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JumpingAdvantage™

Jumping Manual

JumpingAdvantage™

“Information is the Commodity of Kings.” Anthony Robbins

"When does jumping become flying?" Michael

Jordan, For The Love Of The Game

Dear Friend and Fellow Basketball Player:

Congratulations on taking this exciting step to help yourself in achieving your basketball, athletic, fitness, and self-development goals. The JumpingAdvantage™

Package is a mini library of some of the best information, techniques, tips, secrets available all in one place, at a reasonable cost, in a most convenient format. In this guide you will find information that is as enjoyable,

and

inspirational and fun to informative.

read,

as

it is valuable

The JumpingAdvantage™ Package is intended to fill in the information gaps by offering just the right blend of technical background while presenting key information in an easy to understand simple format.

It teaches and inspires you to work hard to achieve your goals and receive the rewards that you deserve, not only today, but for many years to come. And above all I hope it helps you to have more fun and enjoy your life!

Thank you for allowing the JumpingAdvantage™ Ultimate Resource Package to be a part of your athletic, fitness, and self-development library. Good luck!

Sincerely,

Eric Moyer

Coaches Sports Publishing 3419 Via Lido, Suite 411 Newport Beach CA 92663

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JumpingAdvantage™

Jumping Manual

JumpingAdvantage

Jumping and Quickness Improvement Manual

Jump Higher!

Run Faster!

“Dream lofty dreams, and as you dream, so shall you become. Your vision is the promise of what you shall one day be; your ideal is the prophecy of what you shall at last unveil.” James Allen

“There is no knowledge that is not power.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

Table of Contents

-Disclaimer

-Introduction

-Developing Your Jumping Improvement Program -Mandatory Jumping, Weight Training, and Dietary Safety Guidelines -Special Safety Tips for Female Athletes -The 3 Modes/Pathways To Improve Jumping and Quickness with JumpingAvantage™ -JumpingAdvantage™ General Guidelines -Incorporating Optimum Jumping Mechanics and Technique -Vertical Jump Testing Before You Begin -Repetitive Jump Exercise Program™ -Repetitive Jump Exercises™ -Secondary and Sport Specific Jumping Exerc ises -Sprinting -Squats -The “King of Lower Body Exercises” -JumpingAdvantage™ Repetitive Jump Program™ Sample Programs -JumpingAdvantage™ Plyometrics (For advanced athletes)

Eccentric

-Plyometrics Exercises

Muscular Contraction Improvement

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-Executing the Exercises -Guidelines for Maximum Results -Plyometrics Sample Programs Levels 1-4 -Jumping Advantage Isometrics -JumpingAdvantage™ Platform Jumping Shoes Overview -JumpingAdvantage™ Platform Jumping Shoes Complex Program -Additional Exercises and Machine s for Jumping and Speed -Additional Jumping Resistance Machines -Mini Gym Leaper, Hydraulic Leaper, Russian Leaper -Bicycle Running

Disclaimer: Neither the author or Coaches Sports Publishing (CSP) assumes any responsibility for any injuries of any type that result from the CSP programs. This program contains exercises and programs ranging from beginner to advanced, that, depending on physical condition, may be hazardous to your health. User assumes all risk for performing the exercises described in this course. Use of this course constitutes an (covenant) agreement to not bring any lawsuit or action for injury caused by performing exercises described in this course. We do recommend that you consult your physician before beginning this or any other sports, exercise, jump training or dietary program, especially if you have suffered from spine, hip, ankle or knee injuries or cardiovascular and/or breathing problems.

Important Note: It is absolutely essential that user follow all Mandatory Safety Guidelines outlined in the following pages of this guide, as well all safety guidelines to avoid possible injury. Furthermore, the following of all safety guidelines as outlined still does not guarantee the avoidance of injury and will not be mistaken for the right to pursue legal action in the event of injury. Use of this program is at your own risk.

©2001 All rights reserved. No part of the contents of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, email, photocopying, or otherwise, without the written permission of the author. Sharing or distribution by email is stealing.

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Introduction

The object of this guide is to help you to become a better athlete and basketball player. Although improving jumping, quickness,

and strength are the main areas of interest for most athletes, I’d

also like to encourage athletes to

being along with their bodies and athletic skills. I am a strong believer in the mind/body system.

improve their minds and well

Being a good or great athlete or basketball player is the end result of progressive improvement. Improvement is the name of the game for this guide. In fact, boys who start out with little natural ability transform themselves into high school and college stars. The Jr. High or High School benchwarmer may turn himself into the star of tomorrow. It has happened thousands of times in the past, and it is happening every day, even today, right now.

The story of the overnight successes are exaggerated and often appear as if it was magic or luck. The truth of the matter is that the star player has been working harder and smarter than the average player. An athlete can make tremendous strides when he works hard for a few weeks or months. The improvements over a few months can be extremely exciting and gratifying.

But, total improvement occurs from season to season, and more so over the course of a whole athletic career. That is one of the secrets of the Russians and eastern European athletes of the 1980s. They started young, and even though they may not have had as great physical attributes of some others, they managed to make progressive improvements year after year that really added up.

“Great works are performed not by strength but by perseverance.” Samuel Johnson

What this takes is not a few weeks of frenzied workouts before the season, (although there’s nothing wrong with that too) but a systematic plan that you stick to from one season to the next, and from year to year. Persistence, by just plugging away day after day can get you where you want to go in basketball and in life.

There is no magic formula to becoming a better athlete. An athlete must develop a program to improve physical attributes such as

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jumping and strength, as well as fundamental skills, and stick with it. Fundamental skills must be developed to the utmost.

When an athlete decides to develop an improvement program and

follow it loyally, he should expect great dividends in improvement, recognition, self-satisfaction, a college scholarship, and maybe a pro contract. An athlete can expect to improve his jumping ability from 4-16 inches and more, depending on his current development.

I improved my jumping 19 inches. Jumping can be greatly

improved by work. Most pros work an average of 7 years or more on their jumping to get where they are.

“The will to succeed is important, but what’s even more important is the will to prepare.” Bobby Knight

Many people believe that a person is born with jumping ability and speed and can't be taught to jump higher or run faster. This is simply not true. Athletes can be trained to jump higher or run faster, just like singers can be taught to sing better. While you may not be genetically blessed to jump as high or run as fast as others do, you can certainly make a significant improvement in your present running and jumping. I took that as a challenge and I hope you do too.

Plenty of 5'9” players easily dunk after they develop their jumping ability. I was one of them who first dunked at 5’9”. A player's physical attributes, in addition to jumping ability, can also be greatly improved. From one season to the next, we often see a weak player return to practice spectacularly transformed, with great improvements in strength, quickness and jumping ability. This did not occur overnight, but came about from several months

of off- season training. You can transform yourself too!

“There is no tree that will not fall if you strike it 10

times.” Korean Proverb

Similarly, shooting, dribbling, ball handling, court awareness self- confidence, mental attitude, rebounding and defense can be greatly improved over the course of the off-season. Work year round on improving your game and mind. You can make great strides from

one

season

to

the

next,

but

you

can

make

even

greater

improvement

over

a

few

seasons.

Stick

with

it!

These

improvements will not only help you in basketball or volleyball, but in every sport you play. The longer you keep at it, the better athlete and person you will become.

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“If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.” William E.

Hickson

Persistence is the key. Talent is a factor but is not as important. There are plenty of talented players who don't even make the team. If there is a secret to becoming a star, it is to persistently work at improving the fundamental skills. The degree of success a player achieves will usually be in proportion to his persistency and the work he puts into achieving his goals. These goals; making the team being a starter, being a star player, earning a college scholarship, etc. can only be achieved by persistent work. So, commit yourself, stick with it, and let’s get started!

“Winning starts with beginning.” Anonymous

Developing Your Jumping Improvement Program

“And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.”

Anais Nin

The JumpingAdvantage™ guide includes more ways and exercises to improve jumping ability than an athlete or basketball player has time or energy to undertake. Therefore, when the athlete creates his own program, he must pick and choose from the various exercises rather than completing them all.

To get you started, the sample programs have chosen the exercises for you. The athlete is encouraged to experiment, and find out by trial and error, which exercises work best for him. An exercise should be given a trial period in order to determine its worth to the player. Judge the exercise on the results you achieve and not on its difficulty. Often the more difficult and intense the work, the more benefit the athlete will derive from it.

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“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.” Colin

L. Powell

Realistically, not all athletes will respond alike to a particular training routine. A specific exercise that may produce superior results for one athlete, might only produce average results for another athlete. Each athlete may experience a varying degree of improvement from the same exercise.

An example is that an athlete with insufficient strength might experience great results from weight lifting exercises, such as the squat, leg presses, and calf raises, while another athlete without insufficient strength may improve more from sprinting and jumping exercises. Furthermore, an athlete may find that an exercise that had not produced good results initially, may produce good results at a future time, and vice versa. Plyometrics will not produce the desired results unless an adequate strength base is developed first.

This suggests that an athlete should experiment, monitor the results, and periodically revise his program. Joe Weider of the Muscle & Fitness magazines calls this method the Intuitive Method.” Using intuition and feel to decide if something is working. I’d like to suggest a trial and error method combined with the Intuitive Method. Intuition is developed through experience. Experience that beginners do not have.

So actually measuring the results you get by measuring vertical jump improvement, combined with how the exercise intuitively feels is the way to find the Magical Jumper in you. The Magical Jumper is the combination of methods that gives you the optimum results.

Most other programs come nowhere close, because they only have 1 mode available to the athlete. So intuition and trial and error are left completely out of the equation. They’re very limited in the results you get, often don’t work at all, are hit or miss, and often hit plateaus very quickly. When you combine the logical with the intuitive in creating your own program, monitoring your results and making changes and adjustments, which is how you find the Magical Jumper in you. I thank Joe Weider for the Intuitive

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Method because it is only when the intellect cannot answer that magic prevails.

Improvement of jumping ability may occur quite quickly and a player may add several inches to his vertical jump in only a few weeks time. Although quick improvement are usually made, and it is very exciting, it is recommended that you work on improving your jumping ability and physical attributes from season to season and year to year, rather than just a crash pre-season program. The additive results over several seasons will be far greater than a crash program can produce. So, we encourage you to make working on increasing jumping ability, speed and quickness a permanent part of your off season improvement plans.

“Perseverance is not a long race; it is many short races one after another.” Pat Williams

Here are excellent additional reference sources for athletes that would like to be extremely detailed and technical in their research. Sport Stretch by Michael Alter, Jumping into Plyometrics by Donald Chu PHD, High Powered Plyometrics By James Radcliffe and Robert Farentinos, and Periodization Training for Sports by Tudor Bompa, PHD.

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JUMPING, WEIGHT TRAINING, AND DIETARY SAFETY GUIDELINES

“You can’t build your reputation on what you’re going to do.” Henry Ford

The following guidelines are meant to minimize the impact and jolt on the joints when performing Plyometrics, Repetitive Jumping Exercises™ and any exercises found within the CSP programs. All safety guideline are mandatory, meaning they absolutely must be followed. You must be in excellent shape

and 100% healthy to begin any of these programs.

that it is not necessary for your joints to receive more impact in order to receive the benefit from Plyometrics or any jumping exercise. More impact or jolt is not better- it is worse. So, make sure to heed all safety guidelines in this section to minimize the impact on your joints and minimize risk of injury.

Remember

MANDATORY SAFETY GUIDELINES

1. You must be 100% healthy and in good shape to begin any Jumping, Strength or exercise program found herein. Additionally, you must already be a good athlete in great shape in order to begin a Plyometrics training program. For Plyometrics, advanced Jumping exercises and Advanced Platform Shoe training you must have the proper body type and strength base to begin with. If you’re not extremely strong, and can’t already run and jump very well then you shouldn’t perform Plyometrics or the more advanced Jumping exercises

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and JumpingAdvantage™ Complex Advanced Platform Shoe Training. Plyometrics is a highly advanced and an extremely

high impact exercise that by jumping off the box or platform multiplies the force of impact from 3 to 5 times the athlete’s bodyweight. It is very physically demanding and stressful

Similarly,

regular Plyometrics Platform Shoe Training (i.e. Strength Shoes or JumpSoles are considered intermediate to advanced training tools and must be built up to with an initiation period rather than starting out cold by the beginning athlete. And the JumpingAdvantage™ Complex Advanced Platform Shoe training program is an advanced program, not beginning or intermediate.

exercise especially on joints, knees, and spine.

This program contains plenty of additional exercises that a healthy athlete in good shape can use to build their fitness, strength, and athleticism level to an excellent level without Plyometrics or Plyometrics Platform Training Shoes. (i.e. Repetitive Jump Exercises™, Weight training, Isometrics etc.) Athletes who have a history of injuries or who are recovering from an injury should not perform Plyometrics or any Jumping exercises.

2.

