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AXE 10 System Testing 1

Subscriber Services Subsystem, SUS

PREFACE
This book is intended to be used as a course material in the Ericsson training program. The book is a training document and contains some simplifications of any Ericsson system or tool. The contents of this book are subject to revision without notice due to continued development of the described systems and tools. To be able to fully benefit from the contents of this book, the participants should attend the course, which adds to this book exercises illustrating the concepts, techniques and tools described. Any comments on this book will be appreciated. The Student Book is used in the following courses:

LZU 108 1410 LZU 108 1413 LZU 108 1416 LZU 108 1461

Responsibility This Learning Product is prepared by: MV/ETX/PN/CDX

Table of Contents

Table of Contents 1. Subscriber Services, a Survey 2. PSTN Services

1 3 7

2.1Chapter Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.2Basic Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.3Call Management Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.4Business Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 2.5Class Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2.6Operator Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 2.7Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

3. ISDN Services
3.1Chapter Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2ETSI Supplementary Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3Non-ETSI Supplementary Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.4Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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27 27 34 36

4. Exchange Data for Subscriber Services


4.1General Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2Software Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3Route Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.4B-Number Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.5Size Alterations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.6Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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37 39 40 41 42 44

Subscriber Services Subsystem

1. Subscriber Services, a Survey

Chapter Objectives
After completing this chapter the student will be able to: identify services for ISDN and PSTN subscribers respectively describe how subscriber services have been divided into different groups.
Figure 1.1

Chapter Objectives

1.1 Chapter Introduction


The AXE system offers a large number of services. Some of these services are for direct use by subscribers, while others are designed for use by the network operator. This document describes most of the services that can be regarded as subscriber services. However, charging-related subscriber services are not dealt with, nor the services included in the TCS, traffic control subsystem:

Closed user group, CUG Carrier access code, CAC Black and white list, BLW.

1.2 Classification of Services


When PSTN and ISDN subscribers can be connected to the same exchange, it is important to distinguish between the services available to the two types of subscribers. New services, not available to the PSTN subscribers, have been developed for the ISDN subscribers. Some of the services are available to both types. Bearer and telephony services for ISDN subscribers are not treated in this book. Figure 1.2 shows the structure of the services.

Subscriber Services Subsystem

Services Services PSTN Services PSTN Services Basic Services Call Management Services Business Support Services CLASS Services Operator Support Services ISDN Services ISDN Services ETSI Supplementary Services Non-ETSI Supplementary Services

Figure 1.2

The structuring of services used in this book

Each box in the figure above has a chapter of its own. However, note that some services can be given to both PSTN and ISDN subscribers, which is a result of the work on standardisation of services done by ETSI, European Telecommunication Standards Institute. Useful services for PSTN should of course be available to ISDN subscribers. The table below shows the services offered by AXE (APT 210 12/3) to PSTN and/or ISDN subscribers.
Service Absent Subscriber Service Do Not Disturb Abbreviated Dialling Service Last Number Repetition Service Priority Service Fixed Destination Call Service Alarm Call Service Call Barring Services Call Forwarding Busy Call Forwarding No Reply PSTN X X X X X X X X X X X X X X ISDN

Subscriber Services, a Survey

Service Call Forwarding Unconditional Call Diversion Protection Three-Party Services Call Waiting Service General Deactivation Service Remote Control of Subscriber Service Distinctive Alerting Service Change of Keyword PABX Night Service PABX Group Number Diversion Changed Number Announcement Service Queue Service Completion of Calls to Busy Subscriber Completion of Calls on No Reply Malicious Call Identification Interception Service General Availability Service Calling Line Identification Presentation, CLIP Calling Line Identification Restriction, CLIR Direct Dialling In, DDI Multiple Subscriber Number, MSN Sub-Addressing, SUB Connected Line Identification Presentation, COLP Connected Line Identification Restriction, COLR Line and Trunk Hunting, LTH Call Hold, HOLD Terminal Portability, TP Closed User Group, CUG Advice of Charge During the Call, AOC-D User-to-User Signalling, UUS Table 1.1

PSTN X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

ISDN X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Subscriber services for PSTN and ISDN in APT 210 12/3

Subscriber Services Subsystem

2. PSTN Services

Chapter Objectives
After completing this chapter, you will be able to: describe the PSTN services offered by the APT version 12.3 understand how the services interact with the subscribers understand the categories affecting the services.
Figure 2.1

Chapter Objectives

2.1 Chapter Introduction


PSTN, the public switched telephony network, is the traditional telephony network offering POTS, plain old telephony service. Services offered to this type of subscribers will be covered in this chapter. Please note that the services offered here are the standard services offered by this version of APT. Each operator may create unique services and many services are not offered in some countries/networks.

2.2 Basic Services


2.2.1 Absent Subscriber Service
This service resembles temporary forwarding of calls addressed to an absent subscriber. One-man companies and employees on vacation are examples of users. When the service is activated, the incoming calls are diverted to one of the following:

an operator in the network an announcing machine giving appropriate information a special tone.
Outgoing calls are not affected but the dial tone can be changed as a reminder that the service is activated. There are two variants of the service: fixed and subscriber-controlled. If the latter is used, the subscriber can choose the desired type of diversion by changing the subscriber procedure. The fixed variant can only be activated and deactivated. Figure 2.2 shows the main principle of the service.

Subscriber Services Subsystem

AXE

Calling subscriber
r nt to r a me pe e O unc no An ne To

Absent subscriber service activated

Figure 2.2

Absent subscriber service

The categories ASU and CCA are used to control the service:

ASU, fixed variant of absent subscriber service ASU-0, no access to the service ASU-1, access to the fixed variant CCA, code-controlled absent subscriber service (subscriber-controlled)
CCA-0, no access to the service CCA-1, access to the code controlled variant

The service is handled by the blocks SUSASU and SUSCIF.

2.2.2

Do Not Disturb
The service closely resembles the absent subscriber service, the only difference being that it is used when the subscriber wishes to be left undisturbed. Temporary call forwarding to a tone or to a recorded announcement is possible. The category DDB is used to control the service:

DDB-0, no access to the service DDB-1, access to do not disturb service.


The service is controlled by the blocks SUSDDB and SUSCIF. 1.

2.2.3

Abbreviated Dialling Service


Instead of dialling long international numbers, users enter a short code. The service can also be used to give access to numbers in barred areas. For example, an abbreviated number can be used to give access to a number outside the home country while all other international calls are barred.

PSTN Services

PABX lines in a group can have access to a common list of abbreviated numbers. Business group subscribers may have both personal abbreviated number lists and a list for common use by all group members. Up to 100 numbers can be stored per subscriber and a category is set to indicate whether the subscriber should be allowed to change the individual list. The service is activated for a subscriber by changing the category ADI. Different values give access to different variants of the service:

ADI-0, no access to the service ADI-1, access to the operator-controlled variant of the service ADI-2, access to the subscriber-controlled variant of the service.
The service is handled by the blocks SUSADIT, SUSADIA, SUSASSB, and SUSCIF.

2.2.4

Last Number Repetition Service


With this service the subscriber can repeat the number he dialled last, and that encountered busy tone or no answer. There are three variants of the service:

The last number called is dialled when the receiver is lifted. The
registered B-number will be over-written after a predefined time of 5 to 20 minutes.

The subscriber registers the last number dialled and then uses a code to
repeat it.

