the members. To obtain the monotonic displacement and global ductility capacity of the structure. To estimate the concentration of damage and IDI (Interstorey Drift Index) that can be expected during the nonlinear seismic response.

Push-over Curve or Capacity Spectrum

V/W (Acceleration)

Using simple modal analysis equations spectral displacement and roof-top displacement may be converted to each other. High-Strength; High-Stiffness; Brittle

Moderate Strength and Stiffness; Ductile Low-Strength; Low-Stiffness; Brittle

Roof-top Displacement

Design Spectra Representation

Ordinary Design

Push-Over Analysis - Composite or ADRS Plot


Co V/W (Acceleration) nst an tP

V/W (Acceleration)

er io d

Li ne s

Period
DESIGN SPECTRUM

Spectral or Roof-top Displacement


ELASTIC DEMAND SPECTRUM

What Tools Can Be Used?


Nonlinear Analysis software with built-in push-over analysis capabilities Nonlinear Analysis software with built-in push-over analysis capabilities DRAIN DRAIN IDARC IDARC SAP2000NL SAP2000NL ETABS ETABS ANSYS ANSYS SAVE SAVE Spread Plasticity Spread Plasticity Spread and Point Plasticity Spread and Point Plasticity Point Plasticity Point Plasticity Point Plasticity Point Plasticity Spread Plasticity Spread Plasticity Point Plasticity (Public version) Point Plasticity (Public version) Spread Plasticity (Research version) Spread Plasticity (Research version)

Sequential application of linear analysis software Sequential application of linear analysis software

Spread and Point Plasticity


1. Nonlinearity is assumed to be distributed along the length of the plastic hinge. 2. It provides a more accurate representation of the actual non-linear behaviour of the element 1. Plasticity is assumed to be concentrated at the critical locations. In addition to usual moment hinges, there can be axial hinges and shear hinges. 2. Plastification of the section is assumed to occur suddenly, and not gradually or fibre-by-fibre.

Length of plastic hinge

Plastic Hinge
Curvature diagram along the length of the member

Establishing the Performance Point

No building can be pushed to infinity without failure. Performance point is where the Seismic Capacity and the
Seismic Demand curves meet.

If the performance point exists and damage state at that


point is acceptable, we have a building that satisfies the push-over criterion.

ATC-40 Method
This is an iterative procedure involving several analyses. For each analysis an effective period for an equivalent elastic system and a corresponding elastic displacement are calculated. This displacement is then divided by a damping factor to obtain an estimate of real displacement at that step of analysis.

V/W (Acceleration)

T0

eff = 0 + 0.05

T e ff

e/B

SRA =
5% damped elastic spectrum

3.21 0.68ln( eff ) 2.12 2.31 0.4 ln( eff ) 1.65

SRV =

Roof-top Displacement

ATC-40 Nonlinear Static Procedure

1.

Develop the Pushover Curve

ATC-40 Nonlinear Static Procedure

2.

Convert Pushover Curve to capacity diagram

ATC-40 Nonlinear Static Procedure

3.

Plot elastic design spectrum in A-D format

ATC-40 Nonlinear Static Procedure


4. Plot the demand diagram and capacity diagram together Intersection point gives the displacement demand Avoids nonlinear RHA; instead analyse equivalent linear systems

ATC-40 Nonlinear Static Procedure

5. Convert displacement demand to roof displacement and component deformation.

6. Compare to limiting values for specified performance goals.

Points to be taken care..


1. Do not underestimate the importance of the loading or displacement shape function. Know your performance objectives before you push the building. If it is not designed, it cannot be pushed. Do not ignore gravity loads. Do not push beyond failure unless otherwise you can model failure. Pay attention to rebar development and lap lengths. Do not ignore shear failure mechanisms P-Delta effects may be more important than you think. Do not confuse the Push-over with the real earthquake loading. Three-dimensional buildings may require more than a planar push.

2.
3.

4. 5. 6. 7.
8.

9.
10.

