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E VERY ROLE X IS MADE FOR G RE ATNE S S . THE YACHT-MA

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The new MOTOROLA RAZR™ is the most captivating Android- powered smartphone on the scene. Watch as heads turn to check out its ultra-thin form and stunning design, while the mind-blowing power of dual-core processing leaves you all aglow. Stream music, pics and more from your home or work computer – anytime, anywhere. In the light of day or dark of night, hyper-vibrant colours keep everything looking beautiful on the Super AMOLED Advanced 4.3” display. Go ahead. Get your hands on it. We won’t tell your other smartphone.

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EDITOR’S LETTER

EDITOR’S LETTER
EDITOR’S LETTER T his magazine is free. You probably know that already, but we just want

T his magazine is free. You probably know that

already, but we just want to remind you in

case someone tries to charge you for it. As you

may or may not have guessed, this issue is dedicated

to consumption; the consumption of ideas, of food, of

fashion, of, well, anything really.

We, of course, are

part of the problem, creating a magazine that (we hope) you want to read each month. So we apologise for taking up even more of

your precious time. So in that spirit, here’s

what’s on offer in our December

issue. If there

was ever a city that sucks in its visitors, it is Vienna. And its most famous son is Mozart, himself no slouch when it came to creating an atmosphere. Kerry Christiani follows in the maestro’s footsteps around the Austrian capital. Brand guru and Time columnist Martin Lindstrom looks at the hidden motives of why we buy. Think synapses, genetics and other subconscious reasoning. It’s fascinating stuff, if a little bit scary. Just remember not to take those waist sizes for granted. It is not just humans that consume – nature does it too. And rarely has the beauty of the earth’s remote edges been captured so vividly as in Garry Simpson’s portraits. From eerie lakes in Texas to Finland’s frozen north, his work is stunning. Enjoy the issue.

CONOR@OPENSKIESMAGAZINE.COM

Emirates takes care to ensure that all facts published herein are correct. In the event
Emirates takes care to ensure that all facts published herein are correct. In
the event of any inaccuracy please contact The Editor.Any opinion expressed
is the honest belief of the author based on all available facts. Comments and
facts should not be relied upon by the reader in taking commercial, legal,
financial or other decisions.Articles are by their nature general and specialist
advice should always be consulted before any actions are taken.
PO Box 2331, Dubai, UAE
Fax:(+971 4) 282 4436
Telephone: (+971 4) 282 4060
Email: emirates@motivate.ae
84,649
COPIES
Printed by Emirates Printing Press, Dubai, UAE

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Obaid Humaid Al Tayer GROUP EDITOR & MANAGING PARTNER Ian Fairservice GROUP SENIOR EDITOR SENIOR EDITOR EDITOR DESIGNER CHIEF SUB EDITOR STAFF WRITER EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Londressa Flores SENIOR PRODUCTION MANAGER S Sunil Kumar PRODUCTION MANAGER C Sudhakar GENERAL MANAGER, GROUP SALES BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER SENIOR ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER ae ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER Murali Narayanan ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER EDITORIAL CONSULTANTS FOR EMIRATES: com CONTRIBUTORS: Axis Maps, COVER ILLUSTRATION by Simone Massoni MASTHEAD DESIGN

INTERNATIONAL MEDIA REPRESENTATIVES: AUSTRALIA/NEW ZEALAND Okeeffe Media, Kevin O’ Keeffe; Tel + 61 89 447 2734, okeeffekev@bigpond.com.au, BENELUXM.P.S. Benelux; Francesco Sutton; Tel +322 720 9799, Fax +322 725 1522, francesco.sutton@mps-adv.com CHINA Publicitas Advertising; Tel +86 10 5879 5885 FRANCE Intermedia Europe Ltd; Fiona Lockie, Katie Allen, Laura Renault; Tel +33 15 534 9550, Fax +33 15 534 9549, administration@intermedia.europe.com GERMANY IMV International Media Service GmbH, Wolfgang Jäger; Tel +49 89 54 590 738, Fax +49 89 54 590 769, wolfgang.jager@iqm.de HONG KONG/MALAYSIA/ THAILAND Sonney Media Networks, Hemant Sonney; Tel +852 27 230 373, Fax +852 27 391 815, hemant@sonneymedia.com INDIA Media Star, Ravi Lalwani; Tel +91 22 4220 2103, Fax +91 22 2283 9619, ravi@mediastar.co.in ITALY IMM Italia Lucia Colucci; Tel +39 023 653 4433, Fax +39 029 998 1376, lucia.colucci@fastwebnet.it JAPAN Tandem Inc.; Tel + 81 3 3541 4166, Fax +81 3 3541 4748, all@tandem-inc.com NETHERLANDS GIO Media, Giovanni Angiolini; Tel +31 6 2223 8420, giovanni@ gio-media.nl SOUTH AFRICA Ndure Dale Isaac; Tel +27 84 701 2479, dale@ndure.co.za SPAIN IMM International, Nicolas Devos; Tel +331 40 1300 30, n.devos@imm- international.com TURKEY Media Ltd.; Tel: +90 212 275 51 52, mediamarketingtr@medialtd.com.tr UK Spafax Inflight Media, Nick Hopkins, Arnold Green; Tel +44 207 906 2001, Fax +44 207 906 2022, nhopkins@spafax.com USA Totem Brand Stories, Brigitte Baron, Marina Chetner; Tel +212 896 3846, Fax +212 896 3848, brigitte. baron@rtotembrandstories.com

CONTENTS

CONTENTS

DECEMBER ����

CONTENTS DECEMBER ���� OUR MAN IN EDMONTON GIVES US THE LOW�DOWN ON THIS REMOTE CANADIAN BOOMTOWN

OUR MAN IN EDMONTON GIVES US THE LOW�DOWN ON THIS

REMOTE CANADIAN BOOMTOWN (P39)

REMOTE CANADIAN BOOMTOWN ( P 3 9 ) WE TAKE A LOOK AT

WE TAKE A LOOK AT

HOLLYWOOD’S BEST FITNESS CLUBS VIA OUR TWITTER PITCH (P43)

HOLLYWOOD ’S BEST FITNESS CLUBS VIA OUR TWITTER PITCH (P43)

MOSCOW GETS MAPPED THIS MONTH AS WE EXPLORE THE RUSSIAN

CAPITAL (P46)

CAPITAL (P46) BRAZILIAN DRUM & BASS LEGEND, DJ MARKY

BRAZILIAN DRUM & BASS LEGEND, DJ MARKY

REVEALS HIS TOP TEN TUNES (P52)

REVEALS HIS TOP TEN TUNES (P52)
REVEALS HIS TOP TEN TUNES (P52)

COPENHAGEN’S COOLEST GET

THE STREET PEEPER TREATMENT (P60)

THE STREET PEEPER TREATMENT (P60) AMSTERDAM ’S RESTAURANT

AMSTERDAM’S RESTAURANT

INDUSTRY HAS BEEN TRANSFORMED COURTESY OF A FORMER

   

WE CHECK OUT SOME OF THE WORLD’S BEST

 
 
 
 

NIGHTCLUB (P64)

 

MAGAZINES IN BOOTY (P66)

MAGAZINES IN BOOTY (P66) KERRY CHRISTIANI GOES ON THE

KERRY CHRISTIANI GOES ON THE

MOZART TRAIL IN VIENNA, ONE OF EUROPE’S MOST BEAUTIFUL

CITIES (P72)

CITIES (P72)
CITIES (P72)
CITIES (P72) GARETH REES EXAMINES THE MICHELIN GUIDE

GARETH REES EXAMINES THE MICHELIN GUIDE

PHENOMENON AND WONDERS IF ITS STAR IS ON THE WANE (P94)

AND WONDERS IF ITS STAR IS ON THE WANE ( P 9 4 ) BRANDING GURU

BRANDING GURU THOMAS LINDSTROM EXAMINES THE GENETICS OF

SHOPPING AND THE SCIENCE BEHIND WHY WE BUY (P106)

SHOPPING AND THE SCIENCE BEHIND WHY WE BUY ( P 1 0 6 ) G A

GARRY

SIMPSONS HAUNTING PICTURES CAPTURE OTHERWORLDLY

CONTRIBUTORS

CONTRIBUTORS
CONTRIBUTORS DJ MARKY: One of South America’s most successful musical exports, this Brazilian drum & bass
DJ MARKY: One of South America’s most successful musical exports, this Brazilian drum & bass

DJ MARKY: One of South America’s most successful musical exports, this Brazilian drum & bass DJ has pioneered the genre in his home country. Both his DJ sets and production work have gained plaudits from fans around the world.

MARTIN LINDSTROM: A columnist for Fast Company and Time magazine, Lindstrom is a best-selling author

MARTIN LINDSTROM: A columnist for Fast Company and Time magazine, Lindstrom is a best-selling author of numerous books on marketing. He was also featured in the Morgan Spurlock documentary, The Greatest Movie Ever Sold.

GARRY SIMPSON: One of the UK’s best photographers, Simpson’s cinematic take on landscapes and people

GARRY SIMPSON: One of the UK’s best photographers, Simpson’s cinematic take on landscapes and people have gained him a worldwide following. His shots of some of the planet’s most distant locations are particularly haunting.

KERRY CHRISTIANI: A travel writer based in Germany who has written for Lonely Planet ,

KERRY CHRISTIANI: A travel writer based in Germany who has written for Lonely Planet, BBC Olive and Frommer’s, as well as authored 20 books. She currently lives in The Black Forest with her photographer husband.

NINA SIEGAL: Nina is the editor of Time Out Amsterdam and has written for publications

NINA SIEGAL: Nina is the editor of Time Out Amsterdam and has written for publications such as The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, W. Magazine and Bloomberg News. Her debut novel, A Little Trouble With The Facts, was published in 2008.

GIRARD-PERREGAUX 1966 Annual Calendar and Equation of Time Pink gold case, sapphire case back, Girard-Perregaux
GIRARD-PERREGAUX 1966 Annual Calendar and Equation of Time Pink gold case, sapphire case back, Girard-Perregaux

GIRARD-PERREGAUX 1966 Annual Calendar and Equation of Time

Pink gold case, sapphire case back, Girard-Perregaux automatic mechanical movement. Annual calendar, equation of time, date, small second.

INTRO

P. historic gluttons P. 62

DUTCH GOLD AMSTERDAM’S CLUB- TURNED-RESTAURANT MAKES WAVES P64
DUTCH
GOLD
AMSTERDAM’S
CLUB-
TURNED-RESTAURANT
MAKES WAVES
P64

IWC Portuguese. Engineered for navigators.

Always on course.

IWC Portuguese. Engineered for navigators. Always on course. Portuguese Yacht Club Chronograph. Ref. 3902: “Please make

Portuguese Yacht Club Chronograph. Ref. 3902: “Please make a U-turn if possible.” The instruments used by sailors in the tradition of Vasco da Gama are less intrusive. One of the legends of navigation is the Portuguese Yacht Club Chronograph. Its IWC-manufactured movement with fly- back function and automatic double-pawl winding guarantees precise landings. And even if you happen to head off in the wrong direction, no one’s going to start nagging you. IWC. Engineered for men.

going to start nagging you. IWC. Engineered for men. Mechanical IWC-manufactured movement (figure) | Flyback

Mechanical IWC-manufactured movement (figure) | Flyback function | Automatic IWC double-pawl winding system | Date display | Antireflective sapphire glass | Sapphire-glass back cover | Water-resistant 6 bar | Stainless steel

back cover | Water-resistant 6 bar | Stainless steel IWC SCHAFFHAUSEN BOUTIQUES: DUBAI MALL – Tel:

IWC SCHAFFHAUSEN BOUTIQUES: DUBAI MALL – Tel: 04 339 8111, BURJUMAN – Tel: 04 355 1717, ABU DHABI MARINA MALL - Tel: 02 681 1557

Ahmed Seddiqi & Sons: Atlantis - Tel: 04 422 0233, Mall of the Emirates – Tel: 04 341 1211, Dubai Duty Free – Tel Toll Free: 800 - 4443 Rivoli Prestige: Abu Dhabi Mall – Tel: 02 645 6220

OUR MAN IN EDMONTON CANADA’S OIL CAPITAL IS ONE OF ITS MOST PARADOXICAL CITIES Y

OUR MAN IN

EDMONTON

CANADA’S OIL CAPITAL IS ONE OF ITS MOST PARADOXICAL CITIES

Y ou can tell a lot about a place from its traffic – and the capital city of Canada’s

second westernmost province is no exception. On any given Friday night, Jasper Avenue – Edmonton’s main nightlife artery – is choked with brand-new pickup trucks driven by newly well-to-do blue collar men in their early 20s. Some are there for the weekend or on holiday from the northern oil and gas boomtown of Fort McMurray. Others work downstream from the oil sands in ‘Refinery Row’ in the eastern suburb of Sherwood Park. All, however, have come to symbolise the ever-growing affluence of Canada’s ‘Oil Capital’ – a laissez-faire city where just about anything goes, provided you don’t criticise the oil sands. Alberta’s oil sands (also known pejoratively as the ‘Tar Sands’) are a formidable presence in every sense. Physically, the bitumen deposits situated under Alberta’s northern boreal forests are enormous, occupying a land mass roughly the size of Bangladesh and containing the world’s largest proven oil reserves after Saudi Arabia. In

economic terms they have turned Canada into a veritable oil and gas superpower and given Alberta a per-capita GDP higher than all 50 US states. Unsurprisingly, international criticism of the province’s energy industry has become a decidedly sensitive matter. And nowhere is this truer than in Edmonton, a city whose mercurial economic fortunes have paralleled those of Alberta’s oil industry, and whose growing stature has in large part been made possible by the scarred, oil-rich real estate to the north of the city. Alberta’s capital city is a paradoxical place. Founded in 1795 as a northern fur trading post, Edmonton emerged as a transportation gateway to northern Canada in the early 20th century, first to the diamond mines of the North-west Territories and later to Alberta’s burgeoning energy industry. To this day, Edmonton is seen more as a transit point than a destination, overshadowed at every turn by its flashier twin, Calgary, the province’s corporate and tourism hub. And yet the city surprises. Nestled around a leafy bend in the

