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DECEMBER 7-13, 2011
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Special to The Sun/MARTHA GOETTELMANN
Crawford Oswald (freshman), Mary Barr (sophomore and wrestling manager), Marianne Barr, Jim
Ritchings, Dave Holmes, Central School Principal (former wrestling head coach) Chuck Klaus,
Whit Oswald (senior) and Bill Dengler (on ladder) work on the new wrestling workout facility in the
high school.
A new place to train
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Citizen of the Year
Lions Club looking for 40th
annual recipient. PAGE 14
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
Your copy of the HMS Bulldawg Bulletin Jr. is inside!
By ROBERT LINNEHAN
The Haddonfield Sun
Tanner Street is open for busi-
ness, but there are some missing
details of the newly renovated
street that are leaving merchants
in the dark.
Despite the street sporting a
completely redone surface and
being open to drivers 24-hours a
day, several Tanner Street busi-
ness owners have said that cus-
tomers have yet to return to the
roadway. Joe Brown, executive
chef and owner of Melange, said
he and several other owners are
still waiting for lights to be in-
stalled on Tanner Street. Current-
ly, when the sun goes down the
street turns into a dark alley at
night, Brown said, which does not
attract many shoppers.
Were still waiting on the
lighting. The lights will be eye ap-
pealing when theyre finally in-
stalled. They will make you feel
safe as opposed to walking down a
dark alley at night, he said.
To date, Brown estimates that
he has lost more than $300,000 in
business due to the construction
of the street.
Unlike retail business on the
street, Brown said he deals with
losses on a 24-hour basis, seven
days a week. Everything in the
restaurant is bought fresh, and
nothing is ever frozen, he said, so
his wares cannot sit on the shelf
until they find a buyer.
Its a high-end business for
me. The immediacy of people get-
ting down to Tanner and getting
in here is huge, he said. I have
not seen a direct impact on my
Customers
afraid of
the dark?
Tanner Street merchants still
having trouble attracting
business due to lack of street lights
please see DARK, page 2
By ROBERT LINNEHAN
The Haddonfield Sun
Its a new season with a new
coach and a new state-of-the-art
training facility (actually its
just the old wood working class-
room, but its still better than
the old stinky facility) for the
Haddonfield Memorial High
School wrestling program.
The Bulldogs will open with
their first home match of the
season on Monday, Dec. 19 ver-
sus Audubon in the A Gym.
Last years varsity team fin-
ished the season with a record of
28-2. They were Colonial Confer-
ence Liberty Division Champs,
District 28 champs, ranked first
in Region Seven and eighth in
the state. A season highlight
was their win over Paulsboro
the first time Paulsboros team
had lost at home in the past 40
years.
Haddonfield wrestlers, their
parents, siblings, coaches, the
Wrestling Booster Club, alumni
and fans have also pooled their
energy and resources so the
towns wrestlers have a new
larger space this season.
There has only ever been one
practice facility for youth, mid-
dle school and high school
wrestlers in town. In recent
years, these growing programs
have totaled well over 125 ath-
letes. Even with staggered prac-
tice times, the programs needed
much more space, according to
booster club representatives.
please see WRESTLING, page 5
HMHS wrestlings overhaul
2 THE HADDONFIELD SUN DECEMBER 7-13, 2011
Visit our virtual showroom at www.greenleagardens.com
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business through the street being
opened yet.
The holiday lighting ceremony,
which was held on Friday, Nov. 25,
brought hundreds of visitors to
the street, he said, but very few of
them came into the restaurant.
Wendy Kates, owner of Star-
dust Memories, said the holiday
lighting ceremony was one of the
best nights shes had on the
street. However, because the
lights havent been installed yet,
she had to close her shop at 8 p.m.
I cant be open at night during
the holiday season because the
street is too dark. Nobody wants
to walk down the street to our
businesses when its so dark,
Kates said.
Borough Administrator
Sharon McCullough said the light
fixtures are on order and will be
installed by PSEG. When the fix-
tures come in they will be in-
stalled immediately, she said, and
the borough hopes to have the
project completed by mid-Decem-
ber.
Another issue? The newly in-
stalled parking kiosks, which
Kates said are keeping potential
customers away from Tanner
Street.
I have issues with the borough
as why they would pick Tanner as
a test market for the parking
kiosks. Weve been punished
enough with the construction,
why choose this street? Kates
asked.
Kates estimates that she has
seen at least 10 shoppers come to
the street, look at the kiosks, and
then leave since they were in-
stalled about a month ago.
Were the redheaded stepchil-
dren of downtown Haddonfield,
said Ghislaine Bossard, owner of
Angel Bridal on Tanner Street.
I think the borough has really
dropped the ball, in terms of the
lights, and everyone is blaming
everyone else for these problems
and were not getting any an-
swers for when this is going to be
finished, she said. Wed like to
see an end to this. Wed like to get
answers; we really need closure
down here.
DARK
Continued from page 1
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L. Jean Day
November 25, 2011
On Nov. 25, Jean Day (nee
Bourn), age 95, a Haddonfield res-
ident for 70 years and beloved
wife of the late William E. Day,
author of Haddonfields column
Days of Yore. Loving mother of
W. Alan (Janet) of Reston, VA,
and Rob (Carol) of Medford. Also
survived by four grandsons, Bill,
Tim (Kiren), Scott and Peter
(Lindsay) and a great-grandson,
Jackson. She was predeceased by
a devout longtime companion
Frank Raible.
Jean was a volunteer at Ban-
croft School, and the Haddonfield
Library for over 25 years. She was
a volunteer at the American Can-
cer Society, a counselor for
H.O.P.E., Town Watch captain and
was actively involved in AARP.
She received Haddonfields Sen-
ior Service Award for 2005.
She was employed by The Trav-
elers Insurance Co. in Philadel-
phia and in the classified depart-
ment of The Suburban Newspa-
per Group. She was a kind and
gracious lady who was admired
and well liked by those who knew
her.
Interment was at The Baptist
Cemetery in Haddonfield. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be
made to The Baptist Church
where she had been a member for
almost 60 years or Interfaith
Caregivers, P.O. Box 186, Haddon-
field, N.J. 08033. Arrangements by
Kain-Murphy Funeral Services of
Haddonfield.
William E. Garwood
November 14, 2011
On Nov. 14, 2011, age 92, of Had-
donfield. Survived by his beloved
wife of 65 years, Betty, son John
E. of Portland, Ore., daughter
Deborah A. of New York, and
daughter-in-law Jacqueline Lyd-
ston and grandson Thomas W. L.
Garwood, both of Portland, Ore.
His daughter Christine prede-
ceased him earlier this year.
Garwood was a research
chemist with more than 100
patents to his name. His pioneer-
ing work in organic catalytic
chemistry led to the development
of Mobil One and other synthetic
oils. In retirement he researched
the efficacy of zeolites in reduc-
ing ammonia in the bloodstream,
as a potential means of prevent-
ing cancer.
A memorial service will be
held at 10 a.m. on Dec. 10, at the
Haddonfield United Methodist
Church, 129 Warwick Road, Had-
donfield, where friends may greet
and share with the family follow-
ing the service.
The family asks those who
wish to make contributions in
Bill's memory to consider Fellow-
ship House of South Camden, P.O.
Box 261, Collingswood, N.J. 08108
and the Rotary Club of Haddon-
field Foundation, P.O. Box 383,
Haddonfield, N.J. 08033, for col-
lege scholarships in science.
Mary Davie
(nee MacKenzie)
November 29, 2011
On Nov. 29, age 98, of Allen-
town, formerly of Chestnut
House in Haddonfield and a long-
time Cherry Hill resident, wife of
the late James M. Beloved moth-
er of Marylin D. McNulty (Antho-
ny) of Allentown, N.J. and loving
grandmother of Anthony Davie
McNulty of New York City and
Megan McNulty (Stuart Am-
brose) and of North Hollywood;
cherished great grandmother of
Mackenzie Leigh Ambrose and
much-loved aunt and great aunt
of dozens of nieces and nephews.
Davie had been one of the old-
est living members of the Ash-
land Evangelical Presbyterian
Church, having joined in 1957 and
where she was a member of the
Ladies Guild and served as the
Guilds Secretary and Treasurer.
In addition to being a homemaker
who loved cooking and baking for
her family, she worked at Brom-
ley Lace Mills in Philadelphia
4 THE HADDONFIELD SUN DECEMBER 7-13, 2011
Complete details can be found on our website www.voorheesballettheatre.com
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OBITUARIES
please see OBITUARIES, page 13
DECEMBER 7-13, 2011 THE HADDONFIELD SUN 5
Owned and Operated From Historic Haddonfield
That time is now. Formerly
the high schools woodworking
room, the newly renovated facil-
ity is more than double the size
of the old wrestling room.
Wall mats were recently in-
stalled and the booster club is
still raising money for floor
mats, chin-up bars and a sound
system among other items.
In addition to a new facility,
the Bulldogs have a new coach.
The new head wrestling coach
is former HMHS varsity assis-
tant coach Billy Heverly.
He was a Camden Catholic as-
sistant coach and varsity
wrestler there where he was a
four-time district champion,
four-time region finalist, two-
time region champ, and two-
time state runner-up.
After graduation, Heverly
earned four varsity letters
wrestling for Drexel University.
Heverly is taking over for for-
mer head coach Pete DiPol, who
resigned from his position in the
summer.
DiPol decided to resign from
his position and take the head
coaching job at Gloucester
County College.
For more information, to do-
nate to the new facility or to
sign up your youth wrestler for
the 2011-2012 season, go to
www.haddonfieldwrestling.com.
WRESTLING
Continued from page 1
New coach and facility
for a new year
Tobolsky Law is pleased to an-
nounce that real estate attorney
Sean A. OMara, Esq. has joined
the firm in its Cherry Hill office.
OMara, a Collingswood resident
and Haddonfield native, focuses his
practice in commercial real estate
and land use matters in which he
advises clients on leasing, zoning,
and construction law matters.
He negotiates leases, licenses,
right-of-way and easement agree-
ments on behalf of clients com-
mercial real estate projects.
OMara joins Tobolsky Law
letters to the editor
in our opinion
6 THE HADDONFIELD SUN DECEMBER 7-13, 2011
108 Kings Highway East
Haddonfield, NJ 08033
856-427-0933
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
ROBERT LINNEHAN
Haddonfield Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 108 Kings Highway East, 3rd
Floor, Haddonfield, NJ 08033. It is mailed
weekly to select addresses in the 08033 ZIP
code. If you are not on the mailing list, six-
month subscriptions are available for
$39.99. PDFs of the publication are online,
free of charge. For information, please call
856-427-0933.
To submit a news release, please email
news@haddonfieldsun.com. For advertis-
ing information, call 856-427-0933 or
email advertising@haddonfieldsun.com.
The Sun welcomes suggestions and com-
ments from readers including any infor-
mation about errors that may call for a cor-
rection to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@haddonfieldsun.com, via fax at
856-427-0934, or via the mail. Of course,
you can drop them off at our office, too. The
Haddonfield Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium includ-
ing electronically.
A
cross the country, cities and
school districts are in need of
additional revenue sources. In
New Jersey, and elsewhere, some gov-
erning bodies have turned to selling
advertising space on public property.
The results: Mixed.
The Associated Press recently re-
ported that the response to Bank of
America ads stretched across the
Wabash Avenue Bridge in Chicago has
drawn the publics ire probably not
doing BOA or the city any good.
But the same report cited a school
district in Colorado that now includes
ads on report cards. Parents, it seems,
dont seem to mind at all.
