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the staff
editor-in-chief
business manager
production manager
copy editor
news editor
a&c editor
sports editor
op-ed editor
features editor
visual editor
ad manager
technical coordinator
john cameron
editor@carillonregina.com
josh jakubowski
business@carillonregina.com
mason pitzel
production@carillonregina.com
jonathan hamelin
copyeditor@carillonregina.com
natasha tersigni
news@carillonregina.com
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aandc@carillonregina.com
autumn mcdowell
sports@carillonregina.com
edward dodd
op-ed@carillonregina.com
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graphics@carillonregina.com
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advertising@carillonregina.com
matthew blackwell
technical@carillonregina.com
news writer
lauren golosky
sophie long
a&c writer
paul bogdan
sports writer
ed kapp
photographers
marc messett
kelsey conway
troy julé
jarrett crowe
matt yim
contributors this week
arthur ward, britton gray, colton hordichuk,
taylor shire, kyle leitch, kent peterson, chelsea
laskowski
the paper
THE CARILLON BOARD OF DIRECTORS
John Cameron, Anna Dipple, Kristy Fyfe, Jenna
Kampman, Mason Pitzel, Dan Shier, Rhiannon
Ward, Anna Weber
227 Riddell Centre
University of Regina - 3737 Wascana Parkway
Regina, SK, Canada, S4S 0A2
www.carillonregina.com
Ph: (306) 586-8867 Fax: (306) 586-7422
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Names may be withheld upon request at the discretion of
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may be edited for space, clarity, accuracy and vulgarity.
The Carillon is a wholly autonomous organization with no
affiliation with the University of Regina Students’ Union.
Opinions expressed in the pages of the Carillon are expressly
those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the
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mester during the fall and winter semesters and periodically
throughout the summer. The Carillon is published by The
Carillon Newspaper Inc., a non–profit corporation.
the manifesto
In keeping with our reckless, devil-may-care image, our of-
fice has absolutely no concrete information on the Carillon’s
formative years readily available. What follows is the story
that’s been passed down from editor to editor for over forty
years.
In the late 1950s, the University of Regina planned the con-
struction of several new buildings on the campus grounds.
One of these proposed buildings was a bell tower on the aca-
demic green. If you look out on the academic green today,
the first thing you’ll notice is that it has absolutely nothing
resembling a bell tower.
The University never got a bell tower, but what it did get
was the Carillon, a newspaper that serves as a symbolic bell
tower on campus, a loud and clear voice belonging to each
and every student.
Illegitimi non carborundum.

the carillon

The University of Regina Students’ Newspaper since 1962

Nov. 3 - 9, 2011 | Volume 54, Issue 10 | carillonregina.com

cover

3 - 9, 2011 | Volume 54, Issue 10 | carillonregina.com cover news keeping ourselves occupied

news

2011 | Volume 54, Issue 10 | carillonregina.com cover news keeping ourselves occupied sports 7 these

keeping ourselves occupied

sports

7

cover news keeping ourselves occupied sports 7 these fuckin’ guys 13 We’re aware that this photo

these fuckin’ guys

13

We’re aware that this photo is sort of nightmarish. But the photo shoot was completely adorable, as you can guess. Anyway, cast your eyes to the right to see if this provincial election will be a trick or a treat. (I seriously hope that’s a metaphor.)

news

3

arts & culture

hope that’s a metaphor.) news 3 arts & culture cut yer ya-ya’s off op-ed 18 electioneering

cut yer ya-ya’s off

op-ed

18

news 3 arts & culture cut yer ya-ya’s off op-ed 18 electioneering 22 a quick note

electioneering

22

a quick note

We at the Carillon would like to wish you a happy belated Halloween. Chances are, you were stuck at work on Monday night (like us) or stuck doing schoolwork, meaning your Halloween festivities probably amounted to looping “Werewolf Bar Mitzvah” on YouTube as you stuffed yourself with minia- ture Kit Kats until your ruined body had to go to the hospital. But we hope you at least got to go out and have some fun this weekend, mingling with fellow “sexy nurses” or “sexy firefight- ers” or “sexy Dyson spheres”.

And hey, hopefully you’ve recovered enough to flip through this issue (or visit carillonregina.com) and see what your stu- dent paper has to offer you this week.

photos

news nick lachance/the cord a&c mason pitzel sports forums.gametrailers.com

op-ed natasha tersigni cover julia dima

news

News Editor: Natasha Tersigni news@carillonregina.com the carillon | Nov. 3 - 9, 2011

Your cluttered, hashtag- reference-free cheat sheet

The Carillon’s somewhat cluttered guide to the Nov. 7 election

Promises made

Who’s committed themselves to what

Sask Party

NDP

Tuition

Provide $2,000 over four years to all high school graduates for tuition costs through Saskatchewan Advantage Scholarship

Match 10% of RESP contribu- tions up $250 per child per year through Saskatchewan Advantage Grant Education

Implement a fully-funded freeze on tuition

Provide funding for 100 gradu- ate students bursaries annually at our universities to attract top graduate students.

Health care

Reduce surgical wait times to no more than three months by

2014

Forgive student loans to attract doctors, nurses, and nurse practitioners to practice in ru- ral communities

Double the number of primary health care clinics over the next

ten years

Bring chiropractic care back into covered health services

Increase access to midwifery services

Seniors

Increase the Seniors Income Plan by nearly $1,000 annually

Introduce Seniors in Personal Care Home Benefit – a $3,000 annual benefit to low income seniors living in personal care homes

Add 750 new subsidized afford- able assisted living units

Provide a property tax rebate of $500 per year to senior home- owners and renters

Housing

First Time Homeowners Tax Credit, saving first time home- buyers $1,000

Invest $20 million into coopera- tive and community organiza- tions to buy land for housing

Public safety

Hire more police officers and target violent offenders

Provide first-time homebuyers a $2,000 grant

Crack down on online child ex- ploitation by funding additional staff and equipment for police

Highways/transport

Continue investment in im- proving Saskatchewan’s high- ways

Establish a Safe Rural Roads Fund to repair and upgrade sec- ondary and grid roads

Disability funding

Increase benefits and access to the Saskatchewan Assured Income for Disability program

Increase autism funding

Refundable tax credit of up to $1,000 per year to individuals providing care to elderly or dis- abled relatives or friends

Child Care

Create 2,000 additional child care spaces over the next four years

Create 10,000 new early learn- ing and child care spaces

Gaffe-o-meter

new early learn- ing and child care spaces Gaffe-o-meter b uckdogsaskvotes.blogspot.com natasha tersigni news editor

buckdogsaskvotes.blogspot.com

natasha tersigni

news editor

john cameron

editor-in-chief

Office Vandalism

The office of Swift Current NDP can- didate Aaron Ens was vandalized on Oct. 13. It was reported that a tire iron was thrown the window, which – all things considered – is pretty low on the vandalism scale (and, because it’s not so much a public slip-up as a rude way to say “hello,” mostly just a gaffe on the part of society). The office, co- incidentally, is located in Brad Wall’s riding, but so far no agitated Wall fan- boys have come forward to confess. Gaffe Rating: one Jim Pankiw out of a possible four.

Gaffe Rating : one Jim Pankiw out of a possible four. Greg Ottenbreit The Yorkton-area Sask.

Greg Ottenbreit

The Yorkton-area Sask. Party incum- bent was at a Yorkton Chamber of Commerce candidates’ forum on Oct. 19 when a question was asked about the NDP’s proposed resource revenue sharing agreement with First Nations groups, he replied, “What I have been told by some of my First Nations friends is that sometimes when there are handouts or the money comes free and easy, it can be used for alcohol and drugs.” Ill-advised! Gaffe Rating: four Pankiws.