The last number called is automatically registered but the subscriber


still has to use a code to order the service. The customer (the network operator) determines the variant to be used in the network when the system is purchased. Only originating calls can be registered. The service is activated and controlled by the category LNR.

LNR-0, no access to the service. LNR-1, access to the last number repetition service.
The service is handled by the blocks SUSLNR, SUSCIF, and SUSCS.

2.2.5

Priority Service
The service, which is implemented in subsystem OMS and TCS, gives some subscribers, such as the Police and the Fire Brigade, a higher level of service in case of overload. Only a limited number of subscribers can have this service, which is controlled by the category PRI and set by command. Not too many subscribers should be given priority. These values can be used:

PRI-0, ordinary subscriber PRI-1, priority type 1 PRI-2, priority type 2 PRI-3, priority type 3 (types 1 and 2).
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Subscriber Services Subsystem

2.2.6

Fixed Destination Call Service


The service connects the subscriber with a predefined number if no digits are dialled. There are two variants of the service:

Connection to a predefined number without time-out (immediately) Connection after a predefined delay. The service is deactivated if a digit
is dialled within this time. The first variant permits use of the phone for the pre-set number only. This number is specified by command by the operator and cannot be changed by the subscriber. The second variant allows the subscriber to control the service, that is, to activate or deactivate it, or to change a fixed destination number. Figure 2.3 shows the main principles of the service.

Pre-set C-number Without time delay

After time delay

If digits are dialled within 5 seconds

Figure 2.3

The two alternatives of fixed destination call service

The service is controlled by the category FDC and can be given to both PSTN and ISDN subscribers:

FDC-0, no access to the service FDC-1, access to the service without time delay FDC-2, access to the service with time delay.
The function is handled by the blocks SUSFDC, SUSASSB, and SUSCS.

2.2.7

Alarm Call Service


The subscriber uses this service to order one or several alarm calls to his telephone. When the alarm call is made, an announcement machine is

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connected giving prerecorded information (could also include time information). Three variants of the service are available:

An alarm call can be ordered up to 24 hours in advance. The time is


specified by the subscriber.

Several alarm calls can be ordered and will be executed at the same
time for a specified number of days. The information is given by the subscriber.

Alarm calls can be ordered and executed according to a program


specified by the subscriber. All types of alarm calls are booked in the nearest 5-minute interval. If that interval is full (for capacity reasons), up to two earlier 5-minute intervals are checked. Figure 2.4 shows the booking principle.

Booking request Time

Full 5-minute interval Booking executed


Figure 2.4

Booking an alarm call

When the alarm call is executed, up to three call attempts are made in three consecutive 5-minute intervals. The reason for a failed alarm call is that there is no answer or the line is busy. Please study Figure 2.5.

5-minute interval Time


er sw An o N o N ( er sw an a st fir m tte ) pt
Figure 2.5

er sw an

ird (th m te at ) pt m ) pt

d on ec (s

te at

Execution of an alarm call

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Subscriber Services Subsystem

The service is controlled by the category ALS (please note that the values are not allocated as usual as value zero means access to the service):

ALS-0, access to the service alarm call ALS-1, no access


The blocks SUSAACT, SUSAACA, SUSLM, and SUSCIF control the service.

2.3 Call Management Services


2.3.1 Call Barring Services
The services, which are implemented in SUS as well as in other subsystems, enables the operator or the subscriber to control the usage of the telephone. Certain numbers or area codes can be barred. Both incoming and outgoing calls can be barred. One variant of the service allows the subscriber to control the barring by means of a personal code. The categories CBA, CCB, TBI and TBO are used to control the barring services. Category CCB, code-controlled barring, is used if the subscriber should be able to control the barring by means of codes included in the subscriber procedure. Figure 2.6 shows the main barring services available.

CBA, call barring CBB, codecontrolled barring TBO, temporary barring of outgoing calls TBI, temporary barring of incoming calls
Figure 2.6

The available call barring services

2.3.2

Call Forwarding Services


With these services the subscriber can forward incoming calls to any other destination. The forwarding can either be unconditional or dependent on the state of the line (busy and no answer). The different variants of the service will be explained in the following chapters.

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PSTN Services

2.3.3

Call Forwarding Busy


If this service is activated, it will divert calls addressed to a busy subscriber to a third number, the so-called C-number. The service can be fixed or variable:

Fixed
One or more C-numbers are defined in a list by means of commands. The list cannot be changed by the subscriber.

Variable
The subscriber can change the C-number by means of a subscriber procedure. If both variants are active at the same time, the variable type has the highest priority. For the fixed variant of the service, the operator of the system can offer one of two possibilities:

The service will search for the first free subscriber in the defined list
and only that subscriber will be called.

The service will search for the first free number in the list. If there is no
answer within a certain time, the next free number in the list is called. The complete list can be run through once. The search is sequential, with a fixed or rotating starting point. Figure 2.7 shows an example where a subscriber has the fixed version of the service and the system will scan through the complete list for a free subscriber.

List: 123 456

123

456
Figure 2.7

Call forwarding using a fixed list which is scanned through

The services are controlled by the categories CFBF and CFBV:

CFBF, call forwarding on busy, fixed variant CFBF-0, no access to the service CFBF-1, access to the fixed variant
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Subscriber Services Subsystem

CFBV, call forwarding on busy, variable variant CFBV-0, no access to the service CFBV-1, access to the variable variant
The service is handled by the blocks SUSCFB, SUSCFA, SUSCFDB, SUSCFT, SUSCFP, and SUSCIF.

2.3.4

Call Forwarding No Reply


When this service is active, calls that are not answered within a certain time are diverted. The service has exactly the same features as the call forwarding busy service (a fixed and a variable variant; the fixed variant has a list). The services are controlled by the categories CFNRF and CFNRV:

CFNRF, call forwarding no reply, fixed CFNRF-0, no access to the service CFNRF-1, access to the fixed variant CFNRV, call forwarding no reply, variable CFNRV-0, no access to the service CFNRV-1, access to the variable variant
The service is handled by the blocks SUSFNR, SUSCFA, SUSCFDB, SUSCFT, SUSCFP, and SUSCIF.

2.3.5

Call Forwarding Unconditional


When this service is active, incoming calls are diverted to a predefined Cnumber. Diversion takes place regardless of the state of the line (busy or idle). There are two variants of the service:

Fixed
A C-number is defined by command and the subscriber can only activate or deactivate the service.

Variable
The subscriber can activate, deactivate and modify the C-number by means of a subscriber procedure. The services are controlled by the categories CFUF and CFUV:

CFUF, call forwarding unconditional, fixed CFUF-0, no access to the service CFUF-1, access to the fixed variant CFUV, call forwarding unconditional, variable
CFUV-0, no access to the service CFUV-1, access to the variable variant

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PSTN Services

The service is handled by the blocks SUSCFU, SUSCFA, SUSFDB, SUSCFP, SUSCFT, SUSCFSB, and SUSCIF.

2.3.6

Call Diversion Protection


This service inhibits the possibility of receiving diverted calls. In other words, subscribers with this service cannot be reached by diverted calls. The calling subscriber will get a message or a special tone indicating the reason for the unsuccessful call. Figure 2.8 shows an example where a subscriber with the service activated receives a diverted call.

Call diversion activated

Call diversion protection activated


Figure 2.8

The use of the service call diversion protection

The service is controlled by the category CDP:

CDP-0, no access to the service CDP-1, access to the call diversion protection service.
The service is handled by the blocks SUSCFU, SUSCFT, SUSCFA, SUSCFDB, SUSCFP, SUSCIF, and SUSLBP.

