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Cinnamon essential oil (leaf) information

Cinnamon essential oil is extracted from Cinnamomum zeylanicum (also known as C. verum and Laurus cinnamomum) of the Lauraceae family. It is also referred to as Ceylon, Madagascar, Seychelles or true cinnamon. This spicy essential oil has great value in aromatherapy and it fights exhaustion and a feeling of depression and weakness. It has powerful anti-rheumatic properties, is useful in the digestive system, while fighting colds and flu as well.

Oil properties
Cinnamon leaf oil, which we sell, has a warm, spicy musky smell and the oil's color varies from yellow for the leaf oil and red-brown for the bark oil, which is not usually used in aromatherapy. The viscosity is medium to watery.

Origin of cinnamon oil


A native to Indonesia, but cultivated in Sri Lanka and India, the tree is rust-colored and can grow up to 15 meters (45feet), but is kept down to 6 feet for commercial reasons. It has shiny, leathery green leaves and small, white flowers, with oval shaped purple berries. The bark is pale brown and papery, with thick quills that roll inside one another, and is gathered every 2 years. The Greek word 'Kinnamon' means 'tube' or 'pipe'. Cinnamon oil was used as a temple incense, while the Egyptians used it for foot massage, as well as a remedy for excessive bile. It was also used as an ingredient for mulled wines, love potions and as a sedative during birth. It was an important trade commodity between India, China and Egypt.

Extraction
The leaves and twigs or inner dried bark are subjected to steam distillation. The leaves yield 1.6 - 1.8 % and the bark 0.5 - 1.00 % oil. The essential oil that we sell is extracted from the leaves, as it yields a more delicate oil.

Chemical composition
The main chemical components of the essential oil, obtained from the leaves, are eugenol, eugenol acetate, cinnamic aldehyde and benzyl benzoate

Precautions
Cinnamon oil, that is extracted from the leaf, is non-toxic. Caution must be exercised since the cinnamaldehyde and eugenol contained in the oil could

cause irritation, especially to the mucus membranes, so this oil should be used with care. Due to the emmenagogue action of the oil, it should be avoided in pregnancy. High dosages can cause convulsions. The leaf oil should be avoided during pregnancy, while the essential oil extracted from cinnamon bark should be avoided in total, as it is considered to be a dermal toxin, irritant and sensitizer.

Therapeutic properties
The therapeutic properties of cinnamon oil are analgesic, antiseptic, antibiotic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, astringent, cardiac, carminative, emmenagogue, insecticide, stimulant, stomachic, tonic and vermifuge.

Uses
Cinnamon oil can be used for infection of the respiratory tract, rheumatism, arthritis and general pains. It calms an exhausted feeling of depression, tones the whole body and stimulates the glandular system, thus easing period pains.

Summary
Cinnamon oil's benefit lies in its toning and calming effect on the respiratory tract, the nervous system, and in the easing of colds and influenza, as well as period pains. It also calms the digestive system and helps with rheumatism and arthritis. Although traditionally used for clearing warts, it is not recommended to be used in skin care products.

Clove essential oil information


Clove essential oil is extracted from Eugenia caryophyllata (also known as Syzygium aromaticum, Eugenia aromatica, E. carophyllus) of the Myrtaceae family. Although clove oil is a very potent oil that should be used with great care in aromatherapy, it does have wonderful properties - from stimulating the mind and lifting depression, to aiding digestion, relieving pain in arthritis and rheumatism, easing respiratory problems and assisting leg ulcers.

Oil properties
Clove oil has a warm, strong, spicy smell and the oil is colorless to pale yellow with a medium to watery viscosity.

Origin of clove oil


A native of Indonesia and the Malacca Islands, it is an evergreen tree that grows to about 10 meters (30 feet) tall and has bright green leaves and nail-shaped rose-peach flower buds which turn, upon drying, a deep red brown. These are beaten from the tree and dried. The Latin word 'Clavus' means nail shaped, referring to the bud. It was often used by the Greeks, Roman and the Chinese, to ease toothache and as a breath sweetener, especially when talking to the Emperor. It has antiseptic properties and was used in the prevention of contagious diseases, such as the Plaque. It was an important commodity in the spice trade and is still used in perfumes, mulled wines and liqueurs, love potions, dental products and, stuck in an orange as pomade, an insect repellant.

