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S C B E B T B T E B C

ALBANY Football Playbook HIGH


Head Coach Joseph Burke

Table of Contents Offense


Offensive Philosophy Things to know Line Splits and Alignment Formations Offensive Techniques by Position Offensive Plays Passing Tree Passing Protection Running Plays Runs vs 5-3 attachment Page 2 3 4-5 6-7 Appendix 8 10 11 34

Defense
Defense Defense Charts

Page 38 43

Special Teams
Philosophy Extra Point Punt Punt Return Kickoff Kickoff Return Player Name: 59 61 62 63 66 70

Albany High School Football


Why we use the Veer Offense
At Albany High we use the Veer Offense. This offensive set allows us to meet four important goals: Maximize the talents of our players Make plays easy to learn and execute perfectly Balance running and passing to place maximum pressure on the opponents defense Be diverse and exible when calling plays We will constantly attack the defense with plays that utilize our power, speed, nesse and ability to outsmart and deceive our opponents. We will constantly pressure the opponents with our equal willingness to run or pass and attack any weakness they present.

Running Philosophy
Our running plays are designed to use the talents of our athletes: Speed We will get to the point of attack quicker than our opponent. Opponents fear our speed. Power We will get to the point of attack ready to deliver maximum force and leverage in blocking and attacking our opponent Finesse We will get to the point of attack with the option and with deception.

Passing Philosophy
The passing game has the following goals: Neutralize any physical advantage of our opponent The passing game must be half of our offense, not a surprise or gamble We will use the passing game to score quickly. We will be able to score from any spot on the eld within 2 minutes. We will pass when the defense knows we must pass and we will be successful We will strive to eliminate interceptions by continually stressing sound fundamentals

Offensive Philosophy

Albany High School Football

Things to Know

When the Clock Stops


The clock is stopped in the following situations: 1. When any score is made. 2. When a time out is called. 3. When a penalty is called. 4. After an incomplete pass. 5. When a live ball goes out of bounds. The clock starts when the REFEREE signals it is ready for play when it is stopped by penalties, or by the offensive team being awareded a rst down. The exception to this is a rst down which is awarded to the offensive team when they recover their own kick. The clock starts when the BALL IS SNAPPED when it was stopped because of score, a free time out, an incomplete pass, a live ball going out of bounds, or to award a rst down to the defensive team or to the offensive team when they recover their own kick.

Run the Clock Offense


Run roll out pass without throwing the ball and QB sneak. Do not go out of bounds. Get up slowly after the play. Do not commit penalties; they will cost us 25 seconds. Use the maximum allowable time in the huddle without incurring a penalty. Making a normal call after the referee declares the ball ready for play will normally take 23 seconds.

Albany High School Football


10 yd (30') 3' 3' 3' 3' 4' 10 yd (30')

4.5'

4.5'

Line Splits
Proper offensive line splits are important to spreading out the defense and creating enough room for our running attack. If you are not sure of your splits it is better for splits to be too wide rather than too narrow. The exceptions to this are the option and sweep plays, where we are attacking the corners of the offensive line. Guards- Take a constant 3 foot split Tackles- Take a constant 3 foot split Tight End- Take a constant 4 foot split, except when you need to get outside postion on the defensive end. For instance on a down block or arch release you would want 4 1/2 feet.

Back Field Alignment


Full Back- Line up to the side of the formation call. Line up directly behind the offensive guard, with your heels 4 yards from the back tip of the ball. Running Back- Line up to the side of the formation call. Line up directly behind the offensive guard, with your heels 4 yards from the back tip of the ball. Offensive backs must take care to not judge the 4 yards from the back of the guard, but from the back tip of the ball.

Splits and Alignment

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Splits and Alignment

Pro Right
Center

10 yd (30')

3'

3'

3'

3'

4'

10 yd (30')

4.5'

4.5'

Twins Right
Left Hash

4'

3'

3'

3'

3'

6 yd (18')

4.5'

4.5'

Twins Right
Center

4'

3'

3'

3'

3'

10 yd (30')

6 yd (18')

4.5'

4.5'

Twins Right
Right Hash

4'

3'

3'

3'

3'

6 yd (18')

5 yd (15')

4.5'

4.5'

Receiver Alignment
Pro Right of Pro Left Formation Flanker- Split 10 yards from the Tight End - 1 yard deep in the backeld Split End- Split 10 yards from the offensive Tackle on the line of scrimmage. Twins Right of Twins Left Formation Ball on left hash mark Flanker- align on right hash mark Split End- align 6 yards outside of Flanker Ball middle of eld Flanker- align 10 yards outside the offensive Tackle Split End- align 6 yards outside of Flanker Ball on right hash mark Flanker- align 6 yards inside of Split End Split End- align 5 yards from sideline.

Albany High School Football


Pro Right Spl ker

Tight Right Tigh ker

Heavy Right End

Pro, Tight and Heavy Formations


In these three formations, both the Tight End and the Flanker go to the side of the play call. In the Pro formation, the Split End aligns 10 yards outside of the Offensive Tackle. In the Tight formation, the Split End aligns where a Tight End would align 4 feet outside of the Offensive Tackle. We may also use two true Tight Ends with this formation. In the Heavy formation, the Split End lines up on the call side outside the Flanker. (Remember the 5 yard sideline rule for alignment and maintain 6 yard Split End / Flanker spacing) Right Split End Tight End Flanker

Falcon Right Split End Tight End Slot Back Flanker

Right And Falcon Formations


In these two formations, both the Tight End and the Flanker go to the side of the play call. In the Right Formation, a Tight End will line up like a Flanker as a offensive threat. The Flanker will align on the line of scirmmage. (Dont forget the 5 yard sideline rule) In the Falcon formation the Flanker remains off the line, but is split out further. An Offensive Back will move into a normal Flanker position as a Slot Back. The Quarterback will operate from a Shotgun alignment.

Formations

Albany High School Football

Formations

Twins Right Tight End Split End

Flanker

Twins Right Flex Tight End Flanker Split End

Spread Split End Slot Back Flanker Split End

Twins, Twins Flex and Spread Formations


In these three formations, the Flanker and the Split End both go to the side of the play call. In the Twins formation, the Tight End aligns normally away from the play call. In the Twins Flex formation, the Tight End aligns where a Split End would align 10 yards outside of the Offensive Tackle. We may also use two Split Ends with this formation. In the Spread formation, both ends are split out. An Offensive Back will take up a slot position opposite the play call. (Remember the 5 yard sideline rule for alignment and maintain 6 yard receiver spacing) Wishbone Split End Split End

Wishbone Tight Right Split End Tight End

Wishbone 2 Right Tight End Split End

Albany High School Football


1 Slant

Split Receivers- 3 step slan Tight End - Release down f away from slants. Quarterback- Turn and throw

2 Out

Quick 3-step and out

Solid 6-step and out

Single Receiver- Sharp Inside Receivers- Roll t Tight End - Drag. Outside receiver- Probably will receive other play call to draw defenders

Dashed lines show what might happen on a two receiver side. Solid lines are for single receiver side.