The concept, of course, isnt new.
But, in these challenging times when
taxpayers are demanding breaks and
governing bodies try to maintain re-
spectable levels of services, more and
more are looking at ways to raise addi-
tional funds. And renting out public
space for private advertising is one
way to do just that.
It seems that doing so is a sound
concept so long as the governing
body doesnt go too far.
The AP story quoted experts who
said the bridge ads could be simply
disgusting to the public and viewed by
some as blight. In that instance, no-
body wins.
But, under the right circumstances,
its readily apparent that the public
will accept some form of private ad-
vertising in the public space.
It all comes down to taste. An obnox-
ious sign that simply looks out of
place likely will raise objections. A
less intrusive, and perhaps more rele-
vant, advertising message might be
applauded by the community as a way
to save valuable tax dollars.
Governing bodies should continue
to explore private advertising but be
careful in doing so.
Buy an ad, lower your taxes
But be careful not to cross the line of good taste
Private ads, public spaces
Do you think governing bodies should
explore placing advertisements for
private companies on public proper-
ty?
Nice job with
the leaf removal
On behalf of the canine community of
Haddonfield, I would like to thank the De-
partment of Public Works for leaving the
fallen leaves on the ground as long as possi-
ble. I have no idea what all of those hu-
mans are complaining about, but that
smorgasbord of smells emanating from
those piles is just fantastic. In fact, one of
my absolute favorite things is to plow into
those piles and see what nuggets of treas-
ure I might find. We went visiting over this
Thanksgiving and dogs of Haddonfield; let
me tell you we have it good. My friends in
Audubon, Haddon Heights and
Collingswood tell me the leaves in their
towns are picked up every single week.
That is just such a waste of good smelling.
I cant believe it.
The Saturday after Thanksgiving I was
horrified when we turned on to Kings
Highway and saw, not one, not two, but
three! Yes, three public works trucks and
crews scouring the highway and eradicat-
ing every single leaf on it. I was quite wor-
ried that with all of those trucks out it
would be sayonara to the leaves on my reg-
ular walk, but phew, nope thank goodness
the focus was just on Kings Highway and
the residential streets were left in peace
and glorious leaves.
I dont understand it, but my master was
on the phone all day Saturday going on and
on about double time for unionized
crews. Im sure it had something to do
with all of those lovely leaves being picked
up, but humans, sigh they get outraged at
the dumbest of things. I wish they could re-
ally appreciate the finer things in life, like
a good whiff of ground hog or a piece of
petrified pretzel. Alas their needs are just
so strange.
Anyway I just wish I could lick the face
of the person who made the decision to
leave the fallen leaves on the ground. Your
dogs best friend!
Tugger and Darlene Dziomba
Another opinion
about our schools
Im writing in response to Fred Tendts
letter of several weeks ago.
Evidently in response to my letter of
Oct. 19, Tendt writes that There is no ob-
jective basis to say whether it is or is not
cost-effective to buy $120 math textbooks,
employ one teacher for every 12 students,
or pay a teacher $60,000 per year with a
pension and health benefits, nor is it pos-
sible to judge [teachers] performance[s]
on the basis of profit and loss. He goes on
to say, however, for Haddonfield schools to
remain on top, they must accept the disci-
pline of market prices and consumer
choice. It is unclear how a system with
no objective basis for measuring its cost-
effectiveness and in which it is impossible
to judge teachers performances through
profit and loss should go about accepting
the discipline of market prices and con-
sumer choice. Perhaps he is referring to
something like the semi-privatized (but
highly subsidized) education system pro-
moted by Secretary of Education Arne
Duncan (Race to the Top) in which
money is distributed to schools with stu-
dents with higher test scores and where
teachers are encouraged to teach accord-
ing to a standardized, national curriculum.
Such a system promotes competition over
collaboration and solidarity, but, again,
Tendt prefers to safely remain abstract in-
stead of being specific.
He further states the administration is
not governed by the wishes of parents as
it is not a revenue-generating institu-
tion. While it may not be generating rev-
enue (Tendt doesnt say why a public
school should be expected to), a public
school, by its very nature, is funded by tax-
payers and, consequently, should be re-
sponsive to their wishes.
These things are not exactly what is at
stake in the school districts current situa-
tion though it is something we should be
concerned about as changes are taking
place at the federal and state levels.
Ted Fendt
Al fresco dinning, a great
idea for Haddonfield
This idea of Mr. Nosek of making Had-
please see LETTERS, page 9
DECEMBER 7-13, 2011 THE HADDONFIELD SUN 7
The following items can be
found on file with the Haddon-
field Police Department:
A resident of Grove Street re-
ported to police on Nov. 18 at 8:42
a.m. that sometime overnight his
trash container was stolen. It was
valued at $40.
A Farwood Avenue resident re-
ported to police on Nov. 22 at 4:33
p.m. that there was a burglary in
progress. The officers arrived on
the scene and found that the front
door had been kicked open and
three bedrooms were ransacked.
No suspects were located at the
scene.
A Wellington Avenue resident
reported to police on Nov. 23 at
8:27 a.m. that someone damaged a
section of his fence. He estimated
the damage at about $30.
Sometime around midnight the
night before the victim said he
heard a group of juvenile males
loudly walking by his home.
A resident reported to police
on Nov. 26 at 10:07 p.m. that he saw
two male suspects walking
around his street checking car
handles. He approached the two
suspects and they fled into a
small, white vehicle.
Officers reporting to the scene
could not locate the suspects.
An East Park Avenue resident
reported to police on Nov. 27 at
6:30 p.m. for a burglary. The vic-
tim reported that the suspect
stole cash, jewelry, and electron-
ics.
A Lane of Acres resident re-
ported to police on Nov. 27 at 9:42
p.m. that a suspect tried to enter
his home by breaking a window.
When the suspect realized that
someone was home he or she fled
from the scene. Police could not
locate the suspect.
A Mt. Vernon resident report-
ed to police on Nov. 29 at 10:10 a.m.
that there was an owl tangled up
in a soccer net at a nearby athlet-
ic field. The animal control offi-
cer was contacted and they were
able to remove the owl from the
netting.
The owl was take by the animal
control officer from the scene be-
cause it was still entangled in a
piece of the net. The president of
the Haddonfield Soccer Club was
contacted about the net being cut.
POLICE REPORTS
WEDNESDAY
December 7
FOR ALL
Rising Sun Lodge No. 15, F&AM,
Regular Communication: Haddon-
field Masonic Temple, 16 Kings High-
way East. Members Dinner $10, 6:30
p.m. Lodge Opening at 7:30 p.m.
Visit www.risingsunlodge.org for
more information.
Partnership for Haddonfield meet-
ing: Borough Hall. 8:30 a.m.
Newcomers Club: 7:30 p.m. Call
427-0191 for more information.
Overeaters Anonymous: First Pres-
byterian Church. 9 a.m. Call (609)
239-0022 or visit
www.southjersey.orgfor information.
Bible Study: Lutheran Church of Our
Savior. 9:30 a.m. Call 429-5122.
Tai Chi: Lutheran Church of Our Sav-
ior. 4 p.m. Call 429-5122.
Jazzercise: Lutheran Church of Our
Savior. 6 p.m. Call 429-5122 for infor-
mation.
Worship: Grace Church. 7 a.m. E-mail
office@gracehaddon.orgfor informa-
tion.
FOR SENIORS
65 Club pinochle: 110 Rhoads Ave.
12:30 p.m.
Line dancing: Mabel Kay. 1:30 to 3
p.m. Call 354-8789 for more informa-
tion.
Computer Club: Mabel Kay. 10 a.m.
Call 354-8789 for more information.
Book exchange and food shelf drop
off: Mabel Kay. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call
354-8789 for more information.
Wonderful Wednesdays: First Presby-
terian Church. Noon. $3. Call 429-1960
for reservations.
THURSDAY
December 8
10th Annual Holiday House Tour:
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 5 to 9 p.m. Call
216-7253 or email infocenter@had-
donfieldnj.org for more info.
Job Seekers Support Group: Had-
donfield United Methodist Church,
29 Warwick Rd. 8:15 a.m.
Worship: Grace Church. 9:30 a.m. E-
mail office@gracehaddon.org for
information.
FOR SENIORS
Book exchange and food shelf drop
off: Mabel Kay House. 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Call 354-8789.
65 Club: 110 Rhoads Ave. 1:30 p.m.
Call 429-7271 for more information
about the event.
Art Workplace: Mabel Kay House. 9
a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m. Call
354-8789 for more information.
Chair Tai Chi and Chair Boot Camp:
Tarditi Commons Community Room.
11:30 a.m. $1. Call 354-8789 for more
information.
Exercise class: First Presbyterian
Church. 11:30 a.m. $3.
FOR KIDS
Read to a Dog: 4 to 5 p.m. at the
Haddonfield Public Library. Call 429-
1304 for info.
Toddlertime: Haddonfield Public
Library. 10:30 a.m. Ages 2 to 3. Call
429-1304 for info.
FRIDAY
December 9
FOR ALL
Mabel Kay House Rummage Sale:
At noon call 354-8789 for info.
Kiwanis Club meeting: Tavistock
Country Club. 12:15 to 1:30 p.m.
FOR SENIORS
65 Club bowling: 9:30 a.m. Call
Richard Gimigliano at 429-1290 for
more information.
Computer classes: Mabel Kay House.
Call (609) 261-0246.
Book exchange and food shelf drop
off: Mabel Kay. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call
354-8789 for more information.
Friday Program: Mabel Kay House.
12:30 to 3 p.m. Call 354-8789 for
more information.
SATURDAY
December 10
FOR ALL
Jazzercise: Lutheran Church of Our
Savior. 8:15 a.m. Call 429-5122 for
information.
Worship: Grace Church 5:30 p.m. E-
mail office@gracehaddon.orgfor
information.
SUNDAY
December 11
FOR ALL
Lesson and Carol Service: 10:30
a.m. at the Lutheran Church of Our
Savior.
Sunday worship services: Haddon-
field United Methodist Church, 29
Warwick Rd. Traditional 8 and 10:15
a.m. Contemporary 9 a.m.
Sunday Worship: Lutheran Church of
Our Savior. 8 and 10:30 a.m. Reflec-
tions 9:15 a.m. Call 429-5122 for infor-
mation.
Sunday Worship: Grace Church. 8
and 9:30 a.m. E-mail office@grace-
haddon.orgfor information.
Reflections Adult Forum: Lutheran
Church of Our Savior. 9:15 a.m. Call
429-5122 for information.
Dance Haddonfield: Grace Church.
Intermediate lessons 6 p.m. Beginner
lessons 7 to 8 p.m. Social dancing until
10:30 p.m. $12 for 7 p.m. Admission.
$17 for 6 p.m. Call 429-9154 (Mon. to
Fri.) or visit
www.dancehaddonfield.orgfor more
information.
Sunday Worship: First Baptist
Church, 124 Kings Highway East. 11
a.m. Visit www.firstbaptisthaddon-
field.orgfor info.
Adult Bible Study: First Baptist
Church, 124 Kings Highway East. 9:30
a.m. Visit www.firstbaptisthaddon-
field.orgfor info.
FOR KIDS
Sunday School: First Baptist Church,
124 Kings Highway East. 11 a.m. Visit
www.firstbaptisthaddonfield.orgfor
info.
Sunday Church School: Lutheran
Church of Our Savior. 10:30 a.m. Call
429-5122 for information.