Saskatchewan River, Edmonton is home to 40 different arts and culture festivals, including its world- renowned Fringe and Folk Festivals. Its population is increasingly diverse, with a recent influx of immigrants from Africa and the country’s fastest growing Aboriginal population giving this once- predominantly European city an increasingly multicultural flavour. Tolerance extends only so far however. Controversy erupted earlier this year when it transpired that a documentary that criticised the exploitation of the oil sands had been funded in part by the Alberta government, leading the city’s normally mild mannered journalists and citizenry to cry blue murder. Renowned Canadian humourist and Calgary native Will Ferguson once described his fellow Albertans as “a hospitable bunch as long as you don’t push your luck.” Nowhere does this better apply than to Edmonton – an oddly high-brow yet fundamentally blue collar metropolis where a live-and-let-live spirit prevails, so long as the city’s sacred economic cow is accorded its due respect.

city’s sacred economic cow is accorded its due respect. Benjamin Freeland is a writer based in

Benjamin Freeland is a writer based in Edmonton, Canada. You can follow him at: www.twitter.com/benfreeland

GRAPH

INFORMATION ELEGANCE

ILLUSTRATION: CATARINA ATUNES

4141

DUBAI - Baume & Mercier Boutique, Dubai Mall, T: 04 339 8880. Ahmed Seddiqi &
DUBAI - Baume & Mercier Boutique, Dubai Mall, T: 04 339 8880. Ahmed Seddiqi &
DUBAI - Baume & Mercier Boutique, Dubai Mall, T: 04 339 8880. Ahmed Seddiqi &

DUBAI - Baume & Mercier Boutique, Dubai Mall, T: 04 339 8880. Ahmed Seddiqi & Sons - Mall of the Emirates, T: 04 341 1211 - Burjuman Mall, T: 04 355 1717 - Atlantis Hotel, T: 04 422 0233 - Mirdif City Centre, T: 04 284 3100 - Festival City, T: 04 232 9222 - Wafi City, T: 04 324 6060. ABU DHABI - Al Manara Jewellery - Hamdan Street, T: 02 626 2629. Ahmed Seddiqi & Sons - Marina Mall, T: 02 681 1171.

ABU DHABI - Al Manara Jewellery - Hamdan Street, T: 02 626 2629. Ahmed Seddiqi &
ABU DHABI - Al Manara Jewellery - Hamdan Street, T: 02 626 2629. Ahmed Seddiqi &

TWITTER PITCH

LOS ANGELES

HEALTH CLUBS

Every month we profile a number of venues in a different city, country or continent. The catch? The companies must be on Twitter and must tell us in their own words what makes them so special. This month, we feature Los Angeles health clubs. If you want to get involved, follow us at:

www.twitter.com/openskiesmag

to get involved, follow us at: www.twitter.com/openskiesmag Barry’s Bootcamp Gold’s Gym Health, fitness,
to get involved, follow us at: www.twitter.com/openskiesmag Barry’s Bootcamp Gold’s Gym Health, fitness,

Barry’s

Bootcamp

us at: www.twitter.com/openskiesmag Barry’s Bootcamp Gold’s Gym Health, fitness, motivation and strength

Gold’s

Gym

Health, fitness, motivation and

strength

What are you #StrongerThan?

www.twitter.com/goldsgym

Get in shape and burn fat 9 times faster, with Barry’s Bootcamp! The exercise secret of Hollywood’s biggest stars. www.twitter.com/BarrysBootcamp

Pink

Iron

Hollywood’s premier women’s gym! For all women, all ages, shapes, and sizes. www.twitter.com/pinkiron

Pilates

Plus

Effective pilates in the heart of Downtown. 845 S Broadway, Downtown Los Angeles. www.twitter.com/ppspx

all in 140 characters or less.

City

Yoga

Established in 1999. Our experienced teachers provide skilled instruction for students of all levels to practice in a vibrant, friendly environment. www.twitter.com/CityYogaLA

BOOKED

BOOKED FREDERICK EXLEY — A FAN’S NOTES ROOM 208 THE GRAND HYATT DOHA, QATAR INTERNET SPEED:

FREDERICK EXLEY — A FAN’S NOTES

BOOKED FREDERICK EXLEY — A FAN’S NOTES ROOM 208 THE GRAND HYATT DOHA, QATAR INTERNET SPEED:
ROOM 208 THE GRAND HYATT DOHA, QATAR INTERNET SPEED: 1MB, Free PILLOWS: Four IPOD DOCK:
ROOM
208
THE GRAND HYATT
DOHA, QATAR
INTERNET SPEED: 1MB, Free
PILLOWS: Four
IPOD DOCK: Yes
CLUB SANDWICH DELIVERY TIME:
21 minutes
COMPLIMENTARY SNACKS: Tea &
coffee, breakfast, evening drinks
TOILETRY BRAND: Pure
Doha is not the most exciting city in
the region, despite its cultural
ambitions, and the Grand Hyatt fits
in a little too well here. The property
itself is fine, but no more than that
– the grounds are what you would
expect, and the private beach is only
usable four months of the year. Its
location does not help; a good 30
D A I LY N EW S PAPER: The Peninsula
EXTRAS: CD/DVD player
TV CHANNELS: 48
BUSINESS CENTRE: Yes
VIEW: 1/5
RATE: From $370
D OHA.GRAND.HYATT.COM
minutes from the airport and most
of the city’s attractions. There are
pluses: the breakfast buffet is
delicious; the service impeccable.
The rooms were nice without being
mind-blowing and overall it is what
you would expect – a decent hotel.
One element worth mentioning is
Isaan, which serves some of the best
Thai food we have tasted in the
region. Unfortunately though, this
is the lone bright spot in what is
ultimately a very average hotel,

Y es, this is a memoir, a book about this writer’s troubled life. But A Fan’s Notes is

touched by a mad genius that sets

it apart from almost every other

book in the genre. Exley is a magical

writer. Some of his sentences take the breath away and his narrative pulses along manically. The book chronicles Exley’s decent into mental illness, shock therapy and alcoholism as he tries – and fails

Parallel to Exley’s tribulations runs his obsession with New York Giants star, Frank Gifford. In Exley’s zero sum world, life is divided between the misfits (himself) and the conformists (Gifford). He travels in

a

of chronic drunks, of the insane, each step forward met with five steps back. Yet Exley is touched with genius; he writes like an angel; his portrayals are vivid, sharp, and hilarious; sucker punch portraits of the conmen, rubes and mad men he lives, works and drinks with. Those expecting a happy ending will be disappointed, but this is not a book that disappoints in any other way. The best book you have never heard

to capture the American dream.

world of sallow-faced deadbeats,

of. Harper & Row, 1968

book you have never heard to capture the American dream. world of sallow-faced deadbeats, of. Harper

MAPPED

MOSCOW

Money makes the world go round and this is no more true than in Moscow;
Money makes the world go round and this is no
more true than in Moscow; brimming with high-
spending oligarchs who punish their plastic in
the city’s designer stores, stylish restaurants
and cool clubs, it can be hard for mere mortals
to keep up. Tremayne Carew Pole explores the
frenetic Russian capital.
WWW.HG2.COM
HOTELS
1. Ararat Park
Hyatt
2. Hotel National
3. Mamaison All-Suites
Spa Hotel Pokrovka
4. Golden Apple
RESTAURANTS
�. Café Pushkin
6. Galereya
7. Kvartira 44
8. CDL Restaurant
BARS / CLUBS 9. City Space Bar and Lounge 10. Club Che 11. Garage 12.

BARS / CLUBS 9. City Space Bar and Lounge 9. City Space Bar and Lounge

10. Club Che

11. Garage

12. Soho Rooms

GALLERIES 13. Tretyakov Gallery 13. Tretyakov Gallery

14. Zurab Tsereteli Art Gallery

15. Diehl + Gallery One

16. Garage Centre for Contemporary Culture

MAPPED

MOSCOW

HOTELS 1 ARARAT PARK HYATT 2 HOTEL NATIONAL 3 MAMAISON ALL-SUITES 4 GOLDEN APPLE Its
HOTELS
1 ARARAT PARK HYATT
2 HOTEL NATIONAL
3 MAMAISON ALL-SUITES
4 GOLDEN APPLE
Its prime location and
impeccable service makes
this five-star hotel an
easy favourite. Despite its
marbled pillars and grand
exterior, its 216 rooms are
ultra-contemporary and
extremely spacious.
Built in 1903 and now
restored to its pre-
revolution glory, the
SPA HOTEL POKROVKA
National is an eclectic
mix
of classical and style-
moderne. Expect high
ceilings, fine dining, and a
great view of the Kremlin.
This glamorous boutique
hotel features Art Deco
interiors and sleek
furnishings. And let’s not
forget the spa facilities –
the sauna, Turkish baths
and pool are legendary.
Kitschy and fun, this
boutique hotel boasts a
19th-century façade but a
modern and minimalist
interior. The staff are
dressed in designer black
to juxtapose the hotel’s
colour-coded floors.
RESTAURANTS 5 CAFÉ PUSHKIN 6 GALEREYA 7 KVARTIRA 44 8 CDL RESTAURANT Feel like a
RESTAURANTS
5 CAFÉ PUSHKIN
6 GALEREYA
7 KVARTIRA 44
8 CDL RESTAURANT
Feel like a Russian
aristocrat circa 1825 at
Moscow’s most legendary
literary café. Open 24
hours a day, it attracts
hipsters and businessmen
alike. The dessert platter
is not to be missed.
The most exclusive
restaurant in town. The
rich and famous can
be found feasting on
an eclectic menu of
European fusion. Don’t
even bother showing up
without a reservation.
Chilled by day and
crowded by night, this
cosy ex-apartment is
popular with trendy
Muscovites. Café fare and
home-style Russian food
is served with live music
on during the weekends.
Adorned with crystal
chandeliers and
fireplaces, this mansion is
the grandest dining room
in Moscow. Its menu
offers Russian classics
such as pelmeni, fish stew
and rabbit stroganoff.
BARS/CLUBS 9 CITY SPACE BAR AND LOUNGE 10 CLUB CHE 11 GARAGE 12 SOHO ROOMS
BARS/CLUBS
9 CITY SPACE BAR
AND LOUNGE
10 CLUB CHE
11 GARAGE
12 SOHO ROOMS
Perched on top of the
Swissôtel, this bar offers
breathtaking 360-degree
views. Enjoy a cocktail
menu of Russian classics
and mixology creations
amidst pumping music.
A club as legendary as its
namesake, this lively bar/
club/restaurant serves
arguably what is the best
mojito in the city. Tequila
girls, salsa music and a
small dance floor makes
for a crazy night out.
Open 24/7, the car-
themed Garage is where
you’ll find revellers
partying through the
night, every night. Its
R&B parties and ‘fight
club’ nights make for a
truly decadent weekend.
Beautiful people, great
music and a strict door
policy – this exclusive
venue has it all. The
restaurant is known for
haute cuisine, but it’s the
rooftop pool that attracts
Moscow’s elite.
GALLERIES 13 TRETYAKOV GALLERY 14 ZURAB TSERETELI 15 DIEHL + GALLERY ONE 16 This castle
GALLERIES
13
TRETYAKOV GALLERY
14
ZURAB TSERETELI
15
DIEHL + GALLERY ONE
16
This castle houses the
world’s best repository
of Russian art. Allow at
least half a day to soak in
masterpieces such as Ilya
Repin’s Ivan the Terrible,
and Rublyov’s revered
Holy Trinity.
ART GALLERY
Preserves the genius of
Zurab Tsereteli, a Russian
contemporary artist.
Massive bronze sculptures,
enamel panels and
graphic paintings vie for
space throughout.
Owned by respected
Berlin-based dealer Volker
Diehl, contemporary
Russian and Asian artists
feature in this small but
succinct collection of
paintings and sculptures
with an international twist.
GARAGE CENTER FOR
CONTEMPORARY CULTURE
The brainchild of Russian
socialite Dasha Zhukova,
this ex-bus depot has
become a hub of modern
Soviet constructivism.
Regular workshops, talks and
performances are held here.

FLICK

CELLULOID DISSECTED

FLICK CELLULOID DISSECTED W e tend to think of the movie industry as a hotbed of

W e tend to think of the movie industry as a hotbed of capitalist

consumerism, existing purely to wring vast profits from the

general populace in return for

a few hours of entertainment.

Indeed, we appear happy to put up

with this as long as it remains an open and acknowledged truism

– we throw down the cash, they

serve us our regular fix of whizz- bang escapism. Fine. At least we’re all on the same page here, right?

