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THIS WEEK

IN YOUR
COMMUNITY
COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT
December 7 - 13, 2011
I finally decorated my
house for Christmas this
past weekend.
Of course I have put up
more than one tree. Its a tra-
dition in my house to have
more than one tree.
When my kids were grow-
ing up we had a theme tree
for each of them.
My daughter collected
mini-teddy bears, so we had
a teddy-bear tree.
My son was a drummer.
So we collected drum orna-
ments and had a drum tree.
I loved rocking horses of
any kind. Of course there
had to be a tree with a wide
variety of rocking horses.
Perhaps this is why I enjoy
the Christmas Tree Festival
underway at the library so
much. There is such a wide
variety of trees on display.
I encourage anyone who
hasnt been there yet, to visit
the library and see the trees.
One tree is decorated
with the skirt, top bow and
decorations made entirely
of newspapers. Another tree
features birdhouses made
with garden seed packets.
There are trees with orna-
ments made by elementary
students.
The library features nearly
30 trees in all shapes and
sizes. Its worth your time.
If you are like me and
cant get enough Christ-
mas, then you also need to
enjoy the open house this
weekend at the Putnam
County Historical Museum
in Kalida on Friday evening
and Sunday afternoon. The
event will feature live music
including the St. Michaels
Choir on Friday night and
an opportunity to get a very
special picture of your child
with Santa in a Victorian set-
ting on Sunday.
If you want to continue
the fun, then dont forget
the Christmas Tree Gala
at The Meadows of Kalida
on December 18. This
event allows you to bid on
the trees donated by area
individuals, businesses and
clubs. The proceeds from
this event are donated to the
Putnam County Council on
Aging. Its an opportunity to
enjoy seeing many trees and
possibly buying your tree
for the following year while
supporting a good cause.
You can also visit Putnam
Acres east of Ottawa to see
their exhibit of decorated
wreaths. Proceeds from the
sale of these wreaths are
given to the United Way of
Putnam County.
So dont let anyone try to
tell you there are very few
Christmas exhibits to see
in the county. Its not true.
Besides there is always the
Kline home and my trees.
Enjoying
Christmas
around
the county
Preserving
history in
Fort
Jennings
Page V2
Students learn leadership
through service
FREE
Nancy
Kline
nkline@putnamvoice.com
419-231-2444
Putnam Voice
Helping you take fight again
The Runway of Putnam Acres
10170 Road 5-H Ottawa, OH 45875 419-523-4092
On Behalf of the Staff & Residents
of Putnam Acres, We would like to
Wish You a Merry Christmas!
By KATHY SCHROEDER
Prevention Eduction Coordinator
On Sept. 16, local high schools were
invited to attend the second annual High
School Leadership Day. Teams were
comprised team from 10-15 students per
school and an adult leader. The theme of
the day was Students Engaging Real Vol-
unteerism in Communities Effectively.
The purpose of the day was to provide a
setting for students to explore the benefits
of leadership skills and applying it to com-
munity service projects. Nick Jackson,
the School Coordinator for the UGIVE.
ORG, lead the day for the students.
This event was funded by the Safe
Schools, Healthy Students Initiative,
through the Putnam County Educational
Service Center.
The planning committee for this event
was Beth Tobe, Pathways Counseling,
Jason Hedrick, OSU Extension, Jeff Jost-
pille, Fort, Jennings Local School District
and Kathy Schroeder, Putnam County
Educational Service Center.
At the end of the day, the schools were
offered a challenge to carry out a service
project with their school team during the
month of November. If the school team
carried out their project their reward was
a pizza party for their team. The teams
each came up with different types of
community service projects.
The results of these projects has
included a wide variety of events including
honoring veterans, adopting grandparents,
cleaning a park, organizing a blood drive,
and collecting items for food pantries.
The events demonstrate many valuable
hours of volunteering and a commitment
of community services. The students had
an opportunity to learn the importance
and rewards of service others.
PROJECTS BY SCHOOL
Miller City/New Cleveland
This group cleaned the tennis
courts of all materials (weeds,
grass and tree limbs). They
scraped and power washed the
shelter houses. They painted
the shelter houses. All of the
work was done at the Miller City
Sportsmans Club pond area.
More than 80 hours went into
the planning.
Fort Jennings They planned
a day of remembrance for Fort
Jennings Veterans on November
11, 2011. The Veterans were
invited to lunch, followed by an
all school assembly to honor
them for serving their commu-
nity and country. The assembly
was planned and carried out by
the leadership team. After the
assembly the Veterans were
given a tour of the school and
shown the new technology that
is available to students.
Ottawa-Glandorf The Lead-
ership Team joined with their
Student Council and sponsored
a Red Cross blood drive on Nov.
11 in the multipurpose room at
the school. Students assisted
in registering donors, assisting
donors after giving blood, helped
with set up and tear down. The
students also provided snacks/
drinks to the donors and Red
Cross volunteers.
Pandora-Gilboa Students
sponsored a Party for the Pan-
try. The leadership group spon-
sored a blacklight/highlighter
dance (students wore a white
shirt and highlighters were pro-
vided. This event took place on
Nov. 19, in the school auditoria.
The admission to the dance was
four nonperishable food items
for the Putnam County Food
Panty. The Leadership Group
had a good turn out.
Kalida School Leadership
team sponsored a Costume Day
on October 31, 2011. The cos-
tume day took place for students
in grades 612. In order for
a student to dress in costume
they need to donate a dollar or
a canned good. Proceeds were
donated to local charity organiza-
tions.
Columbus Grove Leader-
ship Team did Adopt a Grandpar-
ent at Hilty Memorial Home. On
Nov. 19, Columbus Groves lead-
ership team kicked their adopt
a grandparent program by plan-
ning bingo with a room fully of
residents from the home. The
students assisted the residents
in the bingo as well as present-
ing prizes to the winners. Stu-
dents and residents appeared
to be joining the event. The
students plan to carry on the
visits with the residents during
the school year.
NANCY KLINE Putnam Voice
Members of the Columbus Grove leadership team Adopted a Grandparent helped resi-
dents at Hilty Memorial Home as their service project.
BECKY LEADER
PutnamVoice
Fort Jennings High School
students presented veter-
ans with a Thank You
medal made by students
Morgan Ricker and Sara
Miller.
Submitted photo
The Kalida Cats Who Care organization recently held two
events to generate funds for the Kalida Park Fund and
also the Ottawa Food Pantry. On Oct. 31, students wore
Halloween costumes to school and donated $1 or brought
in a canned food item for donation to the Ottawa Food
Pantry. Pictured are the Cats Who Care officers: Casey
Unverferth, Nicole Kaufman, Halie Zenz and Leah Berheide
presenting their donated food items to Mr. Chas Myers
representing the Ottawa Food Pantry. The Ottawa Food
Pantry is operated through Trinity United Methodist Church
on East Main Street in Ottawa.