MONDAY
calendar PAGE 8 DECEMBER 7-13, 2011
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donfield an al fresco dining is one
of the best and most creative idea
I've heard. In addition to the Tav-
ern on the Green, bike-riding,
and enjoying a drink in the park,
you can hold events there for all
seasons: Selling plants in the
spring, reenact the Colonial War
in the summer (Mullica Hill does
that), fall harvest with pumpkin
rides, and a winter Yule Tide Car-
oling with horse and buggy rides.
This area should be run by a
volunteer committee and the
money raised from these events
will help with the maintenance of
the property.
You can have people dressed in
Colonial times showing the peo-
ple and children the things they
did in the past. Having a wildlife
trail, with birdhouses and such,
the possibilities are endless. The
people of Haddonfield will have
an opportunity to share their cre-
ativeness and skills to make this a
beautiful place in New Jersey. You
could start a volunteer committee
as well in Haddonfield Memorial
High School, which can continu-
ally assist with this project, teach-
ing the young adults of our future
the value of nature and their
community.
Ynnette Karbiwnyk
We can use funding more
efficiently
While reading the article re-
garding the crime increases in
the state and region, the data on
Haddonfield was particularly in-
teresting as was the response of
Police Chief Banning. I was also
surprised that Mr. Borden, Com-
missioner of public safety, was ei-
ther not contacted or had no com-
ment regarding the large increas-
es in crime in Haddonfield. While
Chief Banning noted that small
changes in absolute numbers can
skew the statistics, he did not in-
dicate what was to be done to re-
duce these increases. With violent
crime increasing over 80 percent
and nonviolent over 40 percent, I
would have expected that Ban-
ning and/or Borden would have
taken to opportunity to explain to
the residents as to what actions
would be taken to reduce these
crime increases. In particular did
these increases occur during a
particular time of day and how
were the timing of these crimes
correlated to the number of offi-
cers on duty.
We seem to spend and inordi-
nate amount of funds for outside
planning of space as noted by Mr.
Nosek in his comments, so how
about using that funding to in-
crease the safety of our resi-
dents? While I am discussing safe-
ty issues how about fixing our
streets so that they are not caus-
ing safety issues and damage to
our vehicles which add to the al-
ready high cost of living in this
town?
Joseph Stach
LETTERS
Continued from page 6
letters to the editor
Audubon
Caves Frame & Mirror: 33 East Kings Hwy.
Cherry Hill
Cherry Hill Volvo: 1810 Route 70 West
Forbici Hair Salon: Springdale Plaza
706 Marlowe Road
ACCU Staffing Services: 911 Kings Highway North
113 Apley Drive
Liberty Bell Bank: 2099 Route 70 East
Haddonfield
Elauwit Media: 108 Kings Highway East, Third Floor
Scampers Pals: 9 Lee Ave.
213 East Park Ave.
232 Washington Ave.
127 Avondale Ave.
144 Ardmore Ave.
151 Ardmore Ave.
23 Friends Ave.
401 Kings Hwy W.
Haddon Heights
The Centre for Dentistry at Haddon: 209 White Horse
Pike
Maple Shade
Cottman Transmission: 135 E. Kings Highway
Marlton
The Promenade at Sagemore: 500 Route 73 South
(Concierge Office)
8 Hathaway Court
Christ Presbyterian Church: 515 E. Main St.
29 Longhurst Road
1 Split Rail Lane
Washington Twp.
22 Plumtree Drive
114 Madison Ave
Liberty Bell Bank: 145 North Maple Ave.
Medford
5 Wellesley Way (across from Lenape High School)
19 Tallowood Drive
Medford contd
19 Brookwood Drive
12 Meadowside Court
105 North East Lakeside Drive
10 Georgia Trail
Taunton Forge Elementary School
1 Severn Drive
MaraVillas Grill: 208 Medford Mt. Holly Road
22 Spruce Drive
135 Hickory Lane: Please call (609) 654-5809 before
dropping off items
108 Indian Pipe Trail
Vernamonti Eye Assoc.: 520 Stokes Road
Moorestown
The Moorestown Public Library: 111 W. Second St.
Burl-Moor-Driben Animal Hospital: 104 Kings Highway
Filimon Benefits Group: Blason Plaza, Suite 132, 505
South Lenola Road
422 Park Blvd.
Cornerstone Bank: 253 West Main St.
740 N. Stanwick Road
Furry Friends 22 E. Camden Ave.
265 West Third St.
430 Bridgeboro Road: (down the driveway next to the
barn)
Edward Jones office: 67 E. Main St.
110 Cottage Ave.
700 McElwee Road
Liberty Bell Bank: 227 West Camden Ave.
Mt. Laurel
Spoiled Sweet Pets: 123 Creek Road
Holman Toyota-Scion: 1301 Route 73 North
310 Val Drive
142 Greenview Terrace
Just Children Childcare: 14000 Commerce Parkway Suite J
214 Stratton Court
4410 Church Road
10 Elmwood Road
255 Burnamwood Drive
46 Foxcroft Way
100 Knotty Oak Drive
Mt. Laurel contd
Advantage Engineers LLC: 520 Fellowship Road, Suite A-
112
Victorias Bagel Bistro: 3131 Route 38 & Larchmont Blvd.
Liberty Bell Bank: 860 Union Mill Road
Oaklyn
Fatjacks Comiccrypt: 521 White Horse Pike
Sewell
MCM Portrait Studio & Framing: 460 Greentree Road
50 Quail Hollow Drive
24 Winfield Circle
Shamong
11 Wallingford Way
Jacks Alignment Service Inc.: 324 Atsion Road
1021 Shawnee Lane
2A Oakview Drive
18 Stony Creek Court
Southampton
Lion Self Storage: 124 Eayrestown Road
Tabernacle
Amiano & Son: 1633 Route 206
Neuberts Tire & Auto: 1629 Route 206
23 Hawkins Road
1 Sandra Lane
Voorhees
Jack and Emilys Pet Salon: 2999 Evesham Road
Voorhees Senior Living: 501 Laurel Oak Road (from 9
a.m. to 8 p.m. only)
Emeritus at Voorhees: 1301 Laurel Oak Road
86 Bunning Drive (Beagle Club)
4 Oxford Court
20 Bryce Road
7 Ashton Drive
Washington Township
Critter Cuts Pet Grooming: 373-3 Egg Harbor Rd.
Wedgewood Plaza
108 Kings Highway East | Haddonfield, NJ 08033 | t 856-427-0933 | f 856-427-0934 | www.elauwit.com
Its time to Deck the Paws!
Elauwit Medias annual drive to aid animal shelters and rescue
groups is underway. Shelters always are looking for dog and
cat food, cat litter, cleaning supplies (especially bleach), office
supplies, gift cards, blankets, bedding and, of course, this being
the holiday season and all, treats and toys.
The drive runs through December 16, so dont delay.
Please dontate before December 16th. Questions? Send an email to alan@elauwit.com.
December 12
FOR ALL
Preservation Haddonfield meet-
ing: Mable Kay House, Walnut St.
7:30 p.m. Visit preservationhad-
donfield.org for info.
Haddonfield Parks Conservancy
meeting: Borough Hall. 7:30 p.m. E-
mail AndyHide2001@yahoo.comor
call 429-6789 for information.
La Leche League meeting: Mabel
Kay House, 24 Walnut St. 7:30 p.m.
Contact Andrea at mom-
myandyh@netscape.net or 429-
2082.
Art Group: Lutheran Church of Our
Savior. 7 p.m. Call 429-5122 for infor-
mation.
Jazzercise: Lutheran Church of Our
Savior. 7:15 p.m. Call 429-5122 for
information.
Prayer Group: Lutheran Church of
Our Savior. 7 p.m. Call 429-5122 for
information.
FOR SENIORS
65 Club Duplicate Bridge: 110 Rhodes
Ave. 1 p.m. Call Bernie Schaming at
428-0932.
Book exchange and food shelf drop
off: Mabel Kay. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call
354-8789 for more information.
Senior Cardio Fun: Tarditi Commons
Community Room. 11:30 a.m. $1. Call
354-8789 for more information.
Chair Boot Camp and Chair Tai Chi:
Tarditi Commons Community Rooms.
11:30 a.m. Call 354-8789 for more
information.
FOR KIDS
Sleepy Storytime: Haddonfield Public
Library. 7 p.m. Call 429-1304 for info.
TUESDAY
December 13
FOR ALL
Garden Club meeting: First Baptist
Church. Noon. Call 428-1162 for more
information.
Horticultural Society of South
Jersey meeting: Cherry Hill Com-
munity Center, 820 Mercer St. Call
Mary at 428-6671 for more informa-
tion.
Historical Society of Haddonfield
Library: Greenfield Hall. 9:30 to 11
a.m. Call 429-7375 for info.
FOR SENIORS
Lite aerobics: Tarditi Commons Com-
munity Room. 1 p.m. Call 354-8789 for
more information.
Bingo: Mabel Kay House. 1 p.m. Call
354-8789 for information.
Book exchange and food shelf drop
off: Mabel Kay. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call
354-8789 for more information.
Computer classes: Mabel Kay House.
Call (888) 421-8687.
DECEMBER 7-13, 2011 THE HADDONFIELD SUN 11
Ask me about Accident Forgiveness.
Larry Lerman
CLTC, CMFC
(856) 547-8138
47 E. Kings Highway
Audubon
larrylerman@allstate.com
With other insurance companies, having an
accident can mean your rates rise as much as
40%. But with Allstates Accident Forgiveness,
your rates wont go up at all just because of an
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Feature is optional and subject to terms and conditions. Safe
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Property and Casualty Insurance Company: Bridgewater, NJ
2010 Allstate Insurance Company.
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MICHAELS DIAMOND CLUB
700 Haddonfield-Berlin Rd., Unit #31
Voorhees, NJ 08043
P: 856.784.6453 www.michaelsdiamondclub.com
HOLIDAY SALE
50-70% OFF
Jewelry
20-40% OFF
Watches & Gifts
We Buy Gold,
Diamonds,
Silver, Watches
and Coins
Jewelry and
Watch Repair
done on
premises

Mon-Tue-Thu 11-6
Fri 10-7 Sat 10-5
Closed Wed and Sun
EVENTS
Continued from page 8
This weeks Haddonfield events and activities calendar
Not only do we buy jewelry, we also sell brand new discounted designer jewelry!
HIGHEST
DOLLAR
PAID
ANYWHERE
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By Joseph De Simone
The staff at the Haddonfield
Middle School held special events
to celebrate the Halloween holi-
day. Individual students compet-
ed in a costume contest while
classes vied in a scarecrow deco-
rating contest.
There was one winning class
from each grade for the scare-
crow contest, all three of which
will be treated to a pizza
party. Likewise, there was one
winner in each grade for the cos-
tume contest. Movie gift
cards were given to the three stu-
dent winners: Gianna Downer,
Nick Bateman and Owen Hart.
Gianna Downer was the
6th grade winner for the costume
contest. Her creative costume
was a gorilla holding a cage with
a baby inside of it. Her legs and
arms made up the gorilla and her
head and torso made up the
baby. The rest of the costume was
made of plastic and air. I was
very honored to be picked for the
costume contest. Thank you Mrs.
Gehringer and Ms. Steele, stat-
ed Gianna Downer.
Nick Bateman, the 7th grade
winner, also used creativity to de-
sign his costume. He designed a
freestanding shower with the cur-
tain, rod and nozzle surrounding
him. Nick exclaimed, The cos-
tume contest is a great way to
show holiday and school spirit,
and I am glad to be a winner!
Owen Hart, the 8th grade win-
ner, expressed his surprise about
winning, It feels great to win and
it was exciting to hear my name
announced over the loud speak-
er. Owens winning costume was
a ghost Pac-man.