Well, maybe. We certainly used to be: during Hollywood’s early golden age of the 1930s to 1940s, government censorship and the rigid studio system held down by the ‘big five’ (Paramount, Warner Bros, RKO,

Fox, MGM) meant that any silver screen subversion of the West’s push towards a consumer-driven utopia could be easily quashed. However, skip forward a few decades and the movie landscape looks very different. Since the mid-1970s, anti-capitalist themes have reoccurred not only in the independent film sector; bizarrely, mainstream Hollywood is increasingly tolerant of them. Why? Ironically, it turns out they’re an excellent way to spin a big fat profit. There have always been films whose central premise condemned rampant greed as immoral (It’s A Wonderful Life being a prime early example). With the frenzied spending boom of the 1980s,

resentment towards corporate- fronted runaway consumerism in less binary forms began to surface more regularly. Sometimes these sentiments were the clear basis for an entire movie (Fight Club, Erin Brockovich, American Beauty), while others opted for more subtle comment, pitched at audiences who may not spot the subtext (Dawn Of The Dead, WALL-E). Among the more recent blockbusters, Avatar provides a particularly fascinating case study. Upon its release, director James Cameron was accused of having made a film that was anti-corporate, anti-military, and even anti- American. This wasn’t a particularly radical reading of it, either:

FIGHT CLUB HOLLYWOOD’ AND THE MYTH OF THE CONSUMER BY MARK POWELL Cameron’s tale of
FIGHT CLUB HOLLYWOOD’ AND THE MYTH OF THE CONSUMER BY MARK POWELL
FIGHT CLUB
HOLLYWOOD’ AND THE MYTH
OF THE CONSUMER
BY MARK POWELL
HOLLYWOOD’ AND THE MYTH OF THE CONSUMER BY MARK POWELL Cameron’s tale of unscrupulous humans destroying
HOLLYWOOD’ AND THE MYTH OF THE CONSUMER BY MARK POWELL Cameron’s tale of unscrupulous humans destroying

Cameron’s tale of unscrupulous humans destroying the native Na’vi culture to mine precious minerals on far-flung Pandora was clearly and unapologetically analogous to numerous recent global conflicts, many of which are widely cited as driving the interests of shady multinational corporations. And yet, talking of big business, Avatar quickly became the first film ever to take more than $2 billion at the box office. It’s been clear for years that Western cinema audiences have developed a taste for anti-capitalist sentiment in the movies – what Avatar made even clearer is that we’ll gladly line the coffers of an already spectacularly rich and powerful industry in order to get our fix.

In other words, it starts to look as though we’re getting our dual roles as movie consumers and social critics very muddled indeed. So what’s really happening here? Is it as simple as saying Hollywood has noticed our addiction to anti-consumerist dogma and called our bluff by selling it back to us at a premium? There is surely an element of knee- jerk opportunism underpinning this. However, a more intriguing (if also more depressing) theory claims that even our most overtly ‘anti- consumerist’ films might not be doing at all what we think they are. Rather, by openly critiquing capitalist-driven models of society while failing to offer any viable alternative, they instead send us scurrying for the

next best option: a conscious effort to consume in a way that disassociates us from the herd. In other words, by functioning more as critiques of mass society than of consumerism, these films are in fact sowing the seeds of competitive consumerism. This theory states that it doesn’t matter which end of the consumer scale we align ourselves with; that the choices we make will become mainstream, and when they do, we go in search of the next thing. If the concept of ‘rebellious’ consumerism serves corporate interests as effectively as mass conformity, perhaps the first rule of Fight Club should simply have been “don’t watch it”. We’re pretty sure the Tyler Durden, would approve.

of Fight Club should simply have been “don’t watch it”. We’re pretty sure the Tyler Durden,

SKYPOD

BRAZILIAN DRUM & BASS ICON DJ MARKY

LOU-ISE — GABOR SZABO A proper Jazz groove, recorded live in Boston in 1967. This
LOU-ISE —
GABOR SZABO
A proper Jazz groove,
recorded live in Boston
in 1967. This track is
pure art.
DINORAH DINORAH — IVAN LINS A classic Ivan Lins track, recorded by the mighty George
DINORAH DINORAH —
IVAN LINS
A classic Ivan Lins track,
recorded by the mighty
George Benson.

HTTP://SOUNDCLOUD.COM/DJ-MARKY

ZÉ CANJICA — JORGE BEN & TRIO MOCOTÓ Definitely my favourite Brazilian singer. This track
ZÉ CANJICA —
JORGE BEN & TRIO MOCOTÓ
Definitely my favourite Brazilian
singer. This track represents a lot
to me. I remember my parents
playing this tune every single
New Year’s Eve in Brazil.
NEM O MAR SABIA — LUIZ CARLOS VINHAS Luiz Carlos Vinhas was a fantastic Brazilian
NEM O MAR SABIA —
LUIZ CARLOS VINHAS
Luiz Carlos Vinhas was a fantastic
Brazilian Bossa Nova pianist and
this track always gives me goose
bumps. Many incredible musicians
played in this track including Raul
de Souza on the trombone and the
famous Brazilian drummer,
Edison Machado.
MIDNIGHT AT THE OASIS —
MARIA MULDAUR
As soon as my mum bought
this record I fell in love with it
straightaway. It’s a great folk song
and reminds me of the beach and
of coconut water and holidays!
Her voice makes me feel
so relaxed.

ILLUSTRATION: NISHIKAWA MAIKO

DO IT GOOD — A TASTE OF HONEY When I heard this tune I told
DO IT GOOD —
A TASTE OF HONEY
When I heard this tune I told
my mum that I wanted to go to
the disco, but unfortunately I
was too young. The groove of
this track is simply incredible.
A true Disco-Funk classic.
WILD TIMES [CHOICE MIX] — DE-LITE A classic House track in Brazil. I used to
WILD TIMES [CHOICE MIX]
— DE-LITE
A classic House track in Brazil.
I used to play this track all the
time and it brings to mind one
of the greatest DJs in Brazil: DJ
Ricardo Guedes.
RAPPIN’ — KURTIS BLOW I love Rappers Delight by The Sugarhill Gang but when I
RAPPIN’ —
KURTIS BLOW
I love Rappers Delight by The
Sugarhill Gang but when I
first heard this track at my
sister’s birthday party back
in 1980, it blew my mind. A
proper party tune!
EVEN IF — CALIBRE Dominick Martin, aka Calibre, is my favourite drum & bass producer.
EVEN IF — CALIBRE
Dominick Martin, aka
Calibre, is my favourite drum
& bass producer. The lyrics
are incredible and the vocal
– his own – is beautiful. I
always play this track.
YELLOW SHOES — DJ MARKY & S.P.Y It’s difficult to say something about this track,
YELLOW SHOES —
DJ MARKY & S.P.Y
It’s difficult to say something
about this track, other than
it means a lot to me. This
is specially dedicated to a
special person!

ILLUSTRATION BY VESNA PESIC

ILLUSTRATION BY VESNA PESIC LOCAL VOICES THE MANY SHADES OF CONSUMERISM MAKING THE CHOICE AWARENESS OF

LOCAL VOICES

THE MANY SHADES OF CONSUMERISM

MAKING THE CHOICE

AWARENESS OF HOW AND WHY WE CONSUME IS THE FIRST STEP TO A BETTER LIFE SAYS WAEL AL SAYEGH

T he word ‘consume’ derives from the Latin consumere, with the literal meaning

‘to take completely’. Nowadays an immediate association is made with malls and high streets full of shops and their contents, but there are other aspects of consumption that are worthy of attention. Not least of these are the effects that different kinds of consumption can produce, and the difference between active consumption and being ‘consumed’ by the things we own and the emotions we experience. Over-consumption of food, combined with a lack of physical exercise, creates the prominent modern-day problem of obesity in the world’s better-off regions. For example, it’s not uncommon in Dubai, where it’s cheap to eat out but often too hot to do much walking, to see physically fit newcomers gain a ‘Dubai Pound’ or two in weight.

Whether their consumption is of high-fat, fast food or rich gourmet repasts, too much indulgence results in a loss of fitness. A side effect of obesity is that it can also impair mental agility. Exercise leading to oxygenation of the brain has been shown to improve clear thinking. And, of course, in Dubai one can ‘consume’ the services offered by the many gyms, dance studios, yoga classes and other activities to counteract the effects of over-indulgence. The notion of consumption also describes less tangible things. TV programmes are ‘consumed’, often mindlessly, and they are grist to the mill of how we feel and think about the world. Endless consumption of news channels, for example, can lead to a cynical view that sees only suffering, corruption, starvation, rioting or war. Whereas watching nothing but game shows and other

easily digested offerings might dull

the mind’s critical faculties, or numb

it to the very real problems there are

in the world. Then again, programmes with a theme of discovery and

intellectual quest, or an uplifting story, real or fictional, can provoke

a desire in their audiences to seek a

better way of living, and all for the price of a movie theatre ticket or a satellite TV subscription fee. We live in a time where remote controls and digital dials can be as powerful as tanks and warplanes. The music we

listen to has a noticeable influence on mood and emotions, consciously and subconsciously. In an exercise class, an upbeat melody and rhythm encourage vigorous activity. Relaxation, on the other hand, demands something cooler, calmer, and soothing. Some claim that listening to music with lyrics glorifying violence, alcohol and drug abuse can pull the listener unwittingly into a milieu they did not plan to be involved with. Music with certain rhythms and beats mixed with

empowering words can have a huge motivational effect. It’s sometimes used to treat depression, getting people’s hands pumping the air with the excitement of new potential. Our possessions can occupy a large part of our consciousness. The cars, houses, jewellery, clothes, shoes, watches, the holidays we take, and the general desire to ‘keep up’ in the consumption stakes, obtaining the latest trade-marked clothes or the newest gadgets, provide short-term joy and satisfaction.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF GLUTTONS

1809 While at Cambridge Charles Darwin was President of the Glutton Club, which met once
1809
While at Cambridge
Charles Darwin was
President of the
Glutton Club, which
met once a week to eat
‘strange flesh’. He tried
hawk, owl, armadillo
and once, an unnamed
20lb brown rodent. All
in the name of science,
you understand.
1856 Millionaire ‘Gilded Age’ entrepreneur and American glutton extraordinaire Diamond Jim Brady made his
1856
Millionaire ‘Gilded
Age’ entrepreneur
and American glutton
extraordinaire
Diamond Jim Brady
made his millions from
the railway business,
but made headlines for
his massive appetite.
Apparently fond of
multl-course steak
and fish breakfasts,
after his death doctors
discovered a stomach
six times larger than a
normal human’s.
1887
1887
Fatty Arbuckle was the highest paid actor in the world at one time, and also
Fatty Arbuckle was the
highest paid actor in
the world at one time,
and also had a fond-
ness for food, women
and, er, more food.
Named ‘Baloonatic’
by his fans, he died of
a heart attack at 46,
plagued by scandals.
1924 Once Hollywood’s most celebrated leading man, Marlon Brando was eating peanut butter by the
1924
Once Hollywood’s
most celebrated
leading man, Marlon
Brando was eating
peanut butter by the
jarful as early as 1950
(when he was only
26). He would go on
crash diets before his
movies, but as he got
older, even these
measures stopped
working and his
weight ballooned. A
giant of the cinema in
more ways than one.

But this conspicuous consumption may also lead to disillusionment, dissatisfaction, and even to longer- term despair, particularly if these things are purchased with credit beyond the means to repay. Strong emotions can be all consuming. Love, hate, anger, fear, disappointment, these skew our behaviour and, left uncontrolled, distort our relations with the world and with those we love. Experts in ‘emotional intelligence’ believe that the states of love and happiness stem

not from an absence of negative emotions, but from harnessing the force of positive ones to take us on a powerful journey where we are in control of events rather than being controlled by our emotions. Obsession with the past or with the future can also consume the mind and emotions. Constant preoccupation with what has occurred in the past, or becoming lost in anticipation of the future, leaves us at odds with the here and now. Too much concern for a perceived

LOCAL VOICES

‘better’ past removes value from people and events in the present. Too much regret for past mistakes burdens us with a guilt that can prevent us from learning by them and moving on. Worry about the future can also stultify progress in the here and now. The American self-help guru Anthony Robbins says that “a compelling future is the food on which our souls thrive.” Focusing on the possible negatives in the future eats up our time and energy. Awareness is where it all starts.

up our time and energy. Awareness is where it all starts. 1935 Probably the most famous
1935 Probably the most famous glutton of all, Elvis Presley got through at least 10,000
1935
Probably the most
famous glutton of all,
Elvis Presley got
through at least 10,000
calories per day; some
of his favourite ‘snacks’
including barbecued
spaghetti, peanut
butter and deep-fried
white bread. He died
sitting on the toilet.
1978 1985 1999 Japanese nutjob Takeru Kobayashi trav- els the world eating as much as
1978
1985
1999
Japanese nutjob
Takeru Kobayashi trav-
els the world eating as
much as he can, as fast
as he can. Despite his
small size, he can put
away 69 hot dogs in ten
minutes and is the best
‘competitive
eater’ in
the world. His mother
must be proud.
Michael Phelps is a
swimming legend.
He is also a legend of
gluttony; typically eat-
ing more than 12,000
calories per day, includ-
ing chocolate-chip
pancakes, a five-egg
omelette, French toast
and two cups of coffee
(and that’s just for
breakfast). Of course, he
gets away with this due
to his six-hour a day
workouts. Don’t try this
at home kids.
Dzhambik Khatokhov
is 12 years old, weighs
more than 146kg and
is determined to win a
gold medal for Russia
at the Olympics. His
wrestling trainer strug-
gles to find partners
for him, and some
doubt whether he will
live long enough to
compete. His mother is
unrepentant: “He is just
growing – upwards and
outwards. What can I do
about it?”
It’s time to nurture. Hassan Abdulmagied Ahmed Seddiqi, Vice President of Human Resources, joined the
It’s time to nurture. Hassan Abdulmagied Ahmed Seddiqi, Vice President of Human Resources, joined the

It’s time to nurture.

