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Ordnance & Munitions Forecast

GBU-29 Series Joint Direct Attack Munition


Outlook
U.S. is making extensive use of JDAM in Afghanistan and Iraq, spurring an already strong export demand Besides the United States, there are at least 18 export customers for the JDAM Forecast reflects serial production of JDAM guidance kits for U.S. Department of Defense procurement and export

U
12000

Orientation
Description. An air-launched guided bomb system. Sponsor. The U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy sponsor the development and U.S. procurement of the JDAM. Status. Development through serial production. Total Produced. Through 2009, we estimate over 183,200 JDAM guidance and control tail kits were produced. Application. An air-to-surface weapon system, optimized for the autonomous precision destruction of high-value targets. Price Range. According to U.S. Air Force FY11 budget request documentation (February 2010), the JDAM (all up round) carries an FY11 unit price of $27,074.

Contractors
Prime
Boeing Defense, Space & Security MBDA, Corporate HQ

10000

http://www.boeing.com, PO Box 516, St Louis, MO 63166 United States, Tel: + 1 (314) 232-0232, Fax: + 1 (314) 777-1096, Prime http://www.mbda-systems.com, 11 Strand, London, WC2N 5RJ United Kingdom, Tel: + 44 207 451 6000, Fax: + 44 207 451 6001, Email: contact.css@mbdasystems.com, Licensee http://www.northropgrumman.com, 1840 Century Park E, Los Angeles, CA 90067-2199 United States, Tel: + 1 (310) 553-6262, Fax: + 1 (310) 201-3023, Email: onewebmaster@ngc.com, Second Prime

8000

Northrop Grumman Corp

6000

2010

4000

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GBU-29 Series Joint Direct Attack Munition

Subcontractor
Alliant Techsystems - Missile Products Honeywell Aerospace, Defense & Space Electronic Systems Kaman Corp http://www.atk.com, Canton Crossing Tower, 11th Fl, 1501 S Clinton St, Baltimore, MD 21224 United States, Tel: + 1 (410) 864-4800 (JDAM Hard Target Smart Fuze) http://www.honeywell.com/sites/aero/, 13350 US Hwy 19 N, Clearwater, FL 33764-7290 United States, Tel: + 1 (727) 539-4801 (JDAM Guidance System) http://www.kaman.com, 1332 Blue Hills Ave, PO Box 1, Bloomfield, CT 06002-001 United States, Tel: + 1 (860) 243-7100, Fax: + 1 (860) 243-6365, Email: info.kamancorp@kaman.com (Joint Programmable Fuze) http://www.lockheedmartin.com/ms2/, 199 Borton Landing Rd, PO Box 1027, Moorestown, NJ 08057-0927 United States, Tel: + 1 (856) 722-4100 (JDAM Mission Computer) http://www.raytheon.com, 1151 E Hermans Rd, Tucson, AZ 85706 United States, Tel: + 1 (520) 794-3000, Fax: + 1 (520) 794-1315 (Advanced GPS-INS) http://www.textrondefense.com, 201 Lowell St, Wilmington, MA 01887 United States, Tel: + 1 (978) 657-5111, Fax: + 1 (978) 657-6644 (JDAM Tail Actuation System)

Lockheed Martin Maritime Systems & Sensors (MS2) Raytheon Missile Systems Textron Defense Systems

Comprehensive information on Contractors can be found in Forecast International's "International Contractors" series. For a detailed description, go to www.forecastinternational.com (see Products & Samples/Governments & Industries) or call + 1 (203) 426-0800. Contractors are invited to submit updated information to Editor, International Contractors, Forecast International, 22 Commerce Road, Newtown, CT 06470, USA; rich.pettibone@forecast1.com

Technical Data
Launch/Carrier Vehicles. The U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy currently employ the JDAM from a variety of tactical aircraft, including: F-14, F-16, F/A-18, F-117, B-52, B-1B, and B-2. Follow-on platforms include: F-15E, A-10, AV-8B, and F-22. Most NATO-standard tactical aircraft could integrate the JDAM as well. Dimensions. The U.S. Air Force provides the following dimensional data for the Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM). The dimensions reflect the JDAM tail kit attached to the warhead.
SI Units GBU-31(V) 1/B Length Wingspan Launch weight GBU-31(V) 3/B Length Wingspan Launch weight GBU-32(V) 1/B Length Wingspan Launch weight 3.87 m 0.63 m 923.53 kg 3.77 m 0.63 m 959.36 kg 3.03 m 0.49 m 459.49 kg U.S. Units 12.72 ft 2.08 ft 2,036 lb 12.38 ft 2.08 ft 2,115 lb 9.96 ft 1.63 ft 1,013 lb