Three-Party Services
There are many variants of three-party services in the AXE system. Figure 2.9 shows the relationship between the different types of services.

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Subscriber Services Subsystem

Three-Party Service
Hold for Enquiry

Three-Party Service with Call Transfer, PSTN


Hold for Enquiry with Transfer Full Three-Party Service Full Three-Party Service with Transfer on Busy/Free

Three-Party Service with Call Transfer, simple procedure


Call Hold

Conference Service

Call Transfer

Figure 2.9

Three-party services

Hold for enquiry means that the subscriber who is engaged in a call uses the register recall button (marked with an R in most countries) and gets a new dial tone. The subscriber may now initiate a new call while the original call is held. The new call can be sent to any destination that the subscriber is allowed to address. When the second call has been established, the subscriber may do any of the following, in any order:

Switch between the calls without interconnecting the two parties. Release the ongoing call and retain the call being held. Release the call in the held position. Establish a three-party call so all three parties can speak to each other.

Conference service is nothing but a three-party conference call. All three parties can hear each other and a tone can be generated as a reminder that the call involves three parties. If the subscriber who initiated the service clears, the two other parties will be cleared as well. Hold for enquiry with transfer is an addition to the ordinary enquiry call. When a call has been established to the C-subscriber, the subscriber who initiated the enquiry call can leave the call. Then, the two remaining subscribers can continue talking over a normal two-party line. Figure 2.10 shows an example of the service.

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PSTN Services

Phase 1

Phase 2

Hold

B Transfer

A Enquiry C

C
Figure 2.10

An example of hold for enquiry with transfer

The other services in Figure 2.9 are all variants of the services explained here. The category ENQ is used to control the access to the service:

ENQ-0, no access to the service ENQ-1, access to hold for enquiry ENQ-2, access to add-on conference service ENQ-3, access to hold with transfer ENQ-4, access to full three-party service ENQ-5 to ENQ-9, please study the B-module.

The service is handled by the blocks SUSENQ, SUSCEC1, SUSCEC2, and SUSSCR.

2.3.7

Call Waiting Service


The service enables an engaged subscriber to be notified of a call waiting. When a new call is offered to the subscriber, the following actions can be taken:

Ignore the call from the C-subscriber and continue the original call. Reject the call from the C-subscriber and deactivate the call waiting
service as long as the call remains.

Terminate the ongoing call and answer the call from the C-subscriber. Put the original call on hold and answer the call from the C-subscriber.
If the subscriber has access to the service, a full three-party service can be established if the last alternative is used by the subscriber. When the C-subscriber calls the subscriber with the call waiting service, an ordinary ring control tone is sent. If the called subscriber ignores the

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Subscriber Services Subsystem

call from the C-subscriber, a busy tone is sent to the C-subscriber after a time supervision period. The services are controlled by the category CAW

CAW-0, no access to the service CAW-1, access to the call waiting service.
The service is handled by the blocks SUSCWP, SUSCEC1, SUSCEC2, SUSSCR, SUSLM, and SUSCIF.

2.3.8

General Deactivation Service


The total number of services in the network increases all the time and it might be difficult for a subscriber to remember which services he has activated. This service enables a subscriber to deactivate all subscriber services by means of a single subscriber procedure or by command. Services requiring a key-word are excluded from the deactivation. No categories are associated with the service and the function is implemented in block SUSGD.

2.3.9

Remote Control of Subscriber Service


The service allows a subscriber to perform a service control procedure remotely, away from his own phone. This means that any telephone in the network can be used to control the activation or deactivation of subscriber services. The service requires an advanced announcing machine (ASTDR) which will guide the subscriber by means of announcements. Figure 2.11 shows an example of how the service can be used.

Home telephone

Diversion ordered by means of a subscriber procedure


Figure 2.11

The subscriber on vacation can order diversion of his calls

The service is controlled by the category RSS and the following values can be used:

RSS-0, no access to the service RSS-1, access to the remote control of subscriber service
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PSTN Services

The function is implemented in the blocks SUSRC, SUSCIF and SUSCFT.

2.3.10

Distinctive Alerting Service


The service enables a subscriber to receive calls addressed to different numbers on a single telephone using only one line. Each number that is associated with the line has a distinctive ring signal which enables the subscriber to identify the number being called. There are two different methods used to identify the number dialled:

The line has multiple subscriber numbers. Each number is associated


with a specific ringing signal.

The line has one subscriber number, and an additional digit (dialled
after the subscriber number) determines the ringing signal Figure 2.12 shows an example where a subscriber works for two companies but has only one telephone line. The different ringing signals make it possible for him to give the correct company name when answering the phone.

Golf shop: 012-123200 Ring signal: Tennis shop: 012-123210 Ring signal:

00 32 12

12 32 10

Figure 2.12

Two companies but only one phone

The service is controlled by the categories DAA, DAS and RTY, and the following values can be used:

DAA, distinctive alerting additional digit method DAA-0, no access DAA-1, access to the service DAS, distinctive alerting multiple directory method DAS-0, no access DAS-1, access to the service

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Subscriber Services Subsystem

RTY, ringing type RTY-0 to RTY-3 gives four different ringing signals.
The function is implemented in subsystem SCS, subscriber control subsystem, in block DIAS, distinctive alerting service.

2.3.11

Change of Keyword
Some services, such as the remote control of subscriber service, require a keyword. The subscriber can change the keyword by means of a subscriber procedure. If the change is accepted, the system will respond with a recorded message or a tone. The keyword, which consists of four digits (0000 - 9999), can be provided for all types of subscribers. It is possible to have two keywords, one for the service remote control of subscriber service and one for all other services. If unauthorized change is attempted, the change function can be blocked for a specified period of time (30 minutes to 24 hours) or permanently. The function is controlled by the category KWC, and the following values can be used:

KWC-0, no access to the service KWC-1, access to change of keyword.

2.4 Business Support Services


PABX Night Service
When the service is activated, the procedure for hunting for a free line to the PABX is altered. Instead of the search for any free line, specific lines can be selected for the service. The lines must have individual subscriber numbers. If several lines are defined, the search process is made sequential until a free line is found. If all defined lines are busy, the calling subscriber will get a busy tone. Figure 2.13 shows how the service can be used by a small company with only one operator available during certain working hours.

Hunting altered

Operator Sales staff 1 Sales staff 2

Figure 2.13

A small company with limited resources can take advantage of the PABX night service
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PSTN Services

Activation and deactivation of the service is done with a subscriber procedure or by command. If a subscriber procedure is used, a keyword is required. Outgoing calls are not affected by the service. The services are controlled by the category PXNS:

PXNS-0, no access to the service PXNS-1, access to the PABX night service
The service is handled by the blocks SUSFPX, SUSCFA, SUSCFDB, SUSCFP, SUSKEY, and SUSCIF.

2.4.1

PABX Group Number Diversion


The service makes it possible to change the routing to small PABXs with no in-dialling facility. When the service is active, calls to a PABX group number are forwarded to another number. The service is activated by means of a subscriber procedure or a command. If the subscriber procedure is used, a keyword has to be used. The service can only be given to PABXs and it takes precedence over the PABX night service if both are activated at the same time. The services are controlled by the category PXGND:

PXGND-0, no access to the service PXGND-1, access to PABX group number diversion
The service is handled by the blocks SUSCFPX, SUSCFDB, SUSLBP, SUSCFP, SUSCFT, SUSKEY, and SUSCIF.