3 Curl

Quick 6-step and turn in

Solid 8 to 10-step and turn in

All Receivers- Proper steps to face Quarterback with ha receive ball immediately. If ball is not thrown yet. Slowly move to center.

4 Hitch

Quick 6-step and turn out comeback to ball

Solid 8 to 10-step and turn out

All Receivers- Proper steps swing shoulders around tow Work back towards the line of scrimmage to receive ball. Ball should be thrown low and to outside.

5 Slip

Quick One hard step, then loop towards Tackle

Receivers- Take the first ste off route to run an arc towar line. Quarterbacks- One step and throw

Passing

Patterns

Albany High School Football

Patterns

6 Bubble

Inside Receivers- Step back, jog,look for ball. Tight End - Drag. Outside receiver- Probably will receive other play call to draw defenders or block as this pass is behind line of scrimmage. Quarterbacks- One step and throw

Narrow splits!

7 Post 8 Flag
7
Post- goes toward goalpost Flag- goes toward sideline

Passing

Only run out of Solid (7yds) Receivers- Attack upfield, c away and then run on new angle against man or try to find space against the zone.

pillars to make the mall flags were used. Therefore, running a Flag meant to run to the flags rather than the goal post

9 Wheel

Inside Receivers- Run arc through space behind outside receiver. Do not make the arc too shallow (close to the scrimmage line) Tight End - Drag. Outside receiver- Probably will receive other play call to draw defenders

0 Fade

Qu 3-s look for ball

d ps, release step look after a few more steps

1 Slant 2 Out 3 Curl 4 Hitch 5 Slip 6 Bubble 7 Post 8 Flag 9 Wheel 0 Fade

Backside Receiver Rules If a single number is called all receivers run this pattern. example: Quick 0 - all receivers run the fade. If two numbers are called then the backside receiver(s) aways runs a post unless they are a Tight End, who must run a drag. The exception to the single digit rule is the Dive pass. On this the receiver away from the play will run a post.
9

Albany High School Football

Quick

vs. 4-4

vs. 4-3 E T T E E T N T

vs. 5-2 E

Solid

vs. 4-4

vs. 4-3 E T T E E T N T

vs. 5-2 E

Boot

vs. 4-4

vs. 4-3 E T T E E T N T

vs. 5-2 E

Dive Pass

Sprint Out

vs. 4-4 E T T E E T T

vs. 4-3 E E T N T

vs. 5-2 E

vs. 4-4

vs. 4-3 E T T E E T N T

vs. 5-2 E

Bootleg

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Passing

Protection

vs. 4-4

vs. 4-3

vs. 5-2

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Dive vs 44

Dive vs. 4-4 C B E

S B T B T E B C

Dive vs. 4-4 TED C B E

S B T B T E B C

Running

Dive vs. 4-4 Down Scheme C B E

S B T B T E B C

Dive vs. 4-4 Gap C B E

S B T B T E B C

Dive Weak vs. 4-4 C B E

S B T B T E B C

11

Albany High School Football


S B E B T T B E C C

Dive vs. 4-3 TED C

S B E B T T B E

S C

12

Running Dive vs 43

Dive vs. 4-3

Albany High School Football

Running Dive vs 50

Dive vs. 5-2 C

S B E T N B T E S C

Dive vs. 5-2 Over C

S B E T N B T E S C

Dive Weak vs. 5-2 Over C

S B E T N B T E S C

13

Albany High School Football


C C

B E

B T

B T E

Veer vs. 4-3 C E W

S M T T S E

Veer vs. 5-2 C E T B

S B N T E S C

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Running

Veer

Veer vs. 4-4

Albany High School Football

Option

Option vs. 4-4 C B E

S B T B T E B C

Option vs. 4-3

S C E W T M T S E

Running

Option vs. 5-2 C E T B

S B N T E S C

15

DIVE Weak vs. 5-2 Over (Base) F C B E T N B T E S C

DIVE vs. 5-3 (Base) S C B E T M N T B E C

DIVE vs. 5-3 (TED)