1. Do not underestimate the importance of the loading shape function.


The loading or deformation shape function is selected to represent the predominant dynamic mode shape of the building. It is most common to keep the load shape constant during the push. Loading shape importance increases for tall buildings whose earthquake response is not dominated by a single mode shape. For these buildings, a loading shape function based on the first mode shape may seriously underestimate the seismic demand on the intermediate floor levels.

1. Do not underestimate the importance of the loading shape function.


0.16 0.14 0.12 Vb/W 0.1 0.08 0.06 0.04 0.02 0 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8
Inverted Triangle
Uniform
parabola

/H(%)

Adapting Load Patterns

So called higher mode effects as the load distribution changes Limit base moment increases adapts for maximum shear force Limit base shear increases adapts for maximum bending moment Not apparent from linear analysis

2. Know your performance objectives before you push the building.


No building can be displaced to infinity without damage. building can be displaced It is of paramount importance to understand the specific performance objectives desired for the building. Performance objectives such as collapse prevention, life safety, or immediate occupancy have to be translated into technical terms such as: (a) a given set of design spectra, and (b) specific limit states acceptable for various structural components A push-over analysis without a clearly defined performance objectives is of little use.

BUILDING PERFORMANCE LEVELS


Structural Performance Levels and Ranges
Nonstructural Performance Levels S-1 Immediate Occupancy S-2 Damage Control S-3 Life Safety S-4 Limited Safety S-5 Collapse Prevention S-6 Not Considered

N-A Operational

1- A Operational

2- A

NR

NR

NR

NR

N-B Immediate Occupancy

1- B Immediate Occupancy

2- B

3- B

NR

NR

NR

N-C Life Safety N-D Hazards Reduced

1- C

2- C

3- C Life Safety

4- C

5- C

6- C

NR

2- D

3- D

4- D

5- D

6- D

N-E Not Considered

NR

NR

3-E

4-E

5-E Collapse Prevention

No rehabilitation

Ref: FEMA 356

Earthquake Levels (FEMA356)


Earthquake levels p t years Serviceability earthquake - 1 Serviceability earthquake - 2 Design basis earthquake (DBE) 50% 20% 10% 5% 10% 2% 10% 50 50 50 50 100 50 250 N years 72 224 475 975 1000 949 2475 2500 2373 Very rare Approximate N years 75 225 500 Frequent Occasional Rare Remarks

Maximum considered (MCE) earthquake -1 (alternate)

Maximum considered (MCE) earthquake -2 (alternate)

Extremely rare

Performance Objectives (FEMA 356)


Earthquake levels Probability of Exceedance in a period Target building performance level Operational Immediate Occupancy Life Safety Collapse Prevention

Serviceability earthquake - 1 Serviceability earthquake - 2 Design basis earthquake (DBE)

50% in 50 years

20% in 50 years

10% in 50 years

Ba s

Maximum considered Earthquake (MCE)

2% in 50 years

ick Sa fe ty
o

Ob jep c ti v

3. If it is not designed, it cannot be pushed.


E, I, and A are not sufficient. Push-over characteristics are strong functions of force-displacement characteristics of individual members and their connections. If detailed characteristics are not known, the pushover analysis will be an exercise in futility.

4. Do not ignore gravity loads.


Inclusion or exclusion of the gravity loads can have a pronounced effect on the shape of the push-over curve and the member yielding and failure sequence. Example: Due to the unsymmetric distribution of + and - reinforcements in R/C beams, gravity load delays the onset of yielding and cracking in the beams, resulting in a stiffer structure at lower magnitudes of base shear. The ultimate capacity of the structure, is usually reduced with increasing gravity load.

5. Do not push beyond failure unless otherwise you can model failure

Ultimate Capacity

Lateral Force

Modeled with failures ignored

Actual

Force or Moment

Displacement

Displacement or Curvature

6. Pay attention to rebar development and lap lengths.


For R/C members of existing structures, it is very important to note the development lengths when calculating member capacities. If inadequate development lengths are present, as they are in most of the older buildings, the contributing steel area should be reduced to account for this inadequacy. Failure to do so will result in overestimating the actual capacity of the members and results in an inaccurate push-over curve.