The athlete should resume training only with a doctor or

trainer's medical clearance. All athletes sho uld undergo an overall orthopedic screening and pre-participation physical

before

program. A general physical exam may not yield the information that you need. Contact a physician specializing in sports who understands the demands of the sport you will play, and the exercises that you decide to perform. Particular attention should be given to postural or structural issues that are likely to predispose the athlete to injury.

exercise

engaging

in

Plyometrics,

Jumping

or

any

Your Height to Weight must be proportionate to perform Plyometrics and Jumping exercises. The strength of an athlete’s joints, ligaments and connective tissues do not increase proportionately with their weight or muscularity. The heavier the athlete the more the training demand. Heavier athletes, and athletes who are overweight or have heavier body types (such as football linemen) will experience more stress on their joints and connective tissues and are at higher injury risk from performing Plyometrics and Jumping exercises, than their lighter counterparts. Therefore, heavier athletes are not appropriate candidates for Plyometrics or Jumping training.

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Extremely Heavily muscled athletes are also not candidates for Plyometrics because ligaments, joints and connective tissues are not proportionate to overall weight even though they have

much muscle.

basketball and volleyball players, Track sprinters, high jumpers and triple jumpers, and football wide receivers are more appropriate body types.

Leaner and lighter body type athletes such as

3.

You must have an excellent Strength base to begin with before beginning Plyometrics or Complex Advanced Platform Shoe Training. Plyometrics and Jumping Advantage™ Advanced Platform Shoe Training place extreme forces on the athlete’s body. Physiology and common sense dictates that in order to begin Plyometrics or Complex Advanced Platform Shoe Training there are prerequisite strength levels that are necessary. Muscles and connective tissue must already be extremely strong and have been progressively conditioned before beginning a Plyometrics or JumpingAdvantage™ Complex Advanced Platform Shoe Training routine. Adequate strength of the stabilizing muscles (muscles surrounding the joint) is a key to injury prevention. Perform at least six to twelve months of progressive weight training and repetitive jump training to create a sufficient strength base and foundation first.

4.

Age is also a Factor. Plyometrics and Jump training is not an exercise for the weekend warrior or the middle aged (or older) athlete trying to jump back in and get back in shape. If you used to be in great shape and a great athlete but are no longer in excellent shape, resist the temptation to right jump back into it where you left off. You must first progressively reestablish your strength and fitness base, as well as the strength of your ligaments and connective tissue before attempting Plyometrics or more advanced exercises such as advanced platform shoe complex training. Otherwise you are only inviting injury. Likewise, younger athletes must first develop a strength and fitness base before Plyometrics or any of the more strenuous exercises in the program is begun. Lower intensity exercises are the rule. Please resist the temptation to try and get the jump on the competition by performing Plyometrics or any exercise that you are not ready for. Athletes under 18 must consult with their parents and physician before undertaking the Plyometrics, jump training, physical training, or dietary programs including Creatine.

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5. Always perform Plyometrics and Jumping exercises on some type of resilient shock absorbing surface such as soft level grass or gymnastic, exercise or wrestling mat (Never perform on a hard, slippery or uneven surface) Due to the high impact forces inherent in Plyometrics, never perform the Plyometrics exercises on gym floors (basketball court, wood or other), carpeted surfaces or cement. Avoid any surface that is

hard or has an inconsistent surface that you can slip or sprain

an ankle on, including wet grass.

level and consistent in quality while at the same time soft enough to absorb some of the impact of the force. Soft grass that is level is ideal for Plyometrics. Repetitive Jumping Exercises™ should also be done on a soft level surface such as grass or a wrestling mat, except those exercises that specify that they can be done on a basketball court or with carpeting as the shock-absorbing surface.

You need a surface that is

Note: Some would argue that performing Plyometrics on a soft surface does not stimulate the stretch reflex as much as a hard surface, and that Plyometrics must be performed on a hard surface in order to stimulate the stretch reflex maximally. Although there is truth to this, in the long run, a soft surface offers a better combination of safety and performance benefits.

6. Always wear the best quality athletic shoes, which are in “like new condition when performing any Plyometrics or

Quality shoes with proper

insoles and outer soles aid in absorbing the shock of Jumping

and Plyometrics. Shoes quickly lose their absorbing and protecting qualities with wear. All of the top brands such as Nike, Reebok, Addidas and Converse make shoes with good

shock absorbing qualities.

worn, as well as basketball or cross training shoes. Avoid thin-

Repetitive Jumping Exercise™.”

High top or low top shoes may be

soled shoes, shoes with spikes, as well as racing track shoes. Replace shoes quickly upon signs of wear or loss of impact absorption ability.

7. Always warm up properly and stretch sufficiently before beginning any exercise program. Either warm up properly before the Plyometrics, Jump and Strength Training work out or don’t work out at all- it’s that important! Warming up properly prevents injury by creating physiological changes in your body, such as elevating core body temperature, which prepares your body for the workout. Proper warm up takes approximately 12-15 minutes. You must achieve a good

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“sweat” to be sufficiently warmed up. Stationary biking, calisthenics, jogging, low intensity hopping and jumping, running, and jumping rope are good methods to warm your body up. Make sure to do some light jumping toward the end of your warm up to mimic the type of exercise you will be starting with. Light stretching in addition to the warm up should also be done to prepare the body for the work out, and. Wearing sweat pants and sweat shirts can aid in warming up, as can applying pain relief creams such as Tiger Balm or Flexall 454 to knees and joints being exercised.

8. Always get sufficient rest and recuperation with all exercise programs. Participation in the athlete’s competitive sport of choice, completing Repetitive Jump Exercises™, weight training and Plyometrics are all considered workouts and require sufficient rest and recuperation. Plyometrics should be performed once every 5 to 10 days rather than on the typical 3- 4 times per week schedule of other exercise routines.

Plyometrics are different in that it’s a super high intensity, high impact exercise requiring more rest and recuperation than other exercises. Lack of proper rest and recuperation can cause injury and damage to the joints. Rest is actually what is allowing the body to adapt to the stress and make the corresponding improvement. Don’t be tempted by the “more is better philosophy” because it just doesn’t apply to Plyometrics.

Although some athletes may benefit from training more often, that is up to the athlete and his coach to decide based on the

situation of the individual athlete, his schedule and his strength and skill levels. This is one place where less is generally better, especially when an athlete combine a lot of athletic practice

it’s

into

require

Repetitive

adequate time for recuperation. The same body part must never be worked two days in a row.

the

off-season.

Jump

Similarly,

all

or

exercises,

weight

whether

Exercises™

training

Weight training also requires proper rest and recuperation to grow as well as to avoid overtraining and injury. Training a body part once or twice per week will generally provide sufficient stimulation, while avoiding overtraining. Although some athletes may benefit from weight training more often, that is up to the athlete and his coach to decide based on the situation of the individual athlete, his schedule and his strength and skill levels.

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Keep

in

mind

when

creating

your

workout

routine

that

participation

in

a

competitive

sport,

completing

Repetitive

Jump Exercises™, weight training and Plyometrics are each considered workouts and require sufficient rest and recuperation to avoid overtraining and possible injury.

9. Never work out with sore joints, knees, or when injured, with Plyometrics or any exercises within the program. Soreness is your body’s way of communicating to you that something is potentially wrong. Don’t attempt to continue and “work through” the pain when performing Plyo metrics or any of these exercises. Plyometrics is a high impact and high stress exercise and working through it will most likely either slow the healing process or make it worse.

When soreness does occur, give your body an extra few days of rest and monitor your improvement. Icing of the knees or sore body part, along with taking Ibuprofen (consult physician first) often will ease pain and inflammation, and speed recovery. When you return, reduce the number of sets and repetitions, and reduce the height of the box or platform you jump off of. If pain persists, discontinue Plyometrics or the exercise program and consult your physician. The same goes for Repetitive Jumping Exercise™ and weight training.

10. Always land correctly. Correct landing technique is imperative to both the effectiveness of the Plyometrics exercise and to the safety as well because of the greater height impact involved as you come down off the box/platform. You want to land as quietly possible, making as little audible sound from the la nding as possible. As Bob Gajda says, “you want to land as silently as a cat.”

To do this you land on the toes then balls of your feet and barely touching down on heels and then quickly jump back up. Landing either completely on the heels or on the balls of the foot is incorrect. To emphasize quickness off the ground the jumper should react to the landing as if the ground is “hot.” Landing technique is incorrect if loud noises are made on landing. Additionally, effort must be made to keep the knees from “buckling in” when jumping and landing.

Proper Landing Form Here are proper landing guidelines to incorporate into your landings when you’re playing your sport, in order to lessen the wear and tear of the body and prevent injury. Some athletes instinctively land correctly but most do

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not. Proper form is easy to develop and will become second nature with practice.

The knees should be kept in line with the feet, vertically over the feet rather than buckling in or out, or going far in front of feet. Land first on pointed toe, ready to transfer weight from toes to the ball of the foot, and then to the heels. As heels hit the ground, bend at the ankle and at the knee. At the same time flex at the hips, keeping the back upright. Concentrate on absorbing the shock with the muscles of your legs. Keep knees over your feet at all times. Land softly and as quietly as possible, the less noise, the softer the landing. The object is to distribute the force of the landing and use the muscles to absorb the shock, instead of the knee joints alone. Here is a recap of the landing technique.

a.)

Pointed toes land first, then the balls of the feet, and then the

b.)

heels. Bend at the ankles and knees as your heels hit the ground.

c.)

Bend at the hips and absorb the shock with upper thighs. Remember land softly and allow the muscles to absorb the shock of the landing rather than the joints.

11. Listen to your body and make adjustments to your program that are appropriate to your body, strength, fitness, skill and coordination level. Listen to your body for

pain,

especially

to

knee

pain

underneath

the

kneecap.

Everybody

has

a

different

body

structure

and

different

exercises will potentially affect one athlete differently than another.

Some exercises will cause pain to one athlete while another athlete can perform the same exercise for a lifetime pain free. Throughout the manual, feel free to substitute in less intense exercises (two legged for one legged, hopping for Plyometrics etc.) reduce sets, repetitions and weights if you feel the need to reduce the intensity of the exercise.

If you cannot control your landing or if your knees buckle then the intensity of the exe rcise is too high and you are lacking the necessary strength to perform the exercise. The programs are a starting point and you are encouraged to develop your own customized program based on your individualized needs.

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12. Get a Coach or Personal Trainer All athletes, whether experienced or first starting out, should get help from a coach

or athletic trainer and learn the exercises and techniques the

correct way from the beginning. Many exercises such as the squat are difficult to learn by yourself but easy when you have a coach or trainer.

It’s highly recommended that you have your coach or personal trainer take you through your routine and instruct you on the finer points of the exercise. Most health clubs offer complimentary instruction for members wanting to learn the exercises.

A coach or personal trainer who is personally familiar with

your situation may be able to create a customized program for you based on these methods that will allow you to safely increase the intensity and frequency of exercise while at the same time preventing overtraining and injury. That is when you’re going to get even better results. Some advanced athletes may be able to be their own coach as well.

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Special Safety Tips for Female Athletes

Due to bone structure

and

physiological

differences,

female

athletes

tend

to

have

more

knee

injuries

than

their

male

counterparts. Less overall muscular strength and the female bone structure of the hips and knees puts the female jumper inherently at greater risk right from the start. Females athletes must take special care to follow the mandatory safety guidelines previously outlined. Additionally, special effort must be made to keep the knees from

for

“buckling

illustration of what not to do.

in”

when

jumping

and

landing.

See

below

what not to do. in” when jumping and landing. See below Adjust your expectations: Go at

Adjust your expectations: Go at your own pace and set

your own realistic goals. Don’t compare yourself to others as you

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monitor your own individual progress. In our culture, on average, male athletes have been socialized to begin running, jumping and playing organized sports at a younger age, and on a more year round basis than females.

This means that in addition to the physiological differences between males and females, males are generally more athletically experienced from a younger age than their female counterpart. Therefore, it is generally unrealistic for the average female to expect gains or end results equivalent to males

Decrease the difficulty of the exercises: In the

Plyometrics section, female athletes should jump off of a lower platform/box. If needed, instead of performing the single legged exercise perform the double- legged exercise. Throughout the manual, feel free to substitute in less intense exercises (two legged for one legged, hopping for Plyometrics etc.) reduce sets and repetitions if you feel the need to reduce the intensity of the exercise. If you cannot control your landing or if your knees buckle then the intensity of the exercise is too high and you are lacking the necessary strength to perform the exercise.

Increase overall body strength and skill/coordination prior to beginning a Plyometrics or Jump training program: It is highly recommended that female athletes develop a strength and skills base with a 6 to 12 month strength and skills training program. Basic strength exercises for knees, ankles and back, are outlined in the Bonus ebook #1 Build a Better Body strength section of this program, as are basic Repetitive Jumping Exercises™.