S C B E T M N T B E C

16

SLANT vs. 4-4 S H B E T B B T E B H

SLANT Weak vs. 4-4 S H B E T B B T E B H

SLANT vs. 4-3


S

H W E T M T S E

17

SLANT Weak vs. 4-3 S H W E T M T S E H

SLANT vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

SLANT Weak vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

18

COUNTER DIVE vs. 4-4 S H B E T B B T E B H

COUNTER DIVE Weak vs. 4-4 S H B E T B B T E B H

COUNTER DIVE vs. 4-3 S C W E N M T S E S C

19

COUNTER DIVE Weak vs. 4-3 S C W E T M T S

S C

COUNTER DIVE vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

COUNTER DIVE Weak vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

20

OPTION Weak vs. 4-3 S C W E T M T S E S C

OPTION vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

OPTION Weak vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

21

COUNTER OPTION vs. 4-4 S H B E T B B T E B H

COUNTER OPTION Weak vs. 4-4 S H B E T B B T E B H

COUNTER OPTION vs. 4-3 S C W E T M T S E S C

22

COUNTER OPTION Weak vs. 4-3 S C W E T M T S

S C

COUNTER OPTION vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

COUNTER OPTION Weak vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

23

LEAD OPTION vs. 4-4 S H B E B T B T E B H

LEAD OPTION Weak vs. 4-4 S H B E T B B T E B H

LEAD OPTION vs. 4-3 S C W E T M T S E S C

24

LEAD OPTION Weak vs. 4-3 S C W E T M T S

S C

LEAD OPTION vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

LEAD OPTION Weak vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

25

LOAD OPTION vs. 4-4 S H B E T B B T E B H

LOAD OPTION vs. 4-3 S C W E T M T S E S C

LOAD OPTION vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

26

SLANT COUNTER OPTION vs. 4-4 S H B E T B B T E B H

SLANT COUNTER OPTION Weak vs. 4-4 S H B E T B B T E B H

SLANT COUNTER OPTION vs. 4-3 S C W E T M T S

S C

27

SLANT COUNTER OPTION Weak vs. 4-3 S C W E T M T S

S C

SLANT COUNTER OPTION vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

SLANT COUNTER OPTION Weak vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

28

POWER vs. 4-4 S H B E T B B T E B H

POWER vs. 4-3 S C W E T M T S E S C

POWER vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

29

SWEEP vs. 4-4 S H B E B T B T E B H

SWEEP vs. 4-3 S H W E T M T S E S H

SWEEP vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

30

TRAP vs. 4-4 S H B E T B B T E B H

TRAP vs. 4-3 S C W E T M T S E S C

TRAP vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

31

COUNTER TRAP vs. 4-4 S H B E T B B T E B H

COUNTER TRAP vs. 4-3 S C W E T M T S E S H

COUNTER TRAP vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

32

ISOLATION vs. 4-4 S H B E T B B T E B H

ISOLATION vs. 4-3 S C W E T M T S E S C

ISOLATION vs. 5-2 F C B E T N B T E S C

33

DIVE vs. 5-3 S C B E T M N T B E C

OPTION vs. 5-3 S C B E T M N T B E C

VEER vs. 5-3 S C B E T M N T B E C

34

SLANT vs. 5-3 S C B E T M N T B E C

COUNTER DIVE vs. 5-3 S C B E T M N T B E C

COUNTER OPTION vs. 5-3 S C B E T M N T S E C

35

LEAD OPTION vs. 5-3 S C B E T M N T B E C

TRAP vs. 5-3 S C B E T M N T S E C

ISOLATION vs. 5-3 S C B E T M N T B E C

36

POWER vs. 5-3 S C B E T M N T B E C

COUNTER TRAP vs. 5-3 F C B E T M N T B E C

SWEEP vs. 5-3 S C B E T M N T B E C

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DEFENSE
Nose Guard Four-point stance with weight slightly forward and feet square, head up, and eyes on the ball. Alignment Line up nose on ball to 1 feet from ball depending on defensive call, down and distance. Basic Charge Mirror centers movement, using him to fill the centerguard gap, eventually working across his face. Use twohand shiver under the shoulder pads, gaining control of his movement and the line of scrimmage. Rush all passes in proper lane. Drive To (Away) Rip the backside forearm through the play side shoulder of the center and square shoulders in the center-guard gap. Penetrate 1 yard into the backfield and re-direct to the football. Slam Jam the center and accelerate through the centers block. Vs. Drive Block Step into the center, control him, do not pick a side, read the head of the center, fight across his face to the ball. Vs. Reach Block Mirror the centers block staying a man behind, work across the face of the center to the ball, take cutback lane. Vs. Scoop Block Mirror the center along the line of scrimmage; do not allow him to come off and into the linebacker. Vs. Double Team Control the center, when you feel the double team, (a) split the seam, or (b) grab ankles and create a pile at the line of scrimmage. Vs. Pass Rush lane is away from the strong safety. Stance

38

Defensive Tackles Stance Alignment Basic Charge Drive To (Away) Three-point stance with weight slightly forward, feet square to the line of scrimmage, head up. Line up 1-1 feet from the line of scrimmage with feet splitting the outside leg of the offensive tackle. Key the initial movement of the OT. Use two-hand shiver under the shoulder pads of the OT, controlling his movement and the line of scrimmage. Rip the backside forearm through the play side shoulder of the OT, square shoulders into the guardtackle gap. Penetrate 1 yard into the backfield, redirect to the ball. Open step, aiming point is one whole man outside. Get into the hip pocket of the OT or OG; follow down the line of scrimmage. Step into the OT, control him, do not pick a side, and squeeze the OT down inside the LOS, using him to fill the gap while constricting the OT area. Step into the OT, maintain outside leverage, flattening the block of the OT widening any plays along the line of scrimmage. Dont be hooked. Step into the OT, flattening the block of the OT while keeping him off the linebacker. Close down hard looking for trap, keeping shoulders square to and on the line of scrimmage. Control the OT, when you feel the double team, (a) split the seam, or (b) grab ankles and create a pile. Rush lane is an inside up-field rush.

Loop Vs. Pull Vs. Drive Block Vs. Hook Block Vs. Inside Release

Vs. Double Team Vs. Pass

39

Defensive Ends Stance Alignment Anchor Drive To (Away) Two-point stance. Head up on the TE in normal alignment, up to 1-2 yards split from the DT. Straight-up alignment and charge. Stay square on the line of scrimmage. Read the movement of the TE. Rip the backside forearm through the play side shoulder of the TE, square shoulders into the tackletight end gap. Penetrate one yard into the backfield and re-direct to the football. On split 3-5 of tight end, align splitting inside leg of offensive receiver. Split outside leg of the tight end or same relative position. On Eagle, split outside leg of OT. Penetrate the guard tackle gap from stack. Key TE, near RB, and football. Whip him in his tracks; create distance, keeping outside arm and leg free. Use 2-hand shiver. Fight pressure through Tight ends head; keep shoulders parallel to the line of scrimmage. Fight inside. Jam tight end into gap. Fight outside, keeping outside arm and leg free. Deliver with inside shoulder and forearm. Stay along the line of scrimmage, ride tight end wide. Step with tight end to the inside; stay square to the line of scrimmage. Expect kick-out block by the near back. Do not penetrate. Squeeze off the running lane. Jab out and respect his initial movement. If you read, (a) option, then take QB, (b) near back kick-out block, then squeeze inside, (c) OG kick-out block, then stuff him to the inside with back side shoulder. Stay on the line of scrimmage and check for reverse. Be only as deep as the football. Keep outside leverage. Get to QB outside-in. Rush all passes, outside leverage to the ball.

Inside Technique Weak Alignment Hatchet Triangle Vs. Drive Block Vs. Turn-out Block Vs. Hook Block Vs. Down Block

Vs. Arc Release

Vs. Play Away Vs. Bootleg Vs. Pass

40

Linebackers Stance Alignment Eagle Basic Read Vs. Drive Block Vs. Hook Block Vs. Cutoff Block Two-point with weight on balls of feet, feet parallel and even. Knees slightly in. Split the outside leg of the OG, at the depth of 4 yards from the line of scrimmage. Split the inside leg of the OT. Read the head of the OG. Deliver with inside shoulder and forearm, keep shoulders parallel to the line of scrimmage, and the outside arm and leg free. Shuffle out and up, drive inside shoulder and forearm into him diverting him down the line while working outside. Pursue the ball inside out. On flow away, take on with backside shoulder and forearm. Square up on him and divert him flat down the line of scrimmage, reading for the cutback. Do not overrun the play. Step up expecting either Isolation or Trap. If Trap, step out and look for OT down block. Dont get collapsed inside. If Isolation, attack the FB with shoulders square, as deep as possible using the FB to fill the C-G gap. Keep outside arm and leg free. Step up behind OGs butt and deliver on inside fold by tackle and react to counter and cutback. Control area if back fills, then shuffle to outside ready to defeat down-block of TE. Once outside of OT attack up field, stay inside out on ball. Dont overrun. Control area if back fills, then shuffle across to the point of attack. Drop to the hook area; keep the nearest receiver to your side, head on a swivel, talk.

Vs. Down Block

Vs. OG Out Block Vs. Pulling Guard (To) Vs. Pulling Guard (Away) Vs. Pass

41

Cornerbacks
Stance Alignment Basic Read Blue Coverage Gold Coverage Vs. Option Vs. Sweep Outside foot back, bend at the ankles, knees, and hips. 1 yard inside wide receiver and 7 yards deep. Play your zone, then man in your zone, then the football. If two receivers are in your zone, split the two, and then react to the football. Be deeper than the deepest man. Deep outside , no rotation, 3-deep coverage. field, no rotation, 4-deep coverage. Strong side slow play force. Weak side pitch responsibility. Strong side Slow play force. Weak side contain, get up field as fast as you can and force the play back to the inside.