2.4.2

Changed Number Announcement Service


When a subscriber moves and has to change his number, this service generates a recorded message giving calling subscribers the new number. The new subscriber number is loaded by command and sent to the calling subscriber as a variable announcement. Figure 2.14 shows the main principle of the service as well as an example.

Subscriber 123456 has moved. The new number is 789010.

123456

789010
Figure 2.14

Example of the service changed number announcement

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Subscriber Services Subsystem

The service can only be given to vacant subscribers. The service is controlled by the category CNUA, and the following values can be used:

CNUA-0, no access to the service CNUA-1, access to changed number announcement.


The service is handled by the blocks SUSCNUA and SUSCIF.

2.4.3

Queue Service
The service enables callers to be held in a queue if the called number is busy or all lines to a PABX are busy. The callers do not have to hang up and call again, and while waiting they can listen to music or a recorded message. Figure 2.15 shows how queuing to a small company with a limited number of lines can be organised.

Queue C B A C Music or announcement

B
Figure 2.15

A queue is arranged for the company

A queue is created by giving a queue category to the group number or subscriber that requests the service. Depending on the category, the queue can be activated with or without a keyword. The characteristics of a queue are set by commands defining length of queue, type of message sent to the subscriber, charging, etc. The services are controlled by the category QUE:

QUE-0, no access to the service QUE-1, access to the queue service without keyword QUE-2, access to the queue service with keyword.
The service is handled by the blocks SUSQA, SUSQC, SUSQT, SUSKEY, SUSCIF, and SUSLM.

2.5 Class Services


Class services are based upon the callers A-number which can be used in many different ways by the receiving terminal or by the operator. Call completion gives operators more revenue and A-number presentation gives the called subscriber a useful service.
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PSTN Services

2.5.1

Completion of Calls to Busy Subscriber/on No Reply


The service makes it possible for a calling subscriber to activate callback when the called subscriber is busy or does not answer. If the called number is busy or does not answer, the subscriber line will be monitored. When the line changes from busy to idle, or to idle again after the first call, the initiating subscriber is called. When lifting the handset, the monitored subscriber is called. Figure 2.16 shows the general principle for the service completion of calls to busy subscriber.

A A calls B who is busy. A orders callback.

Monitoring B replaces Bs exchange calls A A answers. B answers. Conversation Bs phone rings.

Figure 2.16

The service completion of calls to busy subscriber

While waiting for the call, the calling subscriber can use the phone in the normal way. Up to five callback orders can be active at the same time from one and the same subscriber. The service is only accessible from ordinary phones connected to analog or digital subscriber switches. PABXs, pay phones or ISDN subscribers do not have access to the service. When the service is ordered by the calling subscriber, the AXE exchange of the B-subscriber will monitor the subscriber line and when the state changes, the call to the calling subscriber is initiated. To prevent the service from being used, a subscriber may have the category CBP, call back protection. The reason for this type of service could be that various types of answering systems are used. The services are controlled by the categories CBB, CBN, and CBP:

CBB, completion of calls to busy subscriber CBB-0, no access to the service CBB-1, access to completion of calls to busy subscriber

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Subscriber Services Subsystem

CBN, completion of calls on no reply CBN-0, no access to the service CBN-1, access to completion of call on no reply CBP, callback protection CBP-0, no access to the service CBP-1, access to the service callback protection
The service is handled by the blocks SUSCCTA, SUSCCTB, SUSCS, SUSLM, SUSCIF, SUSACF, and SUSCCP.

2.5.2

Malicious Call Identification


Calls that are obscene or in any other way disturb the called party can be traced and the calling subscriber can be identified by means of this service. For each registered call, the following is recorded and stored by the function:

A-number and category B-number and category Date and time of the call set-up Date and time of invoke of service Outgoing device if the call terminates in a PABX The first and the last subscriber in case of diverted calls in a chain All parties in a multi-party call (for example during call waiting)

The service is activated by means of a command and remains active until it is switched off by command. The operator decides which of the following registration methods should be used: 1. 2. The subscriber uses a subscriber procedure to invoke the service. This must be done before the called subscriber terminates the call. All calls are registered automatically.

The services are controlled by the categories MCIDSC and MCIDA:

MCIDSC, malicious call identification, subscriber controlled MCIDSC-0, no access to the service MCIDSC-1, activation by flash or code MCIDSC-2, activation by flash and code MCIDSC-3, application-dependent activation MCIDA, malicious call identification, automatic activation MCIDA-0, no access to the service MCIDA-1, access to the service MCIDA-2, application-dependent activation
The service is handled by the blocks SUSMCIT and SUSMCIA.
24

PSTN Services

2.5.3

Calling Line Identification Restriction


The service makes it possible for a subscriber to control the handling of his A-number in the network. Some subscribers, particulary those with a secret number, do not want their A-numbers to be visible in the network. There are two kinds of restriction:

Permanent
All calls are handled in the same way and no A-numbers will be transferred in the network.

Temporary
By using a prefix or a specific subscriber procedure prior to the call, the service can be activated for single calls. The temporary variant may be generally available or restricted to certain subscribers. The default value for number presentation can be set by the operator of the network. It is either set to A-number available or Anumber restricted. When the temporary variant of the service is activated, the default value is changed. Note that some B-numbers may override the service and display the Anumber anyway. The operator and local legislation decide the types of telephone and the number of telephones that should be excluded. The services are controlled by the category SCAPB and the values are as follows:

SCAPB-0, no access to the service SCAPB-1, access to calling line identification restriction.

2.6 Operator Support Services


Interception Service
Calls to, for example, unavailable numbers can be redirected to an announcing machine, a tone generator or to an operator. The service is controlled by the category ISC which can be given a value between 0 and 15:

ISC-0, no interception service activated ISC-0 to 15, application-dependent interception service (set by
exchange data)

2.6.1

General Availability Service


This service enables an operator to simplify the handling of services. This by forming different service groups for different subscriber types. The service is controlled by the category GUG, general user group. The value can be between 0 and 255.

25

Subscriber Services Subsystem

Service Statistics
The service provides short and long-term planning information in the form of reports summarising the use of subscriber service for defined time periods.

2.7 Chapter Summary


From this chapter, you should remember the following:

Examples of basic services are absent subscriber service, do not


disturb, abbreviated dialling, last number repetition, priority, alarm call, and fixed destination call.

Examples of call management services are call barring, call


forwarding of different types, call diversion protection, three party conference calls, call waiting, general deactivation service, remote control of subscriber service, distinctive alerting, and change of keyword.

Examples of business support services are PABX night service,


PABX group number diversion, changed number announcement service, and queue service.

Examples of class services are completion of calls to busy subscriber,


completion of calls on no reply, malicious call identification, and calling line identification restriction.

Examples of operator services are interception service, general


availability service, and service statistics.

26

3. ISDN Services

Chapter Objectives
After completing this chapter, you will be able to: describe the ETSI supplementary services offered by AXE identify categories and blocks related to each service.
Figure 3.1

Chapter Objectives

3.1 Chapter Introduction


ISDN subscribers have access to advanced data-communication services but these services are not described here as these services are the basics of ISDN. Instead, the services offered by subsystem SUS are described here. During the development of ISDN, standardisation organizations like ETSI has standardised the services regarding their introduction and the handling of the services. However, AXE offers some more features and services that those stated by ETSI.