Extraction
Clove oil can be extracted from the leaves, stem and buds. We sell clove leaf oil, which is extracted by water distillation, containing the desired lower percentage of eugenol.

Chemical composition
The main chemical components of clove oil are eugenol, eugenol acetate, isoeugenol and caryophyllene.

Precautions
Clove oil is a very potent oil and should be used with care. If it is used in a oil, lotion or cream applied to the skin, the concentration should be well below 1%. It may cause irritation to the skin of some individuals and can easily irritate the mucus membranes. It should be avoided during pregnancy.

Therapeutic properties
The therapeutic properties of clove oil are analgesic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, anti-neuralgic, carminative, anti-infectious, disinfectant, insecticide, stimulant, stomachic, uterine and tonic.

Uses
Clove oil can be used for acne, bruises, burns and cuts, keeping infection at bay and as a pain reliever. It helps with toothache, mouth sores, rheumatism and arthritis. It is beneficial to the digestive system, effective against vomiting, diarrhea, flatulence, spasms and parasites, as well as bad breath. Clove oil is valuable for relieving respiratory problems, like bronchitis, asthma and tuberculosis. The disinfecting property is useful in cases of infectious diseases. Placing a few drops of clove oil on a cotton ball and then placing the cotton ball in a linen cupboard will not only fragrance the cupboard, but will help to keep fish moths at bay.

Summary
Clove oil is useful for its disinfecting properties, relieving of pain, especially toothache, arthritis and rheumatism. It is effective when used for complaints of the digestion system. It is also of use for skin problems - especially for skin sores and leg ulcers and as an insect repellent.
Burners and vaporizers o In vapor therapy, clove oil can be useful for bronchitis and

dizziness and to help lift depression, while strengthening memory and fighting weakness and lethargy. Massage oil o Clove oil can be used in a blended massage oil to assist with diarrhea, bronchitis, chills, colds, muscular numbness, spasms, rheumatism and arthritis. For toothache the outer jaw can be massaged with this oil. o Use a low dilution of less than 1%. In cream or lotion o When used in a cream or lotion, the positive effects of clove oil are the same as those of a massage oil and can furthermore help to sort out leg ulcers and skin sores. o Use in low dilution of less than 1%. Mouthwash o Clove oil can be included at a low rate as part of a mouthwash for toothache.

Lavender essential oil information


Our lavender oil is extracted from Lavandula angustifolia (also known as Lavandula. officinalis, spica and vera), of the Lamiaceae (Labiatae) family. It is also known as garden, common or English lavender. It is with good reason why lavender oil is one of the most favorite essential oils, as it has wonderful qualities and also smells great. It is a calming, relaxing oil, which combats stress and crisis, while the antiseptic properties helps with cold, flu and other ailments. It is excellent for asthma and migraines. Apart from that it supports female health and on the skin it has a healing effect, while preventing scarring and balancing the skin.

Oil properties
Lavender oil has a light fresh aroma, is clear in color and watery in viscosity.

Origin of lavender oil


It is an evergreen woody shrub about 1 meter high (3 feet), with gray-green narrow linear leaves and the most beautiful purple-blue flowers, perched on a long stem and a few varieties of it grow wild in the Mediterranean region, but the main producer is France. The name is derived from the Latin word 'lavera' which means 'to wash' and the Romans used it frequently in their bath routine, and it is said to have been introduced by them into England, where it soon was a firm favorite. It was a favorite for strewing on the floor, since it released an aroma when walked upon and it is often used these days in toilet water, as an insecticide or in sachets to be placed between linen. It is also used to clean wounds and to treat burns.

Extraction
Lavender oil is extracted from the flowering tops by steam distillation and yields 1.4 % - 1.6 %.