Performance. Detailed JDAM performance data remain limited. The following data reflect JDAM performance parameters available through open-source reporting:
Range Ceiling Circular error probable (GPS-INS guidance) Circular error probable (INS guidance only) Circular error probable (JDAM PIP guidance) SI Units 27.77 km 13,716 m 13 m 30 m 3m U.S. Units 15 nm 45,000 ft 42.65 ft 98.42 ft 9.84 ft

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Variants/Upgrades
Variants. The Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) guidance and control kit has no variants per se; the various kits exist as separate and distinct products. However, over the life of the program, the JDAM guidance and control technology has adapted to a wide variety of applications. The following table serves as a glossary of the major JDAM applications, in alphabetical order by designation.
Designation ADW Description Agent Defeat Warhead. A U.S. Air Force effort to develop a warhead for safely destroying biological and chemical production and storage facilities. One requirement of the project is compatibility with several guidance and control options, including the JDAM kit. 2,000-lb (907.2-kg) class JDAM. 1,000-lb (453.6-kg) class JDAM. U.S. Air Force 2,000-lb (907.2-kg) Mk 84 warhead JDAM with KMU-556/B guidance kit. U.S. Navy 2,000-lb (907.2-kg) Mk 84 warhead JDAM with KMU-556/B guidance kit. USAF 2,000-lb (907.2 kg) BLU-109/B penetrator warhead JDAM with KMU-557/B guidance kit. USN 2,000-lb (907.2-kg) BLU-109/B penetrator warhead JDAM with KMU-558/B guidance kit. USAF 2,000-lb (907.2-kg) BLU-119/B warhead JDAM with undisclosed KMU guidance kit. USAF 1,000-lb (453.6-kg) Mk 83 warhead JDAM with KMU-559/B guidance kit. USN 1,000-lb (453.6-kg) Mk 83 warhead JDAM with KMU-559/B guidance kit. 2,000-lb (907.2-kg) BLU-116/B warhead JDAM. USN 1,000-lb (453.6-kg) BLU-110/B penetrator warhead JDAM with KMU-559/B guidance kit. 2,000-lb (907.2-kg) Mk 84 warhead Global Positioning System Assisted Munition (GAM); also known as GAM-84. 4,500-lb (2,041.2-kg) BLU-113/B warhead GAM, providing a hard target kill capability for the B-2; also known as GAM-113. USAF and USN 500-lb (226.8-kg) Mk 82 (or BLU-111/B) warhead JDAM with KMU-572 guidance kit. A single B-2 bomber can carry up to 80 of these munitions. Laser JDAM, integrating a Precision Laser Guidance Set (PLGS) with a 2,000-lb (907.2-kg) Mk 84 warhead JDAM - Extended Range. Integrates GEC-Marconi (now MBDA) Diamond Back wing kit; development falls under the SDB program (see below). A program similar to the JDAM-ER, developed by Leigh Aerosystems; also known as Condor. Small Diameter Bomb, or Small Smart Bomb. A 250-lb (113.4-kg) Mk 82 warhead with a diameter of 6 in (15.24 cm), integrating JDAM technology. A joint U.S. Air Force-U.S. Marine Corps program. For a more detailed discussion of this program, see the "Small Diameter Bomb" report in this tab.

GBU-29/B GBU-30/B GBU-31(V)1/B GBU-31(V)2/B GBU-31(V)3/B GBU-31(V)4/B GBU-31(V)5/B GBU-32(V)1/B GBU-32(V)2/B GBU-34/B GBU-35/B GBU-36/B GBU-37/B GBU-38/B GBU-54/B JDAM-ER Longshot SDB

Modernization and Retrofit Overview. In order to enhance the accuracy and reliability of the Joint Direct Attack Munition, the prime contractor and the U.S. Air Force began developing a software upgrade in 1998. This upgrade allows the JDAM to use signals from all

GPS satellites in view at one time (as opposed to just five signals). Following the completion of testing in mid-2000, the prime contractor adopted this enhancement as a production cut-in.

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GBU-29 Series Joint Direct Attack Munition JDAM PIP


Under the Joint Direct Attack Munition Product Improvement Program (JDAM PIP), the prime contractor is investigating several types of advanced terminal guidance technology for integration with the munition. We discuss JDAM PIP further in the Program Review section of this report.