Splicing Comments

Early on in the campaign, the Sask. Party called out the NDP for splicing Brad Wall’s comments together. Then during the leaders’ debate, Brad burned Dwayne by calling him out for again splicing comments, this time during the debate. A strong lesson for those who would base their political ad campaigns on how they caught Homer in that Simpsons episode where he grabbed the Gummy de Milo off of the babysitter’s ass. Gaffe Rating: three Pankiws.

of the babysitter’s ass. Gaffe Rating : three Pankiws. Press releases Since the writ dropped, the

Press releases

Since the writ dropped, the parties’ PR departments have been working overtime churning out press releases, including one sent by the NDP a whole nine minutes after the leaders debate, stating. “Link wins by sticking to issues that matter.” Even putting aside the fact that this was the last of four press releases sent out during the debate itself, and the fact that the NDP is probably not going to put out a press release crapping on their leader’s debate performance – wait, actually, don’t put those aside, those things are silly things. Gaffe Rating: two Pankiws.

those things are silly things. Gaffe Rating : two Pankiws. c c a a n n
those things are silly things. Gaffe Rating : two Pankiws. c c a a n n

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visit carillonregina.com for all

your late-breaking election

news.

because once these hit stands, you know, that’s

kind of as much as we can do print-wise

Inevitable

twitter

sidebar

@KyleAddison_ Really hard to focus on midterms with all the election excitement. Cant keep my mind off it. Writ period should be a prov holiday #skpoli

Wednesday, Oct. 19

@nickfaye Free dental care? Free tuition (according to Link tonight)? All based on fluctuating/unstable potash revenue? I dont buy it #skvotes #debate

Tuesday, Oct. 25

@GarethPerry314

New election issue:

Child-dental care. News to me. #skvotes

Tuesday, Oct. 25

@WaywardReporter What are the two par- ties doing for Saskatchewan hipsters? Hipsters are our future seniors. #skvotes

#skdb8

Tuesday, Oct. 25

@mat_bennett Rent control is going to save me $6,000 a year!! I only pay $6,000 in the first place! @linkndp #skvotes

Tuesday, Oct. 25

@prairie4thunder

@PremierBradWall @linkndp buying more front line health care providers needs to be balanced with reducing admin excess #skpoli #skvotes

Tuesday, Oct. 25

@tbeaudrymellor Game changers:resigna- tion of Link or sta- dium.Only two things I can think of that even qualify as poss. game changers at this stage #skvotes

Monday, Oct. 31

@markus_henry my MLA eavesdropped on my conversation at starbucks. How do I know? She whispered “I’m trying to listen to this conversation.” #skvotes ;)

Tuesday, Nov. 1

4

news

the carillon | Nov. 3 - 9, 2011

Bringing the hope home

U of R students hope more students can share in their Holocaust education experience overseas

lauren golosky

news editor

In today’s day and age, it’s almost im- possible to fathom the cruelty of the Holocaust. It’s something that stu- dents learn about in textbooks, but cannot really grasp. That changed this past spring for a handful of University of Regina students. From May 25 to June 3, five U of R students participated in the March for Remembrance and Hope, a program put on by the Canadian Centre for Diversity that encourages leadership and social change. The march takes 60 students each year to Germany and Poland for tours of Nazi concentra- tion camps, where they get to meet Holocaust survivors. One participant, education stu- dent Kyle Caron, found the experience to be both educational and emotional. He said he always had an avid interest in the Holocaust, and found it surreal to tour the areas he learned about in history books. “It was an experience in lots of different ways,” he said. “I’m also get- ting a degree in history, so in that per- spective it was really cool for the first time to see history firsthand. To actu- ally be in Treblinka, Majdanek, or Auschwitz-Birkenau, it’s really cool to be in a place where history hap- pened. “On a completely different side, there is an emotional component to it, where you’re in these concentra- tion camps, but you’re there with Holocaust survivors: people who’ve physically been there before. It’s a feeling you can’t duplicate.” Caron believes that this experi- ence has changed him for the better. Although there were definitely educa- tional components to the trip, he claimed that the largest extent of the learning was about internal. “The real learning was about my- self,” he said. “The experience itself

was about my- self,” he said. “The experience itself Allison Miceli changed me in a lot

Allison Miceli

changed me in a lot of different ways. It made me realize the things that I needed to do in order to contribute more to society. “We felt really indebted by what we were allowed to witness and what we were allowed to be a part of. That made me feel like it was really impor- tant to give back, and maybe become more involved in community events than I had been in the past. To be hon- est, my involvement in the university had been show up, go to class, go home, and maybe go to the Owl on Friday.” Now, Caron and the other stu- dents want give back to the Canadian Centre for Diversity and the March for Remembrance. On Saturday, they’re planning to host a fundraiser to raise money and awareness for Holocaust education. “The first part is a steak night,”

Caron explained. “We’re trying to raise money for the March for Remembrance and Hope and the Canadian Centre for diversity, so that more students can have the experi- ence that we were fortunate to have. That’s our way of giving back to a program that has offered us so much.” The second half of the evening in- cludes a presentation by Holocaust historian and the director of commu- nity relations for the Jewish Federation of Winnipeg, Shelley Faintuch, who is also a documentary filmmaker. Her documentary, Silent Echoes, has been accepted by Yad Vashem, an organization that docu- ments all aspects of the history of the Jewish people during the Holocaust. Caron believes that, although the events of the Holocaust happened over half-a-century ago, the issues are still relevant in contemporary society.

This is why he believes it’s important that students educate themselves on the history of the Holocaust. “It’s important to take the lessons and events of the Holocaust and try and draw them and compare them to the way our society is today, and to re- alize the issues of oppression and so- cial distancing that didn’t end with the Holocaust,” Caron explained. “Anti-Semitism isn’t expressed the same way that it used to be, but anti- Semitism, in regards to the denying of Israel as a state, and what’s happening over there, its interesting and kind of

a different route that anti-Semitism has taken.” Even after all the darkness of the tragedy, Caron said that he took away

a different message, a message of hope. “To be there with Holocaust sur- vivors, as they were telling us their

It’s important to take the lessons and events of the Holocaust and try and draw them and compare them to the way our society is today, and to re- alize the issues of oppression and social distancing that didn’t end with the Holocaust.

Kyle Caron,

U of R social studies edu- cation student

stories, and being in this place, was a really surreal experience,” he said. “But having so much of it, at the end of it, being about hope, and the tri- umph of the human spirit through the Holocaust being the most important thing, and having that being separate from the tragedy that the Holocaust was.” Caron encourages people to come check out the Holocaust education evening, as the proceeds will help oth- ers that want to experience the March of Remembrance and Hope. The March of Remembrance and

Hope steak night will be held in the Riddell multipurpose room on Saturday, Nov. 25. Doors open at 6 p.m., and speaker Shelley Feintuch

will be speaking at 8 p.m. Tickets for the full event are $25, and tickets for her presentation on its own are $10.

photo briefs

for her presentation on its own are $10. photo briefs Arthur Ward Seven easy steps to

Arthur Ward

Seven easy steps to making a sweet pumpkin

Arthur Ward Seven easy steps to making a sweet pumpkin Arthur Ward The University of Regina

Arthur Ward

The University of Regina Students’ Union held a candidates forum at the Owl on Wednesday, Oct. 26, to give students chance to ask candidates questions. Saskatchewan Green Party leader Victor Lau appeared, along with the Saskatchewan NDP’s Yens Petersen and the Saskatchewan Party’s Dustin Duncan.

Yens Petersen and the Saskatchewan Party’s Dustin Duncan. Arthur Ward Students had a pumpkin-carving show on

Arthur Ward

Students had a pumpkin-carving show on Halloween in the Aboriginal Student Centre

show on Halloween in the Aboriginal Student Centre Kelsey Conway Jason Gowan, star of A&E’s Extreme