Hassan Abdulmagied Ahmed Seddiqi, Vice President of Human Resources, joined the company in 2007 and has implemented several Human Resource initiatives that has resulted in a variety of internal growth opportunities for new and existing employees.

seddiqi.com

initiatives that has resulted in a variety of internal growth opportunities for new and existing employees.

MY TRAVELLED LIFE

ROBERTO CAVALLI, 71, DESIGNER

INTERVIEW

MY TRAVELLED LIFE ROBERTO CAVALLI, 71, DESIGNER INTERVIEW ON TRAVEL Travelling is an essential part of
MY TRAVELLED LIFE ROBERTO CAVALLI, 71, DESIGNER INTERVIEW ON TRAVEL Travelling is an essential part of

ON TRAVEL

Travelling is an essential part of my life.

I have collections to design, product lines

being added to the Cavalli brand, as well as boutiques and clubs opening all over the world. However, I use the world around me as my inspiration. When I am designing, I try to use things and places that I have seen as inspiration. Travelling gives me piece of mind as well as inspiration.

ON THE SEA
ON THE SEA

I absolutely love the sea; the Mediterranean is

simply spectacular. I love to explore coastlines

in my dinghy, that’s when I’m completely at peace with the world

that’s when I’m completely at peace with the world ON PHOTOGRAPHY Photography is one of my

ON PHOTOGRAPHY

Photography is one of my great loves, I’m not

a professional photographer of course, but

I’m always taking pictures to remember the beauty I see. The prints in my Roberto Cavalli Collection are usually inspired by some of the photos that I have taken.

ON LOVE
ON LOVE

I remember going on holiday when I was

very young, before I was married. I set out

on a small boat from Tuscany and ended up

sailing to Turkey. If I remember correctly, at the time I was absolutely crazy about a girl

I met there. What an amazing trip that was.

ON EXPLORATION
ON EXPLORATION

I’m a very curious person by nature, and I am always open to trying new experiences.

I love going to new places, somewhere less

obvious to the everyday traveller. Places such as Antarctica or Papua New Guinea are fascinating to me.

as Antarctica or Papua New Guinea are fascinating to me. ON PACKING LIGHT I don’t really

ON PACKING LIGHT

I don’t really worry about packing when

I go away; I like to keep it very simple. I make sure that I always pack jeans, T-shirts, black or white shirts, my boots and my digital camera. I also make sure that when travelling I wear comfortable clothes. Comfort is the most important thing.

comfortable clothes. Comfort is the most important thing. ON RETROSPECTION If I could give any advice

ON RETROSPECTION

If I could give any advice to my younger self, it would be to always believe in myself. That is the most important thing. When you are not sure, you show weakness. To be strong you have to show your power, not muscle power but brainpower. If you shoot people with the energy of your mind you become something special.

power, not muscle power but brainpower. If you shoot people with the energy of your mind
power, not muscle power but brainpower. If you shoot people with the energy of your mind

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61

PLACE

ARCHITECTURE

MAPPED

SELFRIDGES DEPARTMENT STORE

PHOTO: ROHIT MATTOO
PHOTO: ROHIT MATTOO

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STORE

URBAN CARTOGRAPHY MAZZO AMSTERDAM RESTAURANT

I f there’s any one group that

has defined a signature look

for Amsterdam’s culinary

culture in the past decade, it’s that of architectural design firm Concrete and restaurant developer IQ Creative. Their joint credits include some of the city’s iconic venues: Supperclub, Nomads, Envy, Vyne, Nevy and Heinekenhoek. These have a somewhat distinctive look: minimalist chic with industrial elements such as raw steel or exposed piping, mixed with high-end design chairs or lamps. They work from the inside out, starting with a lifestyle concept and building the visual elements, the menu, the service philosophy, and the overall feel of the place around that idea. So when Concrete director Rob Wagemans was asked by IQ Creative to develop a concept for a restaurant in the former disco Mazzo, he set out to solve a very Amsterdam problem. In a city of compact apartments, with living rooms that can just barely fit a couch and a coffee table, where can people just hang out with friends?

“We wanted to create a kind of living room for the neighbourhood,” says Wagemans, “It should be a space that is busy from morning to night, and if you want to have lunch at 3pm or 11pm, that shouldn’t be a problem. You can also just be there all day and have one cup of coffee and no one will bother you.” The model for the space already existed in the Concrete/IQ oeuvre: Brasserie

for the space already existed in the Concrete/IQ oeuvre: Brasserie TEXT: NINA SIEGAL/IMAGE: EWOUT HUIBERS WWW.EWOUT.TV

TEXT: NINA SIEGAL/IMAGE: EWOUT HUIBERS WWW.EWOUT.TV

Witteveen, a French restaurant in the De Pjip district. With its open-plan design, long banks

Witteveen, a French restaurant in the De Pjip district. With its open-plan design, long banks of Chesterfield sofas, inexpensive meals and breakfast, lunch and dinner served all day, Witteveen was incredibly popular because it filled a gap in Amsterdam’s cultural scene that no one knew needed to be filled. At Mazzo, they swapped the menu from French to Italian, focusing on thin-crust pizzas and espresso drinks, and used one wall of the space to build a giant pine cupboard, in which they could store all the ingredients they use in the kitchen, such as extra virgin olive oils, coffee beans and bags of risotto. They brought in the Chesterfield sofas and spider lamps, day-long menu and many of the other elements that made Witteveen successful. Exposed brick, drywall and piping, blackboard walls (on which notes and menu ideas are scrawled) and long wooden tables that can be shared with strangers, added to an informal, living room vibe. To link the new restaurant to Amsterdam’s cool clubbing past, they kept the name Mazzo, which they emblazoned in giant amusement park lights on the wall, making the space feel instantly iconic. It’s the sister of Witteveen,” says Wagemans, who says he’s planning to add more locations. “Maybe in Amsterdam, maybe in some other city; I can’t tell you that yet.”

maybe in some other city; I can’t tell you that yet.” Mazzo, Rozengracht 114, Amsterdam (020)

Mazzo, Rozengracht 114, Amsterdam (020) 344 64 02; www.mazzoamsterdam.nl

65

BOOTY GLOBAL WE FLICK THROUGH SOME OF THE W0RLD’S BEST MAGAZINES. 2 1 4
BOOTY
GLOBAL
WE FLICK THROUGH
SOME OF THE W0RLD’S
BEST MAGAZINES.
2
1
4

1

2

3

Apartamento Innovative interiors mag from Spain.

Esquire España The best Esquire covers in the world.

Brownbook Culture from around the Middle East.

apartamentomagazine.com

www.esquire.es

www.brownbook.me

4

5

6

Fantastic Man

Dapper Dan

Green Soccer Journal

Dutch men’s ‘zine

Spirited Greek

An irreverant, stylish

with a difference.

fashion journal.

look at football.

www.fantasticman.com

www.dapperdanmagazine.com

thegreensoccerjournal.com

3 5 6
3
5
6

7

Worn Quirky fashion mag from Toronto.

www.wornjournal.com

10

Tiger Huge, crazy fashion from Barcelona.

www.tigermagazine.com

8

It’s Nice That A celebration of all things nice. Love it.

www.itsnicethat.com

11

Smith Journal New men’s magazine from Melbourne.

www.smithjournal.com.au

9

VMAN High-end men’s style from New York.

www.vman.com

12

Oyster Aussie fashion and hipness from Sydney.

http://oystermag.com

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WWW.RADO.COM

WWW.RADO.COM
WWW.RADO.COM
WWW.RADO.COM

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UAE NATIONAL DAY

The Emirates celebrates 40 years of independence in style. www.en.uaenationalday.ae
The Emirates celebrates 40 years of
independence in style.
www.en.uaenationalday.ae

H20 FESTIVAL

The 15th year of the hip hop and dance festival in Paris. www.festival-h2o.com
The 15th year of the hip hop and
dance festival in Paris.
www.festival-h2o.com

DIFF

The Dubai Film Festival kicks off. www.dubaifilmfest.com
The Dubai Film Festival kicks off.
www.dubaifilmfest.com

CHRISTMAS DAY

A day of celebration aroud the world with friends and family.
A day of celebration aroud the
world with friends and family.

NEW YEAR’S EVE NYC

Ring in the new year in Times Square with the masses. newyearsevecentral.com/newyork
Ring in the new year in Times Square
with the masses.
newyearsevecentral.com/newyork

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P. 94

GARRY SIMPSON’S OTHERWORLDLY PORTRAITS P118
GARRY
SIMPSON’S
OTHERWORLDLY
PORTRAITS
P118

ON the

MOzart

trail in

vienna

Mozart found freedom, love and success in Vienna. Kerry Christiani follows in his footsteps to opulent Hapsburg palaces, coffee houses and concert halls where – more than 250 years since his death – his music and legacy live on

PHOTO: KIM ERLANDSEN

73

MOZART

N o other Austrian composer has captured the world’s imagination like Mozart. In his prolific 35-year life, Amadeus rocked

the musical world with some 600 compositions, spanning every major genre from symphonies to opera, concertos to chamber music. He gave new meaning to the 18th-century Classical style and dazzled the world with his creative genius. Born in a cramped apartment in Salzburg’s old town in 1756, Mozart was the ultimate wunderkind. He identified a pig’s squeal as G sharp aged two, could play the clavier by the age of three and was composing minor works by the age of five. His father Leopold, a concertmaster at the archiepiscopal court, was quick to spot and promote little Wolfgang’s talents. At the tender age of six Mozart performed for an enraptured Empress Maria Theresa in Vienna and, before long, every palace in Europe was talking about the “prodigy from Salzburg”. Back then, fame didn’t automatically mean fortune. In 1772 Mozart was appointed a court musician in Salzburg for the humble sum of 150 florins a year. He felt stifled and undervalued there, and yearned to escape the clutches of Prince-Archbishop Colloredo, a tyrannical philistine who he hated “to the point of madness”. Receiving a farewell “kick up the arse” from the Salzburg court in 1781, Mozart found his spiritual home in Vienna and became his own master. The 10 years he spent there were his happiest and most creative. Though he frequently performed for royalty and was celebrated for operas like

performed for royalty and was celebrated for operas like The Marriage of Figaro and Don Giovanni

The Marriage of Figaro and Don Giovanni, Mozart and his family often struggled to make ends meet. His pleasures were, therefore, simple ones – dancing, beating Haydn at billiards and teaching his pet starling to whistle the odd piano concerto. Mozart died suddenly in 1791, leaving his famous Requiem unfinished, and was buried in an unmarked grave in St Mark’s Cemetery, Vienna. Speculations of murder and dodgy pork chops aside, the probable cause of his death was rheumatic fever.

Morning

Your morning begins tracing Mozart’s six-year-old footsteps back to 1762 and his first-ever public appearance at Schönbrunn Palace, a short U-Bahn ride southwest of the city centre. Walking through the manicured French gardens that sweep up to the former Hapsburg summer palace, you can imagine how daunting this debut must have been for little Wolfgang, dressed in his finery and best powdered wig. Of the palace’s 1441 sumptuous rooms, 40 are now open to the public,

PHOTO: KIM ERLANDSEN

PHOTO: ERNEST GLEZ RODA

SC HöNBRUNN PALACE W H ERE M OZART FIRST PERFOR M ED PUBLICALLY AT T H E AGE OF SIX

including the Versailles-like Hall of Mirrors where Mozart won the favour of Empress Maria Theresa and her family. After the performance, an unabashed “Wolferl leapt onto Her Majesty’s lap, threw his arms around her neck and planted kisses on her face,” wrote his father. Not content with kissing the empress, he then proposed to a seven-year-old Marie Antoinette, future queen of France, when she comforted him after he fell on the palace’s slippery marble floors. A stroll through the sculpture- strewn grounds brings you to the

Orangery where, some 24 years later, Mozart did musical battle against Antonio Salieri by command of Franz Josef II – sadly losing out to his rival. The baroque building is now a characterful backdrop for concerts of Mozart’s music, performed in 18th- century costume at 8.30pm daily. Mozart lived at a dozen different addresses in Vienna’s historic centre or Innere Stadt. Rising above the labyrinth of narrow streets is Gothic St Stephen’s Cathedral. Nicknamed “Steffl” (“little Stephen”) by the Viennese, the cathedral is where

Stephen”) by the Viennese, the cathedral is where The ten years Mozart spent in Vienna were

The ten years Mozart spent in Vienna were his happiest and his most productive

spent in Vienna were his happiest and his most productive Mozart married Constanze in 1782, where

Mozart married Constanze in 1782, where his sons Karl Thomas and Franz Xaver were christened, and where his funeral was held in 1791. It’s worth the dizzying 343-step climb to the South Tower’s viewpoint to see this city of graceful domes and spires spread out before you. Close by is Graben, Vienna’s smartest shopping street, which retains an old-world feel with its ornate facades and horse-drawn Fiaker. Mozart lived briefly at No. 17 - now Pension Nossek - where he composed The Abduction from the Seraglio. Not far off is Milchgasse No. 1, next to St Peter’s Church, where romance blossomed between Mozart and Constanze Weber in 1781, after her sister Aloysia rejected his advances. Never one to mince his words, Mozart described Constanze as “not ugly, but also far from beautiful”. Looks aside, she made Mozart a fine wife and their marriage was happy, despite financial struggles and bouts of ill-health. From here it’s a short walk to the House of the Teutonic Order on Singerstrasse, where the courtyard bears a marble plaque noting the composer’s brief stay in 1781. Tired of being treated like a “lackey”, this is where Mozart informed Prince- Archbishop Colloredo that he wouldn’t be returning to Salzburg, and was unceremoniously ejected by the

MOZART

ST STEPHEN’S CATHEDRAL WHERE MOZART MARRIED IN 1782

chamberlain “with a kick up the arse”.