Hard Target Smart Fuze


On August 11, 1998, the U.S. Air Force awarded Alliant Techsystems (ATK) the contract for engineering and manufacturing development of the Hard Target Smart Fuze. This fuze enables the JDAM (and other munitions with penetrating warheads) to detonate at a desired point inside buried or reinforced concrete targets, such as underground bunkers and command centers. Detonation occurs after a sensor detects warhead penetration through a pre-programmed number of hard layers or voids in the target. ATK acts as the prime contractor and systems integrator; Thomson-Thorn Missile Electronics Ltd (Basingstoke, U.K.) provides electronic components for the fuze. The initial three-year developmental contract, worth $16 million plus production options, brought the total value of the contract to $54 million through 2006. The U.S. Air Force Precision Strike System Program Office (Eglin Air Force Base, Florida) manages the Hard Target Smart Fuze program.

Anti-Jam Technology
In the early 1990s, Boeing and the U.S. Air Force began full-scale development and integration of anti-jam technology for integration with the JDAM guidance package. Overall, this is a highly classified effort by the U.S. Department of Defense applicable to all GPS-based guidance systems, including the JDAM program. One major portion of this effort, the Advanced Global Positioning System Inertial Navigation Technology program, involved Raytheon's development of a selective availability anti-spoofing module for the JDAM. The prime contractor has incorporated this module as a production cut-in and a retrofit to existing JDAM guidance units. Another avenue of research is related to possible countermeasures to the GPS datalink. In conjunction with Harris Corporation, Boeing has developed a system that replaces the single antenna with four antennas. A computer with the appropriate software allows the equipment to create a steerable null system, minimizing the strength of the jamming signal. Integration of this system would add about $3,000 to the unit price of a GBU series Joint Direct Attack Munition; testing began in 1998 and is ongoing.

Additional Enhancements
In mid-2001, the U.S. Air Force awarded Boeing a contract for the integration of a new-design pin-lock tail actuation system with the JDAM. This enhancement increases the maneuverability and accuracy of the munition. In October 2003, the U.S. Navy awarded Boeing a $121 million contract for the development and demonstration of the Hornet Autonomous Real-time Targeting (HART) system. This system will allow JDAM-armed F/A-18E/F Super Hornet aircraft to designate targets independent of pre-planned mission requirements. The HART guidance kit employs an infrared sensor, processor, and image-matching software to locate and strike targets designated by the Hornet's Active Electronically Scanned Array radar system. Low-rate initial production (LRIP) of the HART reportedly commenced in 2006. Through 2011, the prime contractor expects to produce approximately 6,000 HART kits.

Warhead Developments
Under the Close Air Support Advanced All-Up Round program, the U.S. Air Force is investigating the possible integration of two international blast/fragmentation warheads with JDAM technology. One warhead, the French BIPS, features a stepped-diameter warhead optimized for enhanced terminal effects, including penetration. This warhead is in production for the French Air Force. The Israeli I-800 warhead is a product of the Rafael Armament Authority.

GBU-31/32 Joint Direct Attack Munition


Source: U.S. Air Force

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Program Review
Background. Although the success of the Paveway laser-guided bomb program has been undeniable, by the mid-1980s, the U.S. Air Force was showing interest in the development of an autonomous smart or semi-smart guided bomb. In September 1991, the U.S. Air Force began development of a new guided bomb, based on the

Seeking an Autonomous Weapon


While laser guidance offers great precision, the Air Force desired an autonomous weapon that would: Free the launch platform or the remote designator from the target prior to detonation. Function in bad weather or battlefield obscurants; laser-slaved bombs can become ineffective under such conditions. Integrate with a large number of Mk 80 series gravity bombs.

For a complete discussion of the Paveway program, see the "GBU-10 Series Paveway Laser-Guided Bombs" report in this tab. In the 1980s, the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Navy began several programs to develop new guided bombs. Major programs included: The joint Air Force-Navy Inertially Aided Munition program (1986-1991), which investigated the integration of a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, aerodynamic control surfaces, and the associated guidance and control electronics with a Mk 82 bomb. U.S. Air Force integration of the Northrop inertial measurement unit used on the AIM-120 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) with the Mk 84 gravity bomb. The U.S. Navy began the Advanced Bomb Family program in 1988 to develop and field improved replacements for the Mk 82, Mk 83, and Mk 84 gravity bombs. The new bombs were to feature a refined ballistic shape, improved fillings with insensitive explosives, and improved blast and penetration characteristics. A Navy reevaluation of the program in light of lessons learned from Operation Desert Storm (1991) led to termination of the program in September 1991. In November of that year, the Navy renewed the program under a new structure that eliminated the 450-kilogram (990-lb) guided bomb.