Kelsey Conway

Jason Gowan, star of A&E’s Extreme Paranormal, shot the shit with Austin Davis at the Owl on Oct. 31

the carillon | Nov. 3 - 9, 2011

news

5

Mending a relationship

After last year’s referendum, the U of R and CFS are trying to work together

referendum, the U of R and CFS are trying to work together cupwire.ca sophie long news

cupwire.ca

sophie long

news writer

The University of Regina hasn’t heard much from the Canadian Federation of Students (CFS) since last year’s ref- erendum, when Kyle Addison called into question the necessity of having a CFS membership. It’s been a year since students went to the polls, and although the results of the referen- dum were close, it appears the CFS is here to stay. Although many students still struggle to see where the CFS comes into their lives, Haanim Nur, Saskatchewan’s elected CFS represen- tative, insisted its services will con- tinue to improve until their place here is established. The referendum last year ended with only an 88-vote margin, which indicated that Addison was not the only one who had a problem with the CFS. Many students still harbour some bad feelings towards the feder- ation. “I’m aware of them, at least in as much as the referendum. I can’t say I’m deeply and personally involved in their activities,” said Melissa Enns, a

third-year linguistics student. “Frankly, unless I was going to see some large-scale changes, CFS would- n’t be an important part of my life”. Enns highlighted the CFS’s im- pact on campus; many first-year stu- dents do not know of the CFS since they missed the referendum last year. Emilien Perron, a first-year anthropol- ogy major, said, “I have seen the name, but don’t really know what they do,” when asked if he was aware of their services. Nur did not comment on the strained relationship between the stu- dent body at the U of R and the CFS, but she did emphasize the ways in which the federation is working to re- pair the relationship. Local 9, the uni- versity’s section of CFS, has been working to get discounts on clothing and other necessities for students in Regina through its student saver card. Similarly, it has been attempting to is- sue as many International Student Identity (ISIC) cards to as many stu- dents as possible, which gives stu- dents discounts on travel. While some students are unhappy with the services from the federation, others are welcoming the changes the CFS is making for Regina. Bart

Soroka, a third-year economics and business student, was against the CFS during last year’s referendum, but is impressed with the changes that have been made. “Though the U of R remained in the CFS, I had hoped that by being loud and demonstrating that we did understand what the CFS owed to us, we could force their hand into work- ing closer with us and providing the same benefits to other schools,” he said. “Fast forward and the University of Regina now has a CFS rep, the Student Discount Cards can now be used at businesses in Regina and in Saskatoon, and I no longer feel like my money is going to waste. Last year I did try to remove the U of R from the CFS, but this year, I appreciate the hard work being done on campus to ensure students benefit from our membership.” “I would say Local 9 members are well aware of the Federation benefits they receive as members” Nur com- mented, in regards the lack of knowl- edge on campus of the CFS’s services. While this may not be true for all stu- dents, Nur outlined some ways in which the federation will be reaching out to students.

“On-campus outreach is a key fo- cus to the Federation’s approach to service and campaign implementa- tion,” she said. “On-campus tabling took place during Local 9’s orienta- tion this year, and over the last month leading up to the provincial election. Many on-campus events have taken place to promote the Vote Education and Our Future is Now campaigns, such as a candidate’s forum, Kandidate Karaoke, and a fax mob. A student rally and social will take place this Friday Nov. 4 to get students ex- cited about voting in the upcoming provincial election.” Nur described the federation as “Canada’s national students’ union”, portraying the CFS as an equivalent of URSU, but working for universities across the country. Nur described the ways in which URSU works with the CFS, saying that, in co-operation with URSU, they had “developed and adopted a national campaign called ‘Education is a Right’. As part of the campaign, students, including repre- sentatives from Saskatchewan, met with more than 180 members of Parliament and senators in Ottawa last week to present a vision for an accessible, high-quality, post-second-

Last year I did try to remove the U of R from the CFS, but this year, I appreci- ate the hard work being done on campus to ensure students benefit from our member- ship.

Bart Soroka

U of R third-year economics and business student

ary education system”. However, since the CFS’s issues are country- wide, it is difficult to see how their work affects the U of R. One of the ways URSU co-oper- ates with the CFS is through the “Our Future is Now” campaign. Nur stated that the campaign works “seamlessly” with the campaign when integrated with their Vote Education program. The Vote Education campaign, which Nur said, “Aims to equip students with the tools they need to make an educated vote based on the issues that affect them on a daily basis,” has been featured on URSU’s web page. This year, CFS Saskatchewan has hired its first organizer in four years, Alanna Makinson. Prior to her cur- rent work as the prairies organizer for the CFS, Makinson spent a year as the chairperson of CFS Manitoba. Makinson declined an interview for this article, writing, “I feel focusing on my position rather then the organ- isation as a whole would not be the best way to communicate to students how the organisation is structured and functions.”

Nickels, dimes, and Meyers Norris Penny

URSU takes a trip down annual audit lane

minuteman

john cameron

editor-in-chief

Audit in progress

Actually, the audit of the University of Regina Students’ Union’s 2010-11 fis- cal year is complete; your correspon- dent just wanted to make a Hot Snakes reference (they are reuniting to play Fun Fun Fun Fest in Austin this year and it is killing me, inside). But hooray! The students’ union board and executive got to spend most of their Nov. 1 meeting listening to a representative from Meyers Norris Penny, the accounting firm that performs URSU’s annual audits, take them through page after page of fi- nancial documents. Tedious but nec- essary! Unsurprisingly, the audit – which has to be accepted by the board and approved by the membership at URSU’s annual general meeting – showed nothing to prevent Meyers Norris Penny from declaring that the

organization’s financial statements “present fairly in all respects,” as it has for the last several years. The accounting firm did, how- ever, send a letter outlining a couple of recommendations for the students’ union. Their biggest concern was URSU’s investments. As of April 2011, the students’ union has $464,000 in short-term in- vestments and $722,000 in long-term – meaning they’ve got almost $1.2 mil- lion in things like mutual funds and other equities. The firm found it unusual that URSU would have that amount of money tied up in investments that have risk attached to them the way mutual funds do; while it wasn’t enough of a concern for it to have an impact on Meyers Norris Penny’s as- sessment of URSU’s financial state- ments, they did strongly advise URSU to come up with an internal policy outlining the risks the organization are willing to take when investing. Which, apparently, they do have, according to women’s director Kaytlyn Barber and URSU general

manager Mike Staines – it just isn’t in the copy of the policy manual cur- rently available on URSU’s website. The board will be voting on whether to approve the audited state- ments next meeting. As for us, if credit’s what matters, we’ll take credit (always go out on a Hot Snakes refer- ence).

The Pursuit of Happiness would be outraged

The latest in the long, long series of executive-vs.-board-member slap- fights this year is between URSU pres- ident Kent Peterson and fine arts director Jordan Palmer. As we re- ported at the last meeting, the Fine Arts Student Association failed to show up for a meeting, thus waiving their right to funding from the President’s Advisory Council, and Palmer requested both that URSU re- store funding to FASA and that the board “investigate” its own policies to determine who has the authority to revoke said funding. At the Tuesday meeting, Peterson

clarified that FASA had in fact missed

a meeting to receive an advance

cheque – a cheque which is, appar- ently, otherwise ready for them. Same with the cheque for the Arts Student Association, a representative from which also failed to make it to a PAC meeting. When the latter came up, board chair Sean McEachern asked if the cheque for the ASA had been written; when that question was answered in the affirmative, he looked flummoxed. “I’m not sure how we’re going to reinstate something that hasn’t been given out yet,” he told the board. So there wound up being no mo- tion on this, the thing that wasn’t a

thing yet was enough of a thing that the board voted, in a public motion, to “investigate” their own policies. The cheques in question were advances, they’re going to go out to where they were originally intended to go, no need to panic. Whether FASA’s issues with PAC

in particular are Peterson taking his is-

sues with Palmer out on FASA as a whole, as Palmer believes they do, or

whether they’re rooted in Palmer pro-

jecting motives onto Peterson, or whether the whole thing is just a con- voluted but apolitical mess is hardly relevant at this point; education di- rector Mariah Perkins said it best when she told the entire room that she was disappointed in the way that the issue between FASA and PAC had been handled. “It would have been nice if you guys had sat down and had a conver- sation as professional adults,” she said, after Peterson addressed the af- fair in his report to the board. Wisdom. Maybe by next term the board and executive will collectively be able to end a meeting without once trying to verbally wring each other’s necks. The next URSU meeting is on Nov. 15 at 5:30 p.m. in the URSU boardroom on the second floor of the Riddell Centre. If you can’t make it but would love to read about it as it happens, follow us on Twitter

(@the_carillon).