Joint Detailing

Such reinforcement detailing should not be used

7. Do not ignore shear failure mechanisms


If the shear capacity of structural members is not sufficient to permit the formation of flexural plastic hinges, shear failure will precede the formation of plastic hinges at the end of the member. In R/C members, even if the shear capacity is sufficient, but lateral reinforcement is not spaced close enough at the plastic hinge zones, the concrete may crush in the absence of sufficient confinement. If this happens, the plastic capacity is suddenly dropped to what can be provided by the longitudinal steel alone.

Shear Failure

Short Column Failure

This failure can be avoided by providing special confining reinforcement over entire column length

8. P- effects may be more important than you think.


The P- effects become increasingly significant with larger lateral displacements and larger axial column forces. Strong column - weak beam design strategy commonly deals with the moment capacity of columns in the undeformed state. In a substantially deformed state, the moment capacity of columns may be sufficiently reduced to counteract the strong column - weak beam behaviour envisioned by the design. Cases of plastic hinge formations during a push-over analysis in columns "designed" to be stronger than the beams are not rare.

9. Do not confuse the Push-over with the real earthquake loading.


The push-over load is monotonically increased The earthquake generated forces continually change in amplitude and direction during the duration of earthquake ground motion. Push-over loads and structural response are in phase Earthquake excitations and building response are not necessarily in phase. This is particularly true for near-fault ground motions which tend to concentrate the damage on the lower floors, an effect which is difficult to model by the push-over loads.

9. Do not confuse the Push-over with the real earthquake loading.


0.2

0.15

0.1

0.05

IDARC SAP 0.16g 0 0.002 0.004 0.006 0.008 0.25g 0.3g 0.35g

Vb/W

0 -0.008 -0.006 -0.004 -0.002 -0.05

-0.1

-0.15

-0.2

/H

10. Three-dimensional buildings may require more than a planar push.


For building with strong asymmetry in plan, or with numerous non-orthogonal elements, a planar (two dimensional) push-over analysis may not suffice. For such cases a 3D model of the building must be constructed and subjected to push-over analysis. Three dimensional buildings may be pushed in the principal directions independently, or pushed simultaneously in orthogonal directions.

Analysis Procedure SAP2000 NL

Pushover Analysis Procedure


Create 3D Model Gravity Pushover (Force controlled) DL+0.25LL Lateral Pushover (Displacement controlled)

Assign end offsets Define Load case


(Lateral Load at centre of mass)

Define Hinge properties Run Static analysis

Assign Hinge properties Beams Default M3 Columns Default PMM

Run static pushover analysis

Define Static Pushover Cases

Establish Performance point

Material Properties
Concrete Properties

Cube compressive strength, fck Modulus of Elasticity of concrete (


Reinforcing Steel Properties
E c = 5000 f ck )

Yield strength of steel Modulus of Elasticity of steel Es

Modification Factors
Factors to estimate the expected strength 1.5 times the Concrete compressive strength (fck) Steel yield stress (fy) (Factor of 1.25 used for capacity estimation considering strain hardening of steel)

Knowledge Factors, mk
No 1 2 3 4 5 6 Description of available information Original construction documents, including material testing report Documentation as in (1) but no material testing undertaken Documentation as in (2) and minor deteriorations of original condition Incomplete but usable original construction documents Documentation as in (4) and limited inspection and material test results with large variation. Little knowledge about the details of components mk 1.0 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5

Material Properties

Frame Elements

Infill (struts)

Modeling of Structural elements


Beams and columns Slab Flat slabs Beam column joints Asymmetric Structures 3D Frame elements Diaphragm action (ignore the out of plane stiffness) Plate elements End offsets (Rigid zone factor 1) Centre of mass (add non structural mass to corresponding beams) Centre of stiffness Include water tanks, cantilever slabs

Inclusion of appendages

Modeling of Structural elements


Stairway slabs Shear Walls Infill walls Foundation Isolated footings Single pile Multiple piles Plinth beams Fixity of columns at top of pile cap Frame elements Hinged at the bottom of foundation Fixed at five times the diameter of pile Equivalent frame elements Wide Column Elements Equivalent strut method