NANCY KLINE PutnamVoice
Members of the Pandora-Gilboa leader-
ship team sponsored Party for the Pan-
try on Nov. 19 to collect items for the
food pantry in Ottawa.
Teams blanket
county with
events of caring
By NANCY KLINE
nkline@putnamvoice.com
419-231-2444
FORT JENNINGS Dr.
Wes Klir said he has a pas-
sion for history. On Monday
he spoke about his passion
to restore the Fort Jennings
Memorial Hall to members
of the Ottawa Kiwanis.
Dr. Klir said the hall has
a long history in the region
and serves as a memorial to
veterans.
A lot of people also
remember having their wed-
ding receptions and other
parties in the upstairs area,
he said.
The hall was originally
built with funds from the
original Jennings Memorial
Association, Jennings Town-
ship trustees, village of Ft.
Jennings and state of Ohio.
The property provided for
the hall was donated with
the stipulation on the deed it
should always be used as a
war memorial.
It was erected in 1916 to
commemorate Lt. Colonel
William Jennings and his
men who, under the direc-
tion of General William
Henry Harrison constructed
an outpost here that served
as a vital part of the supply
line for troops in the War of
1812.
A president and 3,000 sol-
diers once spent the night in
Fort Jennings, Dr. Klir told
the group.
Dr. Klir said the Memorial
Hall served as an early civic
center for the region when
it was first built.
It also used for weddings,
anniversaries, plays, parties,
fish fries, and chicken barbe-
cues. In 1935 it served as a
school. It was also used as a
fallout shelter site during the
cold war.
In more recent years it
was a home for veterans
meetings, public offices,
government functions, vot-
ing, the library, story hour,
Santa visits, and many, many
other functions
When you drive through
Fort Jennings now there is
very little that is recogniz-
able from our past, Dr. Klir
said. This is one of the few
historical buildings left in
the town.
The Memorial Hall has
sat unused for six years
and was even considered
for demolition, Dr. Klir
said. Then last March the
Jennings Memorial Associa-
tion reorganized and began
working on renovating the
building.
We meet once a month
and have 20-25 members,
he said. Using donations
and volunteer labor the
Association has worked
to fix up both the upstairs
and downstairs of the
building.
An open house was held
at the Memorial Hall last
July. Dr. Klir said they
hope to have the building
completed in 2012 when
Fort Jennings will celebrate
their bicentennial.
We plan to have a military
museum inside the hall and
hope to include local shows
and activities, he said. Its
a work in progress.
This hall was built to be
a war memorial and to com-
memorate the veterans ser-
vices, Dr. Klir said. This
is our goal to renovate this
building to remember all
those who fought on that
ground and to honor all
veterans.
He has a video at www.jen-
ningsmemorialhall.org that
tells more about the hall.
FEEDBACK
NEIGHBORS LETTERS
OPEN HOUSE
Passion play on Memorial Hall
ABOUT THE VOICE
The Putnam Voice is a free weekly newspaper covering
Putnam County. It is delivered on Wednesday as part of The
Lima News and also can be picked up at various distribu-
tion racks.
The newspaper is proud to publish reader-supplied con-
tent it receives from the putnamvoice.com Web site. These
stories and photographs are provided by Putnam County
residents, members of service clubs, business leaders,
government agencies and school officials.
Readers are asked to write about their vacations, achieve-
ments, or other interesting things they want to share with
the community. We strive to be your Voice in Putnam County
Additional content can be found at putnamvoice.com.
The newspaper is a product of The Lima News. It is
headed up by Putnam County resident Nancy Kline, who
serves as editor.
Connie
Ladd
office
coordinator
Nancy
Kline
editor
Donna
Campbell
advertising
The PutnamVoice is an independent news-
paper whose entire contents are Copyright
2010 by The Lima News. No part can be
reproduced in any form without written con-
sent from the publisher or editor.
Single copies are available free throughout
Putnam County. No one is authorized to
remove more than a single copy of the news-
paper from vending machines without the
advance written permission of the publisher.
Putnam County
Common Pleas Court
The following have been indicted
by the Putnam County Grand Jury
last week.
John J. Mares, 22, 734 E. Sec-
ond St., Ottawa; burglary and gross
sexual imposition.
Joshua A. Morman, 40, 543 W.
Third St., Ottawa; felonious assault.
Gary L. Snow, 34, 306 W. Forrest
St., Continental; two counts sale of
prescription drugs.
Johnny G. Rakes, 36, 555 E. Ervin
Road, Van Wert; five counts traffick-
ing in drugs and four counts permit-
ting drug abuse.
Robert W. Pollock, 37, 831 W.
Wayne St., Lima; three counts traf-
ficking in drugs and three counts
permitting drug abuse.
Daniel J. Garcia, 36, 133 Wabash
Ave., Defiance; two counts trafficking
in drugs and two counts permitting
drug abuse.
Charles R. Gee, 35, 205 Ash St.,
Continental; trafficking in drugs.
William C. Rayle Jr., 50, 303 S.
Third St., Continental; three counts
trafficking in drugs.
Vickie L. Rayle, 53, 303 S. Third
St., Continental; five counts traf-
ficking in drugs and permitting drug
abuse.
Michele L. Mayer, 36, 638 Cornell
Drive, Lima; fleeing and eluding and
theft (misdemeanor).
Dispositions/Nov. 25
Mario Hernandez, Jr., 52, 141
Washington St., Cygnet, was sen-
tenced to 30 months in prison for
trafficking in drugs within 1,000 feet
of school and or a juvenile and per-
mitting drug abuse. He was given
credit for five days served. He was
fined $1,000, and his license was
suspended for five years.
Tiffany Chasco, 805 B Main St.,
Ottawa, was sentenced to 15 months
in prison for unlawful sexual conduct
with a minor with credit for 57 days
served. She was originally charged
with two counts unlawful sexual con-
duct with a minor.
Dispositions/Nov. 28
Danny L. Ruiz, 37, 419 S. Enter-
prise St., Bowling Green, was sen-
tenced to 12 months in prison for
attempt menacing stalking and 180
days for assault. The sentences are
to be served concurrent and he was
given credit for 116 days served.
Dispositions/Nov. 29
James G. Pothast, 45, 14054
Road 12, Ottawa, pleaded guilty to
aggravated vehicular homicide. He
faces up to eight years in prison and
$15,000 in fines. Bond was contin-
ued while a pre-sentence investiga-
tion is conducted.
Nelson A. Giesige, Jr., Defiance,
was granted a divorce from Jenni-
fer Giesige, Continental. They were
married June 1, 1996, in Defiance
County, and have three children.
Jamie S. Moran, Continental, was
granted a divorce from Benjamin C.
Moran, Continental. They were mar-
ried June 12, 1999, in Continental,
and have three children.
Jeffery J. Nordaus, Columbus
Grove, and Kimberly M. Nordhaus,
Ottawa, were granted a dissolution
of marriage. They were married June
27, 1987, in Kalida, and have one
minor child.