Students were excited about
the costume contest but were
even more excited about the
scarecrow and pumpkin display
contest.
The 6th grade winning class
was Mr. Maguires class. Their
theme was Alohalloween. Their
pumpkin was painted like a co-
conut and their scarecrow was a
partying Hawaiian man with a
surfboard. Our class worked
hard and every one pitched in to
help us earn the win! was the
quote given for Mr. Maguires
class. The 7th grade winning
class was Mrs. Durkins
class. Their scarecrow appeared
to be the body of an old man and
they used the pumpkin for the
mans head. The 8th grade win-
ning class was Mrs. Sanchiricos
class. They created a scary chef,
Emeril Lagrossie. Their pump-
kin was a cooking pot filled with
gummy worms and spiders.
Congratulations to all of the
winners and have a scary good
week!
HADDONFIELD MIDDLE SCHOOL DECEMBER 2011
Photo by Bulldawg Bulletin Jr. Staff
Winners of the Annual HMS Halloween Costume Contest display
their creative costumes: Owen Hart (8th grade), Nick Bateman (7th
grade) and Gianna Downer (6th grade).
Pumpkins,
Scarecrows, and
Costumes,
Oh, My!
HMS Welcomes a New Principal
By Emma Tranfalia
and Jules Reed
Students and faculty have been
buzzing about the new principal
of our school. Hes bringing in
new ideas to the school to make it
a better place, stated eighth
grader Maddi Rosandich.
Dr. Gino Priolo brings adminis-
trative experience to his role at
HMS including the following po-
sitions: principal of Tatem for six
years, principal at the Barkley
childhood center for two years,
principal at Woodcrest for two
years, and a teacher for six years.
Dr. Priolo gets a great deal of sat-
isfaction from the joy of helping
kids and having a deep connec-
tion with them.
For example, when he was in
an inclusive classroom they had
decided to join a soccer tourna-
ment sponsored by the Special
Olympics. They had soccer prac-
tice once a week and talked about
topics like diversity, cooperation,
and teamwork. After all their
hard work, they received a gold
medal the first time they entered
the competition. It was a great
team-building experience for our
class, described Dr. Priolo.
One idea Dr. Priolo would like
to see implemented at HMS is
having students use technology
like e-readers instead of text-
books. He remarked that he
would like to look into how the
nooks or kindles would work in
our school. Other possibilities are
having the school go wireless and
having the students use ipads or
laptops.
Many teachers have agreed
that seeing Dr. Priolo around the
hallways is very important when
making an effort to connect with
the students. He makes a real ef-
fort to visit every classroom al-
most every day, Mr. Farrell stat-
ed.
Dr. Priolo loves his job, but also
enjoys spending time with his
loving wife and children. After
work, he coaches his children on
their soccer and baseball teams.
He also likes fishing with his chil-
dren or watching his favorite
sports teams, the Eagles and the
Flyers.
Overall, Dr. Priolo is a man that
has many talents and interests
that could benefit HMS.
New Teachers
are Welcomed
to HMS
By Lily Kwak and Sophie Fontaine
Along with multiple new stu-
dents, HMS welcomed several
new members to the staff this
year including Ms. Licorish, the
new technology teacher, Ms.
Barranger, the new nurse, and
Ms. Norris, the new orchestra di-
rector. These new faculty mem-
bers have admirable backgrounds
in education, strong passions for
teaching, and plans for further
improving HMS.
Ms. Licorish hopes to expand
our use of technology. I am so de-
lighted and excited to be teaching
here at HMS, says Ms. Licorish,
a former general education
teacher for fifth graders at Tatem,
I have big plans for developing a
more advanced technology de-
partment at this school. My main
goal is to build a studio with a
green screen.
Ms. Barranger has had her
school nurse certificate for al-
most three years now and she is
also the new track coach for HMS.
She is happy to feel accepted here
so quickly, but recognizes the
challenges that still lay ahead of
her. I expected to be challenged,
she explains, coming to a school
of 900 kids, compared to the 300 at
my past job.
Ms. Norris has her Bachelors
in Music Education from Temple
University and is pursuing her
Masters of Science in Music Edu-
cation. I hope to grow HMSs
music program and create a team
effort throughout the students,
explains Ms. Norris. The more
we work together, the harder
music we can achieve.
The Greek philosopher Aristot-
le once stated, Change in all
things is sweet. Although we
may miss Dr. Tennant, Mr. Paul,
Ms. Petrillo, Mr. Bires, Dr. Kras-
nokutsky, and many other teach-
ers and administrators that have
come and gone over the years, its
important to learn the signifi-
cance of change, and to know that
it brings opportunity - which is
something we can use to better
not only ourselves and our
school, but the world too.
New staffers take their place
2 THE BULLDAWG BULLETIN JR. DECEMBER 2011
Photo by HMS PTA
Students, staff and administration gave thanks and respect to all those who served our country at the
15th annual HMS Veterans Day Assembly.
HMS Students Honor Veterans
By Julia Mroz and Timmy Webb
Students, staff and administra-
tion gathered in the HMS audito-
rium on November 4th to pay
tribute to our nations Veterans in
the 15th Annual Veterans Day As-
sembly.
As always there was a huge
turnout of veterans, some of
which included family members
of students at the middle school.
Mr. David McGuigen, grandfather
of eighth grader Henri McGuigen
attended along with the father of
our principal Dr. Priolo.
The day was organized by 7th
grade Social Studies teacher Mr.
Farrell and 8th grade social stud-
ies teacher Mr. Thomas.
The assembly began with
the analysis of the Pledge of Alle-
giance provided by Mr. Farrell. In
response to the event Mr. Farrell
said, It went very well and stu-
dents were respectful as always.
Then, the 8th grade jazz band,
led by Mr. Uibel, played a tribute
to the veterans. The ensemble in-
cluded Brian McGrath, Luke
Small, Austin Stoner, Sean
Wilkinson, and Nick Dante.
The assembly also gave Veter-
ans the opportunity to introduce
themselves and state where they
served.
The assembly ended with a
power point of World War Two
which included real photographs
of the war set to the background
of lively music from the era.
After the assembly, the veter-
ans were guests at a lunch in
their honor provided by the PTA.
Following lunch, each class host-
ed two servicemen. Students had
the opportunity to listen to indi-
vidual stories from the Veterans
and to ask questions about the
Veterans experiences.
Marine Harry Dove says, Im
impressed with the effort and sin-
cerity shown by the students.
Every year students are given
an opportunity to personally
thank these men and women for
keeping us safe.
This is why Veterans Day is so
important.
The public gets a chance to
hear stories of what it is like to
serve and the Veterans get the
recognition they deserve.
HMS Remembers September 11
By Colin Gallagher
September 11, 2001 changed
everyones lives in some way.
Whether you were there to see it
or you are just learning about it
in grade school, it affected the
American people. On the 10th an-
niversary of September 11, we
still remember the devastation of
the day when America was at-
tacked by terrorists.
Haddonfield Middle School
took time to remember the histor-
ical date that is now engraved
into the American peoples minds
forever. After our usual morning
announcements, Dr. Priolo, Had-
donfield Middle School principal,
read a reflection of what hap-
pened in his experiences on 9/11.
It was a heartfelt story that really
got everyone to grasp what hap-
pened that day.
During class, many teachers
also shared their experiences on
September 11, 2001. Mrs.
Sanchirico read her reflection to
her 8th grade Language Arts
classes. I was trying to stay calm
in front of the students on Sep-
tember 11 but had many personal
concerns about loved ones, stat-
ed Mrs. Sanchirico. Students also
wrote essays or poems about 9/11
either from their own remem-
brance or from what they had
learned.
Sharing stories and experi-
ences of this day helped everyone
learn more about the event and
about how much we affect each
other. This experience helped cre-
ate a common bond between
everyone.
The event also inspired
builders to make some of the
most beautiful and heartfelt me-
morials in America. Two pools
will be built exactly where the
bases of the twin towers were lo-
cated. They will be exactly one
acre, the same size as the founda-
tion of the towers. Giving fami-
lies somewhere to remember fall-
en friends and family members,
2,980 names have also been etched
into the sides of the granite pools.
Next, a 1,776-foot tower will be
erected from ground zero. This
tower 1 World Trade Center
will be the focus of the memorials
and the tallest building in New
York. This tower has also been
specifically built for emergency
evacuations and is stronger than
any other building in New York.
Hopefully, this project will be
completed by 2013, bringing peace
to the nerves and souls of Ameri-
can people.
A museum will also be created
utilizing steal beams from the old
twin towers.
The steel beams from the old
twin towers will be on site for
everyone to see, along with the
story of how American troops
found Osama Bin Laden and
killed him freeing America from
a terrorizing dark grip.
Lastly, trees from the sites of
9/11 and past terrorist attacks
will be relocated to ground zero
surrounding the pools, museum,
and tower. Some of the trees will
be from the flight 93 crash in
Shanksville, PA where people
risked their lives to save others.
Also, trees from the Pentagon and
surrounding areas of the New
York World Trade Building will
be relocated to the beautiful me-
morial in lower Manhattan.
In reflection, the 1 World Trade
building, the pools, the museum,
and the trees will hopefully close
the open wound that the Ameri-
can people have been grieving
over for so many years.
By Jules Reed
An, actor, psychologist, and co-
median, treated students to an in-
spirational presentation called
You Dont Know Me, Till You
Know Me on October 19th at
Haddonfield Middle School and
Haddonfield Memorial High
School. The HMS counselors Mr.
Toto, Ms. Aquino, and Ms. McK-
elvey, and Principal Dr. Priolo, co-
ordinated the event at the middle
school as part of the The No Place
For Hate program. This program
is part of a state-wide effort to put
an end to bullying.
Michael (Mykee) Fowlin has
always enjoyed creating voices
and he has been performing since
the age of 11. In addition to act-
ing, he earned his Doctorate in
Clinical Psychology. His original
performance utilizes his unique
talents and addresses the issues
of Diversity and Inclusion.
His presentation began with a
reminder about the possible con-
sequences of bullying, the tragic
story of Tyler Clemente and
Dharun Ravi from Rutgers Uni-
versity. Dharun taped Tylers per-
sonal life and posted it on a web-
site. Tyler was so embarrassed
that he committed suicide.
Mykee then portrayed five dif-
ferent characters, acting out their
perspective on what it means to
be bullied. His roles included a 9
year old boy who enjoyed making
prank phone calls, a 6 year old
boy with ADHD, a homosexual
football player, a biracial femi-
nist, and a young boy with cere-
bral palsy.
At the end of each role, Mykee
recited, Our pain is real, no mat-
ter who you are or how much
money you have.
After acting out the various
roles, he told the story of a man
who committed suicide by jump-
ing off the Golden Gate Bridge.
He explained how his suicide
could have been prevented if
someone had just said hello to
him that day.
Mykee then asked the students,
If you had one superpower, fly-
ing or being invisible, which
would you be and why? Many
people responded but there was a
clever response from a 7th grader
who stated, I would choose being
able to fly because it doesnt take
any super powers to be invisible.
Throughout the various dis-
cussions, skits and stories in the
program, Mykee repeatedly allud-
ed to the poem Im Still Here by
Langston Hughes to remind stu-
dents that no matter how differ-
ent each of us are we still matter.
He recited, Been scared and bat-
tered. My hopes the wind done
scatteredStop laughin, stop
lovin, stop livin-I dont care!
Im still here!
At the conclusion of the assem-
bly he had the students say to
themselves, I am beautiful and
to each other, You are beautiful.