Chemical composition
The main chemical components of lavender oil are a-pinene, limonene, 1,8cineole, cis-ocimene, trans-ocimene, 3-octanone, camphor, linalool, linalyl acetate, caryophyllene, terpinen-4-ol and lavendulyl acetate.

Precautions
Although lavender oil is considered one of the safest essential oils, you should discontinue use is you have any allergic reactions.

Therapeutic properties
The therapeutic properties of lavender oil are antiseptic, analgesic, anticonvulsant, anti-depressant, anti-rheumatic, anti-spasmodic, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, bactericide, carminative, cholagogue, cicatrisant, cordial, cytophylactic, decongestant, deodorant, diuretic, emmenagogue, hypotensive, nervine, rubefacient, sedative, sudorific and vulnerary.

Uses
Lavender oil has a soothing and calming effect on the nerves, relieving tension, depression, panic, hysteria and nervous exhaustion in general and is effective for headaches, migraines and insomnia. It is also very beneficial for problems such as bronchitis, asthma, colds, laryngitis, halitosis, throat infections and whooping cough and helps the digestive system deal with colic, nausea, vomiting and flatulence. Lavender oil relieves pain when used for rheumatism, arthritis, lumbago and muscular aches and pains, especially those associated with sport. On the skin, lavender oil tones and revitalizes and it is useful for all types of skin problems such as abscesses, acne, oily skin, boils, burns, sunburn, wounds, psoriasis, lice, insect bites, stings and also acts as an insect repellent. Lavender oil is one of the few essentials oils that can be used neat on the skin, and this is especially useful when treating a minor burn wound.

Summary
Lavender oil is one of the most versatile oils and is handy to have around the house, as it can be used for such a variety of problems. It not only helps with nervous conditions, it is useful for the digestive system, the respiratory tract and skin problems, it also helps with muscle aches and pains and arthritis and rheumatism.
Burners and vaporizers o In vapor therapy, lavender oil can be useful for allergies, anorexia,

dizziness, sleeplessness (also in children), hay fever, headaches, depression, trauma, anxiety, hysteria, fear, nightmares, irritability, nervous tension and as an insect repellant. Apart from that it can assist to lift depression, help in crisis situations, sooth irritability and relieve stress and thereby help with tense muscles and muscle spasms.

Blended massage oil or in the bath o Lavender oil can be used as a massage oil or diluted in the bath,

for abdominal pains, allergies, anorexia, arthritis, bowel disorders, fatigue, hay fever, headaches, insomnia, moodiness, trauma, anxiety, depression, hysteria, nightmares, fear, irritability, nervous tension, stress and just for the plain pleasure of relaxing in such a fragrant surrounding. As a wash / on a cotton bud o Lavender oil can be used as a wash or on a cotton bud for acne, insect bites, carbuncles, bruises, chilblains, dandruff and lice. Cold compress o On a cold compress, lavender oil can be used for: arthritis, eczema and sores. Cream or lotion o When it is used in a cream or lotion, it is most helpful with relieving burns, Its cicatrisant properties help the skin heal faster and the cytophylactic properties will help it do so with less scarring. The soothing and anti-inflammatory action of lavender oil will also have a balancing action on the skin and can be used for dermatitis, eczema, psoriasis, boils, carbuncles and acne. When employing the anti-inflammatory action of this oil, use in concentrations of less than 1%. Furthermore it will help ease the pain of sunburn and sunstroke and will also counter the itching effect of insect bites.

Lemongrass essential oil information


Our lemongrass essential oil is extracted from Cymbopogon citratus (also known as Andropogon citratus, A. schoenathus - West Indian, Madagascar or Guatemala lemongrass; Andropogon flexuosus, Cymbopogon flexuosus - East revitalizing a tired body and mind, as well as keeping the family pet free of fleas and ticks.

Oil properties
Lemongrass oil has a lemony, sweet smell and is dark yellow to amber and reddish in color, with a watery viscosity.