New Cases
William Heacock, Belmore, v. Rose
Heacock, Findlay; support.
Putnam County Municipal Court
Dispositions/Nov. 22
Ciara Ybarra, 20, 116 Poplar St.,
Leipsic, charged with theft, a felony,
bound over to common pleas court.
Dispositions/Nov. 28
Heather J. Burris, 34, 4257 County
Road 90, Alger, pleaded guilty to four
counts non support of dependents.
Sentence: 180 days jail and $100
fine on each count, sentence concur-
rent, with 179 days jail suspended.
Dispositions/Nov. 29
Kristina K. Raciti, 42, 226 N. Main
St., Columbus Grove, pleaded guilty
to theft. Sentence: 180 days jail,
$50 fine, with 178 days jail sus-
pended, and 60 hours community
service, with $500 restitution.
Ashli R. Diemer, 25, 407 E. Main
St., Leipsic, pleaded guilty to theft.
Sentence: 180 days jail, $100 fine,
with 180 days jail suspended, and
40 hours community service.
Judgments/Nov. 29
Glandorf Lumber Co., default judg-
ment v. David A. Kuhlman, Ottawa,
$1,566.04, plus interest and costs.
Glandorf Lumber Co., default
judgment v. Don Kramer, Columbus
Grove, $3,098.82, plus interest and
costs.
Midland Funding, LLC, San Diego,
default judgment v. Maria R. Leal,
Pandora, $1,182.51, plus interest
and costs.
Capital One Bank, Norcross, Ga.,
default judgment v. Leslie J. Rayle,
Belmore, $1,295.46, plus interest
and costs.
Dispositions/Dec. 1
John Trehan, 21, 715 S. First St.,
Hamler, pleaded no contest to an
amended charge of second-offense
OVI and was found guilty. Sentence:
Six points, 180 days jail, $1,000
fine, two-year license suspension,
with 160 days jail and $475 sus-
pended, with counseling at Pathways
Counseling Center or equivalent. A
charge of failure to reinstate license
was dismissed.
Kristy F. Vermilyen, 25, 192
Church St., Ottoville, pleaded no
contest to an amended charge
of second-offense OVI and was
found guilty. Sentence: Six points,
180 days jail, $1,000 fine, two-
year license suspension, with 160
days jail and $475 suspended, with
counseling at Pathways Counseling
Center or equivalent, and restitu-
tion to the village of Kalida in the
amount of $4,508.96. Charges of
seat belt, driving under suspension
and failure to maintain control were
dismissed.
To the Editor
The November 28 reception informational meeting/
fundraiser held at the Ottawa-Glandorf High School was a
huge success thanks to the Putnam County Support Com-
mittee of the more than 35 pastors and their churches,
speakers, news media and in addition to the 90 people
who attended this meeting in support of the (HB-125)
Heart Beat Bill. Thank you.
We are happy to inform you as of this publication
date, HB-125 has been assigned to the Health Care
Committee in the Senate for a hearing on December
7 at the State House in Columbus. This is it! This is
the moment we have been waiting for. We are about
to make history and you were part of the moment we
have been waiting for.
We are about to make history and you were part of this
movement that is going to overturn Roe vs. Wade.
Ohio will be leading the nation by stopping 90 to 95 per-
cent of the abortions and saving 25,000 lives a year. What
we are doing is huge!
Please continue to pray and call all Senators and ask
them to vote for the passage of this bill.
Passage of (HB-125) Heart Beat Bill will be the begin-
ning of restoring America.!
Ken and Julie Deitering
Bud and Mary Lou Bewsey
Marilyn Gulker
Rose Riepenhoff
OFFICE
118 N. Hickory Street
Ottawa, Ohio
419-231-2444
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CONTACT US
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Editor: Nancy Kline
nkline@putnamvoice.com
419-231-2444
ADVERTISING:
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866-546-2237
putnamvoice.com
V2
December 7 - 13, 2011
R. E. Wanamaker honored
OTTAWA The Blanchard River Art
Guilt presented their annual Lifetime
Achievement Award this year to Rolland
R.E. Wanamaker during their annual Hol-
iday Show at the Schroeder Center for the
Arts. Accepting the award was his daughter
Linda Schwarz.
Born in 1909, Wanamaker did numerous
murals, signs, sketches for individuals and
businesses. He is well known for his mural
in the Ottawa American Legion. Dotty
Hovest, Ottawa, said he painted the well-
know drum used by her husband Stanley
Tipper Hovest. Spitnale Concessions, Clo-
verdale, still use signs Wanamaker painted.
Business owner Tom Gustwiller said he
has found some of the paintings of Wana-
maker under the paneling in his Ottawa
business.
COURT NEWS
Ottawa native Linda
Schwarz of New Berlin,
Wis., receives a Lifetime
Achievement Award in
honor of her father, artist
Rolland R. E. Wanamaker,
from Blanchard River Art
Guild member Bruce Stowe
during BRAGs fifth annual
Holiday Art Show on Dec. 3
at the Schroeder Center for
the Arts on Main Street in
Ottawa.
TAMMY EVANS
PutnamVoice
The Putnam County His-
torical Society and Museum
is hosting their annual open
house 6 to 8 p.m. Friday,
Dec. 9, and 1 to 4 p.m., Sun-
day, Dec. 11.
This years theme, A
Cozy Christmas, features
quilts, coverlets and bed-
rugs.
Live music will be fea-
tured both days. Also on
Sunday guests will have the
opportunity from 2 p.m. to
3 p.m. to bring their chil-
dren to sit on Santa Clauss
lap and have their picture
taken in an old-fashioned
Victorian setting, with a
vintage Santa Claus.
Other highlights include
Toys of Yesterday
A Military Tribute
Antique Trees and Orna-
ments
Carols on the Parlor
Organ
Refreshments
The Museum is located
in Kalida.
Heart Beat supporters
upbeat about meeting
Museum featuring live music,
vintage Santa this weekend
Thanks for tribute to father
To the Editor,
I would like to express appreciation to the Blanchard
River Arts Guild (BRAG) for the tribute to my Dad last
Saturday. It was a very emotional evening and his family
is grateful for the recognition of his contribution to the
community.
Linda Schwarz
NANCY KLINE photos PutnamVoice
Dr. Wes Klir, chief officer of the Jennings Memorial Asso-
ciation, spoke Monday at Ottawa Kiwanis about the ongo-
ing restoration of the Fort Jennings War Memorial Hall.
Members of the Jennings Memorial Association started last March doing work on the
Fort Jennings Memorial Hall.
SAY WHAT ?!?!
OTTOVILLE The Mothers, Grandmoth-
ers and Great Grandmother club of Ottoville
met at the home of Helen Devitt on Thurs.,
December 1st. The ladies had a cookie
exchange followed by desert and coffee.
Mary Lou Miller conducted the business
meeting. Business included discussion
about spring meetings and possible philan-
thropic projects.