Special note: Sports bras are highly recommended during all jumping, skills and physical exercise practice.

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The 3 Modes/Pathways To Improve Jumping and Quickness with

JumpingAdvantage™

THREE MODES/PATHWAYS TO IMPROVING JUMPING AND QUICKNESS

1. Improving Coordination and Skill: With the Repetitive Jumping Exercises™, and by skills practice.

2. Improving Strength, Power and Stamina: With Strength Training both with weights and without, Isometrics, and Improving Concentric, Eccentric and Isometric Muscular Contraction.

3. Improving the Myotic Stretch Reflex and Eccentric Muscular Contraction: With Plyometrics, Repetitive Jumping Exercises™, and Strength Training.

Great improvements can be made using any of the three modes/pathways that are explained in the JumpingAdvantage™ program. The good news is that many exercises crossover and improves two or three of the modes/pathways at the same time. The even better news is that by combining improvement modes/pathways an athlete can synergistically improve beyond what can be accomplished with a single mode/pathway program. This multi- mode/pathway approach provides the benefit of prolonging and providing the longest improvement cycle and continuing improvements, breaking through plateaus and barriers that are inevitably encountered with a single mode/pathway approach!

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JumpingAdvantage™

General Guidelines

“The road to success is always under construction.” Arnold Palmer

Progression of Difficulty: The athlete should start with easier exercises and programs and, move to increased levels of difficulty when strength levels and exercise proficiency increases. Higher than normal forces are applied on the musculoskeletal system during Plyometrics and jumping exercises, so it is important for the athlete to have a good sound base of general strength, fitness and endurance.

As a rule, the beginner should build a strength base by performing double leg, flat-surfaced, low- impact drills. As a strength base is developed, more demanding exercises such as single legwork can be added in. Single leg versions of an exercise are more stressful than the double- legged version. As stated in the mandatory safety guidelines section, the athlete must have an adequate strength base to perform a drill correctly and without risk of injury.

The beginning Jumping or Plyometrics enthusiast should "ease" into a program. Because many of the drills may seem easy or effortless, the athlete may tend overextend himself or herself by doing extra sets and reps or starting at a level beyond their strength or skill level. It is not until the next morning, when that person rolls out of bed, that he realizes the price paid for over doing it. Plyometrics and advanced jumping exercises are demanding and stressful. A logical and methodical progression from beginning to advanced exercises must be followed as well as adherence to all safety guidelines.

Fatigue Factor: An adequate rest period allowing full recovery between workouts must be practiced. Approaching each workout session "fresh" will provide best results. Do not exercise beyond the point of moderate fatigue. Proper technique must be maintained to achieve maximal gain and decrease the risk of injury.

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Resist the temptation to add extra workouts during the week. This can lead to over training and under recuperation. During the season, increase rest intervals between workouts or discontinue added individual workouts all together if you participate in team workouts and games. Give yourself at least 2 days and preferably 3 or more days off before game days to allow your body to recuperate and gain energy before game days.

Many basketball coaches and athletes prefer to discontinue Plyometrics, jump training and weight training sessions during the athletic season, and begin again after the season ends. Although some athletes may benefit from continuing training during the season, or training more often than I recommend, that is up to the athlete and his coach to decide based on the individual situation of the athlete, his schedule and his strength and skill levels.

The challenge is providing adequate stimulation to grow while at the same time giving the body the necessary recovery time and maintaining the high energy levels to compete.

Incorporating Optimum Jumping Mechanics and Technique

To achieve maximum jumping height it is essential that you jump with proper form. Legs and hips should be under the body and used as the primary power of the jump. Lower back movement and the excessive bending forward of the torso will propel the body more forward than upward and is to be avoided.

Similar to the weight lifting squat, jump ing power comes primarily from the legs and hips, but all parts work together creating an additive effect to produce maximum vertical jump. Keep your back at the same semi- upright angle as you lower yourself down at hips, knees and ankles.

In addition, learn to bring your feet together while jumping, and push off with your toes last. Jump with feet comfortably spread, but as you take off, simultaneously bring them together to utilize the adductor muscles of the upper inner thighs for extra height. In the free bonus #1 Build a Better Body there’s an excellent exercise for strengthening the adductor muscles and bringing this large but often overlooked muscle into stronger action.

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How far you go down before springing up will vary with the individual and is generally in the 20 to 26 degree range. You will find a point that will be the ideal depth.

Any lower than the ideal depth and you will be wasting energy and reducing speed and height of the jump. On the other hand, if you don't bend deep enough, you will abbreviate the height generating speed necessary for maximum height. Experiment to find the depth that feels natural and produces the best results.

Arm Movement: Another contributing factor to jump height is the upward swing of the arms. Quick upward movement of the arms followed by a sudden stopping of arm movement at the top adds extra height. Increasing quickness of the arm movement, as well as quickness of the entire jump movement is essential to achieving maximum jump height. Proper form comes with practice and will eventually become second nature. Concentrate on proper form as you undertake various jumping exercises.

Research has shown that the arms can contribute up to 10% to the jump. It is important to learn to use the arms to transfer momentum to the whole body through arm movement and coordination. Move arms in a circular arc rather than punching the arms upward. Female athletes especially in volleyball have a tendency to punch arms upward rather than move arms in an arc, subsequently missing out on this additional element to jumping.

upward rather than move arms in an arc, subsequently missing out on this additional element to

Arm Movement

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Start your upward movement on the second to last step: By beginning an upward movement early, you are already moving in the right direction. This technique is why most jumpers jump higher off of one leg, than two.

Maintain

a

stable

torso

for

optimum

jumping:

Strong

abdominal

muscles

coupled

with

a

strong

healthy

back

are

essential and necessary in order to insure proper upward projection and avoid undue strain on the lower back. Too much bend forward at the waist decreases jump speed and height.

Correct postural alignment is directly related to core (torso) strength. If the athlete is having problems holding the torso erect during the movements, this problem can be addressed immediately through a strengthening program of abdominals, lower back, hips and glute work. Basic abdominal and lower back (Lying Hyperextensions) strength building exercises are outlined in this.

Vertical Jump Testing Before You Begin

In order to measure your progress, you must take an initial vertical jump measurement before you start the program. You begin by measuring your standing reach. Then, pivot on one foot and jump off two and measure where you reach. The difference between your standing reach and your jump and touch mark is the vertical distance you jump off the ground, your vertical jump.

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Jumping Manual

JumpingAdvantage

Repetitive Jump Exercise Program™

“The three great essentials to achieve anything worthwhile are first, hard work; second; stick-to-itiveness; third, common sense.” Thomas Edison.

In this Section we explain the Repetitive Jumping Exercises, the lower body Strength Exercises that may be performed without weight such as the squat, calf raise, and Lunge, and the Sprinting exercises, followed by sample programs. The lower body and upper body strength programs and additional exercises are found in JumpingAdvantage™ bonus book #1 Build a Better Body: Strength Training for Jumping and Quickness Athletes. For convenience of the reader, some of the exercises are duplicated in both sections.

Repetitive vs. Plyometrics Please note that many of these exercises in the Repetitive Jump exercise section are actually Plyometrics exercises even though they are in the Repetitive section. That is because we make the distinction between what we call a True Optimal Plyometrics exercise and just a regular plain Plyometrics exercise. For the JumpingAdvantage™ program, the Optimal Plyometrics exercises section follows this section. This is a very key distinction.

For example, the Rim Touches exercise found in this section are a form of Plyometrics exercise but not an Optimal Plyometrics exercise. Even so, Rim Touches serves its purpose depending on the stage of the player. As you read the next few pages and the remainder of JumpingAdvantage™ program, you will understand the key advantages and differences of this program that can allow you to both make fast improvements, as well as ongoing improvements to give you that really huge vertical leap.

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Jumping Manual

Jumping An Exercise In Itself

As mentioned in the previous section “The 3 Modes/Pathways To Improve Jumping and Quickness with JumpingAvantage™” are:

1) Improving Coordination, Skill and Technique with Repetitive Jumping Exercises™, and Jumping Skill practice.

2) Improving Strength, Power and Stamina with Strength Training both with weights and without, Isometrics, and Improving Concentric, Eccentric and Isometric Muscular Contraction.

3) Improving the Muscle Spindle Reflex also known as the Stretching-Shortening Cycle or Myotic Stretch Reflex and the Eccentric (lowering) Muscular Contraction with Plyometrics, Repetitive Jumping Exercises™, and Strength Training.

All three modes/pathways described in this program can create ongoing jumping and quickness improvements that bust through barriers and plateaus week after week, month after month and even year after year.

Jumping Neuromuscular Coordination, Skill and Technique

are

Players who are new to Repetitive Jumping Exercises™ will experience very fast gains with the exercises in this section. Repetitive Jumping Exercises™ can create extremely fast improvements within the first week or two, whereas Plyometrics training as outlined later in the Jumping Advantage™ program may take 1 to 2 months to obtain sizable results.

itself.

best

improved

with

repetitive

practice

of

jumping

But I’ve also included so much high tech information in this section that anyone can jump higher and run faster. Even the

veteran and old pro will benefit.

will learn about Plyometrics, Isometrics and Strength Training for

Basketball Players.

And, following this section you

Repetitive Jumping Exercises™ improve skill and technique as well as crossing over to also improve strength and speed, whereas strength exercises such as weight training do very little to improve skill and technique. Since jumping requires both skill and strength, this points out the need for repetitive jumping practice and strengt h training combined.

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Jumping Manual

Follow a Sample Program or Create Your Own

on Repetitive Jump Exercise™, are descriptions of the Repetitive Jump Exercises™ to improve jumping ability and quickness, the lower body Strength Exercises and the Sprinting exercises followed by sample programs. Some of the exercise are described with and without weights and are duplicated with the weighted variation in the book #1 on strength training. The included strength training book #1 focuses on the topics of lower and upper body strength and conditioning, diet, weight gain and loss, nutrition, as well as additional weight training exercises for basketball players.

In this section

The first part of this section is made up of the primary exercises, followed by secondary and Sport Specific Jumping exercises and sample programs. The primary exercises are the main ones to focus on. But, because this program instructs the user to create their own program by seeing what works best for them, additional secondary exercises are also included which may be substituted in for the primary exercises.

Follow one of the sample programs or make your own, emphasizing the primary exercises. Feel free to make your own program and especially decrease the volume (reps and sets) or intensity if you feel you are overdoing it.

On the other hand. although some players may benefit from training more often, that is up to the player and his coach to decide based on the situation of the individual player, his schedule and his strength and skill levels. The player is reminded to listen to their bodies (refer back to safety guidelines) and create a program customized for themselves based on their own body, schedule, and what works for them through trial and error. Learn what works and what doesn’t. And stick with what works!

Always allow at least two or three days of rest between jumping workouts involving the same body part whether or not weights are involved; even no weight added Repetitive Jumping Exercises™. This will ensure the player avoids overtraining and gets the proper recovery and growth between workouts.

More guidelines for the Repetitive Jump Exercises™ immediately follow the exercise section and precede the sample programs section. Here are the exercises for the first quarter of the program; Improving Coordination, Skill and Technique with Repetitive Jumping Exercises™, Jumping Skill practice, and Strength Training both with and without weights.

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Repetitive Jump Exercises™

“I do not know anyone who got to the top without hard work. That is the recipe. It will not always get you to the top, but should get you pretty near.” Margaret Thatcher

Rim Touches

A primary exercise, Rim Touches build strength, skill, speed, endurance, and quickness in jumping as well as provide a strength base for muscles and connective tissues. Rim Touches is a jumping exercise in which you repetitively jump straight up as high as possible from under the basket or similar target and touch as high as you can on each jump.

Aim at hitting the same height spot on each successive jump as you quickly spring back up without pause, spending as little time on the ground as possible. Imagine that the ground is hot and that you have to jump up as quickly as possible from the hot ground. In order to reduce the impact of the landing, the Rim Touches exercise may be performed on grass or with a section of carpet or mat under the jumper to absorb landing impact.

Rim Touches

may be performed on grass or with a section of carpet or mat under the jumper

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Running Rim Touches

Jumping Manual

Improves ability to convert forward momentum into vertical jump height. Similar to Rim Touches, this drill involves repetitive jumping, but with a 10-15 foot running approach for each jump. For basketball and volleyball players the basketball/volleyball court can be used.

In order to reduce the impact of the landing, the Running Rim Touches exercise may also be performed with a landing onto a mat. Make sure the surface is stable, and also not slippery. Start 10-15 feet away and run toward the target (i.e. basket) and jump up off one or both feet as you touch as high as you can. Work at converting horizontal speed to vertical height. Concentrate on using optimal arm swing on your way up, as well as proper landing form on the way down. Perform repetitions non-stop without pause. Perform a set off of both feet, and a set off of each foot individually. Practicing one and two footed running lay- ups or slam dunks can be substituted for Running Rim Touches.