Strong Safety
Stance Alignment Basic Read Blue Coverage Gold Coverage Vs. Option Vs. Sweep Vs. Off Tackle Vs. Play Away Outside foot back, bend at the ankles, knees and hips. 1 yard outside of the TE and 4 yards deep. Blue align to the strength. Hash align to the wide side. Hard force on run to. Vs. pass flat responsibility, read the triangle (nearest receiver, near back, and ball). Pitch on option. Flat responsibility. No rotation. 3-deep coverage. field, no rotation, 4-deep coverage. Pitch responsibility. Contain. Get up field as fast as you can and force play back to the inside. Be prepared to take on the play as the DE bounces it out to you. Close flat inside keeping outside leverage on the ball. Adjust to proper pursuit angle as play develops.

Free Safety
Stance Alignment Basic Read Outside leg back, bend at the ankles, knees, and hips. 11 yards deep on the weak side OG. Play your zone, then the man in your zone, then the football. If two receivers are in your zone, split the two and react to the ball. Be deeper than the deepest receiver. Force inside out on running plays. Deep middle , no rotation, 3-deep coverage. field, no rotation, 4-deep coverage. Inside out force.

Blue Coverage Gold Coverage Vs. Option

42

DEFENSE 50-Base

E SS

T B

N B

T E

C F

Position Strong End Weak End Strong Tackle Weak Tackle Nose Guard Strong LB Weak LB Strong Safety Free Safety Strong CB Weak CB

Alignment Head up on TE Outside leg TE Outside Leg OT Outside Leg OT Head up on C Outside Leg G Outside Leg G 1x4 outside TE 11 yards weak G 1x7 inside FL 1x7 inside SE

Technique Anchor Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read

Key Triangle Triangle Tackle Tackle Center Triangle Triangle Triangle/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball

43

DEFENSE 50-Drive To

E SS

T B

N B

C F

Stance Strong End Weak End Strong Tackle Weak Tackle Nose Guard Strong LB Weak LB Strong Safety Free Safety Strong CB Weak CB

Alignment Technique Head up on TE Anchor Head up on TE Fire man behind TE Outside Leg OT Basic Read Head up on OT Drive step strong Head up on C Drive step strong Outside leg OG Basic Read Outside leg OG Basic Read 1x4 outside TE Basic Read 11 yds weak OG Basic Read 1x7 inside FL Basic Read 1x7 inside SE Basic Read

Key Triangle Triangle Tackle Guard/Tackle Guard/Center Triangle Triangle Triangle/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball

44

DEFENSE 50-Drive Away

E SS

T B

N B

C F

Position Strong End Weak End Strong Tackle Weak Tackle Nose Guard Strong LB Weak LB Strong Safety Free Safety Strong CB Weak CB

Alignment Technique Head up on TE Fire man behind TE Outside leg TE Basic Read Head up on OT Drive step weak Outside leg OT Basic Read Head up on C Drive step weak Outside leg OG Basic Read Outside leg OG Basic Read 1x4 outside TE Basic Read 11yd weak OG Basic Read 1x7 inside FL Basic Read 1x7 inside SE Basic Read

Key Triangle Triangle Guard/Tackle Tackle Guard/Center Triangle Triangle Triangle/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball

45

DEFENSE 50-Pinch

E SS C

N B

E B C

Position Strong End Weak End Strong Tackle Weak End Nose Guard Strong LB Weak LB Strong Safety Free Safety Strong CB Weak CB

Alignment Head up on TE Head up on TE Head up on OT Head up on OT Head up on C Outside leg OG Outside Leg OG 1x4 outside TE 11yds weak OG 1x7 inside FL 1x7 inside SE

Technique Fire Fire Drive Drive Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read

Key Tackle/End Tackle/End Guard/Tackle Guard/Tackle Center Triangle Triangle Triangle/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball

46

DEFENSE 50-Eagle Out Go/50-Eagle In

E SS

T B

T B

C F

Position Strong End Weak End Strong Tackle Weak Tackle Nose Guard Strong LB Weak LB Strong Safety Free Safety Strong CB Weak CB

Alignment Outside leg TE Outside leg OT Outside leg OT Outside leg OG Strong side leg C Outside leg OG Inside leg OT 1x4 outside TE 11yd weak OG 1x7 inside FL 1x7 inside SE

Technique Anchor Loop (out/go) Fire (in) Basic Read Loop (out/go) Drive (in) Slam Basic Read C/G gap (out/go) Basic Read (in) Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read

Key Triangle Triangle Tackle Tackle Center Triangle Ball Triangle/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball

47

DEFENSE 50-Stack (Hatchet)

E SS

T B

N B

T E C F

Position Strong End Weak End Strong Tackle Weak Tackle Nose Guard Strong LB Weak LB Strong Safety Free Safety Strong CB Weak CB

Alignment Head up on TE Stack behind OT Outside leg OT Outside leg OT Head up on C Outside leg OG Outside leg OG 1x4 outside TE 11yd weak OG 1x7 inside FL 1x7 inside SE

Technique Anchor Basic Read Fire (Hatchet) Basic Read Basic Read Drive (Hatchet) Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read

Key Triangle Ball Tackle Tackle (Ball) Triangle Triangle Triangle Triangle/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball

48

DEFENSE 50-Bear

E SS B C

T B

C F

Position Strong End Weak End Strong Tackle Weak Tackle Nose Guard Strong LB Weak LB Strong Safety Free Safety Strong CB Weak CB

Alignment Head up on TE Outside leg OT Outside leg OG Outside leg OG Head up on C Outside leg OT Inside leg OT 1x4 outside TE 11yd weak OG 1x7 inside FL 1x7 inside SE

Technique Anchor Anchor Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Eagle Eagle Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read Basic Read

Key Triangle Triangle Guard Guard Center Tackle/Ball Tackle/Ball Triangle Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball

49

DEFENSE 50-Tank Man

E S

B C F

B C

Position Strong End Weak End Strong Tackle Weak Tackle Nose Guard Strong LB Weak LB Strong Safety Free Safety Strong CB Weak CB

Technique Loop outside, Quick contain Squeeze outside in, Quick contain Head up on OT Pinch Head up on OT Pinch Head up on C Drive To Head up on OG Read Head up on OG Blitz A gap Inside shoulder of TE Blitz C gap 4 yards Slide to inside Lock on TE shoulder TE 8 yards 1x7 inside FL Lock on FL 1x7 inside SE Lock on SE

Alignment Outside shoulder of TE Relative

Key Near Back Near Back OTs Block OTs Block Cs Block Triangle Ball Ball Man to man Man to man Man to Man

50

DEFENSE 50-Stinger Man

E S

B C F

B C

Position Strong End Weak End Strong Tackle Weak Tackle Nose Guard Strong LB Weak LB Strong Safety Free Safety Strong CB Weak CB

Alignment Outside shoulder TE Relative Outside shoulder OT Head up on OT Head up on C Head up on OG Head up on OG 1x4 inside TE 6 yards deep 1x7 inside FL 1x7 inside SE