Afternoon

By now you’ll have worked up an appetite and it’s just a few minutes’ walk along Rauhensteingasse to Café Frauenhuber. On the way you’ll pass Steffl department store, built on the site of Mozart’s deathplace, which commemorates the genius with a plaque and bust. Entering Café Frauenhuber is like stepping back in time. Opened in 1824, this is Vienna’s oldest coffee house and one of its most authentic, with vaulting and worn red velvet lending it an air of faded grandeur. Mozart gave concertos at the café-restaurant that once stood here, and this is also where Graham Greene wrote the script for The Third Man. Such history is served today over strong coffee, decadent

. Such history is served today over strong coffee, decadent Mozart admitted he would have more

Mozart admitted he would have more than 200 wives if he married everyone he jested with

more than 200 wives if he married everyone he jested with cakes and Viennese classics like

cakes and Viennese classics like wiener schnitzel. Heading back towards the cathedral and down the cobbled Domgasse you reach the Mozarthaus, where the Mozarts lived from 1784 to 1787. The interactive three-floor museum, opened in 2006 as part of Mozart’s 250th birthday celebrations, offers a wonderful insight into the man and his music. Mozart may have been in debt on his deathbed, but his lovingly restored first-floor apartment recalls

flusher times, and it was here that he wrote some of his most brilliant works like comic opera The Marriage of Figaro.

Several blocks south on Seilerstätte, the Haus der Musik takes

a hands-on approach in spotlighting

Austria’s famous composers. The highlight – which would surely have tickled Mozart’s childish sense of humour – is virtually conducting the Vienna Philharmonic through Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. The knack is getting the rhythm right - swing your electronic baton too fast or too slow and the orchestra storms out in a rage. Bear in mind Mozart’s words: “Music should never

be painful to the ear but should flatter and charm it, and thereby always remain music.” Nearby is the stately Burggarten, offering shady respite on summer days. The park’s centrepiece is a dashing Mozart statue. Set high on a pedestal and surrounded by music- making cherubs, the composer is more imposing here than he would have been in real life at just five foot four. From spring to autumn, a treble-clef-shaped flower bed blooms at his feet. Turn the corner and you are confronted with the pomp and splendour of the Imperial Palace, where the Hapsburgs ruled Austria for 640 years. Already a household name aged 12, Mozart was granted

a two-hour audience here in 1768.

During his Vienna years, the 18th- century socialite was a regular in the palace’s Redoutensaal, a gilded baroque fantasy of a ballroom. Here he attended masked balls where he networked, danced and, presumably, flirted. “If I had married everyone I

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MOZART

INSIDE VIENNA’S STATE OPERA HOUSE, WHERE DON GIOVANNI WAS PERFORMED IN 1869
INSIDE VIENNA’S STATE OPERA HOUSE, WHERE DON GIOVANNI WAS PERFORMED IN 1869
STATE OPERA HOUSE, WHERE DON GIOVANNI WAS PERFORMED IN 1869 On any given night the opportunities

On any given night the opportunities to hear Mozart’s music in Vienna are boundless

to hear Mozart’s music in Vienna are boundless jested with, I would have well over 200

jested with, I would have well over 200 wives,” he quipped. The hall is now the setting for somewhat touristy Mozart-meets-Strauss concerts.

Evening

If Vienna looks historic by day, it is by night that its history comes to

life. In Innere Stadt alleyways where lanterns cast a soft, almost nostalgic, glow on the cobbles, and the warmth of jovial chatter and chinking glasses fill cosy Beisl taverns, you could be easily back in Mozart’s day. One of his favourite haunts was Griechenbeisl on the Fleischmarkt. Since opening in 1447, Vienna’s oldest tavern has entertained Mozart and other musical legends like Strauss and Schubert, whose signatures grace the ceiling in the Twain Room. Though firmly on the tourist trail, the warren of vaulted rooms is a highly atmospheric place to tuck into hearty fare like venison with black pudding and drink spicy Burgenland wines.

On any given night, the opportunities to hear Mozart’s music in Vienna are boundless. At the world-famous State Opera, performances are as lavish today as they were back in 1869 when the opera house opened with Don Giovanni. Always meticulous about his appearance, Mozart would have been suitably impressed by the well-dressed crowds who gather to listen to his music here and further along the Ringstrasse at the neo-Classical Musikverein, home to the Vienna Philharmonic. Southwest of town near the foodie Naschmarkt is Theater an der Wien, built in 1801 by Emanuel Schikaneder, the librettist of the Magic Flute and the first-ever Papageno. Following a

MOZART

Addresses

Schönbrunn Palace Schönbrunner Schlossstrasse, 13th district Tel: +43 (0) 1 811 13 239 U-Bahn: U4 Schönbrunn

St Stephen’s Cathedral Stephansplatz, 1st district Tel: +43 (0) 1 513 76 48 U-Bahn: U1, U3 Stephansplatz

House of the Teutonic Order Singerstrasse 7, 1st district U-Bahn: U1, U3 Stephansplatz

Café Frauenhuber Himmelpfortgasse 6, 1st district Tel: +43 (0) 1 512 53 53 U-Bahn: U1, U3 Stephansplatz

Mozarthaus Domgasse 5, 1st district Tel: +43 (0) 1 512 17 91 U-Bahn: U1, U3 Stephansplatz

Haus der Musik Seilerstätte 30, 1st district Tel: +43 1 513 48 50 U-Bahn: U1, U2, U4 Karlsplatz

Imperial Palace Michaelerkuppel, 1st district Tel: +43 (0) 1 533 75 70 U-Bahn: U3 Herrengasse

Griechenbeisl Fleischmarkt 11, 1st district Tel: +43 (0) 1 533 19 77 U-Bahn: U1, U4 Schwedenplatz

State Opera Opernring 2, 1st district Tel: +43 (0) 1 514 44-2250 U-Bahn: U1, U2, U4 Karlsplatz

Musikverein Bösendorferstrasse 12, 1st district Tel: +43 (0) 1 505 81 90 U-Bahn: U1, U2, U4 Karlsplatz

Theater an der Wien Linke Wienzeile 6, 6th district Tel: +43 (0) 1 588 30 200 U-Bahn: U1, U2, U4 Karlsplatz

Tel: +43 (0) 1 588 30 200 U-Bahn: U1, U2, U4 Karlsplatz The sound of his

The sound of his symphonies is as every bit Viennese as the mighty Danube

his symphonies is as every bit Viennese as the mighty Danube mammoth overhaul, this is once

mammoth overhaul, this is once again

a superb venue to appreciate Mozart’s

operas and chamber music. And so it is through music that Mozart lives on today; the sound of his uplifting symphonies drifting from concert halls is every bit as Viennese as the mighty Danube and the chime of St Stephen’s Cathedral. And you don’t

need to be rich to enjoy his music either

– take the lead of the man himself, who

would have been just as at ease in the cheap seats as the royal box.

been just as at ease in the cheap seats as the royal box. Kerry Christiani is

Kerry Christiani is a German-based writer. She has written for Lonely Planet and AA.

the cheap seats as the royal box. Kerry Christiani is a German-based writer. She has written

IMAGES: TONY DE MARCO

no logo

did sao paulo's advertising

experiment work?

By tom foley

NO LOGO

NO LOGO ão Paulo is a gritty, sprawling metropolis of more than 11 million people. It’s

ão Paulo is a gritty, sprawling metropolis of more than 11 million people. It’s the largest city in South America and Brazil’s economic powerhouse. It’s also a place where, a few years ago, something very strange happened. In 2007, São Paulo became the first major city outside of the communist world to put into law a radical, near- complete ban on outdoor advertising. The idea was the brainchild of the mayor, Gilberto Kassab, who declared the proliferation of outdoor advertising to be “visual pollution”. At the time, advertising and marketing executives feared the ban would be an insurmountable blow, and quietly hoped the law would not be fully enforced. Industry representatives protested that the ban would limit freedom of speech, kill jobs and badly damage their sector. Unfortunately for them, the ban was enforced – but not without a struggle. Border, the Brazilian Association of Advertisers, was up in arms over the move. In a statement released on October 2, the date on which law PL 379/06 was formally approved by the city council, Border called the new laws “unreal, ineffective and fascist”. It pointed to the tens of thousands of small businesses that would have to bear the burden of altering their shopfronts under regulations “unknown in their virulence in any other city in the world”. A prediction of US$133 million in lost advertising revenue for the city surfaced in the press, while the São Paulo outdoor media owners’ association, Sepex, warned that 20,000 people would lose their jobs. Others predicted that the city

media owners’ association, Sepex, warned that 20,000 people would lose their jobs. Others predicted that the

NO LOGO

would look even worse with the ads removed, a bland concrete jungle replacing the chaos of the present. North Korea and communist Eastern Europe were cited as indicative of what was to come. “I think this city will become a sadder, duller place,” Dalton Silvano, the only city councillor to vote against the laws and (not entirely coincidentally) an ad executive, was quoted as saying in the International Herald Tribune. “Advertising is both an art form and, when you’re in your car, or alone on foot, a form of entertainment that helps relieve solitude and boredom,” he claimed. The move was welcomed by the public. The law was formally introduced in January 2007 with a 90-day compliance period,

introduced in January 2007 with a 90-day compliance period, Without its billboards the city felt like

Without its billboards the city felt like a battlefield, strewn with blank marquees and painted over storefronts

strewn with blank marquees and painted over storefronts supposedly giving everyone time to take down any

supposedly giving everyone time to take down any posters or signs that did not meet the new regulations or face a fine of up to $4,500 per day. Throughout that period, the city’s workmen were busy dismantling around 100 sites per day, occasionally supervised personally by Kassab, a man with an obvious eye for a photo opportunity. He set up telephone hotlines where

citizens could report instances of advertisers breaking the law. “Some days, we had 3,000 calls on those lines,” he says contentedly. Kassab says that São Paulo’s lead is being followed by Buenos Aires, and some European cities – but not London – have sent missions to have a look at his city’s experience. Regina Monteiro, a colleague, says: “The ads filled our eyes with nothing.” Billboards, outdoor video screens and ads on buses and taxis were quickly removed across the city after the law took effect. Even pamphleteering in public spaces was made illegal, and strict new regulations drastically diminished the allowable size of storefront signage. Without its 15,000 billboards, the city felt like

NO LOGO

a battlefield, strewn with blank marquees, partially torn-down frames and hastily painted-over storefront fascias. São Paolo’s ads were often the size of the entire skyscrapers to which they were affixed. The law was hailed by writer Roberto Pompeu de Toledo as “a rare victory by the public interest over private, of order over disorder, aesthetics over ugliness, of cleanliness over trash and for once, all that is accustomed to coming out on top in Brazil has lost.” Five years after the law came in, it is extremely difficult to find outdoor advertising in the city – no billboards, no ads on buses or taxis or in shop windows. But equally remarkable is how quickly big advertisers and the industry itself have adapted and, in fact, thrived. In an interview with the FT, Marcio Oliveira, vice-president of operations at Lew Lara\TBWA admitted he was not happy with the law before it came in. “We thought, ‘OK, this is gonna screw up all our business. In the first instance, everybody, including the advertisers, loved this – to see their

including the advertisers, loved this – to see their city without this visual pollution we had

city without this visual pollution we had in the past.” As shocking to some as the law itself was the speed in which it was set up. “Usually in Brazil it takes

a little time for laws to get set up,”

in Brazil it takes a little time for laws to get set up,” It’s better this

It’s better this way. We can see the city now. And Sao Paulo is our city and we need to take care of it

And Sao Paulo is our city and we need to take care of it says Marcello

says Marcello Queiroz, an editor at Propaganda and Marketing newspaper in São Paulo, talking to the FT. “It was really dramatic how quick things changed. Big companies had to change their focus and strategies.” Marketing directors had to find a place to spend the money they previously put into

billboards. The result, they say, was

a creative flowering of new and

alternative methods – including

flowering of new and alternative methods – including indoor innovations such as elevator and bathroom ads

indoor innovations such as elevator and bathroom ads – but primarily in digital media. The internet was the really big winner,” says Oliveira. In 2007, there was already a move towards the internet, digital media and social networking marketing worldwide, but the advertising law gave Brazilians an extra push, he told the FT. The most obvious benefit was visual, however. Surveys conducted by São Paolo’s local media indicate the measure is extremely popular with the city’s residents, with more than 70 per cent approval. Maíra Machado, a student at the University of São Paolo, is a strong supporter of the law. “I like it this way,” she says. “We can really see the city.” According to Machado, São Paolo’s physical beauty was hidden behind big signs and billboards. And now that more than [five years] has passed since the ad ban went into effect, she says landowners have beautified storefronts, fixed buildings and improved how the city looks. “There’s already advertising in so many

beautified storefronts, fixed buildings and improved how the city looks. “There’s already advertising in so many

NO LOGO

places,” she says. “The city is ours and we need to take care of it.” One embittered player in the battle was U.S. multinational Clear Channel Communications. The corporation entered the Brazilian market in 1999, purchasing a Brazilian subsidiary as well as the rights to a large share of the city’s billboard market. Clear Channel sponsored a counter- campaign in support of billboards that did not resonate with the masses. Other businesses got more resourceful. In an NPR On the Media interview, Vinicius Galvao, a reporter for Folha de São Paulo, Brazil’s largest newspaper, mentions that, “Big

Paulo , Brazil’s largest newspaper, mentions that, “Big The result of the ban was a creative

The result of the ban was a creative flowering of new and alternative media, particularly digital media

of new and alternative media, particularly digital media banks, like Citibank, and big stores, like Dolce

banks, like Citibank, and big stores, like Dolce & Gabbana, they started painting themselves with very strong colours, like yellow, red, deep blue, and creating like visual patterns to associate the brand to that pattern or to that colour”.