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Step-Ups, and Jumping Step-Ups

Builds single leg jumping strength and power. This exercise can be performed using a box ranging from 8 to 16 inches or conveniently performed on stairs, while holding the handrail. Step-ups are performed at a medium speed with no jump at the top, whereas Jumping Step-Ups are executed more quickly and explosively with a jump at the top of each repetition.

With one foot on the box or stair, about 8 to 16 inches up, step up onto the box or stair to complete the repetition of Step Ups. With Jumping Step-Ups, thrust up with the stair foot pushing off so both the stair foot and ground foot lift off slightly, for a thrust and jump at the top of the movement. Work one leg the entire set. A carpet or gym mat may be placed on the ground to absorb the landing shock.

or gym mat may be placed on the ground to absorb the landing shock. Step Ups

Step Ups On Stairs Using The Hand Rail for Balance

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Sideways Cone (Bench) Jumps

Jump back and forth laterally (sideways) over a 12- inch collapsible cone or bench, continuously for 50 jumps or for 1- minute non-stop. Jump back and forth without hesitation to develop height and endurance. This exercise may also be performed in the same manner without a cone or bench, using an imaginary obstacle. Jump and land using proper technique.

an imaginary obstacle. Jump and land using proper technique. Sideways Cone Jumps Rope Jumps Here you

Sideways Cone Jumps

Rope Jumps

Here you jump rope in a fashion similar to regular rope jumping, but you bend deeper and jump higher. On each jump bend legs down to the ¼ squat position, which brings your thighs to approximately a 45-degree angle. With feet together jump as high as possible, at least 8-10 inches on each jump. As you jump, bring your feet together with the proper jumping technique.

Two Legged Forward Hops

Leap forward off of both feet 10 consecutive hops for both distance and height. Adjust the forward distance to maximize both height and secondarily distance. If you are getting insufficient height or if your legs bend too much then lessen the forward distance of each hop, as maximum height is the primary objective. Execute each jump with maximum power and speed. 10 consecutive forward hops equals one set.

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Knee Lifts

Jumping Manual

Jump up off both feet lifting knees toward your chest on each jump. One set of 30 reps.

Lifts Jumping Manual Jump up off both feet lifting knees toward your chest on each jump.

Knee Lifts

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Heel Backs

Jump up off both feet and lift heels backward up to your buttocks on each jump. One set of 30 reps.

Backs Jump up off both feet and lift heels backward up to your buttocks on each

Heel Back

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Medicine Ball Throws

Jumping Manual

"In a grueling season, only the strong survive. Our medicine ball work is a cornerstone of the functional strength building we emphasize. Championship rings are the result!"

Al Vermeil, Chicago Bulls

8 Lbs. Plyoball

the result!" Al Vermeil, Chicago Bulls 8 Lbs. Plyoball 10 Lbs. Plyoball Medicine ball throws, emphasize

10 Lbs. Plyoball

Al Vermeil, Chicago Bulls 8 Lbs. Plyoball 10 Lbs. Plyoball Medicine ball throws, emphasize primarily the

Medicine ball throws, emphasize primarily the lower back and secondarily arms, abdominals, and legs. The benefit of medicine ball throws is that it provides strength training in a movement that very closely jumping.

Stand holding the medicine ball in front of you with arms fully extended and hands holding the medicine ball at about chest height. Feet should be about shoulder width apart in order to allow enough space for ball and hands to fit between your thighs when you bring the ball down. You will be bringing the ball down so that only about ¼ of it or so goes between your thighs.

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Jumping Manual

JumpingAdvantage™ Jumping Manual As you bring the ball down, flex down at your knees, hips and

As you bring the ball down, flex down at your knees, hips and back, while maintaining tight tensed abdominals throughout the exercise. Flex up as you throw the ball up and slightly behind you, extending at the hip, knee, ankle and shoulder, and lifting slightly off the ground. Aim at throwing the ball as high as possible on each repetition.

Medicine balls should be in the 8-15 pound range depending on the strength of the player. An old basketball or playground ball may be filled with water and substituted for a commercial medicine ball. Go to the hardware store and get rubber tubing that will be attached to the water source consisting of the garden hose (using an adaptor) and the other end to the needle you would normally use to add air to the ball. Buy clamps for both ends. Make sure to fill the ball very slowly to avoid exploding the tubing. and clamps.

If you’d prefer to purchase a medicine ball rather than make your own, we have arranged a special discount on plyoballs which also come with a special medicine ball how to video with Al Vermiel of the Chicago Bulls Championship season. “Step inside the Chicago Bulls' awesome training facility. Watch their strength coach Al Vermeil demonstrate how the Bulls use medicine balls.”

Web Site Link for Plyo Ball discounts http://www.jumpusa.com/jumpusareseller.htm

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Secondary and Sport Specific Jumping Exercises

ZigZag Jumps

Instead of jumping straight forward off of both legs as executed in the Two Legged Forward Hops, the player alternately jumps at an approximate 45 degree angle first to the right and then to the left, alternating right then left on each hop or jump. This variation develops jumping and cutting ability.

180 degree Jumps

This exercise is used to develop coordination and jumping ability for performing turn around jump shots and reverse, 180 and 360 degree slam dunks. Jump as high as possible off two feet while executing 180 degree turn, so that you end up facing the opposite direction. Practice turning both clockwise and counter-clockwise. May also be performed as 360-degree jump.

Power Lay In

Grab a ball and stand right under the basket. Bend legs approximately to the ½ squat depth, and touch the ball to the floor. Explode upward and power the ball in. Work on explosive quickness and power by quickly getting the ball down to the floor and back up to the basket as quickly as possible. Use your whole body; arms and legs to jump, but avoid bending too much at the back. Builds coordination, quickness, the skill of jumping with the ball, ability to score while being fouled, and a quick follow up shot.

Jumping With a Ball

Most of the jumping drills can and should be done occasionally with a ball in your hands. This can be useful to isolate the legs in jumping, by keeping the ball overhead. Or it can be used for

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Jumping Manual

improving coordination by moving the ball as you normally would. The ball provides an added weight and reduces the arm swing; a major contributor to jumping.

Sprinting

Converting strength gains (from squats, calf raises etc.) into speed, quickness and jumping is the objective of the sprinting exercises to follow. The previously described Repetitive Jumping Exercises™ and Plyometrics (described later in this section) also convert strength gains into speed and quickness.

The value of explosive speed and quickness cannot be underestimated in sport. Although sprinting works the entire body, including toning and strengthening the abdominals, the main emphasis is on legs and the hamstrings. Before we get to the exercises, read the following section on sprinting form, and apply this form as you execute the sprinting exercises to follow.

Sprinting Form

The correct sprinting form will be with body tall and erect and in straight alignment, knees lifted to parallel with the ground, feet pointed straight ahead, arm action more behind torso than in front, elbows drive back vigorously on each stride and the elbows stay at 90 to 130 degrees at all times, the hands are palm down and completely relaxed.

Forward body lean is the natural, end result of drive from the foot-ankle explosion. Body lean occurs when using an efficient, powerful running form. The kick up of the push-off foot and leg will be high and natural up behind the player. Complete relaxation coordinated with powerful, explosive arm and leg action is the key to fast sprinting. Fast sprinting is characterized by long, low powerful strides. Action is forward and not up. Great sprinters make sprinting look effortless because of the perfectly coordinated explosions of the knees, feet and arms.

1.

The player runs tall - Straight line of drive.

2.

High kick of recovery leg.

4.

High knee action (result of a great explosion of the foot and ankle).

5.

Arm action -- vigorous elbow drive -- especially behind the body. a. Relaxed wrist and hands (palms down).

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b. Hands stay low below the shoulders.

Warm Up Note: Make sure to warm up and stretch properly before sprinting, especially hamstrings and groin muscles.

Sprinting Exercises

40 Yard Sprints –Run 40 yard sprints the with 20 seconds rest between sprints. Run five sprints the first week and add a sprint each week up to ten. Concentrate on speed, quickness and form. Run at 90 to 95 percent of your maximum effort, focusing on acceleration from the start and focus on proper form to maintain speed to the finish of the sprint.

30-60-90 Yard Sprints (Interval) - Sprint for 30

yards, walk for 20 seconds. Sprint for 60 yards, walk for 20 seconds. Sprint for 90 yards, walk for 20 seconds. Performing the 30, 60 and 90-yard sprints equals one set. Execute 2 sets the first week and 3 sets thereafter. Run at 90 to 95 percent of your maximum effort, focusing on acceleration from the start and focus on proper form to maintain speed to the finish of the sprint.

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Calves

Calf Raises

In this section we include exercises that strengthen all three heads of the calf, the Gastrocnemius, the often- ignored Soleus, and the Shin. These exercises will strengthen all three heads of the calf muscles, which will improve jumping ability, quickness, and indirectly strengthens ankle muscles, which helps in quickness in cutting and running, and preventing sprained ankles.

It also strengthens muscles on the sides and back of the knee, which serve to stabilize the knee joint. The basic standing exercise is performed without weights either one- foot at a time or with both feet at the same time. Weighted resistance may be added with free weights or machines.

Execution of Two Legged Calf Raises and One Legged Calf Raises Stand with the balls of feet on a block of wood or on the edge of the stairs and hold the handrail for balance, allowing the rear 2/3 of the feet to hang off the edge of the block of wood or stairs. The block of wood or stairs allows the heels to be lowered to a point below the toes, which is creates a broader range of motion, essential for ensuring flexibility of the lower leg.

The player may hold onto a handrail or stationa ry object to aid in balance. To execute calf raises, rise up onto the balls of the feet, as far up as you can go. Lower back down to slightly below horizontal and repeat. Calf raises can be performed both legs at a time (Two Legged Calf Raises) or one leg at a time (One Legged Calf Raises). As you begin your program, start out executing calf raises with both feet without weight. Concentrate on raising all the way up onto the balls of your feet and then back down as far as you can go without strain.

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JumpingAdvantage™

JumpingAdvantage™ Jumping Manual Calf Raises on Stairs, Holding Hand Rail for Balance Exercising one leg at

Jumping Manual

Calf Raises on Stairs, Holding Hand Rail for Balance

Exercising one leg at a time isolates the individual leg and intensifies the workout by placing all the weight on one leg instead of two. Stand on one leg and hold the other up off the ground as you rise up onto the ball of the foot. Resistance may be added in the form of free weights, or with various calf machines i.e. Cybex, Universal, Bodymaster or Nautilus, etc. Make sure to wear good quality athletic shoes to protect your feet, as calf raises put a high level of stress on the feet. If you’re new to this exercise, don’t be surprised if after your first calf workout you’re so sore you can barely walk

Seated Calf Raise

Position yourself on the seated calf raise machine with the balls of your feet resting on the platform and the pads of the machine resting on your thighs. Lift the weight by pushing downward with your toes and lifting your heels up as high as possible. Seated Calf Raises work the Soleus muscle of the Calf, which is the lower outer portion of the Calf muscle. The Soleus can only be targeted and worked when the knee is in a bent position such as in the seated calf raises. Combining Seated Calf Raises with Standing versions of the Calf Raise exercise works both heads of the calf muscle.

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JumpingAdvantage™

Toes

Jumping Manual

Toe Raises

An small and usually overlooked component of jumping and quickness is the propulsion derived from pushing off with the toes.

A few players really like the benefit this exercise provides.

Improve the strength propulsion of the toes by doing toe rises. Simply rise up on your toes and back down again. Go all the way

up onto your toes. Begin by exercising both legs at the same time

and build up to exercising one leg at a time. No added weight is

needed.

.

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Squats -The “King of Lower Body Exercises”

In the end the only people who fail are those who do not try.” David Viscott

The squat is the “King of lower body exercises” because it develops the base requisite hip, Glute and thigh strength for better jumping, running and quickness. It is also by far the best muscle builder for the lower body. It is said that squats synergistically promote overall muscular growth and development of the throughout entire body. The squat is considered the best all around strength exercise for jumping and quickness athletes. Even so, squats are not as popular as it once was.

Squats are a controversial exercise because of the many back and knee injuries players have incurred with this exercise, primarily from players going down to below parallel to the full squat position, and bouncing or relaxing at the bottom position. By body type, tall, thinner players are usually more at risk to back and knee injuries from the squat and find it more challenging then shorter thicker players. Please consult with your coach and physician before beginning a squatting routine.

All players, when first starting out, should get help from their coach, and learn the right way from the beginning. Make sure to follow all safety guidelines and start out slowly and really master the movement to minimize the risk. Learn the proper technique using no weight, and only after sufficient strength is gained and technique is learned, then add weight.

For beginners, it is highly recommended that the squat be learned first by practicing the ½ squat without weights. Learn the fundamental movement and skill of the squat. There is much to gain from squatting without weights. In fact, some players may find it unnecessary to ever move onto using weighted squats. Later, depending on the player’s strength needs, and after learning the squat movement, the player may choose to proceed onto performing squats with weights.