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technology developed in the Inertially Aided Munition program, to provide the B-2 Spirit stealth bomber with a precision guided bomb capability. The Inertially Aided Munition/Global Positioning System (later renamed the Adverse Weather Precision Guided Munition) kits would have carried a unit price of $45,000. In January 1993, the U.S. Air Force issued the draft Request for Proposals (RFP) for the Joint Direct Attack Munition program; the definitive request appeared in June of that year. Despite the competitive advantage Texas Instruments enjoyed as prime contractor of the AGM-154 JSOW, the U.S. Air Force selected two other contractors in April 1994 to manufacture a functional equivalent of the Texas Instruments guidance package for the Joint Direct Attack Munition I. Previously, in August 1993, the U.S. DoD had announced that the JDAM program would be the pilot program in a major streamlined acquisition reform effort to reduce program costs. Description. The Joint Direct Attack Munition program has proceeded in three major phases. This first or basic phase of the JDAM program ultimately involved three bomb types: The U.S. Air Force 2,000-pound (907.2-kg) class Mk 84 general-purpose bomb. The U.S. Air Force 2,000-pound (907.2-kg) class BLU-109/B penetrating bomb. The U.S. Navy 1,000-pound (453.6-kg) class Mk 83 general-purpose bomb.

Program Consolidation Yields JDAM


As a result of growing congressional concern over the duplication of effort and funding, the troubles in the Advanced Bomb Family program, and increasingly tight defense budgets, the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) insisted that the various bomb programs of the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy be consolidated. In December 1991, the U.S. Air Force Adverse Weather Precision Guided Munition program and the U.S. Navy Advanced Bomb Family program were integrated under a new combined effort called the Joint Direct Attack program. In 1992, the U.S. Department of Defense renamed the program the Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) program; the DoD designated the U.S. Air Force as the lead service for the JDAM effort. As part of the December 1991 consolidation agreement, the U.S. Air Force joined the U.S. Navy Advanced Interdiction Weapon System program, subsequently renamed the AGM-154 Joint Stand-off Weapon (JSOW) program. For a complete discussion of the JSOW program, see the "AGM-154 Joint Stand-Off Weapon" report in this tab. In June 1992, the U.S. Air Force issued its Bomber Roadmap, a plan for the future composition and direction of the U.S. bomber force that emphasized the importance of the Joint Direct Attack Munition I and III. This plan supported an effort by senior Air Force personnel to accelerate the operational employment of the JDAM with the B-2 bomber.

The goal of this initial phase was to achieve enhanced accuracy over the standard unguided bomb, rather than developing a precision capability such as that offered by the Paveway laser-guided bomb. From a high-altitude drop (30,000 ft/9,144 m), the U.S. Air Force desired an accuracy of 13 meters (42.65 ft). The JDAM I guidance system integrates a GPS receiver with an inertial navigation system (GPS-INS); this package interfaces with the associated guidance and control electronics to actuate the aerodynamic control surfaces at the rear of the JDAM tail fin assembly. Even if the GPS receiver fails to receive updates, the inertial navigation system will still provide the bomb with greater accuracy than unguided bombs. The program specifications require the INS to be able to maintain a specified accuracy for 100 seconds without input from the GPS receiver.

JDAM JSOW Commonality


In September 1992, the U.S. Air Force opened the competition for the Joint Direct Attack Munition I guidance assembly, which represents 70 to 80 percent of the total cost of the weapon. However, the U.S. Air Force required that any guidance package offered be a functional equivalent of the Texas Instruments guidance package so as to preserve commonality between the Joint Direct Attack Munition I and the Joint Stand-off Weapon System. By October 1992, at least 12 firms had expressed interest in joining the program, potentially worth up to $2 billion.

JDAM II 500-Pounder
The JDAM II phase of the Joint Direct Attack Munition program is related to the development and procurement of a new bomb fuze and a 500-pound (226.8-kg) class general-purpose bomb, primarily for the U.S. Marine Corps. The programmable fuze component of the program provides the Mk 83/84 conventional bomb and BLU-109/B penetrating bomb with:

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High reliability Multiple arm time capability Cockpit programmability Hard target survivability Increased shelf and service life Active millimeter-wave/laser radar. This seeker technology offers a better level of adverse weather capability than millimeterwave or laser radar used alone. However, the higher cost of this seeker technology probably precludes its selection. Imaging infrared (IIR) seeker. This type of precision seeker offers a better level of accuracy than electro-optic seeker technology; it also allows for a degree of human control, which is something the U.S. Navy desires. A major advantage is the low cost of the technology. The U.S. Navy is proceeding in this area with its April 1998 contract to Raytheon Systems Electro-optical seeker. This proven technology also offers a "man in the loop" capability; it is cost-competitive with imaging infrared (IIR) seekers. However, the performance of the electro-optic seeker under adverse weather conditions remains open to question. Dual-mode seeker. Finally, a dual-mode seeker assembly combining any two of the above technologies is not out of the question.