“For example, Citibank’s colour is blue,” he says. “They’re painting the building in very strong blue so people can see that from far away and they can make an association with that deep blue and Citibank.” In the years since the ban, businesses have got more and more creative, with the result that the city has some of the most interesting branding in the world. For now then, the scheme has worked, but with Kassab’s term ending next year (he won re-election in 2008 with 69 per cent of the vote), and with the World Cup due to arrive in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016,

NO LOGO

NO LOGO When the hoardings were removed, many locals were shocked at the state of the

When the hoardings were removed, many locals were shocked at the state of the buildings and houses

locals were shocked at the state of the buildings and houses it remains to be seen

it remains to be seen whether this ban will remain. For now though the mayor can be congratulated on an initiative that worked. And brought with it some unforseen advantages. When the hoardings were removed, many locals were shocked at the state of the buildings and houses. Renovation work has increased, and there is a greater sense of pride. This will continue unabated as the country enters the spotlight in the next five years. Whether the city can continue to resist the lure of advertsing dollars remains to be seen.

in the next five years. Whether the city can continue to resist the lure of advertsing
in the next five years. Whether the city can continue to resist the lure of advertsing

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MICHELIN HASHAS PRODUCEDPRODUCED THE WORLD’S MOSTMOST INFLUENTIALINFLUENTIAL HAS PRODUCED THETHE WORLD’SWORLD’S
MICHELIN HASHAS PRODUCEDPRODUCED THE WORLD’S MOSTMOST INFLUENTIALINFLUENTIAL
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FOR MORE THAN 100100 YEARS,YEARS, BUTBUT ITSITS
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INFLUENCE AMONG CHEFS, FOODFOOD CRITICSCRITICS AND CONSUMERS
AMONGAMONG CHEFS,CHEFS,
FOOD CRITICS ANDAND CONSUMERSCONSUMERS ISIS
INFLUENCEINFLUENCE
IS WANING.WANING. WANING.
GARETH REES WONDERS IF
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MICHELIN

MICHELIN

S aulieu. A small town in the region of Burgundy in eastern France. Population roughly 2,500 people. Fairly innocuous,

it boasts just a handful of famous sons, one of whom, chef Bernard Loiseau, made it famous. Saulieu has not often been the setting for high drama or the source of international news, but any food lover worth his or her salt will know the name, or at least the tragic story, of Bernard Loiseau. Born in Chamalieres in central France, Loiseau trained at legendary French restaurant La Maison Troisgros with brothers Jean and Pierre Troisgros, before moving on to work for chef Claude Verger, and gaining the attention of the Gault Millau guide as one of the leading exponents of nouvelle cuisine. In 1975, Verger put the young chef in charge of La Côte d’Or in Saulieu. In 1982 Loiseau bought the restaurant from his mentor and in 1991 he achieved his

life-long goal, winning his third Michelin star. Loiseau became a star himself. He wrote books, launched a line of frozen food and was even traded on the stock exchange. Then, on the evening of February 24, 2003, after a hard day’s slog in his kitchen, the chef put the cold metal of a

slog in his kitchen, the chef put the cold metal of a How does a mere

How does a mere restaurant guide amass enough power to drive a man to suicide? What is the power of the star?

to drive a man to suicide? What is the power of the star? hunting rifle in

hunting rifle in his mouth, over the palate that had helped make his name, and pulled the trigger. Why did such a successful chef choose to end his life? Rumour

immediately began to circulate that Michelin had informed Loiseau that his La Côte D’Or was going to lose its precious third star. Newspaper stories followed. A man was dead, and the celebrated restaurant guide with more than 100 years of history behind it was to blame. The food world was ablaze with speculation. Fellow three-star chef Jacques Lameloise revealed that Loiseau had once confided in him, “If I lose a star, I’ll kill myself”. Lauded Le Figaro critic Francois Simon has since stated that La Côte D’Or was “living on borrowed time”, and many believe Loiseau’s fear that Michelin would take away his hard won third star was at least partly to blame for his death. Michelin has said that Loiseau had been informed that he would keep his third star prior to his death, and it has since been revealed that he was deeply in dept and suffering from

GEOR G ES POM P IDOU AT THE PARIS CAR SHOW IN 1973, WHERE MICHELIN
GEOR G ES POM P IDOU AT THE PARIS CAR SHOW IN 1973, WHERE MICHELIN FEATURED P ROMINENTLY

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MICHELIN

MICHELIN FRENCH INDUSTRIALIST ANDRE MICHELIN IN THE LATE 1920S clinical depression. But it sounds like madness,
FRENCH INDUSTRIALIST ANDRE MICHELIN IN THE LATE 1920S
FRENCH INDUSTRIALIST ANDRE MICHELIN IN THE LATE 1920S

clinical depression. But it sounds like madness, doesn’t it? How does a mere restaurant guide amass enough power to drive a man to suicide? Or at least for people to accept it as a possibility. Well, in Michelin’s own words: “the guide’s well-established credibility is underpinned by the expertise it has acquired over more than a century.” First published in 1900 by tyre manufacturer Andre Michelin and

distributed free to French motorists, the Michelin Guide began awarding one or two stars to outstanding restaurants in 1926, adding the three-star rating in 1930. As of 2011, Michelin publishes guides across Europe, as well as the USA, Hong Kong and Japan. But does its distinguished history and reputation make its approval worth dying for? British chef Marcus Wareing, whose eponymous restaurant at The Berkley in London holds two Michelin stars,

at The Berkley in London holds two Michelin stars, The guide was launched in 1900 to

The guide was launched in 1900 to help motorists travel more easily and therefore to sell more tyres

travel more easily and therefore to sell more tyres says the guide’s rating doesn’t spark fear

says the guide’s rating doesn’t spark fear in him, but winning his first star for London’s L’Oranger was, “probably the biggest shock of my life and the most memorable day I’ve ever had.” “The Michelin Guide is perhaps the longest running, it’s the father figure of restaurant accolades,” he adds. “It’s

a link to our past, and I don’t think that should be forgotten.” Chef and patron of two Michelin starred restaurants in London, Gary

Rhodes agrees that a Michelin star is the highest achievement for a chef. “For me, Michelin is the ultimate accolade, and

if any chefs have told you otherwise,

it’s probably because they’ve never had one,” he says. “Cooking is a fashion world, you see, and the one thing Michelin is not driven by is fashion.” What Michelin, quite openly, is driven by is tyre sales. An article in the The

Financial Times recently referenced a study by Michelin that estimated that in countries where the guide is published, the company sees a three per cent increase in sales. “The Michelin Guide is

a big boost for the Michelin brand,” the

company says. “That was the idea when the Michelin brothers launched the guide in 1900 – to help motorists travel more easily and thus use more tires.”

Now the acceptance of this view of the Michelin Guide as a simple marketing tool for tyres may seem disingenuous, but it could have been

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Five cities in five days?
Five cities in five days?
MON TUE WED THUR FRI Five cities in five days?
MON TUE WED THUR FRI Five cities in five days?
MON TUE WED THUR FRI Five cities in five days?
MON TUE WED THUR FRI Five cities in five days?
MON TUE WED THUR FRI Five cities in five days?
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MICHELIN

a contributory factor in the French company’s decision to expand and publish the famous guide outside of its native Europe. In 2005, the guide embarked on its first sortie across the Atlantic, publishing its first New York edition, which was quickly followed by San Francisco in 2006, Tokyo in 2007, Hong Kong and Macau in 2008 and Kyoto and Osaka and Chicago in 2010. “The fifth edition of the Michelin Guide Tokyo was recently released, a clear indication that it’s been popular with the Japanese public,” argues Michelin. “We don’t reveal detailed sales figures, but what we can say is that we sell one

million guides a year worldwide.” So the books are published in 23 countries and 13 cities, and people seem to be buying them, but the standing of the guide is a different matter altogether. And it’s not hard to find detractors when it comes to Michelin’s potentially dangerous decision to move beyond Europe. “Michelin lost its lustre by expanding into countries where they had scant knowledge,” says London Evening Standard critic, Fay Maschler. “This was true of the Italian and Spanish guides.” Marco Pierre White, a man who at the age of 33 became the youngest chef to

be awarded three Michelin stars in Great Britain – famously handing them back to Michelin when he retired in 1999 – puts it a little less delicately. “Michelin in America is Mickey Mouse,” he says. “Michelin’s whole philosophy was that you had to prove yourself over a period of time, prove consistency so the guide could believe in you. You earn your stars, going from zero, to one, to two and finally to three. That didn’t happen in New York” American food writer and GQ columnist Alan Richman agrees that Michelin had a rocky start when it launched in New York in 2005. “A lot of people thought some of the stars it awarded were very predictable – let’s give out three stars to all the restaurants that are based on French cuisine, and the others we’ll hand out in a way that seems rather irrational,” he says. Richman adds that he’s not impressed with the guide unless he’s in France and the same can be said of the majority of American food lovers. “It doesn’t have the same aura to the American consumer that it does to Europeans, because we’ve seen that the choices are so odd here and so many restaurants we revere do not do well and so many we don’t think much of win stars.” So the American public doesn’t seem to be any more enamoured by the guide than Richman, but the US restaurant industry is just as obsessed as anywhere in Europe. “I know it’s taken very seriously by restaurateurs, and certainly they love to get a Michelin star,” says Richman. “The greatest element of the Michelin Guide in the United States is prestige and business from Europe, because it’s revered by Europeans.” One of those Europeans who harbours a profound respect for

101

BERNARD LOISEAU AT HIS RESTAURANT IN B UR G UNDY IN 1998
BERNARD LOISEAU AT HIS RESTAURANT IN B UR G UNDY IN 1998
One of those Europeans who harbours a profound respect for 101 BERNARD LOISEAU AT HIS RESTAURANT

MICHELIN

the Michelin Guide is Wareing, but even he concedes that to achieve the same status across the Atlantic the guide is going to have to be very patient. “The guide is still going through a bedding in period outside of Europe,” he admits. “The New York Times has more credibility in New York because of its history. That gives it a level of kudos. People still see the Michelin Guide as a European guide rather than a global guide.” Chefs like Wareing and Rhodes might possess the reverential attitude towards the guide that Richman believes all Europeans do, but not everyone in Europe has the same respect for it. Richard Harden, publisher of Michelin rival Harden’s, which rates restaurants based on consumer surveys rather than inspections, even questions his competitor’s historical credentials. “Michelin was really a little- known entity in the UK until about 20 years ago,” he argues. “Its popularity was really all tied up in the celebrity chef phenomenon. The chef builds up the guide and the guide builds up the chef.” It is Marco Pierre White and Gordon Ramsay who Harden singles out as the first celebrity chefs to take advantage of their Michelin credentials to bolster their brands and their businesses. But with Pierre White retired and Ramsay on the decline, the question of whether we are seeing the demise of the celebrity chef is, for Harden, vital to Michelin’s future. “The whole celebrity chef phenomenon is, if not dead, then certainly dying – and good riddance,”

he says. “The interesting question is not whether the whole celebrity chef bandwagon has hit the skids, it is whether it is going to take the Michelin madness with it.” Strangely enough, the man who Harden singles out as Britain’s first celebrity chef, Pierre White, concurs that Michelin doesn’t have the same standing or importance anymore – for the very same reason. “When they start giving stars to chefs who aren’t in their kitchens, you’ve got to question the integrity of the guide,” he says. “If you look at Andre Michelin’s criteria, to achieve two or three stars

Andre Michelin’s criteria, to achieve two or three stars The guide makes and then rewards celebrity

The guide makes and then rewards celebrity chefs such as Gordon Ramsay, because it benefits both parties

such as Gordon Ramsay, because it benefits both parties you had to be proprietor, you had

you had to be proprietor, you had to be behind your stove, but the game has changed now. “Let’s give out the stars to these important chefs who control and have a large percentage of the limelight and they’ll be our supporters and our ambassadors. It’s like they’re buying chefs now.” Maschler agrees: “The guide makes and then rewards celebrity chefs such as Alain Ducasse and Joël Robuchon, and in the UK Gordon Ramsay, because it benefits both parties in getting coverage.” It’s hard to tar all chefs with the same brush; Wareing, for example, has published cook books and done some television, but he is proprietor of

just two restaurants and can be found more often than not in his two Michelin star kitchen at The Berkeley. But Gordon Ramsay, the name that comes up most when the accusation of ‘you scratch our back we’ll scratch yours’ arises, refused an interview, and Michelin itself offers up a pretty flimsy defence, stating categorically that, “there is no favouritism.” Other than its history, the reason for the long-standing reputation of the guide is its method of rating restaurants. Most importantly, the infamous Michelin inspector. Until John Colapinto of The New Yorker managed to secure an interview with one of the guide’s inspectors in 2009, no journalist had ever spoken to one of these secretive culinary authorities on the record. Chefs, critics and the general public still have no idea who these “invisible strangers”, as Wareing calls them, are. That is perhaps the most powerful ingredient in Michelin’s pantry. “Most of us believe in the myth of the Michelin inspector,” agrees Richman. “But the anonymity works both ways, we see it as very professional but we also think ‘who are these people making these very off choices?’” For Wareing, “They are the general public, and they are judging the restaurant as a member of the general public.” But that may be a little misleading. Michelin inspectors famously fill out reports on each restaurant they visit, basing their appraisal on five criteria: product quality, preparation and flavours, the chef’s personality as revealed through his cuisine, value for money, and consistency over time across the entire menu. Is that how you judge a restaurant? Harden believes this scientific, tick