Origin of lemongrass oil


It is a perennial fast-growing aromatic grass, growing to about 1 meter (3 feet) high with long, thin leaves and originally was growing wild in India. It produces a network of roots and rootlets that rapidly exhaust the soil. In India it is known as 'choomana poolu' and is also referred to as 'Indian Verbena' or 'Indian Melissa oil' and used in Ayurvedic medicine to help bring down fevers and treat infectious illnesses. It is a valuable ingredient in perfumes and citrus-type soaps and is also an insect deterrent.

Extraction
Lemongrass oil is extracted from the fresh or partly dried leaves by steam distillation.

Chemical composition
The main chemical components of lemongrass oil are myrcene, citronellal, geranyl acetate, nerol, geraniol, neral and traces of limonene and citral.

Precautions
Lemongrass oil can irritate a sensitive skin, so care should be taken. It should be avoided in pregnancy, due to it being a possible skin irritant.

Therapeutic properties
The therapeutic properties of lemongrass oil are analgesic, anti-depressant, antimicrobial. antipyretic, antiseptic, astringent, bactericidal, carminative, deodorant, diuretic, febrifuge, fungicidal, galactagogue, insecticidal, nervine, nervous system sedative and tonic.

Uses
Lemongrass oil revitalizes the body and relieves the symptoms of jetlag, clears headaches and helps to combat nervous exhaustion and stress-related conditions. It is a great overall tonic for the body and it boosts the parasympathetic nervous system, which is a boon when recovering from illness, as it also stimulates glandular secretions. It is useful with respiratory infections such as sore throats, laryngitis and fever and helps prevent spreading of infectious diseases. It is helpful with colitis, indigestion and gastro-enteritis. Lemongrass oil helps tone the muscles and tissue, relieves muscle pains by making the muscle more supple. It helps with correcting poor circulation and as an insect repellant. It helps to keep pets clean of fleas, ticks and lice. It also is used for clearing up oily skin and acne, as well as athlete's foot. It alleviates excessive perspiration.

Summary
Lemongrass oil has great benefits as a muscle and skin toner, and revitalizes the body and mind, helps with infections and keeps the family pet flea and tick free and smelling nice.
Burners and vaporizers o In vapor therapy, Lemongrass oil can be used for nervousness

and as an insect repellant. It is also great to revive the mind when feeling lethargic and to energize as well as relieving fatigue. Blended massage oil or in the bath o Lemongrass oil can be used in blended massage oil or diluted in the bath to assist with cellulite, digestive problems, as a diuretic, for infections, nervousness, for over exerted ligaments and as a general tonic. Cream or lotion o When used in a lotion or a cream, it has value in clearing cellulite, as well as toning the skin, opening blocked pores and helping with acne. The antiseptic properties are useful in treating athlete's foot and other fungal infections. o Note o Although some people may have an allergic reaction to lemongrass oil, most people do not show an allergy when it is used in concentrations lower than 3%. Since our oil only contains trace amounts of citral (whereas West and East Indian lemongrass (Andropogon flexuosus and A. citratus contains nearly 79%) the possibility of irritation or allergy is less.

Geranium essential oil information


Our geranium essential oil is extracted from the plant Pelargonium odorantissimum, of the Geraniaceae family and is extracted from a different plant than its cousin rose geranium essential oil - as this more expensive oil is extracted from Pelargonium graveolens. It is a strong smelling oil with a floral aroma and a hint of mint, and when extracted from the Odorantissimum plant has a slight apple undertone, whereas the Graveolens oil has a rosier aroma. This fresh essential oil has a firm place in aromatherapy, as it helps to balance the mind and emotions, while stimulating the adrenal cortex and balancing the hormonal system and stimulating the lymphatic system. On the other hand, it balances the production of sebum in the skin, while keeping it supple and helping with the healing of wounds.

Oil properties
The oil is mostly colorless, but can have a slight light green color to it. It has a watery viscosity.