Technique Loop Quick Contain Squeeze Quick Contain Loop outside Drive To Drive To Blitz B gap Read Lock on TE Slide step up Blitz A gap Lock on FL Lock on SE

Key Near Back Near Back Read OT/TE Read OT/OG Read C/OG Ball Triangle Man to man Ball Man to man Man to man

51

DEFENSE 50-Under Griffin Strong

T B

N B

C F

Position Strong End Weak End Strong Tackle Weak Tackle Nose Guard Strong LB Weak LB Strong Safety Free Safety Strong CB Weak CB

Alignment T/TE Gap Relative 1x2 Vs. TE head up G/T Gap Head up on OT Weak side A Gap Head up on OG Head up on OG Outside shoulder TE 11 yards middle 1x7 inside FL 1x7 inside SE

Key OT/TE Near back / Flat coverage Blitz B Gap OG/OT Read OT Blitz A Gap C/OG Basic Read Triangle Basic Read Triangle Loop Quick Near back contain Flat coverage Deep middle Zone Deep outside Zone Deep outside Zone

Technique Blitz C Gap Quick contain

52

DEFENSE 50-Under Stack Blue

E S

T B

N B

T E C F

Position Strong End Weak End Strong Tackle Weak Tackle Nose Guard Strong LB Weak LB Strong Safety Free Safety Strong CB Weak CB

Alignment Head up on TE Walk Away OG/OT Gap Head up on OT Weak side A Gap Head up on OG Head up on OG 1x4 outside TE 11 yd Weak OG 1x7 inside FL 1x7 inside SE

Technique Stuff TE Flat coverage Blitz Gap Outside in Blitz Gap Basic Read Basic Read Flat Coverage Deep middle Deep outside Deep outside

Key Rush-outside in Zone OG/OT/Rush OT/Contain C/OG/Rush Hook zone Hook zone Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball Zone/Man/Ball

53

DEFENSE 6-5 Goal Line

E B C
Position Nose Guards Defensive Tackles Defensive Ends Middle LB Outside LBs

N M

T B

C
Alignment Inside foot on outside foot of C Head-up on OT Outside shoulder of tight end Head up on C 4 yards off ball Split the inside leg of TE. 4 yards deep Technique Drive trough the center/guard gap. Drive low and hard through the OTs inside hip. Drive through the outside shoulder of the tight end. Read flow. Move laterally with flow. Key Get penetration. Establish new LOS. Control G/T gap.

Cornerbacks

1x6 inside WR or 3x6 outside TE

Establish new LOS Squeeze off-tackle area. Quick contain. Square up in hole. Dont allow any yardage. Square up in hole Flow to you - step up and fill off tackle and dont allow any yardage. area. Flow outside step up & penetrate inside out. Flow away Shuffle to G/T gap and check for counter. Slow play; dont Ultimate contain on react too soon. run to your side.

54

6-5 Goal Line (Man-to man Assignments)

Pro Set
#3 #1 #2 E C B T N N M T B E C #4 #5

Wishbone or Full T
#3 #2 #4

#1 E C B T N N M T B E

#5

Twins
#3 #1 #2 E B C T N M N T B C #4 #5 E

55

DEFENSE 80 Goal Line

N M

Position Nose Guards (N) Tackles (T) Linebackers (B) Defensive Ends (E) Cornerbacks (C) Middle LB (M)

Alignment C/G Gap G/T Gap T/TE Gap Outside shoulder TE 3x3 outside Head up on C. 2 yards deep.

Technique Step Down (on C) with inside foot. Deliver with inside forearm pivot back into C/G Gap. Down then up. Get under the block. If you fall down, get up in the gap. Same as Tackle Read 2nd receiver. Hand-shiver the TE. Quick contain. Read 1st receiver. Ultimate Contain. Read Ball. Go with the flow.

Key C/G Gap G/T Gap T/TE Gap 2nd Receiver 1st Receiver BALL rd 3 Receiver

56

DEFENSE 80 Goal Line (Man to man Assignments)

#2

#3

#4

E
#1

N M

E
#5

57

DEFENSE Secondary Coverage

BLUE

Deep

Deep F C Hook Curl (Flat) B B Hook Curl S

Deep

C Flat

GOLD
Play Deepest Man in Zone

C F

Hook Curl B B

58

Philosophy of the Kicking Game

Offensive Kicking Game Our offensive kicking game consists of five parts: 1. Kickoff Return 2. Punt Protection Coverage 3. Place Kick Protection Coverage 4. Fake Field Goal 5. Fake Punt Every phase of the kicking game is extremely important and we must prepare ourselves for any and all possible chances to gain an advantage on our opponents. At the same time we must minimize mistakes in our kicking game so that our opponents do not have the opportunity to gain an advantage over us. Offensive Kicking Game: Mistakes here will either cost you points on the scoreboard or valuable field position. No other phase of the game penalizes a team more. For example, a blocked punt will cost a team 40-60 yards and possibly a touchdown. The missed extra point of field goal can make the difference in winning or losing the game. On the positive side, the successful place kick very often gives you the winners edge. The well-executed return puts great mental pressure on your opponent in an evenly played ball game. This is true of kickoff returns as well. A well-executed return puts us in good field position so that we can immediately open up with all of our offensive artillery. A team with a strong kicking game is seldom outclassed. Rules you should know: 1. Fair catcher does not have to catch the ball, but if he does he may not advance it more than TWO steps. Never tackle a man who has given a fair catch signal. 2. When downing the ball, dont leave it until the whistle blows. 3. Dont let the ball go into the end zone or it comes out to the 20-yard line. Instead, bat the ball back onto the field of play.

59

Defensive Kicking Game It is this aspect of the kicking game that many teams will let up on and consequently lose many opportunities to gain an edge on their opponents. A kickoff that is not well covered allows your opponent to use its entire offense instead of a limited offense that they would have to use if they were closer to their goal line. A good punt return often demoralizes an opponent to the extent that we may get on the scoreboard before they have a chance to regroup. Every single punt or place kick block must have excellent timing and execution. Again, from the psychological aspect, a team that blocks a punt or a field goal attempt very often gets revitalized and completely changes the complexion of the game. DO NOT treat any aspect of the kicking game lightly. Strive for perfect timing and execution on every play. This way, we will put great pressure on our opponent to either match our kicking game or to completely outclass offensively and defensively. We must not and will not be outclassed from the opening whistle to the final gun.

Special Teams Kickoff


-Special Teams are a crucial part of a football game

Kickoff Return
-Special Teams play makes up of each game.

Punt Punt Return

-Special Teams depend on 2nd, 3rd, and 4th efforts. -Special Teams can win or lose a football game.

Extra Point
-Special Teams must have PRIDE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Field Goal

60

Extra Point and Field Goal (Fake Pass Routes)

7 yards

H K

- Elbows on knees - Anchor outside Leg - Step down with inside foot (inter-lock)

61

Punt

5 yards 6 yards

13 yards

Ends: Run through the defender directly to the ball. Linemen: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1st step with outside foot at 45 angle (hinge step) Stay in lanes!!!!! 5 yards between lanes. Hold block for 2 seconds. If uncovered, go directly downfield.