Since age 9 Mykee has been
creating a wide selection of voic-
es and at age 11 started formally
performing. He earned his under-
graduate degree from Evangel
University, Missouri and his doc-
torate degree in clinical psycholo-
gy from Rutgers University.
Not only has this assembly
touched the hearts of many, but it
taught important lessons too. I
learned that everyone has feel-
ings, commented Julia Mroz, an
8th grader here at HMS. We have
to be aware of all of them.
HMS Students are Beautiful
DECEMBER 2011 THE BULLDAWG BULLETIN JR. 3
Photo by Ms. Izzo
Hard work paid off for the cast and crew of Family Album with a successful fall drama production.
Family Album
is a Big Hit
By Bridget Poisel
A great laugh, highly enter-
taining, and crowd pleasing
are only some of the wonderful
praises said about Haddonfield
Middle School drama clubs fall
production, Family Album. This
new play, which officially hit the
stage on October 27th, was about
the everyday life and hardships
that take place in families.
The cast, crew and directors
worked really hard to get this
show in motion. The cast includ-
ed a mix of 6th, 7th and 8th
graders with Allie Shaw as the
student director. The teachers in
charge of the production includ-
ed Ms. Izzo as the director, Ms.
Henhaffer as the assistant direc-
tor, and Ms. Mastantuono as the
crew advisor.
Olivia Plunket, an eighth grad-
er who played the mother, said, A
lot of effort was put into this play
but it was still a ton of fun!
Family Album was unlike any
play that the Drama club has
done before.
The play was made up of many
vignettes, which are different
short stories and plots within the
main play. These vignettes are all
related to their main theme of
family. The play begins with a
large family at a reunion and
then spins off to all of the differ-
ent lives of the relatives.
The actors in this production
played a multitude of roles.
Eighth graders with major roles
included Annie Gosse, Olivia
Plunket, Sean Wilkonson, Rebec-
ca Otto, Kristen Munafo, Remy
Votta, Mya Lupinetti, Caroline
Fleming, Fiona Connor, and
Maddi Rosandich. The major
roles in sixth and seventh grade
include Ellen Berry, Abby Ryan,
Connor Poisel, Eliza Maskery,
Marcus Timar and Anthony
Stumpo. Although this new type
of play required extreme dedica-
tion, everyone persevered. Ac-
cording to Fiona Connor, an
eighth grader, The play went
very well.
This play previewed Wednes-
day at an assembly for all Had-
donfield Middle School students.
Everyone was really excited for
the production. This show was
hilarious and was definitely
worth seeing, said Connor
Poisel, a seventh grader who
plays the father in many of the
skits.
Congratulations on another
successful production, Drama
Club!
The Lion King is a
Classic Brought
Back to Life
By Katarina Ostbye
and Leah Sullivan
The memorable face of baby
Simba being held by a baboon in
front of the magical African king-
dom of pride rock are now so
close it seems as if you could
touch the lions nose. On Septem-
ber 16, 2011, theatres reintro-
duced The Lion King with 3D
technology to put a modern twist
on a classic movie. In just the first
week, sales rose to an amazing
$25 million.
Disney places their classic
movies in a vault, which means
they do not sell anymore copies
until they are released. When the
Lion King came out of the vault,
it went straight to theatres to be
released for a younger generation
to enjoy.
The second release will also
bring in a second generation of
profits for Disney.
The Lion King has been in the
vault since 1994, and therefore no
copies have been sold for 15 years.
Now that it has been brought
back to theaters the color quality
has improved and the option of
watching the movie in 2D or 3D is
available.
Eighth grader Kate Walters
says, I felt reminded of my child-
hood when I saw the Lion King in
3D.
Another student, Tommy
Kadar states that the movie is ex-
citing and modern, but still a clas-
sic. He explains, This movie has
a big influence on our age groups
childhood, and will continue to do
so now that its out of the vault.
When asked about how the
Lion King influenced her child-
hood, Phoebe Adams stated,
This movie taught me many life
lessons, while telling a touching
story of a lion growing up in
Africa.
The Lion King first touched
peoples hearts in 1994, and the
movie can now share its wisdom
with people from all age groups.
Most Americans grew up watch-
ing the Lion King, and their lives
would be different without this
influential classic.
By John Collins
The Little Tuna is a hap-
pening, classy, comfy little restau-
rant where you can get a lot of
seafood for not a lot of money. It
has been in downtown Haddon-
field since 2005 but they have also
had a location on Haddon Ave. for
10 years.
The quaint and relaxed atmos-
phere is certain to reduce stress.
You can also dress fancy or casu-
al; both will be appropriate.
At my recent venture to the
restaurant with my family, I en-
joyed steamy pepper crusted
tuna. The mouthwatering fish
was topped with bleu cheese and
a mushroom stock. Biting into
the entre felt like biting into
heaven, since the mushroom top-
ping complimented the tuna so
perfectly.
The bleu cheese was also a
magical garnish with its sharp,
salty, yet creamy texture. In addi-
tion to the tuna, the Crab Cakes
and Baked Seafood Sampler are
also very popular.
The food wasnt the only pleas-
ant part of my venture. The serv-
ice was also impeccable. The
waiter was very attentive while
still giving us time to have good
conversation.
I am not the only one who en-
joys this restaurant. Elena, a
Mount Laurel resident exclaims,
I adore the mango-peach sorbet
and how it is so artfully decorat-
ed. And for this price for such
great quality food, I am almost
certain Ill be back.
That is why you should visit
The Little Tuna for a little dinner
because here you can be selfish
with your shellfish.
The Not so
Little Tuna
4 THE BULLDAWG BULLETIN JR. DECEMBER 2011
Advisor:
Mrs. Annette Sanchirico
Student Co-Editors: Sophie
Fontaine and Jules Reed
School News: Joseph De Si-
mone, Sophie Fontaine,
Colin Gallagher, Lily Kwak,
Julia Mroz, Bridget Poisel,
Jules Reed, Leah Sullivan,
Emma Tranfalia, Kate Wal-
ters, Tim Webb
Reviews/Editorials: John
Collins, Katarina Ostbye,
Leah Sullivan
Sports: Tommy Kadar,
Brian McGrath, Dan Mora-
marco, Timmy Proctor
BULLDAWG BULLETIN JR. STAFF
High Hopes for Philadelphia Flyers
By Brian McGrath
and Timmy Proctor
Orange towels are waved,
screams erupt from the stands
and fans jump out of their seats;
the Flyers win! Another year
brings another NHL season, and
with it the suspense, excitement
and thrilling moments of hockey
as our Broad Street Bullies try to
skate, shoot and smash their way
to a championship.
After a disappointing finish to
last years Stanley Cup run, gen-
eral manager Paul Holmgren
shook things up on the roster,
trading away captain Mike
Richards and leading scorer Jeff
Carter this summer.
Carson Briere, son of star cen-
ter Danny Briere and seventh
grader at HMS, shares his
thoughts on the risky move, It
was a good choice, but at the same
time, we are giving away our best
players. Now enthusiastic fans
look for redemption, flocking to
an electric Wells Fargo Center,
and rooting for the new and im-
proved orange and black.
Dropping Carter and Richards,
the Flyers made important acqui-
sitions in the off-season. Follow-
ing a playoff collapse in the previ-
ous spring, Philadelphia signed
former Phoenix Coyote Ilya Bryz-
galov, a talented and eager goal-
tender, to a nine year contract.
Still, Bryzgalov wasnt the only
addition. In the Mike Richards
transaction, the Flyers received
right wing Wayne Simmonds
from the Los Angeles Kings.
Stretching beyond the boundaries
of the Atlantic Ocean, Philadel-
phia also made a deal with
Jaromr Jgr of the Russian Kon-
tinental Hockey League.
These two players have quickly
found spots in the completely re-
decorated lineup, and taken on
the roles that were lost with the
departure of Mike Richards and
Jeff Carter.
Eighth grader Tanner Reese,
son of Flyers goalie coach Jeff
Reese, had optimistic remarks on
the unexpected off-season occur-
rences. We are a different team,
but we will also work together. We
have a young, talented core of
hard-working players, says
Reese.
Eager and energized Flyers
fans from all across the area wait
to see how their team can handle
the pressure of another season,
as the Flyers again strive for a
long-awaited Stanley Cup Cham-
pionship.
By Sophie Fontaine
and Lily Kwak
Obesity and malnutrition are
two problems that plague not only
our community, but the entire
world. To combat the problem,
our school began investing in
Helping Unite Man and Nutrition
(h.u.m.a.n) Vending Machines.
The Haddonfield School Districts
food service provider introduced
these new vending machines to
both the high school and the mid-
dle school over the summer.
These machines were placed in
the schools to encourage students
to live a healthy lifestyle by sell-
ing healthful snacks.
I believe that any way we can
offer a healthier alternative for
students is a good thing, ex-
plains Dr. Priolo.
The biggest challenge is pro-
viding healthy options that stu-
dents are interested in purchas-
ing, and it appears that, thus far,
students have responded positive-
ly to the options in this new vend-
ing machine.
I purchased an orange soda
from the h.u.m.a.n vending ma-
chine in the cafeteria, says Ari
Liloia, 8th grade, and I thought
that not only was it delicious, but
it was nutritious, too.
Amanda Rizzuto, 6th grade,
says, Although the food is some-
what expensive, I think the
h.u.m.a.n vending machines are
affecting our school in a positive
way because they offer healthful
foods all day long.
The h.u.m.a.n. Vending Ma-
chines carry 100% organic,
gluten-free, low-carb, low-fat, no
sugar added, and allergen-free
foods and drinks that are not only
healthful, but taste good too!
Along with helping our school
and other organizations such as
gyms and office buildings eat
healthier, this company also do-
nates 10% of their income to
charities that fight obesity and
malnutrition all over the world.
Overall, these vending machines
bring us one small step closer to
creating a human-healthy, clean
world.
Grab a healthful snack
By Tommy Kadar
and Dan Moramarco
Haddonfield Middle Schools
Cross Country team was unde-
feated and competed very strong-
ly in the 2011 season. The team
was one of the best in South Jer-
sey and had many stellar per-
formances. HMS runners trained
almost every weekday since the
beginning of the school year in
preparation for their grueling
meets.
Mrs. Miller, the HMS Librarian
and Cross Country Assistant
Coach said, We have about 100
runners on the team, and each
one of them motivates each other
to become better. We have many
good runners on the team who all
have the drive and determination
to become better.
One of the stellar runners,
Austin Stoner, an 8th grade HMS
student and one of the motiva-
tional leaders of the team, placed
very well in every one of the
races this year. Stoner said, It
has been a very tough year, and I
have been lucky enough to have
done so well. I practice hard and
it pays off. In a South Jersey
open meet, Stoner ran a fantastic
race and came in second place by
one hundredth of a second.
An impressive female runner
at HMS is 7th grader Brianna
Gess. She has broken multiple
course records all throughout
South Jersey in many meets. Bri-
anna explains, The key to suc-
cess is, running every day and
eating healthy.
She also stated that all of the
coaches are very motivational
and help all of the runners on the
team.
Another 8th grade cross coun-
try runner named Timothy Proc-
tor stated, Our team had a lot of
good runners. There is a reason
why our high school team is so
good, and this is because we learn
how to run properly in middle
school, so we are prepared for the
next step.
HMS Cross Country
Team Shines
Kate Walters and Leah Sullivan
Students attended various ses-
sions designed to teach them how
to get and stay healthy during the
annual Wellness Day, October 7th
2011.