Origin of geranium oil


The plants originated from South Africa, as well as Reunion, Madagascar, Egypt and Morocco and were introduced to European countries such as Italy, Spain and France in the 17th century. There are about 700 different varieties of the plant, yet only 10 supply essential oil in viable quantities, as the normal garden geranium produce far too little oil for extraction. It is a hairy perennial shrub, often used in hedgerows, and stands up to about one meter high (3 feet) with pointed leaves, serrated at the edges and it has pinkishwhite flowers. In early times geraniums were planted around the house to keep evil sprits at bay.

Extraction
The leaves and stalks are used for extraction, and the oil is obtained through steam distillation.

Chemical composition
The essential oil is composed of various chemical constituents and includes apinene, myrcene, limonene, menthone, linalool, geranyl acetate, citronellol, geraniol and geranyl butyrate.

Precautions
Geranium oil does not cause any side effects, since it is non-toxic, non-irritant and generally non-sensitizing, yet can cause sensitivity in some people and due to the fact that it balances the hormonal system, it might not be a good idea to use it during pregnancy.

Therapeutic properties
The therapeutic properties of geranium oil are astringent, haemostatic, cicatrisant, cytophylactic, diuretic, deodorant, haemostatic, styptic, tonic, vermifuge and vulnerary.

Uses
Geranium oil can be used to help in the treatment of acne, bruises, burns, cuts, dermatitis, eczema, hemorrhoids, lice, as a mosquito repellant, ringworm, ulcers,

breast engorgement, edema, poor circulation, sore throat, tonsillitis, PMS, menopausal problems, stress and neuralgia.

Summary
This uplifting oil has a great all-over balancing effect on the mind and this uplifting property also extends to the effect it has on the skin - where it helps to create balance between oily and dry skin. It helps to sort out emotions - where it helps to relieve feelings of stress and anxiety, and also works on the adrenal cortex, which has a balancing effect on the hormone system. The strong smell is particularly good to ward off mosquitoes and head lice.
Burners and vaporizers o In vapor therapy geranium oil can be used to help relieve stress,

mild depression, PMS, anxiety and tension, menopausal problems and for general energizing. Blended massage oil or in the bath o Geranium oil can be used in blended massage oil, or diluted in a bath to assist with PMS, depression, stress, anxiety and tension, fluid retention, edema, eczema, shingles, cellulite, bruises, insect repellent, ringworm, hemorrhoids and menstrual irregularities. Blended in cream or lotion o As a constituent in a blended base cream, geranium oil can be used for eczema, repelling insects, shingles, burns and scalds, cellulite, ringworm, bruises and engorgement of the breasts. o It will help to balance the oil production of the skin and help keep it supple, while the cicatrisant properties ensure that it is helpful in wound healing, including burns, wounds and ulcers. Diluted in shampoo o Geranium oil can also be diluted in shampoo to help with head lice.

Sandalwood essential oil information


Our sandalwood oil is from India and extracted from Santalum album of the Santalaceae family and is also known as East Indian sandalwood, santal, saunders and sandalwood Mysore and should not be confused with the cheap sandalwood available from Australia. Although expensive, this oil has wonderful qualities for relieving both chest and urinary tract infections, while assisting the skin in promoting hydration and moisture and for the mind it creates a calming and harmonizing effect, while reducing tension and confusion.

Oil properties
The oil has a woody, exotic smell, subtle and lingering and the color is pale yellow to pale gold. Our essential oil contains 90% santalol - making it a very superior sandalwood oil.