Rita Schnipke won the poinsettia raffle
prize and the ladies enjoyed a Christmas
gift exchange. The group then traveled to
Lima Encore Theaters production of Irving
Berlins White Christmas
Benefit planned
for Greg Horstman
OTTOVILLE A bene-
fit for Greg Horstman will
be held Tuesday, Dec. 13,
at the Big Oak Galley in
Ottoville. Guests may pur-
chase a pork chop supper
for $8. The meal includes
a pork chop, dressing,
mashed potatoes, green
beans and a roll. You will
also receive $1 towards a
50/50 drawing.
Proceeds from the
benefit will go towards
medical expenses for
Horstman, who has been
diagnosed with cancer.
WATCH FOR IT
OTTAWA Members
of the Blanchard River Art
Guild painted over a dozen
birdhouses that are on dis-
play on the Putnam County
Habitat for Humanity tree at
the Putnam County Library.
The tree is on exhibit in the
lobby of the library.
An open house was held
last Sunday for the 20th
festival hosted by the Put-
nam County Friends of the
Library.
The festival was started in
1988. The year of the flood
2007 would have been the
20th festival. Unfortunately
this 20th celebration had to
be put off for five years while
library officials researched
what to do with the former
library on Pratt Street that
had been heavily damaged in
the August 2007 flood.
The decision was made
to build a new library on
Putnam Parkway in Ottawa.
The new library opened this
year.
Members of the Putnam
County Friends of the
Library are happy they can
finally hold the 20th festival
in the new library facilities
this year.
Organizations, businesses,
and individuals have placed
nearly 30 trees on exhibit at
the library.
The festival will run from
Dec. 3 to Dec. 29.
The library is open from 9
a.m. - 8 p.m. Monday through
Thursday and 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.
on Saturday to view the
trees and use the librarys
services.
The birdhouses on the
Habitat tree will be sold
for $10 each following the
festival. All of the money
will be donated to the Put-
nam County Habbitat for
Humanity. Anyone inter-
ested in purchasing a bird-
house should call Nancy
Kline at 419-231-2444. Each
birdhouse will be sold on a
first come basis.
LIBRARY NEWS CHRISTMAS DISPLAY
CHURCH NEWS
COMMUNITY
putnamvoice.com
V3
December 7 - 13, 2011
Buy One
Get One
Half Off
Individual Prices 2 For:
8x10 $30.00 $45.00
11x14 $37.00 $55.50
16x20 $75.00 $112.50
20x30 $108.00 $162.00
*Must be ordered by 12/20 to guarantee ready by Christmas
RECLINER SALE
Special
Financing
For
Qualified
Customers
See Store
For Details
3037 Elida Road
1/4 Mile West Of
The Lima Mall
Call 419-331-0659
Daily 10-8
Sat. 10-6; Sun. 12-5
SO DONT DELAY
HEAD FOR...
The purchase of any recliner in
stock, priced at $400 or more.
Must be presented at time of
sale. Does not apply to past
sales. Expires 3-4-11
$
50
00
OFF
FABRIC
$379-$699
LEATHER
$499-$999

LIFT
CHAIRS
$599-$999
Huge
Selection
www.sayfurnitureonline.com
Expires 12-14-11
RECLINER SALE
Special
Financing
For
Qualified
Customers
See Store
For Details
3037 Elida Road
1/4 Mile West Of
The Lima Mall
Call 419-331-0659
Daily 10-8
Sat. 10-6; Sun. 12-5
SO DONT DELAY
HEAD FOR...
The purchase of any recliner in
stock, priced at $400 or more.
Must be presented at time of
sale. Does not apply to past
sales. Expires 3-4-11
$
50
00
OFF
FABRIC
$379-$699
LEATHER
$499-$999

LIFT
CHAIRS
$599-$999
Huge
Selection
www.sayfurnitureonline.com
Huge
Selection
$299-$699 $599-$999

LIFT
CHAIRS
$699-$999
Beth and Chas Myers stand
beside the Putnam County
Habitat for Humanity Tree at
the Putnam County Library.
Titled A Home for the Holi-
day the tree features bird
houses painted by members
of the Blanchard RIver Art
Guild. Beth holds the book
The Carpenters GIft they
donated to the library tell-
ing the story of how the
Rockefeller Christmas tree
is recycled into wood for
Habitat homes after each
Christmas.
NANCY KLINE PutnamVoice
Donna Lora performed
on her harp and the ham-
mered dulcimer during the
20th Christmas Tree Festi-
val at the Putnam County
Library on Sunday.
Chapel Belles
Boutique features
handmade items
GILBOA Chapel
Belles Boutique and Etc.
Shop in Gilboa offers
hand-crafted items, new
items and gently used
merchandise. The bou-
tique is now decorated
for the season. It is open
every Thursday from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. and Friday
from noon to 4 p.m.
The business is located
in the basement of the
United Methodist Church
at the corner of Main
Street and Franklin Street.
All proceeds will bene-
fit missions of the church.
Food boxes
offered for needy
in P-G district
PANDORA In an
effort to help relieve
some of the hardship and
financial difficulty of the
depressed economy in the
Pandora/Gilboa area, the
churches of Pandora and
Gilboa UMC are offering
food boxes on the last
Saturday of every month
for households in the
Pandora-Gilboa school
district that find them-
selves in need. The boxes
are designed to provide
nine meals (3 breakfasts,
3 lunches and 3 dinners)
for a family of four.
In order to pick up a
box for a household, you
must register by 5 p.m.
on Monday, Dec. 12 by
calling 419-384-3550 or
419-394-3905. Boxes will
be available for pickup
under the name registered
on Saturday, Dec. 17 at 11
a.m. at Pandora United
Methodist Church located
at 108 E. Washington St.
in the center of Pandora
on state Route 12.
MGG Club enjoys holiday outing
Journey to Bethlehem
returns to Ottawa park
St. Annes Council
updated on activities
OTTAWA Resusci-
tated after last years severe
weather prevented it from
happening, the Christmas
Drive-Thru Drama, Journey
to Bethlehem, will come
alive again in the Ottawa
Memorial Park for one night
only from 5:30-8 p.m. Sun-
day, December 11, 2011. With
live animals, a cast of over
50 adults and children, and
the dramatic storytelling,
the park will be transformed
into a venue which will bring
travelers of all ages through
the wonder, majesty, and the
sights and sounds of the cele-
bration of Christs birth 2000
years ago.
In the comfort and warmth
of their own vehicles, pil-
grims will be taken through
a delightful and inspiring
journey that will bring joy
to children and adults alike
as they come face to face
with the Christmas story
in a whole new way. Along
the way, people will meet
and hear from the likes of
Elizabeth and Zechariah,
Mary and Joseph, angels and
shepherds, the innkeeper, a
Roman Centurion, the Magi
and King Herod, and Anna
and Simeon, all of whom will
be pointing to the real mean-
ing of Christmas, the birth of
the Savior!