The first session was an excit-
ing multi-media presentation
called Get A Grip! which taught
students how to use willpower
and healthful activities to create
healthy minds. The morning also
included the annual nature walk,
during which homeroom teach-
ers led their students through
Haddonfield in a path designed by
Mrs. Verdeur.
Students also attended various
activities led by teachers and ad-
ditional volunteers. Some of the
sessions offered included kick-
boxing with Mrs. Hennhaffer; re-
laxation techniques with Senora
Pilla and Mediterranean Cooking
with Mrs. Sanchirico.
In the afternoon, seventh and
eighth graders attended a presen-
tation by DAYTOP (Drug Abusers
Yield To Our Persuasion) in
which former teenage addicts dis-
cussed how their lives were af-
fected by their addiction.
Mr. Toto, school counselor and
organizer of the event, believes
that Wellness Day has a great im-
pact on the student body and
staff. His favorite part was how he
was able to see everyone come to-
gether.
While reflecting on previous
Wellness Days, Mr. Toto said,
The program started out as just
one or two of us doing it, but now
everyones involved and enjoying
it.
Eighth grade student Julia
Mroz said, I liked Wellness Day
because you were learning about
an important topic in a way that
keeps you active.
This year the Cherry Hill
Health and Racket Club was so
impressed by HMS and its Well-
ness Day program that they of-
fered the entire HMS staff a free
three-week trial membership to
their club. This years Wellness
Day was definitely one to be
proud of !
Students and Staff Get
Fit on Wellness Day
Ronald McDonald House Char-
ities and the McDonalds
Owner/Operators of the Greater
Philadelphia Region are seeking
qualified applicants from Cam-
den County to enter the RMHC
Scholars program; the
RMHC/African American Future
Achievers program for African
American high school seniors;
the RMHC/Hispanic American
Commitment to Educational Re-
sources program for Latino high
school seniors; and the
RMHC/Asian Students Increas-
ing Achievement program for
Asian high school seniors. 55 total
scholarships are awarded rang-
ing from $1,000 to $5,000 each.
RMHC offers college scholar-
ships to all high school seniors
who demonstrate academic
achievement, leadership, commu-
nity involvement, financial need
and plan on attending a two- or
four-year college during the next
academic year.
RMHC scholarship winners
are exceptional students who
excel academically while taking
on extra leadership roles and vol-
unteering in their communities,
said Mike Anton, president of the
Ronald McDonald House Chari-
ties of the Philadelphia Region,
Inc. and McDonalds Owner/Op-
erator. Each year we are proud
to recognize their accomplish-
ments and to help make a college
education a reality for these out-
standing young role models.
Applicants will be asked to sub-
mit a high school transcript, a let-
ter of recommendation and a per-
sonal statement detailing their
background and community in-
volvement. Applications are
available in high school guidance
offices and must be completed
and postmarked by no later than
Jan. 27, 2012. Students, parents or
educators can download an appli-
cation or apply online at
www.rmhc.org. For additional in-
formation regarding any of the
scholarships, please call the
scholarship hotline at 215-790-
4320.
The RMHC of the Philadelphia
Region, Inc. grants hundreds of
thousands of dollars per year to
support local non-profit pro-
grams that directly improves the
health and well being of children.
In addition, RMHC supports four
scholarship programs for high
school seniors; the Philadelphia,
Southern New Jersey and
Delaware Ronald McDonald
Houses; the Ronald McDonald
Care Mobile, operated by St.
Christopher's Foundation for
Children; and 13 Ronald McDon-
ald Family Rooms in area hospi-
tals.
DECEMBER 7-13, 2011 THE HADDONFIELD SUN 13
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and also did defense work during
WWII.
In lieu of flowers, memorial do-
nations may be made to Ashland
Evangelical Presbyterian
Church, 33 East Evesham Road,
Cherry Hill, 08043 or First Presby-
terian Church of Hightstown, 320
N. Main Street, Hightstown,
08520. Arrangements by Kain-
Murphy Funeral Services of Had-
donfield, NJ.
Eleanor Ellie J.
Reifsteck
(nee Harshman)
November 24, 2011
On Nov. 24, age 81, beloved wife
of William E. and a Haddonfield
resident for over 53 years. Loving
mother of William E., II (Cathy),
of Newport Beach, CA, Carla J.
Donegan, of Cherry Hill and
Bruce (Carol), of Holland, Pa.
Also survived by sevent grand-
children, Nick, Shannon and Will
Reifsteck, Jack, Charlie and
Casey Donegan and Robert Reif-
steck, and 1 brother, Robert Lee
Harshman (Ann), of N. Palm
Beach, Fla.
Reifsteck was a long time ac-
tive member of the Haddonfield
Celebrations Committee and
Christ the King Church. Addi-
tionally, she was an energetic vol-
unteer with her childrens school
activities and really enjoyed her
Sigma Kappa Sorority.
Ellies family received friends
on Nov. 30 at Kain- Murphy Fu-
neral Home, 15 West End Ave.,
Haddonfield, 08033. Memorial do-
nations in Ellies name may be
made to the charity of ones
choice.
OBITUARIES
Continued from page 4
OBITUARIES
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House Charities scholarships
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The Haddonfield Lions Club in-
vites individuals and organiza-
tions to nominate a person to be
the recipient of the 40th annual
Citizen of the Year award. The
deadline to submit nominations
is Dec. 19.
A committee of community
representatives will review the
nominees and make the selection.
The recipient will be announced
by Mayor Tish Columbi at the an-
nual Mayors Breakfast. The
breakfast will be held on Satur-
day, January 21, 2012, at the First
Presbyterian Church on Kings
Highway in Haddonfield.
The Lions Club seeks nomi-
nees whose achievements and
contributions to the town make
them worthy of special recogni-
tion. The only requirements for
consideration are residency in
Haddonfield and exceptional ded-
ication to the community.
Each nomination must include
nominees name, address, occupa-
tion, background, achievements,
and a statement of support by the
person or group making the nom-
ination. Nomination forms are
available at the Lions Club web-
site, www.HaddonfieldLions.org.
Completed nominations can be
emailed to the chairman of the
Citizen of the Year Committee,
Tom Baird, at tombaird@com-
cast.net or sent to Thomas H.
Baird, 70 Lane of Acres, Haddon-
field, 08033.
Questions? Call Tom at 428-4070
or 609-923-1442. A list of previous
Citizen of the Year Award recipi-
ents can be found by visiting the
Haddonfield Lions Club web site
at www.HaddonfieldLions.org and
following the link on the home
page to Citizen of the Year.
Know someone who should
be Citizen of the Year?
Haddonfield Lions Club is looking for applicants
for its 40th-Annual Citizen of the Year award
Visit us online at haddonfieldsun.com
DECEMBER 7-13, 2011 THE HADDONFIELD SUN 15
Whos The Latest Hair Trendsetter?
Is it Jennifer Lopez? Pink? Lady Gaga?
How about YOU!? Yes, you!
y huvng your consututon vth Dunu DMedo,
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secrets, hur texture, bone structure und estye cun
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My cents suy to me tme und tme ugun, not ony
hov much they ove ther ook, but uso hov much
ther rends und covorkers ove ther ook.
Nov, thut's u trend thut never goes out o stye!
Call for your complimentary consultation!
lBSB 427-B77S
14 South Haddon Avenue
Haddonfield
(Across from the Post Office)
Tue - Fri 10-8 Sat 10-4
Like us on Facebook!
1450 Mar|ton P|ke East Cherry H|||, NJ 08334 www.spr|ng-h|||s.com
Caring with a Commitment to Quality now has a choice.
Spring Hills Home Care Services
or
Spring Hills Cherry Hill Luxury Senior Living
Innovative and Distinct, our holistic approach to senior living is
the cornerstone of our services we call Signature Touches.
Ask our Community Relations Counselor Today to discover which
option is best for you.
Show this ad for pre-opening specials or for a FREE in-home RN
assessment. Call 856-335-3026 for details.
Helping you navigate
the journey ahead.
Specializing in
Medicare Supplement and
Medicare Advantage
Long Tern Care Insurance
Part D of Medicare-Prescription
Drug Coverage (Open Enrollment Period 10/15 to 12/17)
Analyzing Corporate Retiree Benefits
Philadelphia Handbell
Ensemble coming
The First Baptist Church of
Haddonfield at 124 Kings High-
way East will host the Philadel-
phia Handbell Ensemble in con-
cert on Sunday, Dec. 18 at 4 p.m. as
part of their Follow the Star to
the Heart of Christmas celebra-
tion events.
A candlelight reception will fol-
low the performance. For further
information, call 429-2326 or visit
www.firstbaptisthaddonfield.org.
Freewill donations will be accept-
ed.
Annual Holiday Gift
Cottage Dec. 8
In conjunction with the Had-
donfield Holiday House Tour, the
Markeim Arts Center will be
hosting the Eighth-Annual Holi-
day Gift Cottage on Thursday,
Dec. 8 from noon to 9 p.m.
Artisans will be selling hand-
crafted clothing and knit items,
jewelry, small paintings, chil-
dren's accessories and so much
more.
Admission is free and children
are welcome.
The Markeim Arts Center is lo-
cated at the intersection of Lin-
coln Avenue and Walnut Street in
Haddonfield. Call 429-8585 or visit
markeimartscenter.org for more
information.
Haddonfield Holiday
House Tour
Get inspired for holiday deco-
rating ideas. Tickets are now on
sale for the 10th Annual Haddon-
field Holiday House Tour, on Dec.
8.
The tour will be from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. and again from 5 to 9 p.m.
on Dec. 8 and will feature visits to
five private homes beautifully
decorated for the holidays, as well
as several special locations.
Tickets are $15 in advance or
$20 on the day of the tour, and can
be purchased online at www.had-
donfieldnj.org, or in person or by
mail via cash, check or credit
card at the Haddonfield Informa-
tion Center at 4 Kings Court, Had-
donfield, 08033.
For more information call 216-
7253 or email InfoCenter@Haddon-
fieldNJ.org or
TheBag319@gmail.com.
Confirmed homes in order of
the map that is provided with the
tickets are as follows: 20 Sylvan
Lake Avenue (home of Ryan and
Shelley Sparrow), 220 West
Mount Vernon Ave. (home of
Matthew and Stacy Laffer), 61
Kings Highway West (home of
Jason and Reena Schaeffer), 120
Jefferson Avenue (home of Brad
and Denise Brubaker), and 217
Washington Avenue (home of
John and Liz LaProcido).
Accent Studio at 123 Kings
Highway East will be open from
10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and will donate a
portion of all sales of their spe-
cial 2011 Holiday House Tour
Commemorative Friendship Ball.
First Night Haddonfields
2012 line-up
First Night Haddonfield 2012
has announced a fantastic line-up
of performers for the New Year's
Eve celebration of the arts. The
festivities will feature four head-
liners this year!
The Amazing Kreskin, the
world's foremost mentalist will
kick the evening off, followed by
Galumpha, a high-energy show of
choreographed acrobatics.
Tommy Cash will perform a
tribute to his late brother, Johnny
Cash, and Searson will entertain
all with their beautiful voices and
Celtic rock.
In all, more than 40 different
performances will take place in 20
venues in Haddonfield, from 5:30
p.m. to midnight on New Year's
Eve. KidZone at the Central/ Mid-
dle School will feature music,
crafts, puppet shows, storytellers
and sing-alongs.
And a family countdown with
fireworks will take place at the
Haddonfield Town Clock at 9 p.m.
First Night Haddonfield is de-
signed to entertain every member
of your family, from young to old.