3.2 ETSI Supplementary Services


The European standardisation organisation ETSI (European Telecommunication Standards Institute) has been very active in standardising ISDN services. One important part is the standardisation of subscriber services. This is important because much of the functionality of the services has to be included in the terminals connected to ISDN. Suppliers of both telecommunication infrastructure and access terminals must base the development of their terminals on the same specification. The term supplementary services indicates that the services are added to the original telecommunication and bearer services (telephony, fax, and data). It is the network operator who ultimately decides whether the services should be free of charge or charged.

3.2.1

Calling Line Identification Presentation, CLIP


At the ISDN terminal, the number of the calling subscriber is displayed when the phone rings. The service enables the user to see who is ringing before answering. A more advanced solution is to store the number in the telephones memory and then check who has tried to call the subscriber while he was away. An even more sophisticated solution, suitable for companies, is to let the subscriber number address the companys database and then retrieve
27

Subscriber Services Subsystem

information about the calling subscriber. For example, an insurance company can present information about the client on the screen of a personal computer at the same time as the phone rings. The number presentation can be restricted if the calling subscriber has the service calling line identification restriction. See the next chapter. The service is controlled by the category ANT, and the following values can be used:

ANT-0, no access to service CLIP ANT-1, CLIP service is provided ANT-2, CLIP service is provided and overrides any of the CLIR
categories described in the next chapter. The function is implemented in subsystem SCS, subscriber control subsystem, in block OUTF, optional user traffic functions.

3.2.2

Calling Line Identification Restriction, CLIR


The service gives the calling subscriber the option to prevent presentation of his number to the called user. The function is either permanently set or changed on a per-call basis by the user. Note that the B-subscriber may have an override category (ANT-2) which will override the CLIR category. How this is used in the network is determined by the terminating network and the applicable local legislation. Figure 3.2 shows the relationship between the services CLIP and CLIR.

A-subscriber Case 1 APB-0

B-subscriber ANT-1 Presentation of A-subscribers number No presentation. Presentation of A-subscribers number

Case 2

APB-1 APB-1

ANT-1 ANT-2

Case 3

Figure 3.2

The relationship between the services CLIP and CLIR

The service is controlled by the category APB and the following values can be used:

APB-0, CLIR service not provided APB-1, access to the CLIR service

28

ISDN Services

The function is implemented in subsystem SCS, subscriber control subsystem, in block OUTF, optional user traffic functions.

3.2.3

Direct Dialling In, DDI


The service allows a calling subscriber to make a call directly to an extension of a PABX. This is possible as part of the dialled number is transferred to the called PABX. The function requires a PABX which supports the function (can handle the signalling). The function is not controlled by any category as all subscribers calling the PABX have access to the service. Functions in TCS, traffic control subsystem, and SCS/SSS, subscriber control subsystem/subscriber switching subsystem, implement the function.

3.2.4

Multiple Subscriber Number, MSN


Up to ten numbers can be supported and the service can be used in three different ways:

Several terminals, each with its individual number, can share one line.
Telephone, fax, and data can share the same line.

Each terminal can be assigned several numbers. Several terminals can be assigned the same number.
The function is implemented in subsystem SCS, subscriber control subsystem, in block LIBAX and LIPAX, line interface basic access and line interface primary access, respectively.

3.2.5

Malicious Call Identification, MCID


The service is the same as the one offered to PSTN subscribers. Please study section "Malicious Call Identification" on page 24.

3.2.6

Sub-Addressing, SUB
The service makes it possible for a subscriber to extend his ISDN number with an additional address which is beyond the numbering plan of the network. For example, two local area networks (LAN) can establish connections between users in each LAN, which means that the identity within the LAN has to be treated as a subaddress. The network sends the subaddress transparently through the network to the terminating subscriber. Figure 3.3 shows an example of a LAN-to-LAN call and how the subaddress is used in the terminating LAN for addressing.

29

Subscriber Services Subsystem

Subaddress

LAN

ISDN

LAN

Figure 3.3

Two different local area networks (LAN) communicate via ISDN

The service is controlled by two categories, one for the A-subscriber and one for the B-subscriber:

ASUB, A-subscriber sub-addressing ASUB-0, A-subscriber may not send a sub-address ASUB-1, A-subscriber may send a sub-address BSUB, B-subscriber sub-addressing BSUB-0, B-subscriber may not send a sub-address BSUB-1, B-subscriber may send a sub-address
The service is implemented in subsystem SCS, subscriber control subsystem, in the blocks PHBA, PHPA, and LICH.

3.2.7

Connected Line Identification Presentation, COLP


The service provides the calling user with information about the connected part. If the connected line has a sub-address, this information is included as well. The service is available to all switched telecommunication services, and can be assigned to all types of ISDN accesses as well as to group numbers (PABX). The service is controlled by the category COLP, and the following values can be used:

COLP-0, no connected party number transfer COLP-1, unbarred connected party number transfer COLP-2, override connected party number transfer
The function is implemented in subsystem SCS, subscriber control subsystem, in block OUTF, optional user traffic functions.

3.2.8

Connected Line Identification Restriction, COLR


The service enables the called user to prevent his number and subaddress, if any, from being presented to the calling user. The service can be provided permanently or on a per call basis (category SCCOLR).

30

Figure 3.4 shows how the services COLP and COLR relate to each other in a call.

A-subscriber Bs identity transferred No transfer Bs identity transferred


Figure 3.4

B-subscriber COLR-0 COLR-1 COLR-1 Case 1 Case 2 Case 3

COLP-1 COLP-1 COLP-2

The relationship between the services COLP and COLR

The service can be assigned to all types of ISDN accesses as well as to group numbers (PABX). The service is controlled by the categories COLR and SCCOLR, and the following values can be used:

COLR, connected line identification restriction COLR-0, presentation allowed COLR-1, presentation restricted SCCOLR, subscriber controlled COLR SCCOLR-0, presentation allowed SCCOLR-1, presentation restricted
The function is implemented in subsystem SCS, subscriber control subsystem, in block OUTF, optional user traffic functions.

3.2.9

Line and Trunk Hunting, LTH


When a subscriber receives a call, the service automatically selects a free B-channel on an access or a group of accesses that serve the subscriber.

3.2.10

Call Forwarding Unconditional, CFU


The service is basically the same as for the PSTN subscribers and it is described in section "Call Forwarding Unconditional" on page 14. The following ISDN-specific characteristics apply:

A sub-address can be added to the C-number. The service is available to both basic access and primary rate access.

31

Subscriber Services Subsystem

3.2.11

Call Waiting, CW
The call waiting service is basically the same as the service for PSTN subscribers. Please study section "Call Waiting Service" on page 17 for a description. However, the following applies to the ISDN variant of the service:

Call waiting is only activated when all B-channels are busy. If call waiting is rejected by the B-subscriber, the reason is sent to the
calling ISDN subscriber by means of a cause code.