Using the 11th Street
entrance, the dramatic jour-
ney begins with a personal
welcome for each vehicle
and the reception of a CD
or tape to be played that will
guide travelers along the way.
As visitors slowly make their
way through they park, they
will hear a unique retelling of
the story of Jesus birth. The
Christmas story will unfold
before their eyes in a way
that is sure to inspire and
encourage even as it may
bring a tear and a smile.
As the journey draws to
a close, travelers will have
been given the opportunity
to consider again the true
meaning of this season as
they uniquely encounter the
One who went from the crib
to the cross and who truly is
the light of the world. After
a guided meandering through
the park and finally conclud-
ing at Parklane Drive, special
gifts will be given to each
family or vehicle and to the
any children inside who take
part in the Journey to Beth-
lehem. There is no cost for
the journey and everyone is
invited. Depending on traffic
and pace, the journey lasts
approximately 15 minutes.
Last chance to
register for YMCA
drop and shop
OTTAWA Time is
running out to sign up
for the Putnam County
YMCA Drop and Shop.
This program will be held
this Saturday, December
10th from 9:00am-3:00pm
and is open to all kids
age 3-10 years old. While
you are out doing your
holiday shopping kids will
participate in swimming,
art/crafts, movies, lunch
and much more. Fee is
only $10.00 per child or
$25.00 per family. Pre-
registration is required
due to staffing require-
ments. So reserve your
space today before time
runs out. To register or for
more information contact
the Putnam County YMCA
at 419-523-5233.
By PAT AGNER
Secretary
OTTAWA Meeting Nov.
15, 7:30 p.m. after Mass St.
Annes Council # 7 Ottawa.
President Dorothy Siefer
called the meeting to order
in the school cafeteria fol-
lowing prayer and the
Pledge of Allegiance. Carol
Beutler reported that 1500
cards were sent to Service-
men and women doing tour
overseas for the upcoming
Christmas. Doris Tenwalde
read the thank you card
from Putnam American Red
Cross for our Make A Dif-
ference Day donation of $50
to help with mailings of holi-
day packages to Military. Pat
Agner reported that cheer
and sympathy card were sent
to members last month and
at this meeting, cards were
signed for Agnes Morman,
Norma J. Meyer, Henrietta
Wischmeyer, and Jean Lutt-
fring. Doris Tenwalde was
the only November birthday
attendee at this meeting.
Kathy Schnipke won the
door prize and will have a
reading next month.
Dorothy Siefer read
Thanksgiving for daughter
Tina Burgei, last months
door prize winner. Ethel
Walker, Karen Deters, Kathy
Schnipke, and Shirley Duling
were present from the com-
mittee and were thanked
for the pumpkin dessert and
hostess duties.
Next meeting will be Noon
December 6th with lunch on
your own at Henrys followed
by caroling to members in
Nursing Homes. It was sug-
gested that everyone bring
along a jar of peanut butter for
the shelves at Putnam Food
Pantry. A Jitney Auction was
held at the end of the meet-
ing. The proceeds boosted
the Helping Hands Fund to
$200 which will be matched
by Columbus Office. Eight
$50 Walmart giftcards will be
purchased and donated for
Putnam County Senior Citi-
zens Christmas Gift Fund.
A donation was also given
to Putnam County United
Way. It was noted that Sts.
Peter & Paul Altar-Rosary
Society would not be having
a Christmas Party this year.
In the past, $50 was donated
toward this.
Ethel Walker made a
motion to donate that money
to Toys for Tots c/o Glen
Arnold with the Optimists.
Elections were held and
there were no changes in
the offices for 2012. Doro-
thy Siefer, President; Carol
Beutler, Vice President; Pat
Agner, Secretary; Doris Ten-
walde, Treasurer; Monitor,
Agnes Kleman; and Inner
Guard, Ruth Kuhlman. Janu-
ary Meeting will have instal-
lation of officers.
A project for 2012 will be to
update the By-laws. Discus-
sions included having fewer
meeting in 2012. The May
meeting will invite youth
members for Pizza instead
of annual May PotLuck. A
guest will come to Ottawa
to talk about the college
scholarship program that is
open to members of at least
three year standings. Anyone
having questions before that
meeting can contact Joyce
Ellerbrock. The meeting
ended with prayer and after,
cards were played. The com-
mittee had furnished three
prizes for winners Doris Ten-
walde, Shirley Duling, and
Pat Agner.
Holiday tree festival
under way at main library
COMMUNITY
YMCA hosting
New Years Eve
Youth Overnight
OTTAWA Ring in the
New Year with your friends
at the Putnam County
YMCA. Registrations are
now being taken for the
YMCA New Years Eve Over-
night. Kids will participate
in swimming, group games,
food, movies and of course
ringing in the New Year.
Dinner, midnight snack and
light breakfast will be pro-
vided. Overnight will begin
at 8 p.m., Dec. 31, and end
with kids being picked up at
7 a.m. the following morn-
ing. Fee is $20 for members
and $35 for non-membersa
and is open to any youth
5-12 years old. Early reg-
istration is encouraged as
space is limited. To register
or for more information
contact the Putnam County
YMCA at 419-523-5233.
WATCH FOR IT
Santa takes
requests
throughout
Putnam County
You can submit
your stories
The Putnam Voice is a free
weekly newspaper covering
Putnam County. It is deliv-
ered to homes throughout
the county and also can be
picked up at various distribu-
tion racks.
We are all about community
news.
Many of the stories and
photographs that appear are
provided by service clubs,
businesses, government agen-
cies and people like yourself.
Tell us about your vacation,
achievements, or other inter-
esting things you want to
share with the community.
Stories, photos and videos
should be e-mailed to info@
putnamvoice.com or sent to
118 N. Hickory St., Ottawa,
OH 45875
Well take it from there, shar-
ing your information online, in
print, or both.
COMMUNITY
putnamvoice.com
V4
December 7 - 13, 2011
Across
1. High spots
5. Common request (acro-
nym)
9. Doctor Who villainess, with
the
13. Gout-causing ______ acid
14. Kind of code
15. ______ Brockovich
16. O. Henrys The Gift of
the ______
17. Die Lorelei poet
18. Angry, with off
19. Actuarial chart
22. Goddess of the hunt
23. Narrow parallel grooves
24. Jail, slangily
26. Coriolanus setting
28. Bleed
29. Act your ______!
30. Facial contours
35. ______Japanese War
38. Masefield play The Trag-
edy of ______
39. Be exultant
40. Returns to life
43. ______ jacket
44. ______, humbug!