Alliant Techsystems (formerly Motorola) is responsible for the FMU-152/B Joint Programmable Fuze, and its integration under JDAM II. Alliant won the contract for full-scale development of this new fuze in August 1998. In the approval for the JDAM program, the Defense Acquisition Board directed that the U.S. Navy, which acts as lead service for the JDAM II program, explore international (specifically French) opportunities for the development and procurement of this bomb. However, the program moved ahead based on the Mk 80 bomb, which the U.S. Navy ordered into production in September 2000.

JDAM PIP (JDAM III)


As the most ambitious and sophisticated phase of the Joint Direct Attack Munition program, the JDAM Product Improvement Program (JDAM PIP) integrates a terminal guidance seeker with a portion of the JDAM I bombs, significantly increasing accuracy. For a comparison of JDAM accuracy between the standard GPS-INS and JDAM PIP terminal guidance, see the Technical Data section of this report (above). Among the technologies under consideration for this phase of the JDAM program are the following: Synthetic aperture radar. This technology offers a better level of performance in adverse weather than electro-optical systems, albeit with a higher unit price. In the JDAM III application, the bomb would integrate targeting data transmitted to the launch aircraft from the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (J-STARS) E-8 aircraft with imagery from the onboard JDAM synthetic aperture radar. Active millimeter-wave radar. This technology offers a better level of adverse weather performance than electro-optical systems; it also carries a higher unit price. It operates essentially the same as synthetic aperture radar. Laser radar. This seeker technology uses a carbon- dioxide-imaging laser radar system that can operate in the passive and active mode at the same time. As with synthetic aperture radar, the laser radar seeker compares stored data with what it observes in the terminal portion of flight.

Need for Terminal Guidance?


Clouding the selection process was the possibility that a relatively new attack parameter, known as relative targeting, could negate the need for a precision seeker and the JDAM PIP effort altogether. Relative targeting (or target hand-off) involves a synthetic aperture radar capability on the launch aircraft. The radar generates target coordinates; the launch aircraft determines its position via GPS. The triangulated targeting data are then downloaded into the bomb prior to release. By early 1996, the JDAM program had abandoned the idea of integrating one of the advanced seeker technologies in favor of a more affordable option. This followed the loss of $5 million in the FY96 budget for the development and integration of the various seeker technologies. The program has now turned toward the integration of enhanced GPS technology for the JDAM PIP weapon. Other capabilities desired in the JDAM PIP weapon include: Resistance to electronic jamming of the GPS signal. Incorporation of a anti-spoof module. selective availability

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Alternatives to the standard 1760 interface so that aircraft not equipped with the JDAM-specific interface may deploy the munition. System/Global Positioning System-Aided Munition as an interim precision capability for the B-2. The U.S. Air Force placed the total program cost at $67 million for a total of 28 test and 100 operational bombs; the GPS-Aided Munition (GAM) carried a unit cost of around $200,000. The GAM was to achieve IOC in late 1996. On June 13, 1995, the GPS-Aided Munition scored above expectations during its first operational test. Despite an October 1993 decision by the Secretary of the Air Force to procure only 28 operational test GAM weapons, the U.S. Air Force ultimately procured the full lot of 128 GAM weapons. Each B-2 Spirit bomber can carry 16 GPS-Aided Munitions. The Mk 84 bomb integrated with the GAM kit carries the designation GBU-36/B; the BLU-113/B penetrating bomb integrated with the GAM kit is the GBU-37/B. The GAM production run was completed with the delivery of a total of 140 units, including prototype and test units. Operational Analysis. In the opening sorties of Operation Iraqi Freedom, an intermittent problem with the JDAM targeting and guidance software materialized; the problem was significant enough to interfere with mission success.

So, while the original JDAM PIP (JDAM III) program ceased to exist in 1996, the operational performance of the original JDAM weapons has largely negated the requirement for any sort of major redesign.