The service can be offered to both basic accesses and primary rate
accesses (IMUX and PABX) The ISDN variant of the service is controlled by the category CW and the following values can be used:

CW-0, no access to the service CW-1, access to the call waiting service for ISDN subscribers
3.2.12 Call Hold, HOLD
The service makes it possible to interrupt a call in progress, put it on hold, make an outgoing call, and then return to the call that was held. A Bchannel is reserved for the terminal as long as there are calls on hold. The B-channel is reserved by the AXE. While being on hold, the subscriber can hear a tone, a recorded message or silence. A call on hold can be disconnected by any of the two parties. The service cannot be offered to PABX subscribers. The services are controlled by the category HOLD:

HOLD-0, no access to the service HOLD-1, access to the call hold service
The service is handled by the block SUSCH.

3.2.13

Terminal Portability, TP
The service makes it possible for a subscriber to move a terminal from one basic access socket to another during a call in progress. It also allows the subscriber to move the call from one terminal to another during the call. The service can be used by both parties (the A and B-subscribers) during the active state of a call (speech position) and it is only valid for calls on B-channels. The function is implemented in subsystem SCS, subscriber control subsystem, in block LICH, line interface call handler, and block PHBA, protocol handler primary access.

3.2.14

Closed User Group, CUG


The service makes it possible to form groups with different access restrictions. Members of a closed user group can communicate with each

32

ISDN Services

other, but not in general with subscribers outside the group. A subscriber can be a member of more than one closed user group. The service is handled by blocks is the TCS, traffic control subsystem, and is not described further in this book. The service is controlled by the category CUG:

CUG-0, no access to the service CUG-1, access to the closed user group service
3.2.15 Advice of Charge During the Call, AOC-D /At the End of the Call, AOC-E
These services inform the subscriber of the cost of the call, via a digital display, either while the call is in progress or when it has been terminated.

3.2.16

User-to-User Signalling, UUS


The service allows two ISDN subscribers to exchange a limited amount of information over the signalling channel while the call is in progress. The service is restricted to circuit-switched calls. Three types of UUS services have been defined: 1. 2. 3. User-to-user signalling included in the call control message (at call establishment). User-to-user signalling during the alerting phase of the call. User-to-user signalling during the active state of the call.

The services are controlled by the category UUS:

UUS1, user-to-user signalling type 1 UUS1-0, no access to the service UUS1-1, access to user-to-user signalling type 1 UUS2, user-to-user signalling type 2 UUS2-0, no access to the service UUS2-1, access to user-to-user signalling type 2 UUS3, user-to-user signalling type 3 UUS3-0, no access to the service UUS3-1, access to user-to-user signalling type 3
The service is mainly handled by subsystem SCS, subscriber control subsystem, and block NFC, network flow control, in particular.

3.2.17

Outgoing Call Barring - Fixed, OCB-F


The service allows a specified number to be prevented from making calls to certain areas. The function is entirely controlled by the operator giving the subscriber a subscriber category. The service is controlled by the category CBA and the function is implemented in block DA, digit analysis, in subsystem TCS, traffic control subsystem.
33

Subscriber Services Subsystem

3.2.18

Outgoing Call Barring - User Controlled, UCB-UC


The ISDN variant of the service is almost the same as the PSTN variant. Please study section "Call Barring Services" on page 12 for a description.

3.3 Non-ETSI Supplementary Services


3.3.1 Fixed Destination Call, FDC
The ISDN variant of the service is almost the same as the PSTN variant. Please study section "Fixed Destination Call Service" on page 10 for a description.

3.3.2

Abbreviated Dialling, ADI


The ISDN variant of the service is almost the same as the PSTN variant. Please study section "Abbreviated Dialling Service" on page 8 for a description.

3.3.3

Priority, PRI
The ISDN variant of the service is almost the same as the PSTN variant. Please study section "Priority Service" on page 9 for a description.

3.3.4

Call Diversion Protection


The ISDN variant of the service is almost the same as the PSTN variant. Please study section "Call Diversion Protection" on page 15 for a description.

3.3.5

Interception Service, INTS


The ISDN variant of the service is almost the same as the PSTN variant. Please study section "Interception Service" on page 25 for a description.

3.3.6

Incoming Call Barring - Fixed, ICB-F


The ISDN variant of the service is almost the same as the PSTN variant. Please study section "Call Barring Services" on page 12 for a description.

3.3.7

Subscriber Controlled Keyword, SKEY


The ISDN variant of the service is almost the same as the PSTN variant. Please study section "Change of Keyword" on page 20 for a description.

3.3.8

Incoming Diverted Call Barring, IDCB


The service enables the user to prevent all incoming diverted calls from being offered to his access. It may be used to block forwarded calls that are made by mistake, as a result of misdialled numbers, or when someone has forgotten to deactivate the diversion service. The service can either be fixed (IDCB-F) or variable (IDCB-UC) and can be used for all types of bearer services.

34

ISDN Services

3.3.9

Call Forwarding To Fixed Announcement


The service is quite similar to the service described in section "Absent Subscriber Service" on page 7, but intended for an ISDN subscriber. By activating the service, all incoming calls are diverted to an announcing machine. Outgoing calls are not affected but the subscriber can have a reminder that the service is active when outgoing calls are generated. The service is controlled by the category ASU, and the following values can be used:

ASU-0, no access to the service ASU-1 to 15, access to the service. Each value is related to a specific
message, tone or operator. The function is handled by the blocks SUSASU, SUSCIF, and SUSCFSB.

35

Subscriber Services Subsystem

3.4 Chapter Summary


From this chapter you should remember the following: The following subscriber services are part of the ETSI supplementary services:

calling line identification presentation, CLIP calling line identification restriction, CLIR direct dialling in, DDI multiple subscriber number, MSN malicious call identification, MCID sub-addressing, SUB connected line identification presentation, COLP connected line identification restriction, COLR line and trunk hunting, LTH call forwarding unconditional, CFU call waiting, CW call hold, HOLD terminal portability, TP closed user group, CUG advice of charge during the call/at the end of the call, AOC-D/AOC-E user-to-user signalling, UUS outgoing call barring - fixed, OCB-F outgoing call barring - user controlled, UCB-UC The non-ETSI supplementary services are:

fixed destination call, FDC abbreviated dialling, ADI priority, PRI call diversion protection interception service, INTS incoming call barring - fixed, ICB-F subscriber controlled keyword, SKEY incoming diverted call barring, IDCB call forwarding to fixed announcement

36

4. Exchange Data for Subscriber Services

Chapter Objectives
After completing this chapter, you will be able to: understand the general principles for exchange data related to subscriber services. describe the meaning of a software route understand how the sending program in the route analysis affects the service describe how the B-number analysis is made for a service.
Figure 4.1

Chapter Objectives

4.1 General Principles


Exchange data must be specified for almost all services in order to explain how they should work. The main reason for this is that different customers have different requirements and also the fact that all services are optional. A subscriber service can in most cases be reached by means of one or more of the following alternatives: 1. 2. 3. activation by means of a subscriber procedure initialization by means of an A-category initialization by means of a B-category.

When the service has been detected, either by means of a subscriber procedure or a category, the correct block must be found in order to permit activation. The basic procedure for locating blocks is illustrated in Figure 4.2. Please study the figure and the explanatory text.

37

Subscriber Services Subsystem

Service initiated by: Subscriber procedure A-category 3 B-category 4

1 B-number analysis EOS code EOS code

2 Route analysis EOS 5 analysis B-number 6 analysis

Change Activate Interrogate Use

Service XXX 8

Route 7 analysis

ES/ANNC

Figure 4.2

Exchange data for subscriber services, general principles

1.