MICHELIN

CHEFS SUCH AS MARCO PIERRE WHITE HAVE QUESTIONED THE INTEGRITY OF THE GUIDE
CHEFS SUCH AS MARCO PIERRE WHITE HAVE QUESTIONED THE INTEGRITY OF THE GUIDE
PIERRE WHITE HAVE QUESTIONED THE INTEGRITY OF THE GUIDE Michelin comes out once a year. With

Michelin comes out once a year. With social networks it’s a matter of minutes.You cannot beat that

networks it’s a matter of minutes.You cannot beat that box rating system worked for Michelin when

box rating system worked for Michelin when it was solely concerned with the grand French tradition of cooking, but has proved woefully inadequate when applied to other cuisines in Europe, Asia and America. “You can judge restaurants like that with great French cuisine because it’s fairly prescriptive, but everyone says that Michelin completely loses its bearings when it tries to judge any other type of cuisine, and that is of course right, because you can’t possibly be an expert in all the world’s cuisines.” Maschler also believes that Michelin’s methods are outdated. It is the word consistency that pops up most

frequently when talking to chefs about the guide, but Maschler argues it is less important today than it was in the halcyon days of fine dining. “Quite rightly, consistency is valued by a guide published once a year, but it is almost an irrelevance in a volatile restaurant culture as we have in London now, where exciting eating may literally ‘pop up’.” The FT’s restaurant correspondent, Nicholas Lander, is certain that people are beginning to question the guide’s authority. “Once they come to England and start doing pubs, you think wait, hang on, that’s not quite right. Why do I need a French team to tell me about pubs in England? You start to question the whole thing.” Lander is likely referring to the star – its second – Michelin recently bestowed on The Hand & Flowers in Marlow, Buckinghamshire – the first pub to be awarded two Michelin stars. “Michelin is seen as the custodian of French cooking and many accept that

cooking in France is not what it used to be. So for the customer, it is far less relevant,” he says. “French restaurants live on what the bloggers say, and they have a much more casual approach to eating and drinking.” Even Wareing, a staunch believer in the importance of the Michelin Guide, acknowledges it is going to face stiff competition as the digital age taps and clicks its way forward into the future. “The Michelin Guide, most guides, come out once a year, journalism 24 to 48 hours, maybe four or five days later. With social networks, it’s a matter of minutes. You can’t beat that,” he says. Michelin recently appointed a new

international director, Michael Ellis, but he refuses to comment on future strategy until next year. The company does, though, appear

to be making an effort to move with the

times. It has a website, viamichelin.com,

and an iPhone app, and in its most recent promotional literature it highlights the 601 Bib Gourmand restaurants, offering “good value for money for a three-course meal”, featured in the 2011 French guide – a nod to the more casual attitude Lander believes is becoming prevalent in France. But, as it moves into its 112th year, Michelin can no longer rely solely on its history to keep it from becoming ‘just another restaurant guide’. With the methods of its inspectors being questioned, difficulty dispelling accusations of favouritism and

a constant struggle to bolster its

reputation outside of Europe, it is

looking like Michelin itself is living on borrowed time. And only time will tell

if it succumbs to a similar fate as the

unfortunate Bernard Loiseau.

tell if it succumbs to a similar fate as the unfortunate Bernard Loiseau. Gareth Rees is

Gareth Rees is a food writer based in Dubai

BRAINWASHED

the genetics of why we buy

by martin lindstrom

ILLUSTRATION: MITCH BLUNT
ILLUSTRATION: MITCH BLUNT

BUYOLOGY

H ow often have you sorted through the neglected clothes in your wardrobe only to realise that many

of your old jeans or shirts are back in fashion? The thin tie, the slim-fit jeans, the Hawaiian shirts have suddenly become cool again. Yet, in the face of knowing that everything old will almost certainly become new again, you continue to shop. And despite the fact that the fake Rolex you bought in Bangkok’s street market works like, well clockwork, and not a single soul has questioned its authenticity, you still hanker after the real deal. The same can be said for the Prada sunglasses you picked up on the same trip. ‘Number one’ copies or not, they’re still copies. You have been brandwashed. Consider this. 85 per cent of all decisions we make are made in our subconscious mind – only 15 per cent are made in our rational mind. Think about how irrational we actually are. Do you find yourself ‘touching wood’ to keep the evil eye at bay? What do you do if there’s no wood within reach? Do you settle for knocking on your head? How about the magazine pile? Do you always reach for the one that’s second from the top? This may sound odd, but the fact is 92 per cent of all Europeans who buy magazines never take the one at the top of the pile. Should the consumer decide not to buy it, they usually return it to its rightful place – one from the top. So, in the end everyone lands up with the same thumbed-through periodical. Similarly, women usually choose the second stall in a public toilet based on the assumption that everyone uses the first. Since in this situation the majority of women think alike, only 2

in this situation the majority of women think alike, only 2 But there’s more to it.

But there’s more to it. Over the years, the fashion industry has managed to tap into our deepest drivers – our aspirations, our dreams and our fears. Who would have imagined that the finest year for perfume would be 2010? The global financial crisis was at its peak, and people went out and spent their money on of all things, perfume. One can only wonder why, but the simple explanation is we are hardwired to seek out things that will make us feel better when we find ourselves in a miasma of unpleasantness. It seems that the best- selling perfumes were those whose labels placed them in Paris, Milan, London, New York and Tokyo. We are perfectly aware that these perfume factories are not within a scented whiff of the Eiffel Tower, but all we’re really looking for is an express ticket to dream land. And for the grand sum of $125, perfume can take us there. So, what is it about fashion that makes it so irresistible? Why are we

per cent use the first stall with the second toilet getting the bulk of the traffic. Of all the industries that vie for our consumer dollar, the fashion industry has managed to reach our inner psyche more successfully than any other. We buy more clothes than we need, we buy them with not that much deliberation, and what’s more, we influence those around us to do the same – over and over again. In a study conducted in Cologne, Germany, a crowd of 200 people were gathered together in a large circle that was numbered like a clock. Researchers then handed out slips of paper to 10 ‘informed individuals’. The instructions read, “Go to 9 o’clock, but do not leave the group.” For a while, the group seemed to mix and mingle fairly randomly. But soon enough, the ‘informed individuals’ had led everybody else to the designated 9 o’clock point.

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BUYOLOGY

BUYOLOGY so eager to over-extend our finances to pay for something that we know is being

so eager to over-extend our finances to pay for something that we know is being produced by cheap labour in a factory somewhere in Asia? Imagine yourself browsing the shelves in a retail store. Suddenly a pair of jeans catches your eye. You have to try them on. You head to the fitting room, and they’re perfect, as if they were tailor-made just for you. To your surprise, you see that they’re the same size as the pants you wore a good seven years ago. Oh, wow, you’re thinking, I’ve lost weight – a lot of weight. You find yourself feeling a whole lot better about yourself. Then as you leave the fitting room, you see a poster of a totally gorgeous model wearing the very same pants you’re considering buying. Needless to say, she’s glamorous, sexy, and she’s surrounded by a group of similarly stunning ‘friends’. As you stand there holding the jeans, the urge to buy them hits you like a rush. You know you it will hurt your credit card, and you know you probably shouldn’t do it, but… you do. You head to the counter,

sign for the purchase, and head home with your package. Let’s stop here for a minute and take time to examine what went on in your brain as you made the decision to buy. For starters, let’s be clear. You have not lost weight. It’s more likely you’ve fallen victim to ‘vanity sizing’, a devious ploy by which stores make clothes bigger so we think we can fit into a smaller size. Retailers have been doing this with women’s clothes for years, and the tactic is now being applied to men’s clothes as well. When Esquire magazine sent reporter Abram Sauer into various stores with a tape measure, he found that pairs of men’s pants with so-called 36-inch waists actually ranged in size from 37 inches (H&M) to 38.5 inches (Calvin Klein) to 39 inches (Gap, Haggar and Dockers) to 41 inches (Old Navy). It used to be that men didn’t care what the size of his waistband was, but today experts know full well that both genders will be more likely to buy a product that makes them feel trim and svelte. There’s a whole lot more to this story. As you saw the poster on the

a whole lot more to this story. As you saw the poster on the Most of
a whole lot more to this story. As you saw the poster on the Most of

Most of us have fallen victim to vanity sizing where clothes are much bigger than the advertised waistline

where clothes are much bigger than the advertised waistline wall, something else happened in your brain

wall, something else happened in your brain – your mirror neurons were activated. Mirror neurons were discovered in 1989 when Dr. Giacomo Rizzolatti noticed what he originally termed ‘monkey see, monkey do’. In other words, if we someone doing something like yawning, scratching or even dancing, we identify with the action, and our brain behaves similarly. It’s a form of empathy, where we put ourselves in another’s shoes thereby feeling a stronger sense of engagement. So, back to our shopping experience. As we watch people walking down the hallway in a really cool pair of jeans, or maybe see them standing amidst a sophisticated crowd, our brain relates to the situation and leads us to believe that we could be that very person. Even though we know we can’t ever look that way – our very genes prohibit it – in that moment we don’t see the model, we are the model. Our neurons have taken control and they convince us that if we buy the jeans we will be just as cool and just as popular as the image on the poster. All this activity helps trigger dopamine, a chemical in your brain. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that helps create the irresistible urge to buy the jeans. It’s no coincidence that dopamine is the very same chemical

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BUYOLOGY

BUYOLOGY Hiltons and Lindsey Lohans of the world are a fairly recent phenomenon, but back in
BUYOLOGY Hiltons and Lindsey Lohans of the world are a fairly recent phenomenon, but back in
BUYOLOGY Hiltons and Lindsey Lohans of the world are a fairly recent phenomenon, but back in

Hiltons and Lindsey Lohans of the world are a fairly recent phenomenon, but back in simpler times, survival depended on where to find the best food, the whereabouts of unsafe territory, and which path is best taken to cross the raging river. Those who were better informed were far more likely to survive the hardships of everyday life. Obviously things have changed dramatically since then, however our need to gossip is still very much a feature of life in the 21st century. Similarly, we remain drawn to the leaders. Kings and queens are by and large just figureheads, we’re more than jaded with our current crop of politicians, and so what do we have left? Celebrities! They have their fingers on the pulse. They wear the latest fashions, are seen at the hippest venues, and mingle with the most attractive, most popular and most interesting people of the era. The fashion industry knows this well. Giorgio Armani was the leader in this particular pack. He was the first fashion designer not only to understand it, but also to systematize it. He opened his West Hollywood store way before any other designers gained

West Hollywood store way before any other designers gained Armani managed to tap into the essence

Armani managed to tap into the essence of fashion, aspiration and desire

to tap into the essence of fashion, aspiration and desire that’s released in our brains when

that’s released in our brains when we take feel-good drugs. It can be addictive. The term ‘Shopaholic’ is more than the invention of a skilled copywriter. Rather it should be seen for what it is – a description of a disease that currently affects close to 10% of all American women. Fashion is the epicentre of irrational behaviour, and even though we’re conscious of it, the chances are that we’re unlikely to change. There are several ingredients that help create the aura of attraction that keeps the multibillion-dollar industry alive. One of the cornerstones of this phenomenon is our fascination with celebrity. We

want to know how they live, who they love, and of course what they wear. If you’ve ever had the good fortune to chance upon one of the rich and famous, you’ve undoubtedly dined out on the story at many a social gathering. You might even have managed to take a quick pic on your phone. No need for any embarrassment, your reaction is quite natural. It’s yet another behaviour that stems from our basic primate tendencies. You might consider that I’m drawing a fairly broad bow here, but in truth gossip is linked to our survival instincts. It was once a way of securing food. Sure, the Paris

BUYOLOGY

BUYOLOGY a foothold, displayed his clothes and surprisingly, gave away choice items to any celebrity willing
BUYOLOGY a foothold, displayed his clothes and surprisingly, gave away choice items to any celebrity willing

a foothold, displayed his clothes and

surprisingly, gave away choice items to any celebrity willing to wear them. It didn’t take long before A-list celebrities began wearing Armani. Funnily enough, as soon as one successful celebrity was seen wearing the latest and greatest Armani outfit at the Oscars, so it created a need among other A-listers. Armani managed to tap into the essence of fashion, aspiration and desire – and almost half a century later, this

zeitgeist is still defining the industry. It’s quite common for a fashion brand to contract celebrities to show up at casual gatherings wearing their outfits. These days Angelina Jolie

is never photographed without her

Luis Vuitton tote. Rosie Huntington- Whiteley is almost exclusively dressed by Burberry. Paris Hilton demands $100,000 to engage in a few short hours of cocktail chitchat, whilst Kylie Minogue has an enduring relationship with Dolce & Gabbana. She wears their clothes, carries their handbags and dons their sunglasses, and the same skilled and stylish duo design all her stage costumes too.

So does celebrity endorsement work? I confess - a few years ago I was sceptical when told that celebrity endorsement was the single most important factor in building a fashion brand. I set out to discover if this was true by initiating the world’s largest word-of-mouth experiment, which resulted in my new book, Brandwashed (Crown). The inspiration behind this experiment was The Joneses, a Hollywood movie starring Demi Moore. In it she plays the leader of a stealth marketing team. The movie featured a fake home, with

a fake family, whose job it was to

promote brands to unsuspecting friends, family and colleagues. The family was generous with their recommendations, promoting everything from cars to chocolates. The Brandwashed experiment began in early 2010. We started by scouring

the US, looking for a ‘perfect’ family. We finally found the Morgansons,

a picture-perfect family living in

Laguna Beach, California. Gina and Eric Morganson are a wholesome couple in their early forties. They have

are a wholesome couple in their early forties. They have We are genetically programmed to follow
are a wholesome couple in their early forties. They have We are genetically programmed to follow

We are genetically programmed to follow each other. Fashion knows this and taps into it in myriad ways

other. Fashion knows this and taps into it in myriad ways three handsome sons who resemble

three handsome sons who resemble Justin Bieber in varying degrees. Under the direction of one of Hollywood’s top producers, 35 cameras were hidden inside their home. Microphones were tucked inside plants, placed under tables, and hidden behind couches.