Call the information center for
assistance or for other button out-
let locations at 216-7253.
More button sales outlets to be
announced shortly. View the full
line up of entertainers on our
website at www.firstnighthaddon-
field.org.
BRIEFS
16 THE HADDONFIELD SUN DECEMBER 7-13, 2011
For either offer, call or write Tim.
(856) 528-4993 tronaldson@elauwit.com
www.sunne.ws
REALTORS
We've got what you've been waiting for
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about, email Tim with an image (of you, the property, your
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But, hurry: deadline is Monday at noon.
Sound too good to be true?!? It's not.
Introducing:
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The Greater South Jersey Cho-
rus, 90 voices strong, will step up
to perform two special family
concerts on the theme, Home for
the Holidays on Dec. 11 and Dec.
17: the first concert at Christ the
King Church in Haddonfield at
3:30 p.m.; the second at St. Isaac
Jogues Church in Marlton, at 8
p.m. Noted composer and Artistic
Director Dean Rishel will conduct
both performances.
"We celebrate our 20th An-
niversary season by offering a
holiday concert unlike anything
we have done recently, Rishel
said. We are featuring a guest so-
prano who will bring real star-
quality to the program, singing
favorite seasonal pieces. We are
also giving our wonderful accom-
panist, Oleksii Ivanchenko, his
moment in the sun with a virtu-
osic piano Christmas solo. Weve
also planned a novelty number
for some laughs, and we intend to
have our audience join the pro-
ceedings. Seven guitarists help
out in a Ladino-language
Hanukkah song and we have an
old-fashioned sing-along to cap off
the evening. It will be a fun time
for all of us in this 20th anniver-
sary year."
Rishel and the singers welcome
all families and friends to this
specially programmed concert.
Adult admission is $20, and all ac-
companied children 14 or under
can attend free of charge. Tickets
may be purchased from any cho-
rus member, online at
www.greatersjchorus.org, or by
calling 482-8282.
Established in 1992, the 90-
voice, mixed chorus rehearses at
the Unitarian Universalist
Church in Cherry Hill on Monday
evenings from September
through May. Members are draw
from more than 40 communities
throughout the Delaware Valley.
The groups history has been dis-
tinguished by consistent artistic
growth, expanding audiences and
increasing regional recognition.
Interested singers are invited to
audition; please check the web-
site for details.
Greater South Jersey
Chorus performing
special concerts
Family concerts have theme of Home for
the Holidays on Dec. 11 and Dec. 17
Visit us online at haddonfieldsun.com
classified
T HE HA DDO N F I E L D S U N
DECEMBER 7-13, 2011 PAGE 18
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week. All classified ads must be prepaid.
Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun Newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
45per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
$
175per month Only
$
55per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 856-528-4698 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Cherr y Hi l l Sun Haddonf i el d Sun
Marl t on Sun Medf ord Sun
Moorest own Sun Mt . Laurel Sun
Shamong Sun Tabernacl e Sun
Voorhees Sun Washi ngt on Twp. Sun
S & J Construction, LLC
Concrete Masonry Stucco
Brick Chimneys Repaired French Drains
Mudjacking Concrete Leveling
(609) 230-1682 (609) 268-9497
No Job Too Small
Chimney CIeaning
ATTENTION
JUNK CARS WANTED
Sell your junk car for $300 and up. We buy flood cars.
for more info call Mike at 609-820-8643
licensed salvage yard
Concrete Repair
Garage Doors
Smolar Garage Door Service
856-466-7473
Garage doors/openers
Spring replacements
Cables/rollers
Key pads/remotes
Call Today!
Lic.#
13VH05774600
Housekeeping &
Cleaning Service
Provided by
European women
in business
for 17 years
Excellent references
upon request
Please call
(856) 216-7400
856-356-2775
BOARD YOUR
DOG IN A
LOVING HOME!
NOT A KENNEL!
www.OurHome-DogBoarding.com
Dog Boarding
Ccll Georic Todcl
6oq-q1o-1q6q
Georgiu's
Cleuning Service

Reliuble

ependuble

Honest
Autos
CIeaning
DON HAHN ELECTRIC
Since 1972
All Electrical Repairs
100-200 Amp Service
Ceiling

Attic

Bath Fans
Recess & Security Lighting
856-783-9128
800-427-2067
Insured &Bonded NJ LIC #4546
EIectricaI Services
www.cmbcontracting.com
609-953-1798
GeneraI Contracting
856-719-8448
Chimney Cleaning
Air Duct Cleaning
Dryer Vent Cleaning
21 Point
Chimney Safety
Inspection Repairs
Quality Work at a Fair Price
CHEAP
8WEEP
Need Your Home
CIeaned?
Reliable results, excellent
refs. call Anne
856-482-1327
With a crew of 3, and sup-
plying our own equipment,
we detail baths, polish sil-
ver & brass, clean light fix-
tures, as well as mainte-
nance cleaning, great
references available,
Peter Hawkins
(215)-229-5505
FREE ESTIMATES 856-381-0249
NJ License #13VH06184500
CSI Group International
Absolutely all concrete problems solved Repair and Restoration
Cracks are our specialty. Residential and Commercial Services
Decorative Concrete New Concrete Seal Coating
Power Washing Mudjacking Stain Removal
Concrete Leveling
FIREWOOD FOR SALE
(Fully Seasoned)
MIXED HARDWOODS
1 Cord - $180
OAK
1 Cord - $205
Call (856) 207-0501
Firewood
Furniture Repair
WOOD CHARS
Repaired/Reglued
Broken parts Replaced
New Cane/Rush Seats
Tom 856 261-8633
CIeaning
J&C Janitorial
Over 20 yrs. Service
20% Off 1st time Service!
RESIDENTIAL
Your Satisfaction is Our Guarantee.
References Available Upon Request.
856-740-4294
Fully Bonded & Ins. Member of BBB
www.JCCleaningServices.com
www.jhstraincarpentry.com
Decorative Trims, Crown Moldings, Bookcases
Custom Mantles, built-ins, Kitchens and Baths
Professional Painting
Home project consulting
Design cost applied to your job!
FREE ESTIMATES - REFERENCES - LICENSED & INSURED
CALL TODAY! 609 - 561 - 7751
Over
30 yr. exp.
HeIp Wanted
Drivers - Teams: $5,000
Team Sign-On Bonus
when you team drive for
Werner Enterprises!
Call Now for details!
1-866-823-0268
Drivers: Start up to
$.41/mi.
Home Weekly or
Bi-Weekly
CDL-A 6 mos.
OTR exp. Req.
Equipment you'll be proud
to drive!
(888) 247-4037
Full time, part time stylist
wanted.
Growing salon
in Haddonfield
Must be licensed,
personable, & friendly.
Please call ndigo Salon
for info
856-354-8144.
Looking for caring person
for child care,
housekeeping & driving.
2 days per week
Moorestown NJ
Need Refs. &
Good driving record
etanhelp@gmail.com
COOK NEEDED Assisted
Living Experience
Preferred
At Spring Oak Assisted
Living of Berlin For the
11:00AM-8:00PM Shift
Email resume to
jdetzner@springoak.net
or Fax to 856-719-9475
CERTFED MEDCATON
ADES
At Spring Oak Assisted
Living of Berlin For the
3:00-11:00PM Shift
Email resume to
jdetzner@springoak.net
or Fax to 856-719-9475
Home Care Services
ALWAYS THERE
SENIOR CARE
(856) 439-1300
Hourly & Live-in Care
Best PRICE, Best Care
Ask about VA Program
FUEL DELIVERY DRIVER WANTED
CDL/HAZMAT, experienced only
Good driving record
Burlington Co, seasonal Nov-Mar
Harriett's Energy Solutions
Call Delivery Manager Dave
609-654-5739 x46
HeIp Wanted
Paperhanging,
Removal & Painting
By Randy Craig
(856) 981-1359
www.rcpaperhangings.com
Lic. # 13VH05945366

SERVICES, INC
Termite & Pest Control
(609) 953-5444
(609) 268-1002
ROOFING & SIDING
CELLA
Family Owned and Operated
Fully Insured Free Estimates
(856) 429-4088
New Roofs
Siding
Windows
Attic Fans
Repairs
Re-Roofs
SkyIights
Gutters &
Guards
24 HOUR
EMERGENCYSERVICE
Financing
AvaiIabIe
Lic# 13VH01919900
Paperhanging
Pest ControI
SoIar
SOLAR
INSTALLATION
and DESIGN
Residential Commercial
Ask how your roof can make
you 12-15% rate of return!
Pay back in as little as 3-5 years!
FREE ESTIMATES
609-698-4300
www.njsensiblesolar.com
ReaI Estate for Rent
Landscaping
DAVNC PANTNG
Quality Work
Reasonable Price
Licenced & nsured
856-341-4861
GentiIi's Painting
Power Washing and
Wallpaper Removal
(856) 228-2723
(856) 885-8166
Lic # 13VH00966900
HVAC
RAS BUILDERS
Custom Homes, Additions, Sun rooms, Siding, Baths,
Decks, Garages, Basements, Roof, Windows
Since 1974 FREE ESTIMATES
856-627-1974
www.RASBUILDERSNJ.com
Lic. 13VH00932400
856-429-8991
On time. Done Right.
For all your home repairs. Locally owned & operated.
www.mrhandyman.com Lic. # NJ-HIC13VH03642600
3 DS LAWN SERVICE (856) 979-1303
FALL SPECIALS
Thatch/Aerate/Seed (Up to 10,000 sq. ft.) ......$425
Fall Leaf Clean Ups.....................................Starting at $99
Gutter Cleaning...................1 story $75 .....2 Story $95
Pressure Washing...............1 story $145 ...2 Story $175
Home Improvement
Painting
Wholesale priced cabinets
now available to the public!
Bring in your big box store quote
and save 40-60% off retail.
Call Jerseys Home Store
at 856-931-0890, or visit us M-Sat 10-6 at
104 W Browning Rd, Bellmawr, NJ.
www.jerseyshomestore.com
OLD SCHOOL
HOME REPAIR
Let us do your homework.
Gutter Cleaning
& Repairs
Soffitt Fascia
Rotten Wood
Door Installation
Painting
Kitchens
Fully Insured Licensed
609-200-4043
24 hour
Emergency
Service
Lic# NJ 13VH05972600
SNOW REMOVAL
DACONTIS HOME SERVICES, LLC
Lic.#
13VH06043200
Landscaping Fall Clean-Ups Mulching Fertilizing
Lawn Repair Gutter Cleaning Pavers
Seeding Sodding and more
Free Estimates Fully Insured BBB Accredited Business
Call Dan DaConti (856) 222-1226
Pet Care
Pets For SaIe
Goldendoodle Miniatures
Vet checked, very cute
Have had their shots
& wormer
Red or Apricot
Perfect Christmas Gift!
(610) 857-1431
NO HEAT? OIL OR GAS
WE CAN HELP!
Plumbing Drain Cleaning
Quick Services
856-429-2494
NJRMP 9325

Professional Tree Care


Tree/Shrub Trimming and Removal
Stump Removal, Land Clearing
Property Maintenance
856-419-6999
treemenllc@hotmail.com
Fully Insured NJ Lic #0600356314
CLASSIFIED THE HADDONFIELD SUN DECEMBER 7-13, 2011 19
PIumbing
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 1/4/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 1/4/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 1/4/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 1/4/12.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
Roofing
GREAT HOUSE
FOR RENT!
Beautiful home for rent on
a quiet street in
Moorestown, NJ.