45. Be a snitch
47. Priestly garb
48. Nasal partition
51. Fowl place
53. Execution of a plan
56. I, Claudius role
57. ______ Wilson of The
Beach Boys
58. June 6, 1944 (2 wds)
60. Coagulate
61. Heavy drinker, slang
62. ______mutton (2 wds)
63. ______ for the poor
64. Caught in the act
65. Biblical birthright seller
Down
1. Childs stomach
2. Face-to-face exam
3. Inflexibility
4. Video store section, short-
ened (2 wds)
5. Scrutinize again
6. Barbers motion
7. Windmill parts
8. Stringed instrument pluckers
9. Orthodontic appliance
10. Gladiator setting
11. Bridget Fonda, to Jane
12. Memorial Day race
14. Carbolic acid
20. Ring bearer, maybe
21. The Donald
24. The Alienist author
25. Chill
27. Legislate
31. Amuse
32. Roundworms
33. Blue hue
34. High-hatter
36. Secondary storylines
37. Be bombastic
41. Cuban dance (pl.)
42. Citizen Kane actor
Everett ______
46. Auction offering
48. Common sense?
49. Erasable programmable
read-only memory (acronym)
50. Actress Oberon
52. Edge
53. Ancient Andean
54. Big name in sneakers
55. Head-hunters of NE India
59. ______ rang?
WEEKLY PUZZLE ANSWERS ON PAGE V7
JOYCE HONIGFORD PutnamVoice
Lee Walston and Elyse Walston, the children of Ryan and Jen Walston, visit with Santa Claus
last weekend during Ottovilles Christmas celebration.
Connor John-
son, Napoleon,
enjoys his visit
with Santa Claus
last Saturday
morning during
a special Movie
Time at Trinity
United Methodist
Church.
NANCY KLINE
PutnamVoice
BECKY LEADER PutnamVoice
Luke Klear, 4, of Miller City, read his Christmas list
to Santa on Saturday during Movie Time at Trin-
ity United Methodist Church. The Putnam County
Task Force for Youth Red Ribbon Committee, the
Ottawa Lions Club, Jerry Lewis Ottawa McDonalds
and Trinity United Methodist Church collaborated
to present Movie Time for county children ages pre-
school through second grade. The children watched
a currently-released video and enjoyed a McDonalds
lunch. Special appearances were made by Santa and
the Lions Club lion. Each child received a goody bag.
COMMUNITY
By GLEN ARNOLD
OSU Extension
Snow fences can be an
effective and economical way
of improving snow manage-
ment. They keep snow and
ice off driveways and roads
while increasing driver vis-
ibility by reducing the force of
the wind on the snow. A 2006
report by Tabler & Associates
revealed that snow fences
helped reduce accidents
caused by poor visibility by
up to 70% along I-80 in south-
eastern Wyoming.
Snow fences may also
reduce time and energy of
traditional snow removal.
However, on private property,
a poorly placed fence can be
ineffective or do more harm
than good. Traditionally,
property owners are install-
ing snow fence in late fall or
early winter. Once the ground
freezes and receives snow, it
may be too late to install.
Snow fence is generally not
a solid fence. Fence open-
ings should be 2 to 2 1/2
inches wide (openings wider
than 6 inches are ineffec-
tive) and may run vertically
or horizontally. Wind speeds
up as it passes through the
restricted openings, thus pre-
venting snow from plugging
the immediate area around
the fence. The wind slows
down after passing through
the fence and drops much of
its load of snow.
Generally, a snow fence
should be installed at a dis-
tance of 20-35 times its height
from the edge of the protec-
tion area (ie. driveway). That
is, if you were installing a
four-foot-high fence, it would
need to be at least 80-140 feet
from the protection area to be
effective. This distance will
set the fence far enough away
to allow snow to accumulate
before the fence and between
the fence and the driveway,
rather than over and on the
driveway itself.
Wind velocity and fence
height determine the size
of the protected area. For
instance, when the wind is
blowing at 10 mph, a 6-foot-
high porous fence will reduce
that velocity to a minimum
10 feet downwind from the
fence. When the wind is 20
mph, the minimum velocity
point will be 65 feet from
the fence; and at 30 mph, the
area protected is about 90
feet downwind.
A gap of approximately 10%
of the fences height should
be left underneath the snow
fence. If you were install-
ing a fence with a height of
four feet, you would want
to install the fence with 45
inches between the bottom
of the fence and the ground.
This gap will prevent snow
from accumulating near and
on the fence. This will reduce
extra weight and damage
from snow accumulation and
increase the effectiveness of
your fence.
A common pitfall in snow
fence installation is plac-
ing a fence too close to or
too far from the protection
area. A fence too close to
the protection area can actu-
ally increase the amount of
snow deposited. A fence too
far from the area will allow
the wind to pick snow back
up and deposit it on the road.
It is best to properly measure
the distance and, if needed, to
install multiple fences.
A snow fence should also
extend approximately 20 feet
or 30 degrees past the length
of the area intended for pro-
tection. This will reduce
the effect of wind wrapping
around the edge of the fence,
increasing the area of cover-
age. Extending the fence also
helps protect against a larger
variation of wind directions.
The orientation of the snow
fence should be parallel to the
driveway and perpendicular
to prevailing winds. However,
the makeup of the terrain
may alter fence placement.
An adjustment in a fences
angle up to 25 degrees will
not significantly detract from
the fences effectiveness.
OBITUARIES
WINTER SAFETY
COMMUNITY
putnamvoice.com
V5
December 7 - 13, 2011
Diller Furniture
www.dillerfnefurniture.com
Hours: Mon. & Wed. 10-8:00 T, Th, Fri. & Sat. 10-5, Sun. 1-4
Diller Furniture
This Christmas
Free Delivery Free Set-Up
Financing Available for 12 months
Conforms to Your Unique Shape
Additional
10%
OFF
Specials
Muenster Cheese
(Reg. $3.99) Sale $3.59
10% Off Jams & Jellies
Unique Holiday Shaped Sprinkles to
Decorate your Christmas Cookies!
Vanilla Peanut Clusters
(Reg. $6.79) Sale $6.09
Peppermint Crystals are here!
Ambrosia Chocolate $22.90/10# slab
(Also available in smaller quantities)
Dark Chocolate and White Coating also available!
Bulk caramel $3.69/lb.
Holiday Pretzels Holiday Drizzled Trees, Yogurt covered
Snowfakes with Peppermint, Chocolate Covered Pretzels.
3 miles E. of Ottawa on U.S. 224
419-456-3595
Hours:
Thurs.-Fri.9-6; Sat. 9-2; Closed Sun.-Wed.
Gift Certifcates Available!
T HE C ARE Y OU
N EED F OR T HE
O NES Y OU L OVE
Quality care and quality of life come together
at Hilty Memorial Home, where weve worked
hard to create an assisted living facility that
feels like home. Our warm and welcoming
atmosphere, along with our dedicated and
professional team of caregivers, offers a true
sense of community and caring. In addition to
excellent nursing care, we offer delightful
homemade meals in our bright and friendly
dining room, as well as daily social activities.
We invite you to visit today, and see for
yourself what life is like here at Hilty
Memorial Home.