The subscriber procedure is dialled by the subscriber and *, # and the digits are analysed in the B-number analysis table in the usual manner (as ordinary digits). Charging case, number length and routing case are specified. The routing case is used as input data for the route analysis. The route analysis indicates a route in the block that handles the service. Each block has several routes with different function codes for different actions. A sending program is used to indicate if any digits are to be sent to the block. Digits have to be transmitted if, for example, a C-number is included in the subscriber procedure (activation of some type of diversion). An A-category is set and detected by the system when the subscriber generates an outgoing call. Example: an A-subscriber has fixed destination call service. A B-category is set and detected by the system. Most B-categories are checked by block SC (subscriber categories) when the B-subscriber is identified in the terminating exchange. In both cases, that is after an A or B-category has been set, the block that identifies the service as activated, will generate an end-ofselection code (EOS code). The code is sent to the register, which in turn sends it for analysis in block RA, that is the block that contains the end-of-selection analysis table. The EOS code is usually translated into a fictitious B-number, which is analysed in a specific origin. Parameters F and M are used in the EOS analysis. F, which stands for first, indicates the origin to use (for example F=99) and M indicates how the B-number is to be modified (M=0-004 to add 004 in front of a number). The modified B-number is then sent back to the register. The modified B-number is analysed in the B-number analysis table. Charging case, number length and a routing case are specified. The routing case is used as input data for the route analysis.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

38

Exchange Data for Subscriber Services

7.

The routing case is sent to the route analysis in block RA, The route analysis indicates a route in the block that handles the service. Each block has several routes with different function codes for different actions. In some cases, the result of the activation or the use of the service is indicated by means of an EOS code or an announcement code (ANNC). Both codes are used to send tones or announcements to the subscriber. This is required if the service is changed by means of a subscriber procedure.

8.

4.2 Software Routes


As said before, a block has several routes with different function codes for different actions required by the block. Some function blocks have only one route, while others have up to ten different routes. The routes available inside a block can be seen in the application information of the block. The function codes used to indicate the function of the route are also indicated in that document. The function code is given to the route when it is defined. An example of the command is: EXROI:R=1SUSADIT,DETY=SUSADIT,FNC=1; In this example, a route called 1SUSADIT is created. The digit 1 is set to the same value as the function code and the SUSADIT is the name of the block. This route-naming pattern facilitates the handling of route data as the name includes the function code. The parameter DETY indicates the block that owns the route, and the parameter FNC is used to indicate the function code. Figure 4.3 shows a block with routes and function codes.

39

Subscriber Services Subsystem

FNC=1 Call set-up with suffix FNC=2 Registration of complete B-number FNC=3 Registration of incomplete B-number FNC=4 Removal of B-number FNC=5 Interrogation
Figure 4.3

Function block SUSADIT

The block SUSADIT and some of its software routes with different function codes (FNC). (All routes are not shown.)

4.3 Route Analysis


The purpose of the route analysis is to select a route. However, no alternatives are specified as only one route per function is used. The only reasons for having the route analysis are the route indication and the sending program. The sending program indicates when the route is to be seized and the number of digits to be sent to the block. The application information of the block usually shows how the sending program is to be specified. See the example in Figure 4.4.

*51*2*xxxxxxx#

B-number analysis Route analysis RC=xx, SP=MM5, R=2SUSADIT

5th digit sent first

Seizure of route 2SUSADIT after reception of all digits

Figure 4.4

Example of a sending program for a subscriber service


40

Two things should be kept in mind when specifying the sending program:

SP=xx0
If the last digit in the sending program is set to zero, no digits will be transmitted. If the whole number is to be sent, the value of the last digit should be set to one (1).

SP=MMx
If the route is to be called when the whole B-number has been received, the letter M is used to indicate maximum number length. The next chapter explains how the system is informed about this.

4.4 B-Number Analysis


A B-number analysis has to be made in three different cases:

Analysis of the digits included in a subscriber procedure. Both *, #


and the service code have to be analysed.

Analysis of a modified B-number originating from the end-of-selection


analysis. The modification is made in order to find a routing case.

Analysis of the whole B-number in order to find the # in a subscriber


procedure. In most cases, the # is used to indicate the end of the number/procedure. The buttons * and # on the telephone correspond to digit values. These buttons generate so-called over-decadic digits and correspond to overdecadic digits 11 and 12. In the B-number analysis table, these digits are shown as #11 and #12: * # = > #11 = > #12

An example of a subscriber procedure is *51*x*xxx xxx# (loading of a new abbreviated number). The stars as well as the service code 51 will be indicated as follows in the B-number analysis table (origin 100): 100-#1151#11 In order to detect the last # code in the number, a special analysis table is defined. This is required as the subscriber number specified in the procedure may vary between 5 and 20 digits. However, the number must be terminated by the # button. The problem is common to many services as C-numbers are specified in all types of variable diversion services as well as in Fixed Destination Calls. Figure 4.5 shows the analysis tree.

41

Subscriber Services Subsystem

<ANBSP:B=132; B-NUMBER ANALYSIS DATA OPERATING B-NUMBER MISCELL 132-0 132-1 132-2 132-3 132-4 132-5 132-6 132-7 132-8 132-9 132-#11 132-#12 NE END
Figure 4.5

F/N N132 N132 N132 N132 N132 N132 N132 N132 N132 N132 N132 N132

ROUTE

CHARGE

Example of an analysis tree used to find the #in the B-number analysis

When the service code has been analysed, a jump is made in the analysis table by means of the parameter N (next). The parameter specifies in which origin the next digit should be analysed. By specifying N=132 in origin 132, a jump-back is made to the same origin for all digits except for the digit #. For that digit, the parameter NE is specified. NE stands for number end, which indicates to the register that the whole B-number has been received. If the sending program contains the parameters MMx, this means that the whole number is received and that the route is seized.

4.5 Size Alterations


When an outgoing call is generated by a subscriber, an outgoing device is selected in the route pointed out by the routing case. The number of outgoing circuits is determined by the hardware connected to the route. In case of congestion on the route, alternative routes can be selected. The traffic on the route can be recorded. The recordings show the requested and executed traffic on the route at different points in time. The results are evaluated in order to see if more devices should be connected to the route. If that is the case, some hardware has to be installed in the exchange and some data related to the route has to be changed. As far as routes to subscriber services are concerned, there are a few important differences as compared with ordinary routes: 1. 2.
42

No hardware is connected to the route. The number of circuits in the route is determined by a size alteration event. No alternatives are defined in the route analysis. If there is

Exchange Data for Subscriber Services

congestion, the subscriber has to try again. However, there are also similarities as compared with ordinary routes. For instance, traffic recordings can be initiated in order to see if there is enough circuits in the routes. Commands and printouts are also the same as for any route in the exchange. One size alteration event (SAE=500) is used to set the number of telephony devices in many of the APT blocks. SAE=500 is also used for blocks in SUS, subscriber services subsystem. If the following command is used, 5 calls at a time can use the abbreviated dialling service: SAAII:SAE=500,BLOCK=SUSADIT,NI=5; Figure 4.6 shows what this looks like in block SUSADIT.

Block SUSADIT One record is required for each call using the service, or for activation or deactivation.

SAE=500

Figure 4.6

SAE=500 is set in block SUSADIT

Out of the 5 records defined inside the block, one is required for each call in progress. In this context, call means:

Calls using abbreviated numbers Storing of abbreviated numbers (for example *51*x*xxx xxx#) Erasure of an abbreviated number (for example #51*x#) Interrogation of the service (for example *#51#).