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Execution of the ½ Squat and ¼ Squat

As a beginner, it’s essential to learn the proper form and mechanics of the squat in order to ensure safe, injury free workouts. Begin Squat training by first performing the Squat exercise without added weights or using the unloaded weight bar. The following guidelines and description for proper execution of the squat can be used for executing the squat with or without weight.

The two variations of the squat are the ¼ and the ½ squat. The major differences between the ¼ squat and the ½ squat is the depth to which the player lowers his body and the speed of execution. In the ¼ squat the player goes down to about a 45-degree angle and moves very quickly up and down without jerking or leaving the ground.

With the ½ squat the player goes down deeper to just before parallel with the ground and moves at a slightly slower speed. The ¼ squat is always performed with weights, whereas the ½ squat is performed either with or without weights. Note that when using weights, Smith machine rack (in which the bar moves along a track) is highly recommended to aid in balance. As previously mentioned, get a coach or trainer to teach your proper form. Perform squats in front of a mirror in order to check your own form as you complete the exercise.

Begin by stepping under the bar (bar resting on the Smith machine rack) into a position where the bar rests just below the nape of the neck, (Avoid bar resting on neck) lying on the trapezius muscle. The bar may be wrapped with a towel for padding. While gripping the bar slightly wider than shoulder width, tense the abdominal muscles while slightly arching the lower back. Shrug your shoulders and upper back to support the bar and the spinal column as well. Keep your head up and look forward or up at a 45-degree angle.

Make sure to keep your back slightly arched, the bar centered and head up while simultaneously tensing your stomach muscles. Feet will be approximately shoulder width apart with the knees tracking approximately above the feet at all times. A common error is to allow the knees to buckle inward, outward or float too far forward out past the feet as opposed to over the feet. Foot width may be varied, but make sure that knees track approximately above feet, on the same vertical line at all times.

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JumpingAdvantage™

Jumping Manual

JumpingAdvantage™ Jumping Manual (Front View) ¼ Squat (Back View) Eyes maintaining balance. Look forward or up
JumpingAdvantage™ Jumping Manual (Front View) ¼ Squat (Back View) Eyes maintaining balance. Look forward or up

(Front View)

¼ Squat

(Back View)

Eyes

maintaining balance.

Look forward or up at a 45-degree angle to aid in

Bar

neck and above the trapezius muscle. Do not rest on neck.

Rests on shrugged shoulders, just below the nape of the

Back

rounded back. If the player has trouble keeping a slight arch then the back may be too weak. Use a weight belt with heavier weights.

Upright and slightly arched, avoid bending forward or

Thighs -

Almost parallel with the floor for ½ squats, or a quarter of the way down to a 45-degree angle for ¼ squat.

Knees-

Knees track tracking approximately above feet, without

buckling inward, outward or too far forward.

Feet -

Pointed straight ahead or slightly out to the sides, and with weight evenly distributed between feet, and across each foot. Foot width may be varied. Feet are flat on the floor for ¼ squats, and for the ½ squat, either flat on the floor or heels on a wood block. Drive through heels on the way up rather than the balls of the feet.

on a wood block. Drive through heels on the way up rather than the balls of
on a wood block. Drive through heels on the way up rather than the balls of

(Front View)

½ Squat

(Back View)

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Jumping Manual

Inhale and hold your breath as you slowly lower your body down into the squat position, thighs at a 45 degree angle for the ¼ squat, or almost parallel with floor (thighs almost horizontal) for ½ squat. For the ½ squat, go down no further than this point since it is unnecessary and more stressful. Many injuries have occurred because of lowering down past the ½ squat position to the “full squat” position. The ½ position is not as far down as power weight lifters go, but is deep enough to get most of the benefit from the exercise without the added risk and stress on back and knees. As you lower your body, your buttocks should move slightly to the rear and your knees should move slightly forward.

As the player reaches the bottom position, (Do not relax your muscles at the bottom, keep them tensed) continue holding breath as you reverse directions and forcefully raise yourself up by straightening (extending) your legs via knee joint and hip extension. Drive through your heels not through the balls of your feet.

Make sur e the lower back maintains a slight arch (If the player has trouble keeping a slight arch then the back may be too weak) and abdominals are kept tensed at the bottom position to maintain a stable torso. As you rise past the sticking point begin to exhale and complete the exhalation when you are in the full standing position.

Although ¼ squats are performed with feet flat on the ground, ½ Squats may be performed either as flat- footed squats with the whole foot on ground (which serves to increase ankle flexibility as well as work the front thighs, hamstrings, lower back and buttocks) or with a block of wood under the heels.

If you have trouble balancing yourself in the bottom position, which is a sign of ankle, Achilles tendon or hamstring inflexibility, yo u can rest your heels off the ground, on a 2 x 4 block of wood to improve balance. The heels up position places more stress on the front thighs but are of approximately equal value for improving jumping ability. A block is not to be used for ¼ squats.

Leg Curl (Use - Leg Curl Machine)

The complement to leg extensions is the leg curl which works the hamstrings and buttocks muscles, which are the back of the upper leg. Work for near equal strength in leg curls and leg extensions,

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although you will tend to be slightly stronger with leg extensions. Lay chest down on the bench with your heels under the padded bar. Bend at the knee, moving the foot in an arc behind you. Attempt to lift your foot to your buttocks.

At the peak contraction, hold for 5 seconds. Avoid the tendency of arching your back, which tends to happen more so as your hamstrings become fatigued. Do a warm up set with both feet and then work each leg separately. Make sure to keep your buttocks on the bench and keep your back from moving sideways.

Use a weight that is light enough to allow you to move steadily and with good form. Fast movements are not used with this exercise since it is used for injury prevention and not to build quickness. Leg Extensions are performed after Leg Curls because they provide a stretch of the hamstring muscle after they have been worked with the Leg Curl exercise.

Leg Extension (Use Leg Extension machine)

Leg extensions and leg curls are the two main injury prevention exercises for the knee. Leg extensions work on the front thighs and quadriceps while leg curls work the back thigh and hamstrings. Sit on bench with lower leg looped under the padded bar near the floor. Start with knees bent and pivot at the knees. Straighten your legs until locked out at the knees. Slowly bend the knees until the padded bar is back to the starting position.

This exercise should be done slowly with the weight moving at a steady pace, avoiding jerky movements, and overextending. When the leg is locked, pause and hold at the top position for 5 seconds then lower and repeat. After an initial warm up set using both legs, Leg extensions should be performed one leg at a time, to ensure balanced strength from left leg to right. Leg extensions are primarily for injury prevention and do not greatly improve jumping or quickness. Leg Extensions are performed after Leg Curls because they provide a stretch of the hamstring muscle after they have been worked with the Leg Curl exercise.

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Abdominal Muscles/Lower Back

A combination of strong abdominals and a strong lower back creates a more stable torso, which is key for optimal athletic performance and injury prevention. The strength of a player’s abdominal muscles is an often-overlooked component of jumping, quickness and injury prevention. Strong toned abdominal muscles help prevent back injuries while at the same time stabilizing the torso for better balance, quickness and jumping ability.

The key to working the abdominals most effectively is the order in which the exercises are performed. Exercises that work the lower abs must be done before exercises that work the middle and upper abs. This is a huge key! When creating your own ab routine perform the exercises in the order of 1) Hanging Knee Ups/Leg Raises, 2) Lying Leg Lifts, and 3) Crunches.

Hanging Knee Ups/Leg Raises (Lower Abdominals)

For this exercise you need a horizontal hanging bar such a doorway chinning bar from which to hang. Take an overgrip on the bar slightly wider than shoulder width apart. With knees fully bent for Knee Ups, slightly bent for Leg Raises, rock your pelvis forward in a slow controlled motion, as you raise your slightly bent legs up to at least horizontal or fully bent legs until your knees almost touch your chest. Hold for a second and then slowly lower legs back down to the bottom position, taking care to lower slowly and under control to prevent swinging.

Concentrate on contracting your abdominal muscles to create the movement and minimize the action of the hip flexors. Do not bend

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your arms during the raising or lowering. The lower back stays

slightly rounded or neutral, not arched.

Ups) are easier than the Leg Raises. Additionally, shoes may be removed in order to decrease difficulty of this exercise. Lying Leg Lifts (below) are easier and may be substituted for Hanging Knee Ups/Leg Raises until sufficient strength is gained to perform the Hanging Knee Ups/Leg Raises exercise.

Knees fully bent (Knee

Hanging Knee Ups/Leg Raises exercise. Knees fully bent (Knee Hanging Knee Ups Hanging Leg Raises Lying

Hanging Knee Ups

Raises exercise. Knees fully bent (Knee Hanging Knee Ups Hanging Leg Raises Lying Leg Lifts (Lower

Hanging Leg Raises

Lying Leg Lifts (Lower Abdominals)

Lie on a carpeted floor or mat with hands tucked palms down hands underneath your buttocks to cradle and prevent your back from arching. Keep your lower back flat against the floor throughout the exercise. Tense up abdominal muscles slightly to stabilize torso and raise slightly bent legs approximately 18 inches off the ground and lower to approximately 12 inches off the ground, back to 18 and then back to 12, and repeat. Concentrate on using abdominal muscles to smoothly lift your legs rather than your hip flexors. If have very long legs, you're big, or if your back hurts then skip this exercise until you have sufficiently built your abdominal strength from other exercises such as crunches.

too heavy for their lower abs

strength,

exaggerated arch. For extra strong advanced players, Hanging

Knee Ups/Leg Raises (see above) which are a more advanced exercise, may be substituted for Lying Leg Lifts.

an

to

For players with legs that are

lying

leg

lifts

tend

pull

the

lower

back

into

Crunches (Middle and Upper Abdominals)

Lie on a carpeted floor or mat with hands behind your head (or alternately: arms crossed in front of your chest) but not locked. Bring your feet together and place flat on the floor approximately a foot from your hips. Keeping your knees and hips stationary, start

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by raising your head and shoulders up off the floor only a few inches 15-20 degrees off the floor) using your abdominal muscles to force your shoulders toward your hips and chest toward your pelvis.

Concentrate on using abdominal strength and not jerking your hands forward to help with the crunch. Then slowly lower back down to the starting point and repeat. Crunches are to be performed after Hanging Knee Ups/Leg Raises and Lying Leg Lifts.

Lower Back

As mentioned at the beginning of this section, strong abdominals

and

element for optimal athletic performance and injury prevention. The second part of the abdominal/lower back equation is creating a strong lower back. A strong lower back is not only important in extending the back for a variety of sports related movements such as jumping and sprinting, but it also holds the spine rigid for weight training exercises such as squats, leg presses and lunges.

a key

lower

back

creates

a

more

stable

torso,

which

is

The key values of developing strong healthy lower back muscles is to not only to allow these actions to take place, but to also to prevent injury. Although many exercises such as the squat serve to strengthen the lower back indirectly, the lower back needs to be directly exercised in order to make significant gains in strength. One of the best exercises to directly strengthen the lower back is Lying Hyperextensions.

Lying Hyperextension (“Superman” Arch)

Lie face and chest down on the floor, legs and arms outstretched, and tense up abdominal muscles slightly to stabilize torso. Raise arms and legs (You will have the appearance of Superman flying through the air) while at the same time squeezing back muscles,

smoothly arching your back

maintain the “bow” position for a second, and then lower back down to the starting position. Execute this exercise in a slow, smooth, deliberate fashion and concentrate on feeling your lower back muscles contract as you lift your legs and arms together. If this version is too difficult, to decrease difficulty you may raise

up, lifting torso 4 to 6 inches, and

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only your torso or legs rather than both at the same time, and hands may be placed at sides rather than straight overhead.

Repetitive Jump Program™ Sample Programs

Sample programs are included below as general guidelines. Players, along with their coaches are encouraged to create their own programs based on individual needs, body types and competitive schedules. Remember to follow all safety guidelines when creating your program. Here are some additional factors to keep in mind when creating your program as well as the timing of the workouts.

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¸ Perform the Repetitive Jumping Exercises™ once or twice per week with at least two days rest between sessions to avoid overtraining and injury. An example of a two day a week schedule: Monday and Thursday, or Tuesday and Friday. A day or two after performing the exercises, the player’s body and legs may feel a bit tired or sluggish, similar to the feeling of tiredness from an intense physical workout or weight lifting session, that is normal.

¸ When Repetitive Jumping Exercises™ are performed in conjunction with a Legs Weight training routine, then the Repetitive Jumping Exercises™ routine should precede performing the Legs Weight Workout. The Legs Weight Workout should not precede the Repetitive Jumping Exercises™. The Legs Weight Workout may be performed immediately after the Repetitive Jumping Exercises™ workout or on another day that allows maximum rest between Repetitive Jumping Exercises™ and the Leg Weights day in the case of a one day per week Repetitive Jumping Exercises™ and one day per week Legs Weight Workout schedule.