6

news

the carillon | Nov. 3 - 9, 2011

Challenging poverty through arts

Anti-poverty festival hosted in Regina during the provincial election

festival hosted in Regina during the provincial election photos by Natasha Tersigni natasha tersigni n ews

photos by Natasha Tersigni

during the provincial election photos by Natasha Tersigni natasha tersigni n ews editor Community groups from
during the provincial election photos by Natasha Tersigni natasha tersigni n ews editor Community groups from
during the provincial election photos by Natasha Tersigni natasha tersigni n ews editor Community groups from

natasha tersigni

news editor

Community groups from around the city came to the Knox-Metropolitan Church Oct. 29 to take part in an anti- poverty festival to look at ways that the groups and individuals have chal- lenged poverty through the use of the arts. Event organizers knowingly hosted the event around the Nov. 7 provincial election. “When we set the time of the fes- tival, we realized that we were also in conjunction with a provincial election campaign and so we also decided it would be important to hold a rally to focus on poverty issues and to con- tinue to promote poverty issues as im- portant election issues,” said Peter Gilmer, an advocate with the Regina Anti-Poverty Ministry. “So we are here to promote some of the concerns we have in regards to this election campaign.” Although the planned rally that was supposed to happen outdoors took place in the church basement, important issues surrounding poverty were still able to be discussed, as well as the upcoming provincial election. Gilmer said the biggest concerns this election for solving the issues sur- rounding poverty should be invest- ment in social housing and rent control, calling for a living wage that is actually set above the minimum wage and poverty line, and that is in- dexed to the cost of living, calling for significant increase in the number of childcare spaces and an improvement in childcare subsidies.

Aside from the rally, the festival used drama, skits, visual arts, pho- tography, paintings, poetry, and story- telling to examine and discuss the issues of poverty in the city. “Using art is more effective than spewing statistical facts and figures and it brings people’s attention to these issues,” said Gerry Ruecker from the Common Will Community Arts program. Ruecker co-ordinated some skits and the screening of a movie for the festival. He said that speaking through art is important be- cause “it gives people on the margins

a voice.” One of those people that used to live on the margins is Terri Slevea. “I was there. I know what it feels like,” she said. “When we have such a have province, why should people be marginalized? Why should people be allowed to fall through the cracks? We need to help our poorest of the poor.” Gilmer said that politicians and the public need to understand how much financial sense it would make to ad- dress poverty. “It would actually be must less costly to eradicate poverty,” Gilmer said. “To limit economic inequality

would be a big cost-saver because we would be saving in terms of poverty that we pay through our health sys- tem, our justice system. and through our other social systems. The income gap in our society is one the most pressing issues. There is a lot evidence that shows a society that has a nar- rower economic gap [is] actually healthier than societies that don’t, on

a whole wide range of measures.”

When we set the time of the festival, we realized that we were also in conjunction with a provincial election campaign and so we also decided it would be important to hold a rally to focus on poverty issues and to continue to promote poverty issues as important election issues.

Peter Gilmer

Regina Anti-Poverty Ministry advocate

the carillon | Nov. 3 - 9, 2011

news

7

Occupy movement hits Canada

A look into the conditions from which the Wall Street actions emerged

the conditions from which the Wall Street actions emerged Nick Lachance/The Cord m ike lakusiak lindsay

Nick Lachance/The Cord

mike lakusiak lindsay purchase

cord (wilfrid laurier university)

WATERLOO (CUP) — After just over

a month, the Occupy Wall Street

movement has grown to the point where most people are at least aware

of its existence. If they haven’t wit-

nessed one of the hundreds of marches or occupations of parks and other public spaces in cities across the world, they've certainly heard of it. For something that began with the first protesters appearing on the U.S. Constitution Day, Sept. 17, in New York City’s financial district, the

movement, as it has come to be classi- fied, has managed to sustain itself un- der intense criticism that its aims and the numerous issues the participants are rallying around are either ill-de- fined or ill-informed. What are the conditions that de- fine Occupy Wall Street? How can you explain the complex simplicity that seems to be stymieing some of the me- dia’s coverage of the events?

What's black and white and shades of grey?

“I think one of the main challenges is

that there’s nothing simple about this

movement and journalism always re- sponds best to simple black and white situations, and this one is shades of grey,” said Ann Rauhala, a Ryerson University journalism professor, who has worked at the CBC and as foreign editor of the Globe and Mail. “That’s hardly an original observation, but it

is altogether so true.

“In the Canadian media, you can see people following the predictable courses. I am often disappointed by our journalistic leaders in this country who so often revert to the easiest, cheapest shot.” She cited a few less-than-stellar approaches taken in covering and commenting on the Canadian

protests. Given that the Toronto gathering on Oct. 15 began across the street from where a police car burned a little over a year ago during the G20 Summit, Rauhala noted it’s difficult to think

about this protest without recalling those events. Though she noted that before the flames and broken glass of

last July, those assembled were, with the exception of the rioters, concerned with many of the same thing.,. “The main march [at the G20] was many thousands of people who were pretty much people nervous about their futures and aligned with a wide representation of progressive social movements,” she said. “I think there are a lot of those people represented in the 99 per cent we see now. “I can’t help but wonder if there wouldn’t have been more participa- tion in the Occupy group had it not been for the craziness that happened last summer. “It’s the system, man.” The magazine Adbusters bears much of the responsibility for spark- ing the initial protests in New York with a call in July to “pccupy Wall Street” in September, but in retrospect the conditions were already in place, according to observers.

“People are now saying it’s the system overall that’s wrong, not that [it] has screwed things up,” assessed Wilfrid Laurier University communi- cations professor Herbert Pimlott. “I would say that this goes back, in terms of immediate sparks, to the fi- nancial collapse and from that you see the reactions of governments that have been imposing austerity cuts and

making the middle classes – not just the working class or the poor – pay for bailouts for big corporations, banks, and financial institutions that are sup- posed to be too big to fail.” Particularly problematic and cited as in part driving the protests is the massive disparity between the wealthiest one per cent of people and everyone else.

We have this smug Canadian attitude that we’re different, but never really articulate what the dif- ference is and yet there are actual differences not spelled out when a story like this comes along.”

Ann Rauhala

Ryerson University journalism professor

“Essentially, the second they started saying, ‘We’re the 99 per cent,’ the subtext behind that was that the sys- tem isn’t working for the vast major- ity of us,” said Trish Hennessy,

director of the Growing Gap Project at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. “In 2007-08, when the whole world economy came crashing down

to its knees because of a financial sys-

tem that was geared in the interests of

a very wealthy, concentrated few at

the top, at that point I think there was

a public expectation that things would change – that the government would

start standing up for the people – but

it didn’t really happen.”

Instead, Hennessy noted, power- ful interest groups in the American political system in particular wanted to return to the same status quo that contributed to the crisis. And that did- n’t sit right with many people.

Sober second thought

Tammy Schirle, an economics profes- sor at WLU’s School of Business and Economics whose fields of research include trends of inequality between Canadians, weighed in with her im- pression of the situation. “Since the 1990s, it’s been a story

about the middle class,” she said. “By

a lot of measures of inequality, if

you’re comparing the poorest and the richest, that’s actually improved over time. When you look at the gap be- tween the middle class and the poor- est, that has shrunk, the gap between the middle class and the richest has increased. “It’s really a matter that there are

a lot of discontent among that middle

class. They don’t like that the poorest are catching up to them. I think that’s

a really big thing; their relative posi-

tion in society has changed and they’re not happy about it.” She disputed the application of the same 99 per cent group to the Canadian context. “The rallies are using this 99 per cent idea, [but] it’s not about the 99 per cent, it’s about that middle class,” she said. “That’s what’s driving this general discontent that you see.” If there is anything to be derived from this particular issue that helped

spur the protests and move forward toward a change, she said it would involve raising the marginal tax rates

of the highest income bracket.

“That’s something that I think is being called for by many people in the United States and Canada,” Schirle said, noting that such a move would have little impact on the labour market. “That’s a policy that makes sense

and seems very feasible and reason- able. Politically [though], with current governments, I would seriously doubt it.”

Public discourse

So what can we gather from the movement? “The greatest service that Occupy

Wall Street has done for the U.S. and Canada is help breathe some air into

something that we were not talking about,” Hennessy said.