A Ministry of the
Missionary Church
Since 1979
419-384-3218
304 Hilty Dr.
Pandora, OH


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LEIPSIC
Sylvia Faye Berger
Sylvia Faye Berger, 95, of Paulding, formerly of Leipsic,
died at 2:12 p.m. Dec. 4, 2011, at Country Inn Enhanced
Living Center, Paulding.
She was born Oct. 21, 1916, in Gilboa to James and Marie
Bracy Compton, who preceded her in death. On Dec. 1,
1934, she married Edwin W. Berger, who died Jan. 18, 1971.
Mrs. Berger was a member of Leipsic United Methodist
Church and had been a member of the West Leipsic United
Methodist Church, where she served on several committees.
She was a homemaker and had worked for several years
as a cook in the Leipsic High School cafeteria. She was a
graduate of Crawfis College High School. She was a won-
derful wife, loving mother, grandmother, great-grandmother,
sister, aunt and friend. She loved her family, enjoyed garden-
ing, canning, mending her grandchildrens clothes, making
homemade noodles, reading her Bible and writing in her
daily journal. She always had a smile on her face and Christ
in her heart.
Survivors include three children, Edwin D. (Fran) Berger
and Shelba J. Tooman Wilson, both of Leipsic, and David
B. (Sue) Berger, of Katy, Texas; a brother, James V. (Sue)
Compton, of Findlay; 15 grandchildren; 23 great-grandchil-
dren; 11 great-great-grandchildren; and several nieces and
nephews.
She was preceded in death by a son, James A. Berger;
three sisters, Eunice Rutter, Sarah Grubb and Vivian Byrne;
a granddaughter, Vickey E. Tooman; and two great-grand-
sons, Christian Tooman and Brian Berger.
Services were held Friday at Love-Heitmeyer Funeral
Home, Leipsic. Pastor Bill Patterson officiated. Burial was
in Sugar Ridge Cemetery, Leipsic.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made
to Country Inn Enhanced Living Center, 12651 County Road
82, Paulding, OH 45879.
Condolences may be expressed at www.lovefuneralhome.
com.
OTTOVILLE
Martha M. Ruen
Martha M. Ruen, 98, died at 8:30 p.m. Dec. 1, 2011, at
VanCrest Healthcare Center, Delphos.
She was born Sept. 25, 1913, in Ottoville to Frank W. and
Mary C. Schlagbaum Ruen, who preceded her in death.
Miss Ruen retired as a bookkeeper from Odenweller
Milling Co. after 31 years. She was a lifelong member of
Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Ottoville, and its
Altar Rosary Society and Altar Rosary friendly visitors. She
was member and former treasurer of Veterans of Foreign
Wars Post 3740 Auxiliary, Ottoville. She was a 1931 gradu-
ate of Ottoville High School. She was dedicated to her God,
church, family and community. She was a gifted seamstress,
needleworker, artist and cook. She was a lady of etiquette
and gracious hospitality and always made everyone feel wel-
come. She was strong and independent and was never one
to ask for help but always there for others. Her card-playing
skills were well-known. She was a member of the 500 club,
a group of ladies who played cards together for more than
60 years. She never had children of her own but she touched
so many people with her maternal and loving ways. She will
be deeply missed.
Survivors include a sister-in-law, Julie Ruen, of Ottawa;
10 nephews and nieces, Tom Hiett, Rose Keller, Judy
Ruen, Ruth Miesle, Carol Ruhe, Becky Salisbury, Jane
Neumeier, Gene Wannemacher, Ann Wannemacher and
Mary Fischer; and several great- and great-great-nieces
and -nephews.
She was preceded in death by two brothers, John and Alex
Ruen; and three sisters, Helen Hiett, Marcella Wannemacher
and Irene Ruen; and a nephew, Jerry Wannemacher.
Mass of Christian Burial was held Monday at Immaculate
Conception Catholic Church, Ottoville. Father John Stites
officiated. Burial was in St. Mary Cemetery, Ottoville.
Friends may call from 2 to 8 p.m. Sunday at Love-
Heitmeyer Funeral Home, Jackson Township.
Memorial contributions may be made to Immaculate
Conception Church repair fund or St. Mary Cemetery.
Condolences may be expressed at www.lovefuneralhome.
com.
OTTAWA
Richard B. Spangler
Richard B. Spangler, 86, died at 9:50 a.m. Nov. 30, 2011, at
Putnam County Ambulatory Care Center, Glandorf.
He was born May 7, 1925, in Blanchard Township, Putnam
County, to Mathias and Eva Gores Spangler, who preceded
him in death. On Sept. 27, 1952, he married Frances Roddy,
who survives in Ottawa.
Mr. Spangler was a construction worker for Stechschulte
Builders, Ottawa, for 35 years. He was an Army veteran of
World War II, serving with the 575th AAN Battalion, 11th
Armor Division from 1943 to 1945. He received a recogni-
tion award from France for participating in the Normandy
Invasion. He was a member of SS. Peter & Paul Catholic
Church, Ottawa. He was a life member of American Legion
Post 63 and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9142, both in
Ottawa. He enjoyed woodworking and was a Mr. Fix-it
handyman. He was a gentle, kind and caring husband, father,
grandfather and friend.
Survivors also include five children, Suzanne (Doug)
Graham and Karen (Cody) Miller, both of Lima, Kimberly
(Carl) Toczynski, of Toledo, Richard Spangler, of Ottawa,
and Betsy (Tim) Hansen, of Glandorf; nine grandchildren;
16 great-grandchildren; and three sisters-in-law, Gladys
Spangler, of Ottawa, Esther Furry, of Elida, and Patricia
Krouse, of Napoleon.
He was also preceded in death by a grandson, Ross
Hansen; a great-granddaughter, Gracie Meek; four broth-
ers, Gerald, Kenneth, Leo and Paul; and two sisters, Mary
Margaret Barlage and Anna Rose Kahle.
Mass of Christian Burial was held Saturday at SS. Peter &
Paul Catholic Church, Ottawa. Father Matt Jozefiak offici-
ated. Burial was in St. John the Baptist Catholic Cemetery,
Glandorf, with military rites by the American Legion Post 63
and VFW Post 9142.
Arrangements were handled by Love Funeral Home,
Ottawa
Memorial contributions may be made to SS. Peter & Paul
School Endowment Fund.
Condolences may be expressed at www.lovefuneralhome.
com.
FORT JENNINGS
Cheryl Dean Radabaugh
Cheryl Dean Radabaugh, 57, formerly of Leipsic, died at
5:18 p.m. Nov. 30, 2011, at St. Ritas Medical Center.
She was born Aug. 10, 1954, in Troy to William and Shirley
Becker Lucas Sr., who survive in Fort Jennings. On Dec. 10,
1973, she married Walter Radabaugh Jr., who survives in
Fort Jennings.
Mrs. Radabaugh was a homemaker and had been a nurses
aid.