¸ Repetitive Jumping Exercises™, Legs Weight Workouts and Plyometrics should be discontinued during the competitive athletic season unless otherwise prescribed by your coach or team trainer.

¸ Do not play a sport (basketball, volleyball etc.) on the same day, after completing Repetitive Jumping Exercises™ or Leg Weights Workouts, as your legs will be tired and more susceptible to injury.

¸ Schedule the Repetitive Jumping Exercises™ and Legs Weight Workouts to provide maximum days rest between workouts, and at least 3 days of rest before playing your competitive sport.

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Sample Programs

Beginners make sure that you resist the temptation to skip levels rather than starting at level one. Keep in mind that even though the exercises may seem easy and the muscles may not be growing visibly in size, the muscles, connective tissues and nervous system are being worked and stimulated through the exercises. Neuromuscular coordination is also being improved. Concentrate on getting as much as you can out of the first level. Develop a base of strength and skill.

More is not better when first starting out. Overloading the body too much too soon wastes energy and increases the chance of injury. The player must allow his body time to learn the new exercises, grow and adapt to the new stresses placed upon it. Here are some additional guidelines to keep in mind.

1. Make sure you have stretched and are properly warmed up and have broken a sweat.

2. Rest approximately 1-2 minutes between sets.

3. The exercises are listed in the order they are to be completed.

4. If you are unable to complete the total number of repetitions in a set, that is ok. You may rest for 20 seconds or so and complete the remaining repetitions in the set. It is also ok to decrease the repetitions and sets to accommodate your current strength and fitness level.

5. The rep range may be increased if you find yourself not being challenged enough. Make sure to concentrate on all reps rather than just going through the motions.

6. Exercises designated as Optional (Optl.) are exercises that may be added to the routine but are not required.

7. As you become more advanced, it is recommended that you combine modes of improvement and create your own program. Use trial and error, and your intuition to find the best combination of methods, Repetitive Jumping Exercises, Sprinting, Weight Training, and Plyometrics in order to find the Magical Jumper in you.

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JumpingAdvantage

Repetitive Jump Program™ Sample Programs

“If we did all we are capable of doing we would literally astonish ourselves.” Thomas Edison

Level One

Week

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Rim Touches

1

10

2

15

2

15

2

20

2

20

2

20

2

25

2

25

Step-Ups

1

10

2

15

2

15

2

20

2

20

2

20

2

25

2

25

Rope Jumps

1

10

2

15

2

15

2

20

2

20

2

20

2

25

2

25

Knee Lifts

1

20

1

30

1

30

1

30

1

30

1

30

1

30

1

30

40 Yard Sprints

 

5

 

6

7

 

8

 

9

10

10

10

½ Squats (No Weight)

2

10

2

20

2

20

2

25

2

25

2

30

2

30

2

30

Calf Raises (2 Legs)

2

10

2

20

2

20

2

25

2

25

2

30

2

30

2

30

Lying Leg Lifts (Optl.)

1

20

1

20

1

20

1

25

1

25

2

20

2

20

2

20

Crunches (Optional)

1

20

1

20

1

20

1

25

1

25

2

20

2

20

2

20

 

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Level Two

Week

Jumping Manual

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Rim Touches

1

20

2

20

2

20

2

25

2

25

2

30

2

30

2

30

Running Rim To uches

1

10

2

15

2

15

2

20

2

20

2

20

2

25

2

25

Jumping Step-Ups

1

10

2

15

2

15

2

20

2

20

2

20

2

25

2

25

Rope Jumps

1

20

2

20

2

20

2

25

2

25

2

30

2

30

2

30

Knee Lifts (Optional)

1

20

2

20

2

20

2

25

2

25

2

30

2

30

2

30

30-60-90 Yard Sprints

2

 

2

 

2

 

2

 

3

3

3

3

Medicine Ball Throws (Optional)

1

8

2

8

2

8

2

8

3

8

3

8

3

8

3

8

½ Squats (No Weight)

1

20

2

20

2

25

2

25

2

25

2

30

2

30

2

30

Calf Raise(Single Leg)

1

15

2

15

2

15

2

20

2

20

2

25

2

25

2

30

Lying Leg Lifts(Optl.)

1

10

1

10

1

10

1

15

1

15

1

15

2

15

2

15

Crunches (Optional)

1

20

1

30

2

30

2

30

2

30

2

30

2

30

2

30

Lying Hyperextension (Optional)

1

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

Leg Curls (Optional)

1

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

 

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

Leg Extensions

1

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

(Optional)

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

Toe Raises (2 Legs) (Optional)

1

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

2

12

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

 

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JumpingAdvantage

Plyometrics (For Advanced Athletes)

Eccentric Muscular Contraction Improvement

“For every disciplined effort there is a multiple reward.Jim Rohn

Plyometrics operates on the principle that when a muscle is stretched prior to it’s firing, the subsequent contraction will be more powerful and rapid. Plyometrics provides accelerated motor nerve training by actively pre-stretching the quadriceps muscles. The benefits of Plyometrics are that it can increase a player’s jumping and quickness in as little as 20 minutes a day (in addition to proper warm up and stretching), performed only once every 5 to 10 days. That is very time efficient!

Plyometrics creates no visible increase in muscular size and there is no pump in the muscle during the performance of the exercise. It works by improving the muscle spindle reflex also known as the stretching-shortening cycle or myotic stretch reflex and the eccentric (lowering) phase efficiencies. Plyometrics training involves high- intensity, explosive muscular contractions that invoke the muscle spindle reflex also known as the stretching- shortening cycle or myotic stretch reflex.

Results do not happen overnight but rather “kick in” and become measurable after the second, and third month and thereafter. Plyometrics can create improvements month after month and year after year when other type exercise programs hit the wall or plateau and stall out on improvements. Plyometrics is a system that actually programs, trains and tricks your nervous system into having your body jump higher.

Plyometrics is the most controversial and highest risk exercise discussed in this guide. It is also one of the most rewarding. It has both a high risk and a high reward. Plyometrics exercises are a particularly controversial exercise because many players have been

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injured or developed tendonitis from the performance of Plyometrics improperly and some players may experience injuries even when performing Plyometrics properly.

Nobody can guarantee that even by performing an exercise correctly with proper warm up that injury will not occur. Everybody’s body reacts differently. We believe in presenting the downside along with the benefits. The following information is not recommending that you incorporate Plyometrics into your exercise program. We are simply presenting the benefits, safety guidelines, as well as a conservative Plyometrics sample program.

Here are excellent additional references for players that would like to be extremely detailed and technical in their research. Jumping into Plyometrics by Donald Chu PHD, High Powered Plyometrics By James Radcliffe and Robert Farentinos, and Periodization Training for Sports by Tudor Bompa PHD, and Sport Stretch by Michael Alter.

Additional resources are the National Strength and Conditioning Association, American Council on Exercise (ACE) and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). The choice to pursue the exercise of Plyometrics is between you and your physician. That warning being said, Plyometrics are still very effective and a multitude of strength coaches on the high school, college and pro level continue to use Plyometrics and get terrific results with their players.

Plyometrics history: Pioneered by the East Germans and Russians, Box Jumping/Plyometrics is often credited with the success of many white athletes in track events traditionally dominated by blacks.

The former Soviet Union/Russia has been practicing what we now call Plyometrics since the 1960's. The Soviets had been successfully using Plyometrics in their training regimes for their jumping athletes. Soviet Union Professor Yuri Verhoshansky is usually credited as being the "Father of Plyometrics " or “shock training” as he calls it.

He has been the leading researcher and the coach most recognized with the spread of Plyometrics. Olympic sprint champion Valeri

Borzov credits Plyometrics as well. He also has been credited with

mo st of the forms of Plyometrics training that are used today.

approximately 1975, a former Olympic Track and Field Athlete, Fred Wilt, coined the term Plyometrics.

In

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The word Plyometrics comes from the Latin words "Ply" and "Metric" meaning respectively 'increase' and 'metric', producing the word Plyometrics. As stated earlier, many jumping exercises crossover modes/pathways of improvements.

Recently, the word Plyometrics, right or wrong, has come to encompass many types of jumping activities whether they are truly Plyometrics training or not. Plyometrics has become a buzzword and is often used to describe any exercise involving jumping, whether it is Repetitive Jumping Exercises™, rim touches, platform shoe training, cone jumping, etc.

Although calling a multitude of exercises “Plyometrics” may be technically correct, most are not what I call “True” optimal Plyometrics. I performed many of the “so called” Plyometrics exercises off and on for years but never got optimal results until I used the “True” optimal Plyometrics as described in this section of JumpingAdvantage™

For the JumpingAdvantage™ program, the term “Plyometrics” will encompass exercises that are unarguably Plyometrics and what

are “True” optimal plyometrics. In these exercises the player jumps off of a box consisting of exercises called “Drop Jumps” and

“Depth

“Bounding.”

and an exercise that uses no box, called

Jumps”

A fourth exercise called “altitude jumps” is also described but is

Before

we get started with the exercises themselves let’s talk about the equipment you will use.

not included in scope of this program for safety reasons.

Equipment needed: Two Plyometrics boxes made of ¾ inch plywood of the following heights are all that’s needed. The

first box should be in the range of 12 to16 inches in height and is

to be used for One legged jumps. The second box should be in the

range of 18 to 24 inches in height and will be used in the Two-

legged jumps.

Bare in mind that box height determines the force of impact that your body absorbs as you land. Female players will use boxes at the lower end of the range (12 inches for single legged jumps and 18 inche s or for Two legged jumps. Heavier, smaller, and younger players should use boxes in the shorter end of the range as well.

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Remember that the height of the box multiplies the force of your weight, and concentration on correct form and quality of each repetition is more important than jumping off a higher box.

Plyometrics boxes can easily be made using ¾ inch plywood that can be bought and cut from Home Depot. Alternately, jumping off of stairs or a park bench may be used as substitute box as well, so long as you remember that you need to land on soft level grass or a shock absorbing mat as described in the safety guidelines.

It’s ok to improvise for the jumping box, but make sure that the item is strong and steady enough to support your weight without breaking or tipping over. Common items used to improvise include: park benches, stairs, weight benches, steel milk crates, and non- folding chairs and stools.

steel milk crates, and non- folding chairs and stools. 12-16 inches, 18-24 inches -Shorter box 12

12-16 inches,

18-24 inches

-Shorter box 12 to16 inches fo r One- legged jumps. -Taller box 18 to 24 inches for Two legged jumps. -Female players will use boxes at the lower end of the range (12 inches for One legged jumps and 18 inches or for Two legged jumps. Heavier, smaller, and younger players should use boxes in the shorter end of the range as well.

-Note: If legs buckle or you are unable to quickly jump up after you land then that means the box is too high and (or) you need to go back and work on your strength and jumping skills before commencing with the Plyometrics.

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Important Safety Reminder: Please make sure

you understand and adhere to and religiously practice all Mandatory Safety Guidelines in full at the beginning of this guide before undertaking Plyometrics or any exercises in the JumpingAdva ntage™ program.

MANDATORY SAFETY GUIDELINES (outline review)

1. You must be 100% healthy and in good shape to begin any Jumping, Strength or exercise program found herein. Additionally, you must already be a good athlete in great shape in order to begin a Plyometrics training program.

2. Your Height to Weight must be proportionate to perform Plyometrics and Jumping exercises.

3. You must have an excellent Strength base to begin with before beginning Plyometrics. Go back and work on strength if you do not.

4. Age is also a Factor.

5. Always perform Plyometrics exercises on some type of resilient shock absorbing surface such as soft level grass or gymnastic, exercise or wrestling mat. Some would argue that performing Plyometrics on a soft surface does not stimulate the stretch reflex as much as a hard surface, and that Plyometrics must be performed on a hard surface in order to stimulate the stretch reflex maximally. Although there is truth to this, in the long run, a soft surface offers a better combination of safety and performance benefits.

6. Always wear the best quality athletic shoes, which are in “like new condition when performing any Plyometrics or Repetitive Jumping Exercise™.”

7. Always warm up and stretch properly and sufficiently with all exercise programs.

8. Always get sufficient rest and recuperation with all exercise programs. Plyometrics workouts are performed only once every 5 to 10 days.

9. Never work out with sore joints, knees, or when injured with Plyometrics or any exercise in this program.

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JumpingAdvantage™

10. Always

Land

techniques.

correctly

Jumping Manual

following

proper

landing

11. Listen to your body and make adjustments to your program that is appropriate to your strength, fitness, skill and coordination level body.

12. Females Players pay attention to Tips for Female Athletes found in the beginning of this guide.

.