“In Canada, we don’t talk about record-high levels of household debt. Canadian households are in it far

more than they’re able to manage if the system goes down – if we have a housing market crash, for instance. “Things could happen and people know it and are anxious, but at the same time, there’s this middle class insularity that’s going on.” She explained that many in Canada’s middle class are simply cop- ing and not expecting things to be much better than they are at a given moment. Pimlott suggested that the protests and occupied parks could be a sign of greater things to come. “This is a spark that has fired peo- ple’s imaginations. There [are] links to other things that are happening and

no one is determining all of them be- cause there are so many diverse groups, but I think it’s a clear indica- tion that politics cannot continue as they have been,” he said, noting a few historical examples of social move- ments from similar beginnings that created profound change over time. “People have been talking to each

other. I think that’s maybe what’s most important; all these groups are coming together and talking to each

other. Perhaps what we’re seeing is a real democracy, where everybody does have a voice, happening right now at the grassroots.” Rauhala explained that there might be, in the Canadian context, greater meaning yet to be derived from the protests, like a focus on un- employment among young people. Differences from the American situa- tion factor in as well, she said. “We have this smug Canadian at- titude that we’re different, but never really articulate what the difference is and yet there are actual differences not spelled out when a story like this

comes along,” she said. “I may be wrong, but our unemployment rates are not the same, our foreclosure rates are not the same, the cartoonish [Wall Street] bad guys are not as readily available. There are reasons why the anger and frustration cannot solidify into a clearer meaning here yet.”

Occupy

Regina

thus far

Mid-July

Via their electronic mailing list, Canadian magazine Adbusters proposes a peaceful occupation of Wall Street to protest corporate influence on democracy, address a growing disparity in wealth, and the absence of legal repercussions behind the re- cent global financial crisis.

Sept. 17

The first Occupation starts on Wall Street, coinciding with Constitution Day.

Oct. 6

The Leader-Post reports that plans are underway for a lo- cal Occupation. The article states, “The Regina Police Service plans to uphold everyone’s rights during a protest that is slated to take place in downtown Regina next week.”

Oct. 15

Occupy Regina sets up in Victoria Park. Regina is only one of an estimated 1,500 cities worldwide to host an Occupy Wall Street move- ment.

Oct. 17

Days after the movement be- gan, the Saskatoon StarPhoenix runs a story head- lined“Protestors vow to stay put,” declaring that “many people aren’t sure what demonstrators are trying to say.”

Oct. 18

The Regina Public Interest Research Group has ap- proved spending up to $800 in basic living supplies for the protesters. It will provide $200 in aid this week and next, followed by $100 per week for up to four weeks af- ter that. Protesters applied for the funds earlier in October by university students in- volved with the movement. Money for the research body is collected voluntarily from student fees at the University of Regina.

Oct. 27

Occupy takes a political turn when CBC reveals that Green Party candidate for the con- stituency of Cannington, Daniel Johnson, has been liv- ing in Victoria Park for the last two weeks. He admitted to CBC that he is a parachute candidate and only running as a favour to old high school friend and Green Party Leader, Victor Lau.

natasha tersigni

news editor

8

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the carillon | Nov. 3 - 9, 2011

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RUSS MARCHUK

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REGINA

INGRID ALESICH

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ELPHINSTONE-

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ELAINE TORRIE

CENTRE

BILL STEVENSON

COMMUNITY COORDINATOR

RAYNELLE WILSON

REGINA

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16 LYNN BAY, REGINA S4S 2W9 161 HABKIRK DRIVE, REGINA S4S 3M1 108 ARLINGTON ST, REGINA S4S 6M9

JOHN NILSON

LAWYER

LEN ANDRYCHUK

LAKEVIEW

MIKE WRIGHT

ENGINEER

TYLER SMITH

REGINA

KEVIN DOHERTY

12042 WASCANA HEIGHTS REGINA S4V 3E2

VICE PRESIDENT OF SASKPOWER

SASKATCHEWAN PARTY GREEN PARTY NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY (NDP)

KEN AZZOPARDI

152 CONNAUGHT CRES REGINA S4T 6M9 33-31 CENTENNIAL ST, REGINA S4S 6P8 231 ROTHWELL CRES REGINA S4N 1R5

NATHAN SGRAZZUTTI

209 - 2351 WINDSOR PARK RD. REGINA S4V 1N4

STUDENT

JOHN KLEIN

NORTHEAST

DWAYNE YASINOWSKI

111 ALPORT CRES REGINA S4R 7Y5

RESEARCHER

BRAD SMITH

REGINA

HAFEEZ CHAUDHURI

SALES MANAGER RENEWABLE ENERGY CONSULTANT BUSINESSWOMAN YOUTH COUNSELLOR

 

PARMINDER RANDHAWA

4222 NICURITY DRIVE REGINA S4X 0B9 BOX 4 RR1 REGINA S4P 2Z1 22 MILLAR CRES REGINA S4S 071 4610 MARIGOLD DRIVE REGINA S4X 4S5

QU’APPELLE

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~ GREEN PARTY SASKATCHEWAN PARTY NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY (NDP)

CHAD PATTERSON

LAURA ROSS

BLAIR ROSS

VALLEY

STEVE RYAN

FRANK BUCK

REGINA

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549 PASQUA ST REGINA S4R 4M9 654 MCTAVISH ST REGINA S4T 3T5 503-1255 BROAD ST, REGINA S4R 1Y2

IT SUPPORT ANALYST STUDENT EDUCATOR

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ALLAN KIRK

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DAVID ORBAN

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PHIL BOYCHUK

 

YENS PEDERSEN

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LAUREN MENTIPLAY

 

REGINA

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sports

Sports Editor: Autumn McDowell sports@carillonregina.com the carillon | Nov. 3 - 9, 2011

s ports@carillonregina.com the carillon | Nov. 3 - 9, 2011 circlingthewagon.wordpress.com Jordan Weal will make more

circlingthewagon.wordpress.com

Jordan Weal will make more money in his life than anyone who answered this roundtable

If I didn’t watch

a game because a team was out of

the playoffs, then I would be watching

a hell of a lot less

university sports. Zing.

Autumn McDowell

ROUNDTABLE

What would you rather watch: a university game or the Pan Am Games?

autumn mcdowell, jonathan hamelin, britton gray, colton hordichuk, taylor shire

this week’s roundtable

Do you plan on attending any University of Regina sporting events this year?

Autumn McDowell: Of course. Since it is pretty much my job to go to the games and know what I am talking about when it comes to University of Regina sports, I will be there. At every game. Whether I like it or not. Every single goddamn game.

Jonathan Hamelin: Hell no. I was the sports editor last year, so I’ll leave that to the poor sucker who has the posi- tion this year. (Just kidding, Autumn and all the members of the university sports scene who were co-operative last year!)

Britton Gray: Yes, I will be attending university games. If your going to a school, you’ve gotta show your sup- port by cheering on the sports teams and helping them be the best they can be.

Colton Hordichuk: It’s too early to tell. I’ve always wanted to attend a U of R game, but I’ve never had any time. So I guess my answer is yes. Wait, I mean no. I’m going to change my answer back to yes.

Taylor Shire: If I pretend to turn my lectures into games, then yes.

How much time do you spend watching sports every week?

McDowell: Hmm, lets see. I probably go to six hours worth of university games each week plus probably a good sevenish hours of hockey and football I watch at home. If a UFC event is on there’s another solid three hours. So probably between 13 and 16 hours. Good god.

Hamelin: Well I am a freelancer for the Regina Leader-Post sports section, have edited their Saskatchewan Roughriders home game program and aspire to be a sports journalist, so naturally maybe an hour. I’ve found the more you start covering sports, the less time you have to watch sports. That comes with the territory of being a journalist, though; you have to be an expert on any subject that is thrown at you.

Gray: During the week I watch a few NHL games, but Sunday is when I do the majority of my sports watching. Nothing like waking up, watching football, eating supper, watching more football, then going to bed. GO COWBOYS!

Hordichuk: As of last week, I spent probably 20-plus hours watching my Ducks play on the NHL Centre Ice channels. My free trial is up, so I’m back to watching the Toronto Make-

Me-Laughs make their ‘glorious push’ for Lord Stanley’s cup on CBC. A 6-2- 1 record is a good enough to take the Presidents’ Trophy, right?

Shire: I’m an athlete. I play sports.

Do you even care about the last two Rider games this season?

McDowell: Meh, I don’t know. I guess part of me cares; it’s still sports so I will watch it. If I didn’t watch a game because a team was out of the play- offs, then I would be watching a hell of a lot less university sports. Zing.