Modeling of Beams and Columns


3D Frame Elements Cross Sectional dimensions, reinforcement details, material type Effective moment of inertia Beams Rectangular T-Beam L-Beam Columns 0.5 Ig 0.7 Ig 0.6 Ig 0.7 Ig

Modeling of Beams

Modeling of Columns

Modeling of Beam Column Joints


End offsets (Rigid zone factor 1)

Modeling of Slab

Modeling of Infill Equivalent Strut Approach


Step 1. Equivalent Strut Properties Smith and Carter Model a) Strength of infill, P b) Initial modulus of elasticity of infill, Ei c) Equivalent strut width (when force in the strut = R), w d) Thickness of infill, t

Step 2. Stress Strain Values Stress = P/AEi ,where A = wt Strain = P/A

Modeling of Shear Wall (Lift Core )


Type I Model - Single Lift Core Column Equivalent Wide Column Elements connected to the frame through rigid links

BEAM
y x

MASTER NODE
t L
Beam elements with rigid ends

Modeling of Shear Wall (Lift Core )


Type II Model - Single Lift Core Column The lift core can be treated as a single column with master node defined at the centroid and the beams connected by rigid links

BEAM y x CORE MASTER NODE

SLAVE NODE

Modeling of Shear Wall


(Lift Core Column Properties)

For axial and torsional rigidity, the full cross-sectional area should be used

BEAM
y x

CORE MASTER NODE

FOR A, J

SLAVE NODE

Modeling of Shear Wall


(Lift Core Column Properties)

For shear along y axis and bending about x-axis (ground motion along y-axis), the walls in the direction of ground motion should be considered as two parallel elements

BEAM
y x

CORE MASTER NODE

FOR Ay, Ixx

SLAVE NODE

Modeling of Shear Wall


(Lift Core Column Properties)

For shear along x axis and bending about y-axis (ground motion along x-axis), the walls in the direction of ground motion should be considered as three parallel elements

BEAM
y x

CORE MASTER NODE

FOR Ax, Iyy

SLAVE NODE

Beam Hinge Properties - Flexural hinge (M3)

Hinge Properties for Beams

b a

Lateral Load

1.0

D c A y

Lateral Deformation

Generalized Load Deformation Relations * ATC 40 Volume 1

Beam Hinge Properties - Shear hinge

Beam Hinge Properties - Shear hinge


Shear capacity
Shear strength (V)

V sy = f y A sv

d 0 .6 s v

Vy

Vu = 1.05Vy

=0
0.2 Vy
y

Total Shear Capacity, Vy = Vc + Vsy

Residual Shear Strength


1.5y
m=15y

Shear deformation ()

Refer Clause 6.3.3 of IS13920

Column Hinge Properties- Flexural hinge (PM2M3)

Hinge Properties for Columns

b a

Lateral Load

1.0

D c A y

Lateral Deformation

* ATC 40 Volume 1

Column Hinge Properties- Shear hinge

Column Hinge Properties- Shear hinge


Shear capacity
0.8 f ck ( 1 + 5 1) c = 6 0.116 f ck bd w h ere = 1.0 100 A st

3Pu = 1+ 1.5 Ag f ck

Note: For moderate and high ductility of the column section

Vc = c bd

V sy = f y A sv

d 0 .6 s v

3 Pu 0 .5 A g f ck

Total Shear Capacity, Vy= Vc + Vsy

is taken in calculation (ATC 40)

Column Hinge Properties- Shear hinge


Yield deformation (y) is to be calculated using the following formula.

Yield shear strength R y = = Shear stiffness GAeff l

Rl = G 0.75 Ag

Where G = Shear modulus of the reinforced concrete section Ag = Gross area of the section l = Length of member

Column Hinge Properties- Shear hinge


The ultimate shear strength (Vu) is taken as 5% more than yield shear strength (Vy) and residual shear strength is taken as 20% of the yield shear strength for modelling of the shear hinges as shown in Figure.
Shear strength (V) Vy Vu = 1.05Vy

0.2 Vy
y
y Shear

Residual Shear Strength


1.5 m=15y

deformation ()

Similarly maximum shear deformation is taken as 15 times the yield deformation. The values were taken as per SAP 2000 manual recommendations.