Blocking Backs: 1. Responsible for center-guard gaps. 2. The become outside contain. Up Back: Step up in center after the snap and take the first man that shows. Center: First responsibility is to make a perfect snap. Punter: 1. Catch the Football. 2. Get the punt off. 3. Become the safety.

62

Punt Return (Right) Vs. Tight Punt

SS

E B
Fake Screen Draw

N B

Pressure Punt Last 2 men on wall

#1 Defender

Set wall up on hash harks, 5 yards apart. Look back inside and up field.

63

Punt Return (Right) Vs. Split Punt

SS H

E B
Fake Screen Draw

N B

E S

Pressure Punt Last 2 men on wall

#1 Defender

64

Hold Return

SS

S
Double Team 5 yards Double Team

-Step up and pass block

65

Kickoff Coverages
We will always kickoff with for goals: 1. 2. 3. 4. Prevent the return from knowing where the ball will be kicked. To make them adjust to our strategy. To recover every short kick. To keep all returns inside the 25 yard line on long kicks.

AREA D
10 20 30 40 50

AREA B

AREA E AREA C AREA A

** A kickoff is a free ball once it passes the 50-yard line. The ROVER is always on the move either toward or away from the ball placement. He should always end up in position to be around the ball. His movement is a method of confusing the opponents blocking assignments.

66

Area A Coverage

L5

L4

L3

L2

L1

R2

R3

R4

R5

Area B Coverage

L5

L4

L3

L2

L1

R2

R3

R4

R5

67

Area C Coverage

L5

L4

L3

L2

L1

R2

R3

R4

R5

Area D Coverage

L5

L4

L3

L2

L1

0 K

R2

R3

R4

R5

68

Area E Coverage

L5

L4

L3

L2

L1

0 K

R2

R3

R4

R5

69

Kick Return

50

40

30

20

DROP TO A DISTANCE 5 YARDS FROM BALL

10

GO Call when caught

70

Quarterback Techniques Open step to play side, on the third step reach back with both hands and ride the dive back into the LOS as you hand off. DIVE Dive back will drive the inside hip of the offensive tackle. The accelerate to the corner. Open step as on dive, and hand the ball off at the mesh point which is the outside hip of the offensive tackle, then accelerate VEER to the corner. Vs. 5-man front open at 180, vs. a 4-man front open at 90 and bring backside foot parallel, hand off as deep as possible. SLANT Accelerate to the corner. Open step away from play side and bring other foot parallel. The third step is a reverse at 120 bringing the other foot COUNTER DIVE parallel, then hand the ball off. Accelerate to the corner. Landmark is the center guard gap. Open step at 180 bringing backside foot parallel. Hand the ball TRAP off similar to slant. Accelerate to the corner. Same as dive to the mesh point. Then use the mechanics of OPTION optioning the pitch key. COUNTER OPTION Same as counter dive to the mask point. Then use the mechanics of optioning the pitch key. Drop step-hop step, then use the mechanics of optioning the LEAD OPTION pitch key. Fake slant to nearside back, then hand off to the offside back BELLY into the off tackle area. Reverse pivot and hand the ball off to the offside running back. POWER Then bootleg in the opposite direction of the action. Reverse pivot and toss the ball to the offside running back. SWEEP Then bootleg in the opposite direction of the action. Reverse out at 180 and hand the ball off as deeply as possible. ISOLATION Same as power to the mesh point. Fake to the offside back, and then turn toward the LOS. Hand the ball off to the onside back, COUNTER TRAP this is an inside handoff.
Mechanics of Optioning the Pitch Key: The quarterback must occupy the man responsible for him on the option and not allow him to take an effective angle of pursuit to the pitch. At the mesh point, do not put the ball in, but ride alongside the hip of the running back. Then: 1. 2. Sprint directly at the inside shoulder of the pitch key. Attack into the LOS (downhill). Throttle down slightly to make the pitch key take you. If he plays along the line of scrimmage (feathers) or plays the pitch back, accelerate up field. If he closes to take you, execute the pitch. Sneak-a-peak!!!

3. Execute the pitch by extending your arm outward toward the pitch back and dropping your thumb toward the ground while pushing with your fingers. Fall away from the defender so as to cushion the blow that will most likely ensue. NEVER pitch without looking.

Appendix

71

Running Back Techniques DIVE AND OPTION 6 directional step with the play side foot at the inside hip of the tackle. Run to daylight and look for the cutback. 6 lateral step with the play side foot then run at the outside hip VEER of the offensive tackle. Vs. 5-man front - 6directional step at the butt of the center. SLANT Read his block and run to daylight. Vs. 4-man front - 6 directional step at the butt of the guard. Read his block and look to the inside. On dive, veer, and slant you open step, crossover step and run in PITCHBACK the proper pitch relationship to the quarterback (4yds. Out and 4yds. Deep). Hands should be in position to take the pitch on the third step. The pitch relationship is the running backs responsibility. COUNTER DIVE & Dive Back - 6 jab step directly at the quarterback. Then run at COUNTER OPTION the center/guard gap. Exaggerate jab step with head, shoulder and elbow action. Be sure to be squared up when approaching the line of scrimmage. Pitch Back jab step straight ahead to show dive action. Then whip elbow back, turn and run the pitch route. Dive Back - Offside back runs behind the trap of the guard. TRAP Pitch Back Run pitch route. Lead Back Run an arc course; keep outside leverage on the LEAD OPTION first defender that shows outside the pitch key. Stay up on his outside breast. If he comes across the line too quickly, merely ride him out. Pitch Back Run pitch route. Onside Halfback Kick out the last man on the LOS. POWER Offside Halfback Receive handoff, run parallel to the LOS, then plant outside foot and cut inside the kick out block. Onside Halfback Turn up inside 1st guard and lead ball carrier. SWEEP Offside Halfback Receive pitch, stay deep, and break up field behind the 1st guards kick out block and behind offside guard and lead back. Onside Halfback Lead ball carrier through the running lane. ISOLATION Block the first man that shows in the running lane. Offside Halfback Keep shoulders parallel to the LOS. Take a lateral step, crossover step, and receive the handoff on the third step. Run to daylight. Offside Halfback Fake power. COUNTER TRAP Onside Halfback Jab step laterally away from trap block, then take inside handoff and break up field behind the pulling guards trap block.