Hamelin: Oh snap, Autumn. I have nothing else to add to that.

Gray: Nope, these games mean noth- ing to me. I actually kinda stop fol- lowing the CFL once the NFL season begins.

Hordichuk: I thought the Rider’s sea- son was already over. I care more about watching the Colts go 0-16-0 than watching the Rider’s last two games. Peyton Manning for MVP.

Shire: I went to the last home game of the year against Hamilton, but it was mainly to use up my leftover drink tokens on long island iced teas. I got lucky and five out of eight drinks ac- tually had booze in them! I’ll consider that a win.

Do you think Jordan Weal will make it to NHL?

McDowell: The guy is un-weal. The big knock on him is that he is small but boy does he have a nose around the net. Weal was projected to go 30th overall in the 2010 NHL entry draft, but ended up dropping to 70th. Barring an untimely injury, Weal will eventually play for an NHL team, though it may be a while before we see old Wealer in the show.

Hamelin: To properly assess that, it would require me having watched a minute of the Regina Pats in action, which – for the time restrictions I mentioned earlier – simply hasn’t happened.

Gray: Yeah, he could make it into the NHL if he works hard and is dedi- cated. By practicing and improving his game he could find his way into an NHL lineup.

Hordichuk: It’d be nice to see a for- mer Pat make the NHL, but the Kings are too sound already and truthfully, they don’t need him. One day he’ll be able to play along side Kopitar, Richards, Gagne, and the rest of the al- ready loaded Kings offence – just not this year.

Shire: It’s going to be a daunting task trying to make the deep Los Angeles Kings team for Weal. Hopefully he can Weal – er, wheel – his way in there somewhere, because if he can do in

the NHL what he is doing in the WHL (see Eberle of less calibre), then he should be a strong player for what- ever team he is on.

The Pan Am Games are happening right now. Does anyone even care?

McDowell: The Pan Am Games are on? Lets be perfectly honest; no, I don’t care. I pay attention to them when I know someone that is com- peting, but other than that the Pan Am games are just interrupting my hockey-watching time.

Hamelin: If I don’t even have time to watch mainstream sports, there’s no way I have time to watch the Pan Am games.

Gray: No, football is on.

Hordichuk: I thought Pan Am was a T.V. show about an American airline starring Christina Ricci and Mike Vogel? I didn’t know there’s games based off of this. I can’t wait to see which flight attendant is going to take the crown for most customers served.

Shire: Oooh, that’s what Onrait and O’Toole were talking about on SportsCentre last night. After the ringette highlights. I get it now. So the answer is no, but for some reason I want to sing some Van Halen now.

ccaannaaddaaiinnffeeddeerraattooiinnooffssttuuddeennttssssaasskkaattcchheewwaannssttuuddeennttssccooaattiillooiinnmmcciihhaaeeaajjllcckkssoonnmmoovveeiiaallyyttoonnuunn--

tthhoosseeaasssshhooeellsswwhhooggvviieeyyoouuttcciikkeettsswwhheennyyoouuppaarrkknniitthheewwrroonnggppaallcceeoonnccaammppuussaattllllhhnniiggssccaappttiiaassiilltt

ggaayymmccaannaaddaaiinnffeeddeerraattooiinnooffssttuuddeennttssssaasskkaattcchheewwaannssttuuddeennttssccooaattiillooiinnmmcciihhaaeeaajjllcckkssoonnmmoovveeiiaallyy--

ttuunneerreecceessssooiinnaaffgghhaannssiittaannttaasseerrssddoommeebbaaoolliiuuttsshheeaattllhhccaarreebbaannkkrruuppttccyysswweeaatteevvrreesshhttppiisstteeddrroouucchheebbaaggss

ddeerrrreetthhaattssppeeeecchhsstteepphheennhhaarrppeerrccaannaaddaaiinneeeellccttooiinnttwwttiitteerrttiiuunneesskkaannyyeewweessttaallddyyggaaggaattpp--aanniiaauuttoo--

sports@carillonregina.com is what you type in the to: eld if you want to

email us about doing the sports roundtable.

10

sports

the carillon | Nov. 3 - 9, 2011

Art of the climb

Fine arts student John Kalyn stays rock-steady

of the climb Fine arts student John Kalyn stays rock-steady John Kalyn Kalyn has been climbing

John Kalyn

Kalyn has been climbing in many parts of the world

Kalyn Kalyn has been climbing in many parts of the world “ There is an interesting

There is an interesting thing that happens when you climb. Lots of people go climbing and they think, ‘Man, that’s fun’, but after climbing for two to three hours straight for your first few times your arms are so burnt out. It gets to the point where you can hardly open doors; that feeling was awesome

John Kalyn

U of R fine arts student

was awesome ” John Kalyn U of R fine arts student a utumn mcdowell sports editor

autumn mcdowell

sports editor

For John Kalyn, a University of Regina third-year fine arts student, art has always been a passion in his life, but it is his other passion – rock climb- ing – that allows him to reach new heights. After being invited to come climb- ing by his sister and brother-in-law at the age of 22, Kalyn took to the sport like a duck to water. Kalyn instantly loved the feeling he got from climb- ing, one that is almost indescribable. “There is an interesting thing that happens when you climb,” Kalyn said. “Lots of people go climbing and they think, ‘Man, that’s fun’, but after climbing for two to three hours straight for your first few times your arms are so burnt out. It gets to the point where you can hardly open doors; that feeling was awesome.” According to Kalyn, it is not just the feeling that keeps him climbing year after year, but the relationships that he has built with other climbers is something special. “The climbing community is awe- some,” Kalyn said. “Almost every- where that you go – for the most part

– people are super positive, and sup- portive, and really encouraging. That really draws me in.” Kalyn admitted that he was not the type of kid to be involved in highly competitive sports growing up, but with climbing it was different. “I played sports as a kid, but I wasn’t very good because I am not super competitive,” Kalyn said. “I would rather have fun with it, whereas some people are just set on winning. With climbing and climbers, it’s different. I have climbed with guys that were top five in Canada, and I was climbing stuff that for them would be peanuts and maybe it’s challenging for me. They are still su- per encouraging saying, ‘Go for it, go for it.’ That really draws me in be- cause it’s a super solid community.” Climbing has also allowed Kalyn

to experience things that he may have

never had the chance to otherwise. “I have climbed in Thailand, in California, and just outside of Vegas at

a place called Red Rock,” Kalyn re-

called. “Those are the main trips that I have taken, but I have also climbed

a little bit in the Rockies outside of

Banff. I am hoping to climb in Squamish, there are so many places that I would just love to go and climb.” During his numerous climbing trips, Kalyn has managed to make in- credible memories while achieving

has managed to make in- credible memories while achieving personal goals. However, when asked to pick

personal goals. However, when asked to pick just one favourite memory, the task was nearly impossible. “There [have] been a few; proba- bly one of the highlights was when I was in Bishop,” Kalyn said. “There is this boulder there that is one of the biggest in the world. It is actually cracked in half; there are two halves to it called the grandpa and grandma. I was doing a climb on the grandma, which has slightly easier climbs and I remember that I got up to one section where no one from our group had made it past; it was the crux of the climb. “I was holding on to two [small grips] and I saw this pocket up above and I knew that was the next move. I remember holding on and prepping and I looked back and realized that I was about twenty feet off of the ground and it was slightly slopping. I thought to myself, ‘If you don’t make this, you are going to fall and it is probably going to hurt.’ When I went and hit it, it was full of water, but just holding onto it and scrambling up the top half of the boulder was a rush. Being on top of this huge boulder was awesome.” As Kalyn reminisced about other climbs he had done, he mentioned

getting to the actual climb is some- times half the battle. “There are so many memories to pick from; there are a couple of spots in Thailand that we climbed, but get- ting to the climbing areas is almost more fun than the climbing because you have to hike through crazy paths,” Kayln said. “In Thailand there is forests and jungles; there was one area where we had to hike up a super- narrow canyon that was about twenty-feet wide. At the top of the slope there was a drop and then a pit. “You had to rappel down and across this pit to get to the climbing area, which was maybe an eight or ten foot ledge that you stand on and then you climb up from there and be- low is a drop into the ocean. Those kinds of things are really cool.” For Kalyn, it isn’t just the places

he goes or the climbs he does but rather the people he meets. “Just the people that you meet climbing are awesome,” he said.