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Plyometrics Exercises

Depth Jumps Depth jumps involve jumping down off the box and absorbing the landing with minimal knee bend and minimal noise without jumping back up. Depth jumps are done with both legs and are an exercise that accustoms and prepares the body for the force of the more intense and advanced two and one legged Drop Jumps.

Even though the player does not jump up when performing Depth Jumps, there is still sufficient stimulation to the myotic stretch reflex and the eccentric (lowering) phase efficiencies and subsequent improvement to the player’s vertical jump and quickness. Depth Jumps are performed off of the taller 18 to 24 inch box.

Depth Jumps

the player’s vertical jump and quickness. Depth Jumps are performed off of the taller 18 to

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The main Plyometrics

exercise in the Jump ingAdvantage™ program is the Two Legged Drop Jump in which the player jumps off the box, landing on both feet and then jumps back up instantaneously as high as possible. When you jump up, make sure you jump just slightly forward as opposed to absolutely straight up or far forward.

Two Legged Drop Jumps

just slightly forward as opposed to absolutely straight up or far forward. Two Legged Drop Jumps

Two Legged Drop Jumps

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One Legged Drop Jumps The player jumps off the box, landing on one foot and then jumps back up instantaneously as high as possible. Do not “step down,” rather take a slight hop down off the box in order to get the drop of the full height of the box. When you jump up, make sure you jump just slightly forward as opposed to absolutely straight up.

Even though the shorter box (12-16 inches) is used for this exercise, it is still more difficult than the Two Legged Drop Jump because the weight is focused on one leg rather than two. Less intense substitutes for this exercise include single legged jump roping, single legged hopping and jumping in place.

jump roping, single legged hopping and jumping in place. One Legged Drop Jumps Note: One Legged

One Legged Drop Jumps

Note: One Legged Drop Jumps is a very advanced exercise. Six to twelve months of single legged jump roping and hopping should be substituted in for this exercise if this exercise is too intense. This will help build better coordination, skill and strength in preparation for this exercise. Six to twelve months of strength training consisting of squats, leg presses, lunges, leg extensions, and leg curls etc. may be required to build sufficient strength required for this exercis e as well.

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Bounding Bounding is an exercise most used by track and field athletes to improve horizontal jumping ability. Please do not confuse bounding with high knee running, which is another popular exercise of track and field athletes. The ability to jump both horizontally and vertically is useful in performing numerous sports related moves such as hard driving lay ups, the slam dunk, rebounding, as well as pass receiving and intercepting, etc.

rebounding, as well as pass receiving and intercepting, etc. Bounding Bounding actually looks as if the

Bounding

Bounding actually looks as if the athlete is running in an exaggerated form, taking extra long strides, going as far forward and jumping as high as possible with each stride. The athlete starts slowly and within a few step is into the bounding action.

-Come down on opposite foot than you took off from.

-Steps are longer and higher than running.

-Go for maximum height and distance on each stride.

-Vigorously drive knees and arms in an exaggerated

manner, lifting the opposite knee high on each stride and driving hard with knees to assist in the movement. -Speed should be at about 1/4 running speed.

-Perform bounding on grass.

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Altitude Jumps Altitude jumps are Depth Jumps done from

a more extreme height, sometimes from a box or platform of a

height up to four feet or higher. Altitude Jumps are not included in the JumpingAdvantage™ program because of the extreme forces

and stresses that they place on the player’s body, because the player will be able to sufficiently stimulate myotic stretch reflex and the eccentric (lowering) phase efficiencies with Drop Jumps, and because the JumpingAdvantage™ program more than makes up for it by stimulating strength and power modes/pathways that provide more bang for the jumping and quickness buck without the accompanying risks of injury.

Executing the Exercises

The player jumps from the box to the ground and back up as high

as he can go, and repeats for desired number of repetitions. There

is to be no pause on the floor. Jump right back up onto the box

instantly or you will defeat the purpose of the pre-stretch. Cover the floor with a padded mat to decrease stress on joints. Ideally, boxes of varying heights should be constructed to substitute for benches, in order to increase stability.

Plyometrics is a whole body exercise and arm movement (as outlined in previous jumping technique section) along with lower body should be included to create a best/highest jump on each repetition. Old Plyometrics techniques often emphasized leg and hip strength improvement, with lessened arm movement by placing hands straight overhead. But because jumping is a whole body coordination movement, we are focusing on maximum arm swing and whole body coordination.

The basic exercise is performed by jumping straight ahead off the box and up off of both feet straight ahead at a slight angle as if the player were a bouncing ball. Although you must jump back up immediately, don’ t be in a hurry to jump back down off the box. Jump off under control, with balance, and with premeditated focus and concentration. Here are the guidelines for maximum results.

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GUIDELINES FOR MAXIMUM RESULTS

1. Minimal ground time . Concentrate on jumping back up as quickly as possible. The repetition will be more effective the shorter the time the feet are in contact with the ground. Don't hesitate, but jump right back up as you touch down. The quicker the landing and takeoff, the higher you will jump. The shortening and lengthening of the muscles accomplished by jumping down and quickly back up is highly beneficial for improving jumping ability.

2. Land softly and quietly. Concentrate on a smooth and soft landing.

3. Minimal knee bend of approximately 20 to 26 degrees. Many players make the mistake of bending at the knees too much, which dissipates their upward thrust.

4. Move arms in an arc rather than punching up. Learn to use the extra 10 % thrust that the arms can provide.

5. High Intensity Execution. Each repetition is performed with maximum effort. Maximum force and minimum time. Make each repetition a Quality repetition, making it the highest and best possible. Concentrate on each repetition. To execute the Plyometrics jump explosively, you should mentally prepare for each repetition prior to stepping off the boxdon’t just go through the motions.

To do this most effectively, pause for a brief moment before stepping off the box to mentally prepare, anticipate and concentrate on making the jump a maximally fast and forceful jump. Quality is stressed over quantity.

6. Follow all mandatory safety guidelines. If you cannot control your landing, your knees buckle or wander to front back or sides, or if you can’t jump up quickly, then you’re jumping off a box that is too high and (or) you are lacking the necessary strength and skill to perform the exercise.

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Plyometrics Sample Programs

“Just keep going. Everybody gets better if they keep at it.” Ted Williams

Sample programs are included below as general guidelines. Players, along with their coaches are encouraged to create their own programs based on individual needs, body types and schedules. Remember to follow all safety guidelines when creating your program. Here are some additional factors to keep in mind when creating your program as well as the scheduling of the workouts

¸ Perform the Plyometrics routine only once every 5 to 10 days to avoid overtraining and injury. Track & Field athletes who specialize in jumping events are often instructed by their coach to increase the frequency of the Plyometrics workouts. Consult your coach or trainer to see if increasing the frequency is appropriate for your situation.

The day or two after performing the Plyometrics workout, the player’s body and legs may feel a bit tired or sluggish, similar to the feeling of tiredness from an intense physical workout or weight lifting session, which is natural.

¸ When Plyometrics are performed in conjunction with a legs weight training routine, then the Plyometrics routine should precede performing the legs weight workout. The legs weight workout should never precede the Plyometrics workout. The legs weight workout may be performed on the same day immediately after the Plyometrics workout or preferably on another day that allows maximum rest between Plyometrics and leg weights day. Maximum rest would be provided by the following example: Plyometrics on day 1, 10 and 20…, and legs weight training on day 5, 15, and 25…etc.

¸ Plyometrics should be discontinued during the competitive athletic season unless otherwise prescribed by your coach or team trainer.

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¸ Do not play the sport (basketball, volleyball etc.) the same day after Plyometrics, as your legs will be tired and more susceptible to injury.

¸ Schedule Plyometrics (and weights) workouts to provide maximum days (at least 3 days or more) of rest before playing your sport.

Make sure

that you resist the temptation to skip levels rather than starting at level one. Keep in mind that even though the exercises may seem easy and the muscles may not be getting a “pump” or growing visibly in size, the nervous system and the myotic stretch reflex and the eccentric (lowering) phase efficiencies are being worked and stimulated through the exercises.

Sample Programs- Start on level one

More is not better and harder is not better with Plyometrics and especia lly when first starting out with Plyometrics. The player must allow his body time to learn the new exercises, grow and adapt to the new stresses placed upon it. Make sure you are properly warmed up and have broken a sweat. Rest approximately 1-2 minutes between sets.

Level One

Weeks 1-6, Frequency - once every 5 to 10 days. On Level One the player is introduced to Depth Jumps and Two Legged Drop jumps. As the muscles, connective tissues and nervous system are becoming accustomed to the stress of the new exercises, consciously develop the good habits of using proper technique and following all safety guidelines during this first level. You’ll be glad you developed good habits as you progress from level one to two.

1. Depth Jumps 24 inch box

2. Two Legged Drop Jumps inch box

2 sets of 10 reps, off of the 18 to

1 set of 8 reps, off of the 18 to 24

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Level Two

Weeks 7-10, Frequency - once every 5 to 10 days. On Level Two a second set of Two Legged Drop Jumps are added.

1. Depth Jumps

24 inch box

2. Two Legged Drop Jumps

24 inch box

2 sets of 10 reps, off of the 18 to

2 sets of 8 reps, off of the 18 to

Level Three

Weeks 11-20, Frequency - once every 5 to 10 days. On Level Three Depth Jumps are discontinued, a set of One Legged Drop Jumps are added in their place, and a third set of Two Legged Drop Jumps are added. Make sure pay special attention to form and safety guidelines as you add in the One Legged Drop Jumps.

1. Two Legged Drop Jumps

24 inch box

2. One Legged Drop Jumps the 12 to16 inch box

3 sets of 8 reps, off of the 18 to

1 set of 8 reps, each leg. Off of

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Level Four

Weeks 21-52, Frequency - once every 5 to 10 days. On Level Four a third set of Two Legged Drop Jumps is added, a second set of One Legged Drop Jumps added, and one set of Bounding is introduced. Make sure to pay special attention to form and safety guidelines as you add in Bounding.

1. Two Legged Drop Jumps 24 inch box

2. One Legged Drop Jumps the 12 to16 inch box

3. Bounding

3 set of 8 reps, off of the 18 to

2 sets of 8 reps, each leg, off of

2 sets of 40 yards each set

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JumpingAdvantage™

Isometrics

“Never, never, never give up.” Winston Churc hill

The following Isometrics exercises are included for supplemental strength training, without the use of weights. These exercise take very little time to complete, but may give some players the added boost they are looking for.

As you complete the exercises measure your results and also see how you feel about the exercises. Use your intuition as well as the measuring stick to measure results. Are they helping you, or would you be better off using a more conventional method such as weights?

For the following four exercises, all that’s needed is an 8- foot length of rope, which will be tied into a loop and then doubled into a 4-foot loop for some of the exercises.

Use an 8 foot piece of rope which you securely tie the ends together to make a continuous loop. The first 3 exercises require the rope to be doubled up, making a 4-foot continuous loop of doubled up rope. Obviously, the rope needs to be tied securely to avoid coming loose. Workout gloves and shoes are recommended. Make sure you are properly warmed up before performing isometrics. Perform 2 sets of 10 seconds exertion each set, for each exercise, at the end of the workout, 1 to 2 times per week.

1) Lie on your back with knees slightly bent. Grip doubled rope firmly with hands while keeping elbows slightly bent. Loop the doubled rope around both feet. Push outward using legs while resisting with arms for 10 seconds. Do not allow legs to move.

2) Stand with legs bent and two strands of rope under feet and held with hands together. Attempt to push up with legs, similar to the squat, but resist with hands and rest of body. Extend for 10 seconds.

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3)

Stand with feet on two strands of rope and with feet shoulder width apart. Pull up using your legs and the rest of your body. Pull up for 10 seconds.

4) Stand on one strand of rope, with hands together in front of you, with feet shoulder width apart. Pull upward for 10 seconds.

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Plyometric Platform Jumping Shoes: Strength Shoes® and JumpSoles

Please note that the bulk of your speed and jumping exercises should be performed with regular high quality athletic shoes on versus platform shoes. Platform shoes are used as an additional

training tool to get the extra edge, and add incremental, additive and complimentary aspects to your training, rather than replace

your mainstream training.

without platform training shoes, but their addition adds another dimension to the athlete’s development. Likewise, athletes who only do platform shoe workouts and neglect to perform the bulk of their workouts in regular athletic shoes will not achieve their improvement potential.

An athlete will get excellent results

Platform jumping shoes are a unique training device that attach a wedge of plastic under the balls of the feet. This wedge prevents your heels from bottoming out, thus placing most of the training load on the 2 muscles of the calves, the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. The two top selling brands of platform training shoes are Strength Shoes and JumpSoles, which each have their own advantages over the other. Both are of high quality.

Prices from the manufacturers range from about $69-$89 for JumpSoles and $125-$175 a pair for Strength Shoes. For your convenience, we’ve arranged a discount for our JumpingAdvantage™ eBook clients for both Strength Shoes and JumpSoles. Discounts are available for both teams and individuals.