Appendix

72

Wide Receiver Blocking Techniques


Slow Blocking:
The slow block is a very effective method of neutralizing a defender, but it takes determination and patience to execute the block properly. There are some basic differences in the technique to be used when slow blocking the pitch support defender, in contrast to the defender responsible for the deep . Let us assume that we are facing a seven man front with four deep secondary versus our twin formation and we have called one of the following plays; Option, Counter Option, or Lead Option to the formation side. The wide receivers would block all three plays exactly the same, and they would block as if the ball were pitched on all three plays. Because of our width we would anticipate the strong safety taking the pitch support defensive assignment and the corner to be responsible for the deep . Both receivers would release downfield for the first three steps exactly the same, reading the defense as they run. Flanker: The flanker is responsible for the pitch support and he anticipates the strong safety reacting up on his read. The flanker will run off after his first three steps, but under control, reading both defenders. If the strong safety reacts up, the flanker will maintain a cushion of three or four yards and break down with one yard outside leverage. It is important to keep the three to four yard cushion because if the difference exceeds four yards, the defender can build up to much momentum and run through the blocker. When the flanker breaks down he maintains a good base by keeping his feet at least shoulder width, drops his tail and bulls his neck with his eyes on the defenders numbers. He must be ready for the defender to fake and alter his course or run through him. If the defender alters his course to get more width, the flanker will uncoil into the defender with his heck bulled and the facemask on the numbers. It is important that the flanker not become overextended during the initial contact. With the defenders momentum temporarily neutralized, the flanker must fight to maintain his outside leverage and recoil to butt again and again. When working with the receivers on slow block technique, we tell them that the block takes forever. The goal of the flanker on any of these plays is to run effectively enough to make the defender skate backward. We do not want the flanker coming downfield and breaking down two or three yards from the LOS. The slow block is most effective when it occurs in the defensive secondary and not close to the LOS. When the flankers first contact is six to seven yards downfield, he can afford to be less aggressive in order to give ground slowly and maintain his proper leverage. With a pitch in this situation, and a soft corner, we will have a big gain on any of our option plays. If the corner rotates up for the pitch support assignment, the flanker re-directs on a kick-out angle toward the defender. Our slow block principles are still applied but now we will create a running lane inside for the ball carrier by forcing the corner wide. As the flanker approaches the corner he eyes the inside breast of the as his target for the initial contact. The flanker will use his slow block technique by butting and recoiling, thus forcing the defender to go wide and keeping leverage so he cannot release downfield. There are situations in which a reverse cross-body block is more appropriate for the flanker to use on the rotating corner. This is especially true if the corner rotates very quickly and the flanker loses a good slow block angle.

Appendix

73

Split End: The split ends assignments on the option plays are the same, the deep . He can afford to sprint downfield at full speed, reading the secondary. If the corner rotates up, the split end passes him up and continues his sprint downfield eying up his target, which now becomes the defender on the flanker. The split end applies his slow block technique similar to the flanker but the big difference is that his block is normally much deeper in the secondary. It is possible to just have the split end run his take off position assuming that someone has to cover him in the deep . If the secondary ignores his pattern, the halfback pass is an effective weapon to keep them honest. If our receivers read man coverage on any of these option plays, they will both automatically run off.

Inside Out Block (Dive, Counter Dive, Slant):


When a play is called that will break inside of our relative position with the play action to the twin set, the wide receivers will block the defender that lines up on him. For all these inside plays, the wide receiver will sprint downfield on an angle that will give them an inside out block. Because the inside plays develop so much quicker than our options, the receivers cannot maintain a three to four yard cushion. We want them to make contact at the intersection points and keep their feet as long as possible. Unfortunately, the receivers cannot tell which way the back is cutting after he clears the LOS. If the receiver breaks down with a cushion, he will be reacting on the defenders movement to get to the ball carrier and by then he is too late to be effective. The receivers will have a tendency to want to look inside at the developing play to see if the back is going to clear the LOS. It must be stressed in practice that the receivers assignment is to keep their eyes on the target at all times. The ball carrier that clears the LOS will cut off the downfield block.

Cross-Field Blocking (All plays with the action going away from the receiver):
When a play is called that will cause the defender to rotate away in their pursuit course, the wide receivers will use two types of blocks, (1) the Cross-body Block, and (2) the Slow Block. The wide receiver must know when to use each of these blocks. Their primary goal is to be able to prevent the secondary defenders from making the tackle. On the snap of the football, both wide receivers will sprint at an angle to intercept their man before he can get the ball carrier. When the wide receiver reaches a point ahead of the defender, he can use his cross-body technique to block, making sure that his head and shoulders are in front of the defender. If there is any question in the receivers mind about the head and shoulders being in front, he will stay up and chase the defender, anticipating the cut back. If the ball carrier does cut back across the grain, our receiver is now in good position to slow block his man. In the chase situation the receiver can use his peripheral vision as he is chasing to determine the cut back possibilities. If it appears that he can be more beneficial to the ball carrier by peeling back toward the LOS, he will do so. When the receiver elects to peel he will block the first wrong colored jersey he sees. As the wide receiver becomes more experienced on crossfield blocking he will make sound decisions regarding whether he should chase or peel. Through the study of films and situations in practice, he will discover how effective his blocking is on the plays away from him. The only time that the wide receiver is wrong is when he is indecisive and blocks no one.

Appendix

74

Crack Block (Lead Option):


The lead option has been a very consistent play for us in our offense. By getting the inside sealed by the flanker and the split end slow blocking the deep , it gives our back the opportunity to cut off the lead backs arc block. Flanker Assignment: First defender inside, off of the LOS, in a linebacker position. On the snap of the ball he will step with his inside foot on a flat angle toward the linebacker. Since we do not have the benefit of a back diving, there is nothing that will hold the linebacker inside unless he waits for the quarterback on the keep. The flanker will not try to maintain a three or four yard cushion and let the linebacker come to him. It must be a full sprint up to one yard from the collision point. We are going to create the widest seam possible to establish a running lane for the back. Since the flanker must block above the waist, the technique is very similar to his initial contact on a slow block without the benefit of a cushion. At one yard from the collision, the flanker will break down with a good base so he can get more explosion and extension. His aiming for the block will be the downfield breast. After his original contact he will recoil and butt, maintaining leverage, to force the linebacker toward the LOS. If the flanker loses the linebacker, we would rather it be inside and not downfield where he can still make the tackle when the back crosses the LOS.

X Block:
The defensive secondary may present some situations where it is desirable to change the wide receivers blocking assignments. For example, if the flanker is getting beat by the strong safety when he slow blocks on pitch support assignments, a change up could solve the problem. A call such as X it between the two wide receivers would mean an X Block would be installed. The cross action between the two receivers appears to be a combo pass pattern to the secondary. When using the X it block, it is important that the split end take an angle that is flat enough that the strong safety cannot sprint by to get the ball carrier. The same blocking can be used vs. a walk-away defender if he is deep enough for the split end to get to him.

Appendix

75

Tight End Blocking Technique

The Arc Block


In the option series, the block of the tight end is critical to the success of the outside attack. The technique of the block will vary with the type of secondary and rotation being faced. The responsibility of the tight end versus a four-deep type of coverage is to block the secondary man responsible for the pitch. The problem is to quickly determine whether corner or safety rotation is being used. At Bishop Maginn, we make this decision by keying the near defensive back. Defenses utilizing as eight man front generally cover the pitch from the LOS. The tight end must be able to distinguish between the two and make the proper adjustment before the snap of the ball. In the first situation he will use his normal arc release and is responsible for blocking the most dangerous defensive back, usually the safety.