“When I was in Bishop, I met a couple that was living out of there van. I started climbing with them and it was

like we had been friends forever; it’s just a really solid bond that exists be- tween climbers.” Since Kalyn has had the incredi- ble opportunity to climb in various parts of the world, the new surround- ings and experiences in other cultures have been very beneficial.

“Traveling is always inspirational

– that, along with positivity and being

a part of the climbing culture and ex-

periencing other cultures and open mindedness and willingness to try other things,” Kalyn said. “I wouldn’t be who I was had I not had that per- spective.” While many people might stay in

a luxurious five-star resort during

their vacations, for Kalyn to truly ex- perience another culture, he tries to live as the locals do. “The biggest thing is that when you travel to an area, if you are stay- ing in resorts you aren’t really experi- encing that culture, but when we were climbing in Thailand we tried to really experience it,” Kalyn said. “We took a day to take a cooking class, we went to an authentic Thai market where no tourists go; no one spoke English, and we stuck out so much. You see wild and exciting stuff. When someone hands you a beetle or ant eggs as a snack you have the choice to think it’s disgusting or try anything twice. That has brought me perspective.” Although Kalyn has not done any art pieces solely based on climbing, he has been able to take the focus that he has while climbing and translate it to his art. “I don’t really do a lot of art about climbing. But [climbing] is just a good thing to get into, it’s a good head- space,” he said. “Especially when you are climbing outside and among na- ture it is a really good meditative feel- ing and an awesome place to be, it rejuvenates you.” While many would say that Kalyn is an experienced climber, according to him, his art is far from experienced. “It’s developing,” Kalyn said with

a laugh. “I am trying to learn every- thing that I can. I am passionate about it and it is something that I love to do. I talk about it all the time; people are remarked by how much I talk

about it, but it is a huge part of my life.” With convocation coming sooner rather than later for Kalyn, he just hopes that both climbing and art re- main big parts in his life. “I would love to be climbing for- ever. When I was living in Saskatoon we had a couple of guys that were in

their ’50s and ’60s climbing and they were still in super good shape,” Kalyn said. “I would love to stay a part of the climbing community, just finding

a place to climb is a hard thing in

Regina; there isn’t a whole lot of op- tions, but I would like to continue to climb. As far as art goes, I will be mak- ing art my entire life. Guaranteed.”

the carillon | Nov. 3 - 9, 2011

sports

11

A set above the rest

The University of Regina men’s volleyball team looks to make an impression

Regina men’s volleyball team looks to make an impression adrenalinreginasports.com The men’s volleyball team looks

adrenalinreginasports.com

The men’s volleyball team looks to finish out of last place this year

autumn mcdowell

sports editor

Although the University of Regina Cougars men’s volleyball team has not always been considered a top con- tender, the team would like to prove the critics wrong this year. Throughout the preseason, which consisted of three tournaments for the Cougars, including the Super 8, Cougar Invitational, and Husky Dino Cup, Regina came out with a 4-8 record. The results may not have been quite up to par, but head coach Greg Barthel is happy with the outcomes of the preseason. “It wasn’t too bad; we performed well and we had a lot of guys play,” Barthel said. “By sure [statistics] prob- ably not what we wanted, but as far as when our guys were playing they played pretty well. [Overall] their per- formance was okay.” This year the Cougars lineup fea- tures three Australian players. Matt Hender is returning for his second year with the team, while Andre Borgeaud and Jacques Borgeaud have also been added to the roster.

As far as recruiting these players for Regina, Barthel admitted it takes effort from both himself and the play- ers.

“It’s a little bit of both [scouting and seeking],” he said. “Last year we had Matt [Hender] come and I had found out about Matt through their national team people. It was kind of the same process with Andre and Jacques. Matt talked to them a little bit too; he had known Jacques before so that worked out well.” Although Andre and Jacques may be rookies, Barthel believes that Jacques has the potential to make an immediate impact. “Jacques coming in at the libero position will contribute a lot; he stabi- lizes our passing quite a bit, and our defence,” Barthel said. While both Andre and Jacques are in their first year of eligibility, Barthel expects it will be the fifth-year players who take on a bigger role with the team this year. “This year, we have four fifth-year guys: Joel Colter, Drew Smith, Jamie Wilkins, and Brody Waddell,” Barthel said. “You expect those guys to be pretty big contributors for your

group.” Aside from the veteran presence that is sure to a strong part of the court this year, Barthel said that younger guys are stepping up as well. “We are seeing some good im- provement from some of the guys that have developed,” he said. “Nathan Cherwaty has had a great preseason, and hopefully with the year he had [last year] I can expect him to con- tribute this year as well.” Last year the team finished with a 2-16 record, something it looks to im- prove on in the 2011-12 season. “We always want to go for the playoffs; that’s an attainable goal that you always have to try and go for,” said Barthel, who is in his fifth year with the team. “We realize that we are not the biggest team, but I think it is a definite goal that we want to try to achieve.” With the ability to make a run for the playoffs this year, Barthel would like everyone to come and support the team, namely students. “I think that if we had more stu- dents come out it would help a lot.” Barthel said of the low attendance. “Most of the people that come watch our games are not students; it’s either alumni guys or parents or friends of players, that type of thing or general people from the volleyball commu- nity. But there is definitely not a lot of student population out.” There were still plenty of vacant seats in the stands when the Cougars took on the UBC Thunderbirds in their first pair of regular season games last weekend. Although the Cougars put up a good fight against the east coast team, the Cougars finished the weekend with two losses on their record after set scores of 24-26, 25-23, 25-20, 25-11 on Oct. 28 and 25-16, 25- 16, 25-21 the very next night. Students will have plenty of chances to see the men’s volleyball team in action this year; their next home game against provincial rivals the Saskatchewan Huskies is sched- uled for today at 8 p.m.

the Saskatchewan Huskies is sched- uled for today at 8 p.m. Hanging in there The Regina

Hanging in there

The Regina Rams stare playoff hopes in the face

in there The Regina Rams stare playoff hopes in the face huskieoutsider.com A drian Charles will

huskieoutsider.com

Adrian Charles will go to work Nov. 4 against the University of Calgary

autumn mcdowell

sports editor

The University of Regina Rams are set to take on the powerhouse Calgary Dinos in Canada West semi-final ac- tion Friday night in Cowtown after a 31-22 decision victory over the Manitoba Bisons on Oct. 28. The Rams have experienced so many ups and downs this season that it is a miracle the playoffs are here – and that the Rams are in them, for that matter. Regina went from being ranked first in a conference preseason coaches’ poll, to losing three straight games along with its first string quar- terback in a matter of weeks. After a few trial and errors with second- and third-string quarterbacks, as well as more injuries, converted slotback Zach Oleynik provided a true spark to the offence and essentially got the ball rolling. After rattling off two consecutive wins against the Alberta Golden Bears and Manitoba Bisons, everything was looking up for the Rams and many people believed that this would be the turning point in their season. To many people’s surprise and some people’s disgust, the Rams lost the next two games in a row. Although both games came down to the final play of the game, a loss is still a loss, no matter how close the score was. The Rams hopes and dreams of a playoff spot that at one time seemed guaranteed came down to the final game of the season in a clash against the Bisons. It was a winner-takes-all game, as the winner would move on and the loser would be sent home early, cut and dry with no strings at- tached. The Rams jumped on the gun early and didn’t stop firing until the fi- nal minute of play. The Rams have had a horrible habit of giving up half time leads, but this game would be a different story. A massive defensive play that oc- curred just five minutes into the con- test had the Rams pumped more that they already were. Linebacker Jorgen Hus managed to block Manitoba’s punt while defensive back Steven Famulak had the quick thinking to scoop of the ball and scamper into the end zone to register a major for the visitors. Adrian Charles would be the next to hit the end zone for the Rams after catching a 13-yard pass from Oleynik