3 bedrooms, 1 full bath-
room, full basement, 2 car
detached garage, large lot,
washer/dryer/refrigerator.
Cats/dogs are okay.
Excellent school system.
Location:
55 Browning Avenue.
f interested, please call
(609) 324-7979.
Asking $1675/month.
READING ASSISTANCE
AVAILABLE
Need a patient, motivating
tutor? Certified Reading
Specialist K-12.
Assessments, Phonics,
Comprehension,
Writing Skills.
Specializing in hands-on,
multi-sensory teaching for
ADHD, Language-
based/Auditory/Visual
Processing disorders
Call Ellen G. Topiel
(609) 410-2674
Tutoring
Tree Service
Wallpaper Removal,
Wall Repairs, & Painting
Call Ray Forker
856-234-0014
FULLY N8URED
www.rayforkerpainting.com
Place your
classified today!
856-427-0933
Tank RemovaI
CLASSIFIED 20 THE HADDONFIELD SUN DECEMBER 7-13, 2011
BaaebaII carda,
Coina, MiIitary itema,
Vintage itema
SWINO AND A HIT
CaII CharIie 856 313 5579
B0YINO
Wanted to Buy
If youre reading your
competitors ad?
Whos making money
YOU OR THEM?
Advertise with us!
Special Classified offers available.
Dont delay! Call today!
(856) 427-0933 x 512
INTO ACTION!
Place your classified today! 856-427-0933
CLASSIFIED THE HADDONFIELD SUN DECEMBER 7-13, 2011 21
LET THE SUNS
WORK FOR YOU!
Call 856-427-0933
for Advertising Info.
Ninety Tanner Street Haddonfield, NJ 08033
HADDONFIELD
Well maintained Colonial style brk home in Elizabeth Haddon sec-
tion w/several nice renovations. Freshly painted int, new ceramic tile
BA, newer hi-eff gas boiler heating system , central air, newer wins,
gas fp, updated KIT, hw oak flring, FR, full bsmnt, walk up attic,
newer appliances & much more. The exterior boasts newer roof,
large rear deck, shed, & nicely landscaped yard. Offered for $349,900.
(856) 428-9677, Ext. 241
rwoods@lvlrealtors.com
Ron Woods
Associate Broker
PRIME HADDON TWP!
Beautiful, well maintained, brick Colonial located in
desirable Haddon Leigh section. Three bedrooms,
1
1
/2 baths with screened porch, eat-in kitchen,
private rear yard, attached garage, and much more.
Handsome exterior with nicely landscaped yard.
A must see! Offered for $229,900
LENNY, VERMAAT
LEONARD
I N C O R P O R A T E D
R E A L T O R S
HADDONFIELD
Rare Haddonfield "Williamsburg" Cape w/brk ext w/steel I-beam con-
struction on wide lot! Frml step-down LR w/marble fp & 2 pict wins.
Formal DR w/built-in corner cabs & beautiful bay wins. Remodeled KIT
overlooking brk patio. Generous sized BRs & 2 full BAs, lrg walk-in
cedar closet, hw flrs & moldings galore. Landscaped grounds w/fen rear
yard, 2 car att gar w/adj slate breezeway. Offered for $574,900.
HADDON HEIGHTS
Charming, totally remodeled home located on beautiful tree-lined
street. 3 BRs, 2.5 BAs w/neutral, comfortable inter w/large list of
amenities. Sunroom, family room w/wet bar, office & nicely manicured
exterior w/well groomed mature plantings, garage, & stone fireplace.
A great home for entertaining. Sensibly priced at $284,900.
Just one look and youll fall in love.
If youre reading your competitors ad?
Whos making money you or them?
Advertise with us!
Special Classified offers available.
Dont delay! Call today!
(856) 427-0933 x 512
INTO ACTION!
RLAL1ORS
Ninety 1anner Street Haddonfield, New Jersey
LENNY, VERMAAT
LEONARD
I N C O R P O R A T E D
Visit www.lvlrealtors.com to tour our many properties
COLLINGSWOOD413 Virginia Avenue
Nice4BR,2.5BAtwostoryColonialhomewithlargeroomsthatincludeaformalliving
room&diningroom,eat-inkitchen,familyroom,mastersuiteplus3othernicesized
bedrooms,enclosedporch,fullbasement&detachedtwocargarage.
$319,000 (5880417)Text to JRWEAAIX to 64842
HADDON HEIGHTS2 Second Avenue
LargetwostoryCenterHallColonialhome/officebuilding.Featuresaformallivingroom&diningroom,familyroom,kitchenw/breakfastroom,sun-
room/den,threeBRs,2.5BAs,fullbsmnt&alargetiereddeckoutback.Theofficebuildingisnowbeingusedasaveterinarianofficeandconsists
ofareceptionarea,examroom,operationroom,powderroomandlabareaonthe1stflr.Thesecondflrconsistsoffiveofficesandstorageclosets.
$499,000 (5892218) Text to JRWEAAKA to 64842
CaroIe Yeager
428-9677 x 238
Mark Lenny
428-9677 x 239
CaroIe Yeager
428-9677 x 238
Mark Lenny
428-9677 x 239
Mark Lenny
428-9677 x 239
Gary Vermaat
428-9677 x 243
Gary Vermaat
428-9677 x 243
Mark Lenny
428-9677 x 239
Gary Vermaat
428-9677 x 243
HADDONFIELD406 Haddonfield Commons
Greatonebedroomplusdenoverlookingcourtyard.Eat-inkitchenandbalcony,
plustheconvenienceofwalkingtospeedline,townandlocalrestaurants.
$114,000 (5904527)
HADDONFIELD118 Avondale Avenue
ThisCapeCodcharmerhasaknockout500+sq.ft.familyroomw/cathedralceiling,
fireplace&glassdoorsthatleadtoatiereddeck.3BRs&2fullBAs&lotsofupdates.
JustablocktotheElizabethHaddonschool.
$399,900 (5861751)Text to JRWEAAHA to 64842
HADDONFIELD372 Kings Highway
ThisisanexceptionalClassicTudorupgradedthroughout.Newkitchen,4bedroom,
4fulland2halfbaths.Greatforaupair.Amazinggroundsonalargeprivatelotwith
swimmingpoolandprivateterraceand2ndfloorbalcony.Mustseetobelieve!
$999,000 (5893669)Text to JRWEAAJG to 64842
HADDONFIELD612 Grove Street
It`shardtobelieveyoucanownthisspacioushomeforthisprice!DutchColonialwith
4/5BRs&2.5BAs.Eat-inkitchen,familyroom,fireplace,HWfloors&garage.Itjust
needssomeonewithavision&somefixingbutisloadedwithpotential.
$299,000 (5849326)Text to JRWEAAFX to 64842
HADDONFIELD30 Warwick Road
Beingsold'asis`.Presentlyusedasa4BR,2.5BAhomeplusan800sqftofficewitha
separateentrance.Theofficespacecancontinuetobeusedasofficespaceorconvert-
edtoresidentialspace.Closetotown&transportation.
$392,500 (5949994)Text to JRWEAANF to 64842
COLLINGSWOOD115 Fern Avenue
LargetwostoryVictorianthatfeaturesacenterhall,parlor,formallivingroom&dining
room,eat-inkitchen,familyroom,den/playroom/bedroom,fourbedrooms,twofullbaths,
walk-upatticthatcanbefinished&afullbasement.
$319,000 (5893669)Text to JRWEAAKB to 64842
HADDONFIELD416 Kings Highway East
Stately4BR,3BAColonialwithamasterbedroom&masterbath,countrykitchen,
familyroom&screenedporch.Ona.43acrelotjustblockstoschools,parks,shops
andyearroundfestivities.
.$529,900 (5908234)Text to JRWEAAKX to 64842
Visit www.lvlrealtors.com or text LVL to
64842 to tour our Haddonfield Properties.
LENNY, VERMAAT
LEONARD
I N C O R P O R A T E D
REALTORS
Ninety Tanner Street Haddonfield, NJ
428-5150
GARY VERMAAT
Broker of Record, Owner
MARK LENNY
Broker/Owner
315 Jefferson Avenue
This 3 story Center Hall Colonial has 5 BRs & 2.5 BAs including a newer master bedroom
suite, eat-in kitchen & family room. Beautiful hardwood floors & NEW C/A. Third floor can be
finished for additional living space. Perfect for a growing family.
$879,000 (5977432)
CaII 428-9677 x 239 Text JRWEAAOV to 64842
460 Westminster Avenue
Wonderful Cape Cod style home located in Historic Haddonfield that features a formal LR &
Dr, FR, den/library/bedroom, eat-in kitchen w/island, 1st floor master suite, 3 nice sized BRs
on 2nd floor, 2nd floor sitting area, finished basement, 2 car attached garage & much more.
$850,000
CaII 428-9677 x 243 Text JRWEAAON to 64842
405 Loucroft Road
11 room stately brick Colonial on .92 acres of lush grounds. 6 BRs,
4 full BAs & 2 powder rooms including a stunning Master Bedroom
Suite If you want the best, this home is for you!
$1,900,000 (5689923)
CaII Mark Lenny at 428-9677 x 239 Text JRWEAAAI to 64842
Haddonfield
423 Washington Avenue
Spacious Victorian completely rebuilt less than 25 years ago with lots of
NEW since then. 4 bedrooms 3.5 baths including a master bedroom suite,
3 fam/great rooms, den, playroom and huge 4 car garage. Gorgeous!
$1,099,000
CaII 428-9677 x 239 Text JRWEAAAP to 64842
124 Kings Highway
Great opportunity to live & work in the same place. Victorian Mansion boasts professional offices on
the 1st floor & private residence on 2nd/3rd flrs. Some of the many features include h/w floors, crown
moldings, ceiling medallions, 2 kitchens, custom KIT in residence, 3 BRs, 4 full BAs & so much more.
$990,000 (5721565)
CaII 428-9677 x 243 Text JRWEAAEB to 64842
640 Farragut Avenue
This sprawling all brick home will surpass your expectations. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths
including a master bedroom suite, 2 family rooms, office & a 2.5 car garage. Major
updates in the last 10 years include a cherry kitchen, roof, heater, C/A & master bath.
$519,900 (5906281)
CaII 428-9677 x 239 Text JRWEAAKS to 64842
59 Gill Road
Large Cape Cod style home with 5 BRs, 4 full BAs, stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, chair
rails, lots of windows, skylights, updated kitchen, living room with gas fireplace, den, master suite,
guest suite, open front porch, back deck, partial basement, 1 car garage & more.
$559,900
CaII 428-9677 x 243 Text JRWEAAJH to 64842
137 The Mews
Sunny end unit with a 2 story foyer & a floor plan rarely offered. 3 BRs,
2.5 BAs, deck & a recently refinished family room. Lovely location adjacent
to Wallworth Lake & Park & close to jogging, walking & bike paths.
$369,000 (5873429)
CaII 428-9677 x 239
205 Marne Avenue
2 story Colonial home features a formal LR & DR, eat-in
kitchen, 3 nice sized bedrooms, finished basement
w/game room & office & 1 car attached garage.
$322,500 (5780526)
CaII 428-9677 x 243 Text JRWEAADG to 64842
165 Tavistock Lane
Custom Executive two story Colonial home that features a formal LR & DR, custom kitchen, screened
porch, office, 5 BRs, 4 full BAs & one powder room, finished bsmnt w/recreation room, addition that
features a 1st floor family room 0r master suite & convenient location to the Tavistock Country Club.
$710,000 (5899627)
CaII 428-9677 x 243 Text JRWEAAKG to 64842
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