Laser JDAM
Nevertheless, the prime contractor pressed on with the development of a follow-on version of the JDAM featuring laser guidance. This development initiative yielded another bolt-on variation of the JDAM weapon system. An existing JDAM becomes a Laser JDAM with the installation of the Precision Laser Guidance Set (PLGS). Identified as an urgent operational need in early 2007, the U.S. Air Force completed the GBU-54/B development and testing cycle in less than 17 months, fielding the 500-pound (226.8-kg) class bomb for the first time in combat in Iraq in 2008. In October 2010, the U.S. Air Force 510th Fighter Squadron employed the GBU-54/B Laser JDAM for the first time in Afghanistan. Boeing completed the first flight tests of the 2,000pound (907.2-kg) class Mk 84 Laser JDAM in September 2010.

Early Stumble, Then Success


On March 21, 2003, the U.S. Air Force tasked technicians at Edwards Air Force Base with correcting the software problem. The technicians took 15 hours to solve the problem; the U.S. Air Force was able to release updated and tested software to operational units in Southwest Asia a mere 30 hours after receiving the first report of the deficiency. Within the first two months of Operation Iraqi Freedom, U.S. aircraft dropped 5,086 GBU-31, 768 GBU-32, and 675 GBU-35 JDAMs on targets in Iraq. In September 2003, the U.S. Air Force successfully dropped a 500-pound (226.8-kg) GBU-38/B JDAM from a B-2 Spirit bomber. The B-2 can carry 80 GBU-38/B JDAMs; we expect all 21 B-2 bombers in service will attain this JDAM capability through upgrades to their weapon racks. The U.S. Air Force completed accelerated testing of the same munition with the F-16 in July 2004; the GBU-38/B JDAM is now certified for employment with the F-16. In September 2004, an F-22 Raptor successfully struck a test target with a JDAM. Not only did this test represent another viable platform for the JDAM, but it was also the F-22's first complete air-to-ground demonstration.

GPS-Aided Munition (GAM)


In 1993, Northrop Grumman, which was involved in the Inertially Aided Munition developmental program that preceded the JDAM program, announced a program to develop an interim advanced strike capability for the B-2 Spirit bomber. Called the Global Positioning System-Aided Targeting System/Global Positioning System-Aided Munition, this technology was not a surrogate or replacement for the JDAM; rather, it provided an early precision bomb capability for the B-2 while the JDAM was still in development. In April 1993, Texas Instruments, the JSOW prime contractor, offered a similar program using the same GPS and INS components as the JSOW. Complicating the GAM effort was the on-again/off-again desire of the U.S. Air Force to provide an early precision-guided bomb capability to the B-1 and B-2 bombers. One month the Air Force would favor the B-1; the next month, the B-2 would be the platform of choice. In June 1993, the U.S. DoD authorized the development of the Global Positioning System-Aided Targeting

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Joint Direct Attack Munition-Extended Range (JDAM-ER)


Source: The Boeing Company

Related News
Obama Administration Green Lights $60 Billion Saudi Arms Package After months of speculation, the Obama administration has finally approved a broad $60 billion package of Foreign Military Sales for Saudi Arabia. The four FMS agreements are intended to upgrade Saudi aviation capabilities and provide the country with air dominance over its Gulf rival Iran. The deals will also provide U.S. industry with ample workshare at a time of near 10 percent unemployment and boost revenues at American defense prime Boeing. From a strategic perspective, the series of sales solidifies U.S.-Saudi military cooperation, boosts interoperability between the forces of both nations, and reassures a regional ally that Washington does not intend to see the Arab Gulf states left to their own devices as it winds down its military commitment in Iraq. For the Saudis, the sale is about replenishing its air fleet and acquiring the military heft to establish itself as the dominant regional player among the Arab nations. The bundle of sales presented to the U.S. Congress includes 84 F-15SA jet fighters and the upgrade of 70 existing Saudi F-15s to the same configuration. In addition, facilities and infrastructure for the F-15SA fleet will be built and/or refurbished and a host of weapons to outfit the aircraft will be purchased, including 300 AIM-9X Sidewinder missiles, 1,100 GBU-24 Paveway III laser-guided bombs, 1,000 GBU-31B V3 Joint Direct Attack Munitions (JDAMs), and 400 AGM-84 Block II Harpoon and 600 AGM-88B HARM missiles. Altogether, the price tag for the F-15 package reaches $29.432 billion. The remainder of the FMS agreements covers Saudi rotorcraft requirements. In all, 70 Boeing AH-64D Apaches (36 Block IIIs and 34 Longbows) are being ordered, along with 72 Sikorsky UH-60M BlackHawks and 36 Boeing AH-6i Little Bird light attack helicopters. The total cost of these purchases will reach $31 billion. Another expected bundle of sales, this time meant to upgrade the Royal Saudi Navy, has yet to be approved and announced by the administration. This set of agreements is rumored to fall in the $30 billion range, which would bring the entire Saudi shopping spree to $90 billion. The four announcements made by the Pentagon's Defense Security Cooperation Agency on October 20, 2010, represent the largest such U.S. sale to a foreign partner in history. (FI, 10/10) GBU-54 Makes First Appearance on Afghan Battlefield The U.S. Air Force's 510th Fighter Squadron has employed the GBU-54 laser Joint Directed Attack Munition (Laser JDAM) for the first time on the Afghan