In this case, the holding time for each call type is rather short, which means that the number of subscribers served by these 5 records can be rather large (holding time of less than 10 seconds). The holding time can be seen in the result of the traffic recording. This type of size alteration must be set in almost all blocks having subscriber services. SAE=500 is always used for this type of records participating in the actual call. However, more data has to be stored inside the blocks and the data is usually divided into records belonging to

43

Subscriber Services Subsystem

subscribers or PABXs. If the abbreviated dialling service is studied as an example, each subscriber having access to the service must have there B-numbers (abbreviated dialling numbers) stored somewhere. The numbers are stored inside the block SUSADIA in records and the number of records is set by means of size alteration. Here we have selected SAE=46, which can be found in the application information of the block SUSADIA. Since each subscriber requires one record, SAE=46 should be set equal to the number of subscribers that have the service. The records contain information about the subscribers that have access to the service. The abbreviated numbers are stored in another record set with SAE=47. One individual is required for each module of 5 numbers. Please study Figure 4.7.

Block SUSADIT

Block SUSADIA A-number A-number A-number SAE=46 4 5


Number 1 Number 2 ... Number 1 Number 2 ...

SAE=500
Figure 4.7

SAE=47

All the size alteration events in blocks SUSADIT and SUSADIA

This type of SAE is more unique to the block and the number and the meaning of the SAE are more dependent of the block. Please study the application information for the blocks concerned.

4.6 Chapter Summary


From this chapter you should remember the following:

All subscriber services are initiated by categories. The subscriber service blocks have software routes. B-number analysis and route analysis are performed as for any
outgoing call.

Size alterations have to be performed to adjust the capacity of the


subscriber services.

44

#11 41 #12 41 A abbreviated dialling (ISDN) 34 abbreviated dialling service 8 absent subscriber service 7 A-category 37 ADI, service 34 advice of charge at the end of the call (ISDN) 33 advice of charge during the call (ISDN) 33 alarm call service 10 announcement code (ANNC) 39 AOC-D, service 33 AOC-E, service 33 B B-category 37 bearer service 3 block DIAS 20 LIBAX 29 LICH 30, 32 LIPAX 29 NFC 33 OUTF 28, 29, 30, 31 PHBA 30, 32 PHPA 30 SUSAACA 12 SUSAACT 12 SUSACF 24 SUSADIA 9 SUSADIT 9 SUSASSB 9, 10 SUSASU 8, 35 SUSCCP 24 SUSCCTA 24 SUSCCTB 24 SUSCEC1 17, 18 SUSCEC2 17, 18 SUSCFA 14, 15, 21 SUSCFB 14 SUSCFDB 14, 15, 21 SUSCFP 14, 15, 21 SUSCFPX 21 SUSCFSB 15, 35 SUSCFT 14, 15, 19, 21 SUSCFU 15 SUSCH 32 SUSCIF 8, 9, 12, 14, 15, 18, 19, 21, 22, 24, 35 SUSCNUA 22 SUSCS 9, 10, 24 SUSCWP 18 SUSDDB 8 SUSENQ 17 SUSFDB 15 SUSFDC 10 SUSFNR 14 SUSFPX 21 SUSGD 18 SUSKEY 21, 22 SUSLBP 15, 21 SUSLM 12, 18, 22, 24 SUSLNR 9 SUSMCIA 24 SUSMCIT 24 SUSQA 22 SUSQC 22 SUSQT 22 SUSRC 19

45

Subscriber Services Subsystem


SUSSCR 17, 18 B-number analysis 41 business support services 20 C call barring services 12 call diversion protection 15 call diversion protection (ISDN) 34 call forwarding busy 13 call forwarding no reply 14 call forwarding services, general 12 call forwarding to fixed announcement (ISDN) 35 call forwarding unconditional 14 call forwarding unconditional (ISDN) 31 call hold (ISDN) 32 call management services 12 call waiting (ISDN) 32 call waiting service 17 callback 23 calling line identification presentation (ISDN) 27 calling line identification restriction 25 calling line identification restriction (ISDN) 28 category ADI 9 ALS 12 ANT 28 ASU 8, 35 ASUB 30 BSUB 30 CAW 18 CBA 12 CBB 23 CBN 23 CBP 23 CCA 8 CCB 12 CDP 15 CFBF 13 CFBV 13 CFNRF 14 CFNRV 14 CFUF 14 CFUV 14 CNUA 22 COLP 30 COLR 31 CUG 33 CW 32 DAA 19 DAS 19 DDB 8 ENQ 17 GUG 25 HOLD 32 ISC 25 KWC 20 LNR 9 MCIDA 24 MCIDSC 24 PRI 9 PXGND 21 PXNS 21 QUE 22 RSS 18 RTY 19 SCAPB 25 SCCOLR 31 TBI 12 TBO 12 UUS 33

46

CFU, service 31 change of keyword 20 changed number announcement service 21 class services 22 CLIP, service 27 CLIR, service 28 closed user group (ISDN) 32 C-number 13, 14 COLP, service 30 COLR, service 30 completion of calls on no reply 23 completion of calls to busy subscriber 23 conference service 16 connected line identification presentation (ISDN) 30 connected line identification restriction (ISDN) 30 C-subscriber 16, 17 CUG, service 32 CW, service 32 D DDI, service 29 DETY, parameter 39 direct dialling in (ISDN) 29 distinctive alerting service 19 do not disturb 8 E ETSI supplementary services 27 european telecommunication standards institute, ETSI 4 F F, parameter 38 FDC, service 34 fixed destination call (ISDN) 34 fixed destination call service 10 FNC, parameter 39 function code, of route 39 G general availability service 25 general deactivation service 18 H hold for enquiry 16 hold for enquiry with transfer 16 HOLD, service 32 I ICB-F, service 34 IDCB, service 34 incoming call barring - fixed (ISDN) 34 incoming diverted call barring (ISDN) 34 interception service 25 interception service (ISDN) 34 INTS, service 34 L last number repetition service 9 line and trunk hunting (ISDN) 31 local area network (LAN) 29 LTH, service 31 M M, parameter 38 malicious call identification 24 malicious call identification (ISDN) 29 MCID, service 29 MSN, service 29 multiple subscriber number (ISDN) 29

47

Subscriber Services Subsystem


N NE, parameter 42 O OCB-F, service 33 operator support services 25 outgoing call barring - fixed (ISDN) 33 outgoing call barring - user controlled (ISDN) 34 P PABX group number diversion 21 PABX night service 20 PRI, service 34 priority (ISDN) 34 priority service 9 Q queue service 22 R remote control of subscriber service 18 route analysis 40 S sending program 41 service statistics 26 size alteration 42 SKEY, service 34 software routes 39 SUB, service 29 sub-addressing (ISDN) 29 subscriber controlled keyword (ISDN) 34 subsystem SCS 28, 31, 32, 33 subsystem TCS 33 T terminal portability (ISDN) 32 three-party services 15 TP, service 32 U UCB-UC, service 34 user-to-user signalling (ISDN) 33 UUS, service 33

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Ericsson Telecom AB MV/ETX/PN/CD S-126 25 Stockholm, Sweden Telephone: +46 8 719 9222

EN/LZT 101 1619 R1A Ericsson Telecom AB

Subject to alterations without prior notice. Printed in Sweden.