Web Site Link for Discounted JumpSoles http://www.jumpusa.com/jumpusareseller.htm

Web Site Link for Discounted Strength Shoes http://www.strength-shoes.com

Models range from strap on versions that attach to your own shoes JumpSoles, to self-contained shoes Strength Shoes that have the wedges permanently attached to their own shoe. For players with growing feet the strap on version has the advantage of not being outgrown (unless your shoe size is on the border of a JumpSole size), and they are less expensive.

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JumpSoles come in size ranges: Small (Mens 5-7½), Medium (Mens 8-10½), Large (Mens 11-14½), XLarge (Mens 15-20) rather than exact sizes whereas Strength Shoes come in half sizes from size 5 to 16. Both versions come with a video and a brief instructions sheet.

Jump Soles

come with a video and a brief instructions sheet. Jump Soles Strength Shoes Models that are

Strength Shoes

and a brief instructions sheet. Jump Soles Strength Shoes Models that are self-contained Strength Shoes with

Models that are self-contained Strength Shoes with the wedges permanently attached to their own shoes, can be outgrown, and cost more. But they seem to offer the very real advantage of more stability on lateral and reverse running and cutting movements, which are especially helpful when practicing sports specific movements such as power slides and backpedaling. Additionally, there are no straps to come loose with the Strength Shoes because they are self-contained. This offers more peace of mind in return for the higher price tag of the product.

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Both Strength Shoes and JumpSoles work well going straight forward, but Strength Shoes also excel at moving sideways and backwards, and Strength Shoes are more stable of the two.

JumpSoles also has an optional plug that fits into the bottom of the sole and is used to perform balance or Proprioception exercises. This feature makes the JumpSoles a tool for specifically improving balance. Improving balance not only improves athletic performance but also reduces the likelihood of injury. The “Proprioceptor” feature of the Jump Soles product has three separate plug adjustments to vary the difficulty of the exercise. Both Strength Shoes and JumpSoles will improve balance and “Proprioception” but the JumpSoles with the Proprioceptors feature takes it a step further.

Jump Soles with “Proprioceptors”

it a step further. Jump Soles with “Proprioceptors” Web Site Link for Discounted Proprioceptors

Web Site Link for Discounted Proprioceptors http://www.jumpusa.com/jumpusareseller.htm

Jumping, running and sports specific exercises are commonly performed while wearing the platform training shoes and place high proportion of the workload on the lower leg calf muscles. As

you learned earlier in this section, jumping is a whole body action,

and calves contribute their share to the equation.

over what percentage the lower leg plays in jumping and quickness, but it’s not debatable that strong calves are a necessary requirement for peak jumping and quickness.

There is debate

Before we get to the JumpingAdvantage™ Complex Advanced program for Strength Shoes and JumpSoles, let’s cover what you already get with the manufacturer’s programs.

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Strength Shoes® and JumpSoles Programs Overview

JumpSoles come with an 8-week program of 7 exercises that consists primarily of jumping exercises but no agility or sprinting exercises. All exercises are performed with the shoes on.

Strength Shoes come with three levels: Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced programs consisting of fewer jumping exercises but more running and agility drills. All exercises are performed with the shoes on.

Both manufacturers of the platform shoes seem to over emphasize the part calves play in jumping. From my experience with hundreds of athletes, that percentage actually varies somewhat from individual to individual based on their own body structure, limb length, and bodily proportions. Generally it’s about 20-25%.

Most players I have worked with have greatly benefited from increasing calf strength, whether from performing calf-training exercises such as calf raises, using the shoes, or a combination of both. It is rare that I don’t recommend calf raises to an athlete interested in improving his athletic performance.

Likewise, my personal experience is that increasing my calf strength really contributed to my jumping improvement, as well as quickness. As a side benefit, calf training also strengthens ankles, which prevents ankle injuries.

I personally have very some strong and nice looking calves, from

a combination of calf raises, running, jumping and platform shoes

training exercises. Calf size is often a hard to develop area for some athletes due to genetics, and it is debatable on how much the shoes will increase calf size. But calf raises can definitely take care of increasing size of the calf. But calf raises and size improvement is not what we’re focused on right here. It’s jumping and quickness improvement with Strength Shoes and JumpSoles.

So, even though platform shoe training takes a back seat to calf raises for increasing calf size, it does have some very unique benefits that can help an athlete in addition to calf raises. For many athletes, training with platform shoes can contribute quite a bit to quickness, running speed, and balance (proprioception),

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which are often-overlooked benefits, and in my opinion, the top benefit of the shoes rather than jumping improvements.

Let me repeat that for emphasis. Although jumping improvement is a commonly stated and promoted benefit of platform shoe training, the area I see the biggest athletic improvements with platform shoe training are in quickness, running speed, and balance (proprioception) improvement rather than jumping improvement. And balance improvement can improve jumping ability incrementally as well.

The emphasis on vertical leap improvement is an often-overstated benefit of platform shoe training, because it seems that is what sells the shoes. Quickness, agility and running speed improvement may be an even bigger and more commonly realized benefit than the increases in jumping improvement, and should not be overlooked by the improvement minded player or coach.

Much of that improvement may come from the improvements in balance from both the increase in strength of all muscles of the body that support balance, as well as development of better motor balance development itself.

The calf muscle and the supporting ankle and knee structures play a large part in running and quickness, and the platform shoe works it in a very unique and complete way that works the supporting muscles more so than would performing calf raises alone. The calves do play an integral part in jumping, but only play a part. Calves alone are worked in numerous other ways, such as calf raises, sprints, Plyometrics etc.

But not in a way that emphasizes balance and supporting muscles the same way as with the platform training shoes.

The way we typically use the shoes in a vertical leap or quickness improvement training program is different than how they are used with the programs that come with the purchase of the Strength

We will get to the Jumping Advantage™

Complex program for Strength Shoes or JumpSoles after the all

important safety guidelines.

Shoes or JumpSoles.

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JumpingAdvantage™

Complex Advanced Program for Strength Shoes® or JumpSoles

The JumpingAdvantage™ Complex Advanced Program for Strength Shoes or JumpSoles is an advanced program for advanced athletes who have already completed several cycles of the Strength Shoes or JumpSoles manufacturer’s program first and qualify as an advanced athlete.

Safety Guidelines

1. Follow all safety guidelines of the Strength Shoes or JumpSoles manufacturers including reading and watching

instructional

videos

that

come

with

the

shoes.

The

JumpingAdvantage™ Complex Advanced

Program

for

Strength Shoes and JumpSoles is meant for advanced athletes that have already completed several cycles of the shoes manufacturer’s programs that come with the platform shoes and fulfill the criteria previously set forth to qualify as an advanced athlete.

2. Follow all safety guidelines in the JumpingAdvantage™ program found in the beginning of this book as well as safety guidelines for Plyometrics in the previous section.

3. Proper warm up and stretching of the Achilles tendon, calf and leg muscles. Because of the direct stress on these areas, this is highly emphasized. Be aware that these shoes place huge stresses on the Achilles tendon, so extreme care in stretching and warm up must be taken.

4. Warning : Plyo metrics Depth Jumps (a.k.a. box jumps) with platform shoes are not included in this program. As you already read in the Plyometrics section, jumping down off a box multiplies the force by many times your body weight and therefore the stress on the joints.

The addition of platform shoes for Drop Jumps places additional force and stress on the calf and Achilles tendon placing more risk than the potential reward is worth, for all but the most highly conditioned athletes.

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Drop Jumps (a.k.a. box jumps) as described in the JumpingAdvantage™ Plyometrics are to be performed with regular athletic shoes only, and are not to be combined with platform shoes.

JumpingAdvantage™

Complex Advanced Program for Strength Shoes® or JumpSoles

Complex training is traditionally defined as the completion of a weight training exercise such as weighted squats immediately followed by a speed exercise such as sprinting or jump squats. Alternately, the complex training set may be switched around so that the speed exercise is completed first and is followed by the weights exercise.

The JumpingAdva ntage™ Strength Shoes or JumpSoles Advanced Complex Training program consists of performing a jumping or quickness enhancing exercise with the Strength Shoes or JumpSoles on immediately followed by performing the same exercise with regular high quality athletic shoes on, or first with regular high quality athletic shoes on immediately followed by performing the same exercise with the Strength Shoes or JumpSoles on.

This Advanced Complex Training concept synergistically multiplies the benefits of both the platform shoe exercise and the regular shoe exercise.

Please Note that the bulk of your speed and jumping exercises should be performed with regular high quality athletic shoes on versus platform shoes. Platform shoes are to used as a training tool to get the extra edge, and add incremental, additive and complimentary aspects to your training, rather than replace your mainstream regular shoe training. Doing your entire jump training or even the bulk of your jumping and quickness training solely with platform shoes on will keep you from achieving your overall improvement potential.

In order to add in Platform Shoe Training and still emphasize most sets with regular athletics shoes, you may either perform your first set, middle set, or last set of a partic ular exercise with the Platform Shoes on, giving you one set designated for Platform

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Shoes per exercise. When more total sets are included in a program, then alternating sets between regular shoes and Platform Shoes will take advantage of the complex training method. You are encouraged to experiment and create your own program through trial and error.

JumpingAdvantage™

Complex Advanced Program for Strength Shoes® or JumpSoles

Sample Program

The following twice per week sample Complex Advanced Program for Strength Shoes or JumpSoles uses the complex training principal in order to synergistically multiply the benefits of both the platform shoe exercises and the regular shoe exercises. It also adds in basketball sports specific training exercises to generate quickness and explosiveness that translate directly to jumping higher and improved quickness on the basketball court:

slam dunks, better defense, steals, rebounding and more! Allow two or three days of rest between workouts and never use this workout two days in a row.

JumpSoles owners will notice that the sample program that follows, adds in sprints, power slides, running rim jumps and backpedaling to the familiar exercises that you have already performed in the manufacturer’s program. Although you may have done several cycles of the JumpSoles program, please note to proceed with caution on these new exercises. It should not pose any particular challenge as these are common athletic movements, but we wanted to bring that to your attention nonetheless.

Each set of the first five exercises are first completed with the platform shoes first and then followed after a brief rest by a set of the same exercise wearing regular athletic shoes. Alternating between sets with platform shoes and regular athletic shoes is the complex system. In the case that you decide to add in an extra set for an exercise, first add a set of the exercise with regular shoes, and then if you add in two additional sets, add a set with the platform shoes followed by a set with regular shoes.

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The rest interval is generally the time it takes to change from platform shoes to regular shoes, and vice versa, with a slightly greater rest allowed after each 2 sets.

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JumpingAdvantage™

Complex Advanced Program for Strength Shoes® or JumpSoles

Sample Program

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

Sets

Reps

1. Rim Touches

2

20

2

20

2

20

2

25

2

25

2

30

2

30

2

30

1. The first set is performed with platform shoes and is followed by the second set wearing regular

athletic shoes. Rest between sets is between 30-90 seconds depending upon conditioning.

 

2.

Jumping Step-Ups

2

10

2

15

2

15

2

20

2

20

2

20

2

25

2

25

2.

The first set is performed with platform shoes and is followed by the second set wearing regular

athletic shoes. Rest between sets is between 30-90 seconds depending upon conditioning. Each set is performed working one leg at a time. So, for example, you will perform one set working your right leg with the platform shoes followed by a set with your right leg with regular athletic shoes. Then next perform a set working your left leg wearing the platform shoes, followed by a set wearing regular athletic shoes.

3.

40 Yard Sprints

2

 

2

 

4

4

4

 

6

 

6

 

6

3.

The first set is performed with platform shoes and is followed by the second set wearing regular

athletic shoes. Rest between sets one and two is between 30-90 seconds depending upon conditioning. Rest between sets two and three is 60-120 seconds depending upon conditioning. Rest between sets three and four is between 30-90 seconds depending upon conditioning. Rest between sets four and five is 60-120 seconds depending upon conditioning. Rest between sets five and six is between 30-90 seconds depending upon conditioning.

4.

Back Peddling 30

2

2

4

4

4

 

6

 

6

 

6

Yards (Running

     

Backwards)

4.

The first set is performed with platform shoes and is followed by the second set wearing regular

athletic shoes. Rest between sets one and two is between 30-90 seconds depending upon conditioning. Rest between sets two and three is 60-120 seconds depending upon conditioning. Rest between sets three and four is between 30-90 seconds depending upon conditioning. Rest between sets four and five is 60-120 seconds depending upon conditioning. Rest between sets five and six is between 30-90 seconds depending upon conditioning.

5.

Defensive Power

2 Right

2Right

4Right

4Right

4Right

6Right

6Right

6Right

Slides (Width of Basketball Court)

2 Left

2 Left

4 Left

4 Left

4 Left