Origin of sandalwood oil


Sandalwood is an evergreen, parasitic tree that burrows its roots into other trees. It can grow up to 9 meters (30 feet) high and has a brown-gray trunk, many smooth slender branches, leathery leaves and small pink-purple flowers. It can take thirty to sixty years for a tree to reach full maturity, when it is cut and distilled and the yellowish wood is sold in thin scrapings. It is agreed that the best sandalwood oil is from Mysore in India. The documented use of the wood goes back 4000 years and caravans carrying this wood from India to Egypt, Greece and Rome were a familiar sight. Many temples were built from the wood and the Egyptians used the oil in embalming. Sandalwood is much in demand as incense and has a calming effect during meditation. Swahra yoga recommends it for the union of the senses and Tantric yoga for the awakening of sexual energy. Once Sandalwood was used for making furniture and caskets, but as the tree is nearly extinct, it is only used for the distillation of oil. Because of the threat of total extinction, this oil is now very well controlled in India - but has caused the price of this very fine oil to soar, and become one of the most expensive essential oils on the market - and for that reason we offer the pure oil, as well as a more affordable blend which contains 25% of the pure oil.

Extraction
Sandalwood oil is extracted from the chipped heartwood by steam distillation and yields 4 - 6.5 %.

Chemical composition
The main chemical components are santalol, santyl acetate and santalene. Our essential oil contains 90% santalol.

Precautions
It is considered a non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing oil.

Therapeutic properties
The therapeutic properties of sandalwood oil are antiphlogistic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, carminative, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, sedative and tonic.

Uses
This relaxing oil has a harmonizing and calming effect which reduces tension and confusion and is ideal for use in depression, hectic daily lifestyles and states of fear, stress, nervous exhaustion, chronic illness and anxiety. It is very useful for any chest complaints as it has a pronounced effect on the mucus membranes of both the pulmonary as well as genito-urinary tract - making it very effective for complaints of the urinary tract as well. Chronic chest infections, sore throats and dry coughs as well as bronchitis and asthma can benefit greatly from this oil, as well as cystitis and bladder infections, also helpful with sexual problems such as frigidity and impotence. On the skin, sandalwood oil relieves itching and inflammation of the skin, and is most effective in relieving dehydrated skin - making it great for anti-ageing skincare - and the astringent action has a great toning effect and is also used with great results in oily skin conditions and to prevent the skin from forming ugly scars and for fighting dry eczema.

Summary
Sandalwood oil can be helpful for the nervous system, for chest and urinary tract infections, for sexual problems and for skin care.
Burners and vaporizers o In vapor therapy, sandalwood oil can be used for its aphrodisiac

effect, to help clear bronchitis, coughs, chest infections, asthma, insomnia, irritability, nervous tension, stress, tension, for relaxing and as an insect repellant. Blended massage oil or in the bath o As a blended massage oil or diluted in the bath, sandalwood oil can assist with bladder infections as well as chest infections and bronchitis, coughs, dry eczema, insomnia, forming scar tissue, irritability, nervous tension, stress, tension, as an aphrodisiac and for relaxing. Gargle o It can be effective when diluted and used as a gargle for a sore or dry throat.

Lotions or creams o When used in a lotion or cream sandalwood oil can assist with

chapped, dry or inflamed skin and has wonderful moisturizing and hydrating properties, which are great for anti-ageing skincare. The toning effect is useful when fighting oily skin.

Camomile essential oil information


Roman Camomile essential oil is produced from Anthemis nobilis (Chamaemelum nobile) of the family species Asteraceae, formerly placed in the Compositae family and also known as English camomile, sweet camomile and garden camomile. German camomile essential oil is from Matricaria chamomilla (M. recutica) of the same family and also known by the names of blue camomile, Hungarian camomile and single camomile. Both Roman and German camomile have excellent calming properties, but Roman camomile is more effective for irritation, impatience and feeling disagreeable, and has great value in treating PMS and other menstrual and menopausal problems, while German camomile again is super effective on the skin, not only to sooth and calm, but to heal and to regenerate tissue.

Oil properties
The Roman camomile essential oil has a sweet, apple-like fragrance and is very light clear blue in color with a watery viscosity, while the German camomile oil is sweet and straw-like in fragrance, is dark blue in color and its viscosity is medium.