Infill Properties - Axial hinge (P)

Static Pushover Case Data (Gravity Pushover Force Controlled)

Lateral Load Pattern


Determination of the Load pattern: (IS 1893 (part 1) : 2002 ) Fundamental natural period Design Base Shear Design Lateral Force
0 . 09 h d

Ta =

Q3

VB = Ah W
Wi hi Qi = VB 2 W j hj
2

Q2

Q1

Static Pushover Case Data (Lateral pushover Displacement controlled)

Seismic Evaluation of a Typical RC Building

Building Data
Building frame system Usage Built in Zone Number of stories Footing Symmetry Material used Plan dimensions Building height Soil Type (assumed) RC OMRF Residential 1999 V G+4 Multiple Piles About Y-axis M15 & Fe 415 25.2m X 13.95m 15.7m Type-II (Medium)

Plan- Beam Locations

Storey number Beams (only in 1 to 4


floor)

Plan - Column and Equivalent Strut Locations

Infill wall Location Storey number n

Comments
Visual inspection did not reveal concrete deterioration. Knowledge factor was not applied. Architectural drawings were not available. Location of infill walls was postulated. Geotechnical data was not available. Rebar detailing was not complete in the available structural drawings. Building considered to be noncompliant with IS 13920: 1993 (R = 3). Fixity considered at pile cap. Soil-structure interaction neglected. Elevator walls not considered as lateral load resisting elements.

Plan Frames along X-direction

Plan Frames along Y-direction

Elevation along line A-A

Typical Beam Section (Ground Floor)

Typical Column Sections (Ground Floor)

Tie spacing 100 mm c/c near beam-to-column joints

Detailed Structural Analysis


Gravity Load Analysis Lateral Load Analysis Linear static analysis (Equivalent Static Method, IS 1893 (Part 1): 2002) Response Spectrum Method (IS 1893 (Part 1): 2002) Non-linear Static Analysis (Pushover Analysis, ATC 40)

Structural Parameters
Center of Mass (m)
Xdirection Ydirection

Floor

Seismic Weight (kN)

Lumped Mass (Ton)

Center of rigidity (m)


Xdirection Ydirection

Static Eccentricity, esi ( m)


Xdirection Ydirection

Design Eccentricity, edi (m)


Xdirection Ydirection

5 4 3 2 1

3550 4175 4175 4175 3200

255 306 306 306 222

12.55 12.55 12.55 12.55 12.55

6.90 7.15 7.15 7.15 7.15

12.60 12.60 12.60 12.60 12.60

7.23 7.23 7.23 7.23 7.23

0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05

0.33 0.08 0.08 0.08 0.08

1.34 1.34 1.34 1.34 1.34

1.20 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.82

edi = 1.5esi + 0.05bi

edi = esi 0.05bi

Location of Centre of Mass

Calculation of Base Shear IS 1893(Part 1):2002


Base shear, VB = AhW W Z I R = Total seismic weight of the building = 0.36 (for Zone V) = 1 (for normal building) = 3 (for OMRF)

ZI Sa Ah = 2R g
Ah = 0.15 VB = 0.15 20270 kN = 3039 kN

Sa/g = 2.5 corresponding to both the time period in with-infill case.