Arc Block Technique a. The Release


The release of the tight end is flat across the face of the defensive end. To achieve this he assumes his normal stance with the weight concentrated on the inside leg. This is necessary in order to take the first step with the outside leg. The head should be facing the key with the inside shoulder pulled back forcing the shoulders to remain parallel to the LOS. If the shoulders are allowed to become perpendicular to the LOS the tight end will be unable to cope with force coming quickly to his inside. The lead step is followed by a flat crossover step. The third step should restore proper base and balance. The tight end should now be clear of the defensive end and ready to start his arc path downfield. Throughout the release the body must be kept low and under control. Occasionally an opponent will attempt to create a lost yardage play to the quarterback before he can read and react. The most common method is to fire the defensive end hard and fast inside the tight end. The slam release is an effective counter to this type of penetration. Here the tight end steps toward the defensive end with his near foot, jolts him down the line in order to gain separation, and then proceeds on his normal arc release.

b. The Read
The alignment of the defensive backs will generally tell the tight end who he must block even before the snap of the ball. However, he cannot determine the angle or intensity of the defensive backs approach. Therefore, he must key or read the near back beginning with the first step. The approach route of the defensive back must be determined before the tight end gets him out of position to successfully cope with it.

Appendix

76

c. The Approach
The downfield path of the tight end should be an ever-changing arc determined by aiming the nose of the helmet at the outside leg of the defensive back. This presents the defensive back with the problem of attempting to maintain leverage on the ball while at the same time coming up to force the play as near the LOS as possible. Ideally, the tight end is striving to achieve two objectives; (1) To produce the maximum inside running lane by forcing the defensive back to widen, and (2) To make the block as far downfield as possible thus producing a soft corner. Throughout the approach, the body should be under control with the knees bent and he head up. As contact becomes imminent, the tight end should assume the break down position. This is achieved by a further dropping of the tail, a slight widening of the base, and a rapid chopping of the feet.

d. The Block
The tight end must now execute one of two basic types of arc blocks. The direction, angle, and intensity of the defensive backs approach will dictate the choice. 1. When blocking the normal, cautious type of force, the tight end should work to achieve a squared up position with the defensive back. We describe this as being nose-to-nose and shoulder-to shoulder! This position gives the offensive back the advantage of running either inside or outside the block. To attain this position the tight end, at the moment of contact, must come up out of his legs driving into the outside breastplate of the defensive back and whipping his outside arm up past his ear. This exaggeration of the arm whip will force his hips around into a squared up position. Once this position has been attained the tight end must stay on his feet and continue to block! The arc block is not intended to knock the defender off his feet. This will result in more failures than successes. Instead, the blocker should strive to tie up the defender until the ball has gone by him. This is best achieved by recoiling (regaining a good base and the bend of the knees) after each butt. Failure to stay up is the result either of over-extension or of being pulled off balance laterally. Recoiling is the solution to both problems because it allows the tight end to maintain a low center of gravity. 2. There will be times, either by accident or design, when the tight end will be faced with a very aggressive type of force. If this force is from the outside in, the halfback will be coming hard and fast attempting to squeeze the ball into the smallest possible running lanes. In this situation the tight end should no longer be concerned with depth, but concentrate on gaining width in order to produce the maximum running lane. The shoulders may now be turned parallel to the sideline as the block will be of the kick out type. The tight end must block the defensive back on the downfield shoulder, stay on his feet, and not lose him downfield. Rarely will a defensive back force aggressively inside of the block. To do so would violate his rule of keeping outside leverage on the ball. However, if this does occur, the tight end must react quickly to the inside and seal him off. If necessary as a last resort, the tight end may leave his feet in an attempt to cut down the defensive back.

Appendix

77

Offensive Line Blocking Techniques

Drive Block 1. Step with the near foot directly at the defender. 2. Use your eyes as an aiming point. 3. Upon making contact, roll the wrists and sink the hips, slide the head to the side. 4. Accelerate and rise up in order to use the chest on the defender.

Scramble Block 1. Step with the near foot, explode out at the near hip of the next down lineman to the play side. 2. Drive the offside shoulder into the play side thigh of the down defender and get the head by. 3. Keep a wide base and work on all fours. 4. Do not allow the defender to pursue to play side.

Combo Block 1. Inside blocker uses his normal drive block techniques attempting to handle the defender himself. 2. Outside blocker takes a short lateral step toward the defender and drives the near arm and shoulder into the part of the defender that shows. If the inside blocker can maintain the block alone, the outside blocker then steps up to seal the inside linebacker.

Double Team 1. Both blockers step with near foot directly at the defender to be double-teamed. 2. Both blockers attack the defender with a drive block anticipating that they will have to block him alone. 3. Both blockers strive to close the gap between them by swinging their hips toward each other. 4. Now work as a single unit to move the defender off the LOS. 5. Both blockers must rise up and accelerate as a means of following through.

T 1. Both the guard and tackle step with the near foot directly at the defensive tackle. 2. If the defender slants inside, the guard locks on and hard drives him off the LOS while the tackle steps up on the linebacker. 3. If the defender comes straight up or outside the tackle, the tackle locks on him and the guard releases up on the linebacker.

Appendix

78

Fold 1. Inside offensive lineman steps to the defender to his immediate outside and uses the drive technique. 2. Outside offensive lineman pulls around the inside man cutting off of his butt and stepping up on the linebacker using a drive technique.

TED 1. Tight end releases inside and seals the inside linebacker. 2. Onside guard pulls and drive blocks the inside hip of the defensive end.

Pass Protection Drop Back Protection All offensive linemen utilize a controlled drive technique if covered by a down lineman. If uncovered, check for blitzing linebacker, then help out the center then the tackle, in that order. Sprint Out Protection Onside linemen: use a controlled drive, hit and recoil, maintain for 4 seconds. Center and offside linemen: Use the step and hinge technique. Step with the near foot to the play side gap. If the defender is moving to the play side, jolt him down the LOS. If the defender is using a run around technique, pivot off the play side foot immediately bringing the other foot back in a parallel position at a 45 angle to the LOS. Remain on balance and keep the defender away from the quarterback. If the defender is a linebacker and doesnt blitz, look backside to help the next man down. Quick Onside guard and tackle step to the next defender to play side exploding out at the crotch of the defender. Stop penetration and force the defenders hands down. Continue to drive up field on all fours. Offside Linemen, if covered by down linemen, use a controlled drive block, if uncovered, step to the play side gap and check for blitz. Dive back will fill for the onside guard. Double Center and onside guard: Double-team the nose guard. Onside tackle: Controlled drive block. Dive back: Fill for onside guard. Offside linemen: If covered by down lineman, use a controlled drive block, if uncovered, step to play side gap and check for blitz, then look to help out the backside. Bootleg Offside guard: pull down the line of scrimmage and drive the inside hip of the defensive end. Onside tackle: controlled drive block. Dive back: fill for pulling guard.

Appendix

79