A crew of 12 professionals monitored

the experiment. The object of the

experiment was to understand the true power of word of mouth. Let’s fast forward. No dialogue

was scripted and we ended up with 2,000 hours of footage. So, what did we discover? I was shocked to discover that word-of-mouth is probably one

of the most powerful marketing

tools I’ve ever encountered. Those who entered the family’s sphere purchased 90% of the brands recommended by the Morgansons - even the producer couldn’t resist the recommended shampoo, and he only got the information from behind the observational mirror. Recent research

BUYOLOGY

BUYOLOGY showed that people are more likely to believe advertising in the Economist than they are

showed that people are more likely to believe advertising in the Economist than they are on the Huffington Post. In other words, context has an indirect effect on the message. In our experiment, the Morgansons were the ‘channel’. Every recommendation they made, seemed to come along with a certificate of endorsement that was powerfully stamped with the invisible message: ‘You can trust this. Buy it.’ The subtext of the recommendation was, “If the Morgansons like it, so will I”. The endorsement continued way past the initial recommendation. We tracked the effects via mobile devices and control groups, and the initial recommendations were equally effective as the word-of-mouth spread to the second, the third, and even the fourth circle beyond the family’s sphere. What does this mean for brands and

fashion? A lot. Firstly, we need to be mindful of the ethical implications. Are we going to see hundreds if not thousands of Morgansons popping up as sleeper cells in the future? Probably. However, what’s particularly interesting is that our experiment showed that even though our control family (indirectly competing with the Morgansons) openly declared their mission, they did even better than the Morgansons. So, it seems, that if the consumer is aware that this is part of a marketing scheme, they are even quicker to embrace it. And all this brings me back to the world of fashion. Whether we care to admit it or not, we are genetically programmed to follow one another. More than any other industry, fashion knows this and taps into it in ways you’ve never even thought

this and taps into it in ways you’ve never even thought We have all been brandwashed;

We have all been brandwashed; we are doing the same to each other, and we love doing it

we are doing the same to each other, and we love doing it about. The fact

about. The fact is that most of the clothes we wear, regardless of their price tag, are made in some poorly lit and inadequately ventilated factory somewhere in the heart of China. Even though most designers would find it hard to admit, the same production lines produce a range of items for a number of competing brands. In the morning, Gucci glasses are assembled, in the afternoon the factory hands switch to Versace. We rarely even glimpse this side of the story. We’re only exposed to the other side – the fashion, the glamour, and the sensual delights we’re all so magnetically drawn to. We’ve been brandwashed.Not only that, we’re all brandwashing one another. And what’s more, we’re loving it.

one another. And what’s more, we’re loving it. Martin Lindstrom is the best-selling author of Buyology

Martin Lindstrom is the best-selling author of Buyology and Brandwashed.

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P. 138 route map P. our fleet

EYES IRISH FLYING ARE EMIRATES’NEW TO DAILY SERVICE DUBLIN STARTS P130
EYES
IRISH FLYING
ARE
EMIRATES’NEW
TO DAILY
SERVICE
DUBLIN
STARTS
P130

A���

EMIRATES

TO

SERVICES

HEATHROW

LONDON

BECOME TRIPLE

WILL

DAILY FROM

24 JAN

EMIRATES NEWS

EMIRATES NEWS
DUBLIN A GUIDE TO EMIRATES’ NEWEST ROUTE GUINNESS STORE HOUSE CROKE PARK Whether they like
DUBLIN
A GUIDE TO EMIRATES’ NEWEST ROUTE
GUINNESS
STORE HOUSE
CROKE PARK
Whether they like it or not,
Guinness has become
synonymous with the
Irish. The tour of the
Guinness Store House
in the city centre is
touted as Ireland’s
most popular
international
visitor attraction.
Fully renovated in 2004, Croke
Park is one of the world’s
most famous sporting
arenas. With a capacity
of 82,300 it is Europe’s
third biggest stadium
and the home of Irish
Gaelic football, and
it also hosts the Irish
national rugby team.
TRINITY
TEMPLE BAR
COLLEGE
Cobblestone streets, bars, art
galleries, cafés and historic
architecture – Temple Bar is
what people imagine Dublin
should be like, and it is. Drop by
the IFC for cutting-edge films or
have a pint in one of the many
old school pubs that dot the
district’s alleyways.
THE SPIRE
Officially known as the Monument of
Light, this towering stainless steel pin-
like monument on O’Connell Street is
better known as the Spire of Dublin. It’s
visible from across the city.
Founded by Queen Elizabeth I in
1592, Ireland’s oldest university
boasts wonderful gardens,
beautiful architecture and an
impressive alumni cast including
Oscar Wilde and Samuel Beckett.
The perfect place to sit and enjoy an
alfresco lunch on one of the cricket
pitches. Be sure and see the Book of
Kells while your’re there.
EMIRATES PLACES RECORD $26BN AIRCRAFT ORDER
EMIRATES ORDERED A RECORD
additional 50 777-300 ER aircraft from
plane manufacturer Boeing at last
month’s Dubai Airshow.
The order, which also includes 20
777-300 ER options, is valued at US$26
billion, and is the single largest dollar
value aircraft order in the history of
Boeing. The additional 50 aircraft
ordered adds to the existing Emirates
order of 40 777-300 ERs, making the
number of aircraft on firm order 90.
Emirates is already the largest operator
of 777 aircraft in the world, including 61
300-ERs currently in service, and the
expansion of the fleet reaffirms Emirates’
intention to continue to expand its long
haul service. “This record breaking dollar
value order is another milestone for
Emirates and affirms our strategy to
continue to excel as a world leading
carrier, connecting the world to Dubai
and beyond,” said HH Sheikh Ahmed
Bin Saeed Al-Maktoum, Chairman
and Chief Executive, Emirates Airline
and Group. “The Boeing 777-300 ER
aircraft plays a pivotal role in Emirates
development of a modern fleet to meet
the demand for global air travel for
the future.”
ILLUSTRATION: EDWARD MCGOWAN
VOLVO OCEAN RACE IS COMING TO ABU DHABI THIS NEW YEAR ARE YOU? 313131 DECDECDEC
VOLVO OCEAN RACE IS COMING TO ABU DHABI THIS NEW YEAR ARE YOU? 313131 DECDECDEC
VOLVO OCEAN RACE IS COMING TO ABU DHABI THIS NEW YEAR ARE YOU? 313131 DECDECDEC
VOLVO OCEAN RACE IS COMING TO ABU DHABI THIS NEW YEAR ARE YOU? 313131 DECDECDEC
VOLVO OCEAN RACE IS COMING TO ABU DHABI THIS NEW YEAR ARE YOU? 313131 DECDECDEC
VOLVO OCEAN RACE IS COMING TO ABU DHABI THIS NEW YEAR ARE YOU? 313131 DECDECDEC
VOLVO OCEAN RACE IS COMING TO ABU DHABI THIS NEW YEAR ARE YOU? 313131 DECDECDEC
VOLVO OCEAN RACE IS COMING TO ABU DHABI THIS NEW YEAR ARE YOU? 313131 DECDECDEC
VOLVO OCEAN RACE IS COMING TO ABU DHABI THIS NEW YEAR ARE YOU? 313131 DECDECDEC
VOLVO OCEAN RACE
IS COMING TO ABU DHABI
THIS NEW YEAR
ARE YOU?
313131 DECDECDEC 201120112011 --- 141414 JANJANJAN 201220122012
FREEFREEFREE ADMISSIONADMISSIONADMISSION
N
NE
E
SE
S
SW
W
NW
N
NE
E
SE
S
SW
W
NW
N
240
210
180
150
120
90
60
30
330
300
270
240
210
180
150
120
The greatest ocean adventure on earth is coming to Abu Dhabi for a two-week stopover. Join us for an
unforgettable New Year’s celebration in our specially created ‘Destination Village’ and soak up the excitement
as the competing yachts – including our own ‘Azzam’ – arrive. Be part of this historic and epic celebration.
www.volvooceanrace abudhabi.com
Presenting Sponsor
Official Hotel
Technical HQ
Host Partner
Host Partner
Organised By
31% AMOUNT THAT THE BOEING HAS REDUCED ITS C�� EMISSIONS SINCE ����. SOURCE: ENVIRO.AERO
31%
AMOUNT
THAT
THE BOEING
HAS
REDUCED
ITS C��
EMISSIONS SINCE
����.
SOURCE:
ENVIRO.AERO

EMIRATES NEWS

EMIRATES NEWS ENVIRONMENT

ENVIRONMENT

WINGING IT

AS THE AVIATION INDUSTRY IS constantly looking for new ways to reduce its environmental impact, solutions can be found in not only investing in new fuel types and implementing favourable initiatives such as paperless flights, but also from developing more efficient ways of saving energy whilst in flight. Fuel consumption can be reduced if the aerodynamics of the aircraft can be improved, despite the fact that aircraft and engine technology has increased fuel efficiency by 70 per cent over 40 years, development still continues in order to make more energy savings. Advances in winglets – the extensions on the end of some aircraft wings – by companies such as Winglet Technologies have lead to a three per cent reduction in fuel consumption. They lessen the drag caused by airflow over the wing,

They lessen the drag caused by airflow over the wing, reducing fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and

reducing fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and noise pollution – similar to the design of a modern Formula One car. Emirates maintains a fleet, with an average aircraft age of just six years, of which the aircraft come direct from Boeing and Airbus already fitted with latest technology wingtips.

and Airbus already fitted with latest technology wingtips. WALL LIGHT JAVAN RHINO COP17 MEETING A
and Airbus already fitted with latest technology wingtips. WALL LIGHT JAVAN RHINO COP17 MEETING A
and Airbus already fitted with latest technology wingtips. WALL LIGHT JAVAN RHINO COP17 MEETING A

WALL LIGHT

JAVAN RHINO

COP17 MEETING

A revolutionary new idea for light-emitting wallpaper is being developed by a company in north Wales. Lomox has developed a low energy light source from organic light

emitting diodes (OLED) that can be integrated into wallpaper. The OLEDs require very little energy to run, which could cut down on costs as they are cheap to manufacture.

The International Rhino Foundation has reported that the endangered Javan rhino is now extinct in Vietnam. A mere 50 of these rhinos remain in the wild around the world, making it the rarest large mammal on earth.

This month sees the annual conference of the COP17, the body comprising of the parties involved in the Kyoto Protocol. This branch of the UN meets to discuss environmental resolutions.

LIGHT ORCHESTRA

Gone are the days when the only decision you faced when buying a light bulb was whether to get a bayonet or screw. These days there are seemingly thousands of different variations of bulbs. Here’s the run down:

Incandescent bulbs – the traditional bulb is highly inefficient as 90 per cent of its energy is given off as heat. These bulbs are being phased out in Europe. Energy efficient halogen bulbs – similar to incandescent, but with halogen gas inside them that slows down the deterioration process. Fluorescent lamps – the long tubes are only effective as energy savers if they are not constantly turned on and off. Compact fluorescent lamps – more energy saving as they don’t take long to warm up. Reduces the carbon output of an incandescent bulb by 70 per cent. LED – The future of lighting. They only need to be replaced about once every 25 years and use less than 10 per cent of the energy of an incandescent.

95%

THE PERCENTAGE OF THE AIRCRAFT THAT

MANUFACTURERS ESTIMATE IS RECYCLABLE.

.SOURCE: ENVIRO.AERO

25-30

THE LENGTH OF TIME IN YEARS THAT MOST AIRCRAFT ARE BUILT TO OPERATE FOR.

SOURCE: ENVIRO.AERO

EMIRATES NEWS

EMIRATES NEWS COMFORT

COMFORT

BEFORE YOU R JOU RNEY

BEFORE YOU R JOU RNEY

CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR BEFOREBEFORE YOU R JOU RNEY   T R AV ELLING IF YOU HAV E ANY MEDICAL

 

T R AV ELLING IF YOU HAV E ANY

MEDICAL CONCERNS ABOUT

MAKING A LONG JOURNE Y, OR IF YOU

SUFFER FROM A RESPIRATORY OR

IN THE AIR

CARDIOVASCULAR CONDITION.

PLAN FOR THE DESTINATION � WILLA RESPIRATORY OR IN THE AIR CARDIOVASCULAR CONDITION.   TO HELP YOU ARRIVE AT YOUR destination

 

TO HELP YOU ARRIVE AT YOUR destination feeling relaxed and refreshed, Emirates has developed this collection of helpful travel tips. Regardless of whether you need to

rejuvenate for your holiday or be effective at achieving your goals on a business trip, these simple tips will help you to enjoy your journey and time on board with Emirates today.

 

YOU N EE D ANY VACCINATIONS OR

SPECIAL MEDICATIONS?

GET A GOOD NIGHT’S REST BEFORE  YOU N EE D ANY VACCINATIONS OR SPECIAL MEDICATIONS?   THE FLIGHT. EAT LIGHTLY AND

 

THE FLIGHT.

EAT LIGHTLY AND SENSIBLY.GET A GOOD NIGHT’S REST BEFORE   THE FLIGHT.   AT THE AIRPORT SMART TRAVELLER  

 

AT THE AIRPORT