Comparison of Base Shear

Without infill stiffness Analysis methods Vx (kN) Equivalent Static Method EQX EQY 2796 2796 Vy (kN)

With infill stiffness Vx (kN) Vy (kN)

3039 -

3039

Response Spectrum Analysis EQ 1773 1851 2092 2170

Comparison of Fundamental Periods


Empirical Formulae With infill stiffness Time Period (s) Sa/g Tax= 0.28 2.50 Tay= 0.38 2.50 Without infill stiffness 0.59 2.30 Computational Model With infill stiffness 0.73 1.87 Without infill stiffness 0.83 1.64

First five modes and their participation

Without infill Mode T (s) 0.83 0.78 0.42 0.25 0.24 Mass Participation (%) UX 1 2 3 4 5 88.34 2.22 1.23 6.05 0.14 Uy 1.95 86.71 0.47 0.16 8.02 0.73 0.69 0.38 0.22 0.21 T (s)

With infill Mass Participation (%) UX 92.29 1.26 0.72 4.44 0.11 Uy 1.10 90.23 0.59 0.13 6.33

Mode Shapes

First Mode T=0.83s (UX=92.91%)

Second Mode T=0.76s (UY=90.51%)

Mode Shapes

Third Mode T=0.39s (RZ) (UX=0.11% UY=0.52%)

Fourth Mode T=0.25s (UX=5.39% UY=0.04%)

Mode Shapes

Fifth Mode T=0.24s (UX=0.03% UY=7.07%)

Demand and Capacity for Columns - Moment (Equivalent static method)


Y

Section

Absolute Capacities

Absolute Demand (Without Infill stiffness) DCR

Absolute Demand (With Infill stiffness) DCR

y Pu x

ey

ex Pu

Puz
Y

PuR

MuR,y

P (kN)

M2 (kNm)

M3 (kNm)

P (kN)

M2 (kNm)

M3 (kNm)

P (kN)

M2 (kNm)

M3 (kNm)

MuR,x Mux1 load contour

Muy1

0 Muy = Pu ey

1C1 1C2 1C3 1C4 1C5 2C4

2871 3102 3070 3241 3301 3241

236 280 250 263 296 263

207 218 242 277 253 277

1744 1534 2266 2614 1422 2355

323 433 288 414 420 416

311 334 335 350 346 270

2.30 2.60 1.81 1.84 2.20 1.57

1712 1860 2400 2506 1546 2029

342 159 310 435 445 285

338 354 354 368 365 220

2.49 2.72 1.95 1.92 2.36 1.04

2 2 M uR = M ux + M uy

Mux = Pu ex

Demand and Capacity for Columns Shear (Equivalent Static Method)


Sections Absolute Capacities Absolute Demand (With infill stiffness) Vd (kN) 184 226 189 227 231 154 0.74 0.87 0.69 0.80 0.81 0.55 DCR Absolute Demand (Without infill stiffness) Vd (kN) 161 206 177 209 212 231 DCR

Vu (kN) 1C1 1C2 1C3 1C4 1C5 2C5 250 259 275 282 285 282

0.64 0.80 0.64 0.74 0.74 0.82

Vu is higher of the shear from analysis and the shear corresponding to the flexural capacity Mu (Vu = Mu / Ls)

Maximum displacement response in X-direction (Equivalent Static Method)


5 4 Storey Level 3 2 1 0 0 20 40 60 80 100 Displacement (mm)

5 4 Storey Level 3 2 1 0 0 20 40 60 80 100 Displacement (mm)

With Infill

Without Infill

Inter-storey Drift in X-direction Equivalent Static Method


18 16 14 12 Storey level (m) Storey level (m) 10 8 6 4 2 0 0 20 40
-2

18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 60 0 20 40 60 In te r-store y dri ft ( X 10 %) Inter-store y drift ( X 10 -2 %)

With infill

Without infill

Performance Objective

1.

Design Basis Earthquake + Life Safety (2% total drift) Maximum Considered Earthquake + Collapse Prevention (4% total drift)

2.