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battlefield. The GBU-54 is the U.S. Air Force's newest 500-pound precision guided weapon. This weapon is equipped with a special targeting system that uses a combination of Global Positioning System (GPS) and laser guidance to accurately engage and destroy moving targets. Previously, the U.S. Air Force used a combination of two different weapons. One was the GBU-38, a standard 500-pound JDAM that used a GPS guidance control unit to guide it to the target, and the other was the GBU-12, a 500-pound laser guided bomb. Identified as an urgent operational need in early 2007, the U.S. Air Force completed the GBU-54's development and testing cycle in less than 17 months, fielding it for the first time in combat in Iraq in 2008. Another benefit of the Air Force's newest weapon is that it actually uses a majority of the same parts to build as the previous JDAMs. (U.S. Air Force, 10/10)
Market Intelligence Service Subscribers: For additional news, go to the on-line E-Market Alert page located in the Intelligence Center at www.forecastinternational.com and click on the links to the products you subscribe to.

Funding
The following data reflect U.S. Department of Defense FY11 budget request documentation (February 2010) for the procurement of JDAM guidance and control kits. The procurement data below do not include the base bombs or other components. U.S. FUNDING
FY07 QTY Procurement JDAM Kit (USAF) JDAM Kit (USN & USMC) Total 7,261 3,324 10,585 FY10 QTY Procurement JDAM Kit (USAF) JDAM Kit (USN & USMC) Total 7,517 7,517 FY13 QTY Procurement JDAM Kit (USAF) JDAM Kit (USN & USMC) Total
All amounts are in millions of U.S. dollars.

FY07 AMT 194.1 86.6 280.7 FY10 AMT 190.4 2.0 192.4 FY13 AMT 103.2 103.2

FY08 QTY 4,312 1,412 5,724 FY11 QTY 9,331 9,331 FY14 QTY 3,100 3,100

FY08 AMT 124.1 43.0 167.1 FY11 AMT 252.6 252.6 FY14 AMT 105.1 105.1

FY09 QTY 6,073 169 6,242 FY12 QTY 3,250 3,250 FY15 QTY 3,000 3,000

FY09 AMT 165.8 9.3 175.1 FY12 AMT 101.7 101.7 FY15 AMT 107.0 107.0

3,250 3,250

Contracts/Orders & Options


Since January 1, 2009, the U.S. Department of Defense has awarded the following contracts relating to the JDAM program. All amounts are in U.S. dollars.
Date 2009/06/0 8 2009/08/1 7 Contract FA8681-06-C-0009 FA8681-09-D-0065 Contractor ATK Tactical Systems McDonnell Douglas Corp Amount $5,986,994 $98,000,000 Description DSU-33D/B nose-mounted sensor used on M117 and Mk 80 series general-purpose bombs and the JDAM. Production and integration of Laser JDAM for various FMS aircraft platforms throughout the life of the

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Ordnance & Munitions Forecast

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GBU-29 Series Joint Direct Attack Munition


Date 2009/10/2 8 2010/03/0 8 2010/04/0 8 2010/05/0 5 Contract FA8681-10-C-0072 FA8681-10-C-0072 FA8677-10-C-0063 Contractor McDonnell Douglas Corp McDonnell Douglas Corp Ellwood National Forge ATK Tactical Systems Amount $72,022,275 $148,668,470 [Unspecified] Description contract. 2,925 Lot 14 guided vehicle kits for JDAM purposes. 6,565 Lot 14 guided vehicle kits for JDAM purposes. 108 BLU-121 bombs to be used on precision-guided air-to-surface weapons and JDAMs for the F-15E, F-16, and B-2 platforms. Nose-mounted proximity sensor used on M117 and Mk-80 series general purpose bombs, including JDAM.