Origin of Roman and German camomile oil


German camomile oil is mostly cultivated in Hungary, Egypt, Eastern Europe and France, while Roman camomile is cultivated in Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Morocco and France. Roman camomile is a small perennial herb with a hairy stem and feathery pinnate leaves, daisy like white flowers (larger than those of German camomile) and grows about 25 cm high, while German camomile grows about 60 cm high and has a hairless branching stem with delicate feathery leaves and simple daisy like white flowers on single stems. To the Egyptians it was a herb dedicated to the sun, used to cure fevers, and to the moon, for its cooling ability. It was also recognized as a soother of nervous complaints and used in shampoos, cosmetics and perfumes.

German camomile contains azulene, a powerful anti-inflammatory agent and this blue crystal is not actually present in the plant, but forms in the oil. Only a small quantity is needed to be effective.

Extraction
Both the camomile oil are extracted from the flowers by steam distillation, with the Roman camomile yielding about 1.7 % from fresh flowers and the German camomile yielding about 0.2 - 0.4 %.

Chemical composition
The main chemical components of Roman camomile oil are a-pinene, camphene, b-pinene, sabinene, myrcene, 1,8-cineole, y-terpinene, caryophyllene, propyl angelate and butyl angelate. The main constituents of German camomile oil are chamazulene, a-bisabolol, bisabolol oxide A, bisabolol oxide B and bisabolone oxide A.

Precautions
Both are considered non-toxic and non-irritant, yet since they do have emmenagogue properties when used in high concentrations, they should be avoided during pregnancy.

Therapeutic properties
The therapeutic properties of Roman camomile oil are analgesic, anti-spasmodic, antiseptic, antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-infectious, anti-depressant, antineuralgic, antiphlogistic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, bactericidal, carminative, cholagogue, cicatrisant, emmenagogue, febrifuge, hepatic, sedative, nervine, digestive, tonic, sudorific, stomachic, vermifuge and vulnerary. The therapeutic properties of German camomile oil on the other hand are analgesic, anti-allergenic, anti-spasmodic, antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, antiphlogistic, bactericidal, carminative, cicatrisant, cholagogue, emmenagogue, hepatic, digestive, sedative, stomachic, vermifuge, vasoconstrictor and vulnerary.

Uses
Roman camomile oil is used for This essential oil can be used with great effect on children when they feel irritable, impatient, teething or colicky. When used for women, it is great to relieve PMS

and in general for abdominal pain, gall bladder, as well as throat infections. it furthermore helps to relieve allergies, hay fever and asthma. For the skin it can be used to calm acne, eczema, rashes, wounds, dermatitis, dry and itchy skin and other allergic conditions in general. For babies it can be used in a very diluted form to sooth an irritated and teething baby. It helps for colic, diarrhea and gastric spasms. German camomile oil is used for This essential oil has a calming effect on the mind and body and is excellent in treating any type of inflammation - be that internal or external. It is very effective on urinary stones (bladder gravel) as well. It furthermore stimulates the liver and gall bladder, thereby improving digestion and is valuable in treating menstrual and menopausal problems. On the skin it is a miracle worker, and calms red, dry and irritated skin, as well as calming allergies, eczema, psoriasis and all other flaky skin problems. It is high in -(a)-bisabolol, which promotes granulation (healing) and is also a great tissue regenerator.

Summary
Both Roman and German camomile have calming and relaxing abilities, especially on the nervous and digestive systems, regulating and easing the menstrual cycle, and has soothing and healing influences on the skin, as well as being a potent remedy for inflammatory conditions.
Burners and vaporizers o Roman camomile can be used in vapor therapy for nervous

complaints, headaches and migraines.


Blended massage oil or in the bath o Roman camomile can be used in a blended massage oil, or

diluted in the bath to assist with allergies, anorexia, addiction, colic, insomnia, back pain, muscle pain, arthritis, post-natal depression and bowel disorders, whereas German camomile can be used for asthma, measles, mumps, PMS, menopausal symptoms as well as rheumatism. Lotion and cream o Roman camomile can be used in a cream base for diaper rash, burns and sunburn, while German camomile is useful in general skincare, especially allergic skin. Mouthwash o Roman camomile can be used as a mouthwash for dental abscesses and tonsillitis.