Distribution of Lateral Force at each Storey Level for Lateral Pushover


Q5= 15.22 Q4= 11.70 Q3= 6.83 Q2= 3.25 Q1= 1.00 5 4 3 2 1

Moment Rotation Curve for a Typical Element

Hinge Property
1.2

B IO LS
CP

B IO

Yield state Immediate Occupancy

0.8

Moment/SF

0.6

LS Life Safety
D A
0 0.005 0.01 0.015 0.02 Rotation/SF 0.025 0.03 0.035 0.04

0.4

CP Collapse Prevention
E

0.2

Ultimate state

Demand Spectrum
Seismic Coefficient, CA Soil Type I Type II Type III Zone II (0.10) 0.10 0.10 0.10 Zone III (0.16) 0.16 0.16 0.16 Seismic Coefficient, CV Type I Type II Type III 0.10 0.14 0.17 0.16 0.22 0.27 0.24 0.33 0.40 0.36 0.49 0.60 Zone IV (0.24) 0.24 0.24 0.24 Zone V (0.36) 0.36 0.36 0.36

Base Shear Vs. Roof Displacement Push X


4000

1.5VB
3500 3000

= 2.41 /h = 0.49% = 1.46 /h = 0.34%

Base Shear (kN)

2500

2000

1500

1000
Without infill stiffness With infill stiffness

500

0 0.00 0.01 0.02 0.03 0.04 0.05 0.06 0.07 0.08 0.09 0.10

Roof Displacement (m)

Base Shear Vs. Roof Displacement Push Y


4000 3500

1.5VB

3000

Base Shear (kN)

2500

2000

1500

1000
Without infill stiffness With infill stiffness

500

0 0.00 0.01 0.02 0.03 0.04 0.05 0.06 0.07 0.08 0.09 0.10

Roof Displacement (m)

Capacity and Demand Spectra (With infill stiffness)


1.0 Spectral Accelaration Coefficient (Sa/g) 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.4
Spectral Accelaration Coefficient (Sa/g) 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30

Spectral Displacement (m)

Spectral Displacement (m)

Lateral Push along X

Lateral Push along Y

Capacity and Demand Spectra (Without infill stiffness)


Spectral Accelaration Coefficient (Sa/g) 1.0 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 Spectral Displacement (m)
Spectral Accelaration Coefficient (Sa/g) 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 0.00

0.10

0.20

0.30

Spectral Displacement (m)

Lateral Push along X

Lateral Push along Y

Retrofitting Scheme

1. 2.

Continuing infill walls only at a few locations. Strengthening of the ground floor columns.

Ground Floor Plan

Capacity Curve Push X

9000

8000

C B A
/h=0.28% /h=0.48% /h=0.75%

7000

6000

Base Shear (kN)

5000

VB

4000

3000

2000

/h = 1 %
1000

0 0.00

0.02

0.04

0.06

0.08

0.10

0.12

0.14

0.16

0.18

0.20

Roof Displacement (m)

State of the Hinge at A and B in Lateral load

A, /h=0.28%

B, /h=0.48%

State of the Hinge at C and D in Lateral load

C, /h=0.75%

D, /h=1%

Performance Point ( Demand spectrum- Z )


1.0

Spectral Accelaration Coefficient (Sa/g)

0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.0

5%

Demand Spectrum Capacity Spectrum Effective Period

Teff = 1.224s eff = 24.9% V = 7682 kN D = 0.167 m = 0.93% of H

15% 17.3% Performance Point

Sa = 0.29 m/s2 Sd = 0.11 m/s

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

Spectral Displacement (m)

Storey Displacements
18

15

12
H(m)

0
0.00 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.10 0.12 0.14 0.16 0.18 0.20

Displacement (m)

IDI
5
B A D C

3 H(m) 2 1 0 0.000

0.005

0.010 IDI

0.015

0.020

What if Performance Point Does Not Exist?

FE
V/W (Acceleration)

ADD STRENGTH OR STIFFNESS OR BOTH

FI

Inelastic demand spectrum 5% damped elastic spectrum capacity spectrum

Roof-top Displacement

What if Performance Point Does Not Exist?

FE
V/W (Acceleration)

ENHANCE SYSTEM DUCTILITY

FI

Inelastic demand spectrum 5% damped elastic spectrum capacity spectrum

Roof-top Displacement

What if Performance Point Does Not Exist?

FE
V/W (Acceleration) REDUCE SEISMIC DEMAND BY: ADDING DAMPING OR ISOLATION

FI

New demand spectrum

5% damped elastic spectrum

Roof-top Displacement