FA8681-06-C-0009

$9,689,059

Timetable
Month Apr Jun Jan Early Jul Sep Late Jul Jun Apr Jun Year 1992 1992 1993 1993 1996 1996 1996 1997 1998 1999 2006 2010 Major Development U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy agree to collaborate on new Joint Service Air-to-Surface Munitions master plan Defense Acquisition Board approves startup of JDAM program; U.S. Air Force issues Bomber Roadmap U.S. DoD issues draft Request for Proposals for JDAM Initial JDAM operational concept demonstrations First operational GAM weapons delivery First guided test of JDAM Deliveries of GAM weapons completed U.S. Air Force certifies JDAM for carriage by the B-2 Spirit Initial JDAM production deliveries First test of extended-range JDAM U.S. Air Force F-16C aircraft target and kill Abu Musab al-Zarqawi with a GBU-38 JDAM and GBU-12 Paveway strike Serial production ongoing for U.S. DoD procurement and export

Worldwide Distribution/Inventories
Export Potential. The Joint Direct Attack Munition kit has attracted considerable interest from potential export customers. Shortly after the U.S. Department of Defense commenced procurement of the JDAM, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom expressed interest in procuring the new weapon. In addition, following the widely publicized success of the JDAM during NATO operations in the Balkans, many more nations expressed interest in the JDAM. In June 2000, the F-16 Multinational Fighter Program group (Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, and the United States) announced joint procurement of the JDAM. In July 2008, the Federal Republic of Germany awarded Boeing a contract of undisclosed value for the Laser JDAM. This contract marked the first export sale of the LJDAM The Forecast International Weapons Group believes that some sort of licensed production of JDAM kits outside the United States could emerge during the forecast period. Countries. Australia, Belgium, Denmark, Federal Republic of Germany, Israel, Italy, Republic of Korea, Morocco, the Netherlands, Norway, Oman, Poland, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Spain, United Arab Emirates (UAE), United Kingdom, and the United States.

2010

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Ordnance & Munitions Forecast

GBU-29 Series Joint Direct Attack Munition

GBU-31/32 JDAMs On a B-52's External Racks


Source: U.S. Air Force

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Ordnance & Munitions Forecast

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GBU-29 Series Joint Direct Attack Munition

Forecast Rationale
In the fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq, precision-guided munitions (PGMs) are the weapons of choice. The Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) has seen wide use in both countries. At the start of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), U.S. aircraft dropped over 6,500 JDAMs, constituting about 22.4 percent of all bombs expended during the opening two months of the conflict. The JDAM was second only to the Paveway in the number used during OIF. Of the total amount of air-delivered munitions employed during Operation Iraqi Freedom, almost 70 percent were guided weapons. Once Saddam Hussein's regime fell, conventional warfare gave way to counterinsurgency operations. In this environment, precision-guided munitions were even more in demand. The U.S. could mount air strikes on militants that otherwise were not possible. A JDAM was used on June 7, 2006, to kill al-Qaeda terrorist leader Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, killing Zarqawi, his spiritual adviser Sheik Abdul Rahman, and four other people. The heavy use of the JDAM is helping to support purchases by the U.S. Department of Defense, even though the Navy suspended procurement after 2009.

Strong International Demand


Further supporting the JDAM production line are international sales. 2008 was a banner year for JDAM requests. Among the countries asking permission to purchase JDAM were Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). All told, these nations sought to purchase 1,530 JDAM kits. Production of the JDAM will easily continue through the next 10 years, supported by U.S. and international purchases. Further, there could be a near-term surge in the production of export units in response to the recent high number of JDAM requests.

Ten-Year Outlook
ESTIMATED CALENDAR YEAR UNIT PRODUCTION
Designation or Program
Thru 2009 2010 High Confidence 2011 2012 2013 Good Confidence 2014 2015 2016 Speculative 2017 2018 2019 Total

Boeing Defense, Space & Security


GBU-29/B/GBU-30/B/GBU-31/B/GBU-32/B/GBU-34/B/GBU-35/B/GBU-38/B <> Export
2,751 180,479 183,230 183,230 454 7517 7971 7971 672 9331 10003 10003 753 3250 4003 4003 519 3250 3769 3769 225 3100 3325 3325 201 3000 3201 3201 213 2750 2963 2963 205 2750 2955 2955 200 3000 3200 3200 200 3000 3200 3200 3,642 40,948 44,590 44,590

GBU-29/B/GBU-30/B/GBU-31/B/GBU-32/B/GBU-34/B/GBU-38/B <> United States


Subtotal Total

2010

December 2010

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