barely into the second. After a team safety and two Chris Bodnar converts, the Rams had a 15 point cushion over the Bisons, though there was still 14 minutes left in the second quarter. Manitoba was not about to give up, as Khaleal Williams finished off a four-play, 41-yard drive to put Manitoba on the board just two min- utes later. Anthony Coombs, who has been a beast for the Bisons all season, went to work for his team four min- utes after that as he also capped a 41- yard drive with a touchdown. The Rams lead had suddenly slipped to one point, but a second touchdown by Charles with just un- der three minutes left in the half put them up by eight. The Bisons weren’t ready for the locker room as Nick Boyd hit a 26- yard field goal to cut the lead back down to five points at the break. An action-packed first half paved the way for the Bodnar show in the second half of action. Bodnar hit field goals from 35, 43, and 11 yards to put Regina up by two touchdowns with one quarter left to play. Manitoba would never be able to fully make up the deficit – two team safety’s would be all the points that Manitoba would muster in their last half of football in 2011. The Rams went on to secure the victory and a spot in the postseason. With the regular season behind them Regina will be preparing to take on the No. 1 team in the conference. Although the odds are not necessarily in the Rams’ favour heading into the game, anything can happen – that is the beauty of football. Calgary is currently riding an eight-game winning streak against the Rams and has won three out of the past four playoff battles between the two teams. The time is now for the Rams to stop the streak. Friday night’s game will be a bat- tle of the running backs, as the first- and second-ranked players go to work. Steven Lumbala vs. Adrian Charles will be a battle in itself to see who best running back in the CIS is. Consequently, it will be a defen- sive showdown, as both teams will be looking to eliminate the other team’s running back – whichever team stops the run will win the game. What started as a season with so much promise has gone through many setbacks, but ultimately the Rams are right where they need to be. It’s the playoffs, it’s a new season, and anything goes.

12

sports

the carillon | Nov. 3 - 9, 2011

Steppin’ up

Members of the men’s hockey team are putting up big numbers

of the men’s hockey team are putting up big numbers thesheaf.com T he University of Regina

thesheaf.com

The University of Regina Cougars are 2-5-1 in regular season action

what the puck?

autumn mcdowell

sports editor

Eight games into the regular season and members of the University of Regina Cougars men’s hockey team are already bettering last season’s to- tals.

The improvement in statistics could either mean that rookies on last year’s team were adjusting to the CIS game, or maybe that they had an off-

year. It’s also possible that veterans were snakebitten or that team just sucked. Whatever the case may be, things appear to be taking a turn for the better this year. Regina has seen Matt Strueby put up eight points, just one shy of his to- tal last season in 26 games. With his four goals and four assists so far in regular season action, Strueby sits eighth on the Canada West scorers list and first on the Cougars for overall point totals. He is also tied for first on the team in goal scoring. The confer- ence list claims that Strueby is a rookie, which he clearly is not. According to the Canada West rookie scoring stats, Strueby is second in the league; way to drop the ball on that one, Canada West. Lucas Isley, who is returning for his third year of eligibility, has been able to rack up seven points during the first eight games of the season. Isley also finished with nine points in total last year in 27 games played – barring a season-ending injury he will surely top that this year. Isley’s three goals and four assists put him at No.

12 on the Canada West top scorers list.

Once again, the list claims that Isley is

also a rookie, yet they don’t have him

listed as a rookie in exhibition scoring. They’re really having trouble with this list of theirs. Last season Terrance DeLaronde emerged as one of the teams go-to for- wards. After racking up 14 points in

24 games last season, DeLaronde fin-

ished 38th overall in scoring and sec- ond on the Cougars just behind de- fenceman Dillon Johnstone. This season, DeLaronde appears to be at it again, posting six points in as many games. He is currently tied with Strueby for team goal scoring and is third on the Cougars for overall points. DeLaronde currently sits at first on the plus-minus scale, some- thing that he will look to keep on the positive end after finishing with a mi- nus 13 in 2010-11. Captain Russ Neilson sits fifth in Canada West for defenceman scoring with four points in eight games. The four points that Neilson has already plotted this season matches his season total from last year, which he earned over the course of 21 games. Matt Sawa has also matched his point total from last season. Although it was only one, Sawa played 25 games to get one point last year, while he only had to play in six to get an as- sist on the board this year. As far as true rookies are con- cerned, Tyler Henry is leading the way for the Cougars with six points in eight games. If the Canada West web- site was at all right with naming rook- ies, Henry would probably sit around third, but instead he is supposedly eighth. Lucas Gore has had a stellar rookie campaign in goal for the Cougars thus far, sitting at a .912 save percentage after seeing action in seven of the team’s eight games. Gore was in goal during both of the team’s wins and they surly could not have gotten the W without Gore standing on his head on more than a few occasions.

Despite the improvements from nearly every member of the team, the Cougars still sit in last place in the conference with a 2-5-1 record. The Cougars will look to get out of the basement this weekend when they are scheduled to take on the Calgary Dinos (5-3) at the Co-operators Centre. The puck drops at 7 p.m.

Schooling his opponents

U of R wrestler Paul Grebinski has big plans for the future

U of R wrestler Paul Grebinski has big plans for the future carillonregina.com Paul Grebinski hopes

carillonregina.com

Paul Grebinski hopes to finish at the top of the standings this year

ed kapp

sports writer

In the future, Paul Grebinski, a first- year education student at the University of Regina, is hoping to make his living by teaching in class- rooms. In the meantime, however, this amateur wrestler for the Cougars and undefeated amateur mixed martial artist spends his time trying to teach his opponents lessons on the mats and in the ring. Nearly a lifelong martial artist, Grebinski first took to wrestling at a young age. “I started wrestling when I was very young. My dad used to wrestle and I would go around with them, running around on the mats,” Grebinski said with a laugh. “I wres- tled until I was about 11, but I got to be too busy with hockey.” After a hiatus from the sport, Grebinski began wrestling again as a sophomore at Archbishop MC O’Neill High School in Regina. “My high school didn’t have a wrestling program in my Grade 9 year,” Grebinski explained. “If they would have had one, I would have started wrestling again sooner. As soon as they established a program, though, I signed up.” After wrestling for three years in high school, Grebinski was looking to take on a new challenge and a few years ago joined Complete MMA, a martial arts academy in downtown Regina. Here he decided to try his hand at Brazilian jiu-jitsu. “I had wrestled in the past, obvi- ously, and I really had an urge to do something new,” Grebinski said. “I

had heard a lot about AJ Scales – who

is a phenomenal grappler – who had

a good school of guys at Complete.

One day I decided to check it out. Immediately, it reminded of being in wrestling and I fell in love with the sport right away.” Although Grebinski claimed he didn’t intend on competing as a mixed martial artist when he first started training at Complete MMA, since deciding to try his hand at the sport he has yet to look back. “I was just hungry for a new chal- lenge and I always thought, in the back of my mind, that this would be something that I could do well in,” Grebinski said. “Now, I just want to take tough fights and work my way up. It’s not going to be easy – this is a very difficult sport – but I’m ready to put everything I have into succeed- ing in mixed martial arts.” Grebinski, who is tentatively scheduled to return to the ring in Regina in early December, has big plans in both wrestling and mixed martial arts moving forward. “In wrestling, I want to medal at the CIS championships – that’s on a

personal level, but I want to see the

team win a national championship,”

he said. “It hasn’t happened for a few years, but we’ve got quite a team and

I feel that goal is within reach. “I would like to see myself com- peting at the highest level in mixed martial arts, too. Fighting in the UFC would be an awesome opportunity.” While Grebinski’s aspirations in

athletics are ambitious to say the least,

a career in the classroom is what the

27-year-old Regina product has his sights set on. “I definitely want to be a teacher and work with at-risk youth,” Grebinski, who has helped coach the Sheldon-Williams Collegiate wrestling program for the last several years, said. “I feel that I have a lot to offer kids and I really want to help kids that may have not gotten some of the opportunities that they should have gotten. “I changed my mind a few times when I was younger, but I have al- ways wanted to be a teacher. I’ve al- ways been told that I was good with kids. I think that that would be a very rewarding and challenging career.”

In wrestling, I want to medal at the CIS championships – that’s on a personal level, but I want to see the team win a national champi- onship. It hasn’t happened for a few years, but we’ve got quite a team and I feel that goal is within reach.

Paul Grebinski

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