Survivors also include three children, Walter Radabaugh III
and Mathew Radabaugh, both of Fort Jennings, and Jennifer
(Adam) Mathews, of Lima; two grandchildren; three broth-
ers, William Lucas Jr., of Fort Jennings, Christopher (Teresa)
Lucas, of Van Wert, and Rodney (Barb) Lucas, of Sidney; and
two sisters, Candy (Gale) Green, of Ewington, and Terry
(Bruce) Radabaugh, of Van Wert.
She was preceded in death by a sister, Christine Lucas.
Services were held Monday at Love-Heitmeyer Funeral
Home, Leipsic. The Rev. Tom Graves officiated. Burial was
in Sugar Ridge Cemetery, Leipsic.
Memorial contributions may be made to the family.
Condolences may be expressed at www.lovefuneralhome.
com.
CONTINENTAL
Rita F. Varner
Rita F. Varner, 92, died at 11:53 p.m. Dec. 3, 2011, at
Putnam Acres Care Center, surrounded by her loving family.
She was born Nov. 8, 1919, in Putnam County, to Bernard
and Anna Siefker Meyer, who preceded her in death. On July
15, 1936, she married Edward Slattman, who died Sept. 30,
1950. On April 22, 1952, she married Byron Varner, who died
Dec. 5, 1976.
Mrs. Varner retired after 13 years at Campbell Soup
Co., Napoleon. She was a member of St. Barbara Catholic
Church, Cloverdale, and its Altar Rosary Society.
Survivors include three sons, Alphonse (Norma) Slattman,
of Continental, Raymond (Nancy Bannister) Slattman, of
Defiance, and Clyde (Michelle) Varner, of Napoleon; three
daughters, Anna Marie (Chick) Tumblin, of Continental,
Mary Cathern (Larry) Holman, of Ottawa, and Janet Smith,
of Wapakoneta; and 36 grandchildren, 86 great-grandchil-
dren, 31 great-great grandchildren, eight stepchildren, and
many stepgrandchildren, stepgreat-grandchildren and step-
great-great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by a son, Ronald Slattman;
two grandsons, Charles Holman and Dean Varner;
two granddaughters, Jacki Krontz and Rita Johnson;
a great-granddaughter, Monica Boecker; a great-great-
granddaughter, Tori Boecker; and a great-great-grandson,
Nathan Ladd.
A Mass of Christian Burial was held Friday at St. Barbara
Catholic Church, Cloverdale. The Rev. John Stites officiated.
Burial followed in St. Isidore Cemetery, Cuba.
Arrangements were handled by Heitmeyer Funeral Home,
Continental.
Memorial contributions may be made to Putnam County
Hospice, St. Barbara Catholic Church or Putnam Acres Care
Center.
Condolences may be expressed at www.heitmeyer
funeralhome.com.
Snow fencing:
Tis the season
Your Voice, in print
every Wednesday,
and online every day
COMMUNITY
PutnamVoice.com contributor
OTTAWA Kalidas girls
basketball team is learning
how to put teams away.
Ottawa-Glandorf is adapt-
ing to the varsity way of
life.
The teams teams squared
off Saturday and showed
theyre improving in both
regards.
Kalida began strong and
held off a pesky O-G squad
with four freshman in
the lineup 47-39.
Kalida improves to 2-1
while O-G falls to 0-2.
Kalida started strong
taking a 7-2 lead with a
steal and layup by Sum-
mer Holtkamp. The Titans
went on a 6-1 rally with a
bucket by Kristen Miller
and a three-pointer from
Niki Ellerbrock. Kalida
took a 13-8 first quarter
lead with a layin by Haley
McIntyre.
Kalida started out strong
the second quarter with a
Brandi Merschman offen-
sive rebound and put-back
to give her team an 18-10
lead at the 2:58 mark. Miller
then nailed a trey to bring
her team to within seven at
the break, 20-13.
To begin the third, Julia
Vandemark hit a 3-pointer
at the 3:02 mark to give
Kalida its largest lead of the
game, 32-22. But back-to-
back field goals by Danielle
Schroeder to end the third
quarter put O-G to within
five.
The Wildcats then out-
scored the Titans 13-10 in
the fourth quarter to claim
the nonleague victory.
Vandemark led the Kal-
ida offense with 13 points.
McIntyre had six points
and eight rebounds. Brandi
Merschman had nine points
and 10 rebounds. Amy
Smith added six points and
five steals along with six
rebounds. Nicole Kaufman
also added six points and
three steals.
Miller had a team-high 10
points for the Titans. Niki
Ellerbrock had eight points
and Elissa Ellerbrock
had six points and eight
rebounds. Danielle Schro-
eder finished with eight
points.
PutnamVoice.com contributor
BLUFFTON Pandora-
Gilboa had a huge void to
fill when 6-foot-7 Tyler Gratz
went down with a knee
injury three weeks ago.
In Tuesdays 59-41 non-
league win at Bluffton,
the Rockets got plenty of
help covering up the hole
as three players scored in
double figures.
Josh Lee led P-G (11-3)
with 14 points, six rebounds
and two blocks. Zach Niese,
who has stepped into the
starting role since the injury
to Gratz, scored 13 points,
including three 3-pointers.
And Justin Schutz added 10
points to help the Rockets.
Levi Gleason, a 6-5 post
player, led Bluffton (3-11)
with 21 points and had a
game-high 13 boards; he
also made four steals at the
defensive end. Matt Gillett
scored nine points, includ-
ing two 3-pointers to help
lead the Pirates.
P-G got the early lead and
never looked back, push-
ing its advantage out to as
many as 24 points in the
third quarter.
The Rockets defensive
pressure caused 13 first-half
Bluffton turnovers which
led to a 31-12 halftime lead
for P-G. For the game, Bluff-
ton turned over the ball 20
times.
P-G coach Joe Braidic
said while Gratz has been
out of the lineup, his team
has responded well. Since
Gratzs injury against New
Knoxville on Jan. 2, the
Rockets have won four of
its last five games.
Bluffton coach Todd
Boblitt said his team is still
struggling to find consis-
tency at the offensive end.
Braidic said that even
though his team led from
start to finish, they still need
to stay a little more focused
in the second half.
Saturdays boys basketball
LAFAYETTE Tanner Richardsons double-
double led Allen Easts boys basketball team
grabbing its first victory of the season, beating
visiting Pandora-Gilboa 61-52 on Saturday in
nonleague action.
Richardson finished with 13 rebounds and
10 points for Allen East, Logan Rex scored 15
points, Dylan Mulholland had 14 points and
James Richardson scored 13 points. Mason
Schutz scored 12 for Pandora-Gilboa, Abe Bas-
inger scored 11 points and Josh Breece had 10.
Ottawa-Glandorf 56, Bryan 45
OTTAWA John Lammers scored 13 points
for Ottawa-Glandorf in the teams season-
opening victory. Logan Koch scored 12 points
for the Titans, Michael Rosebrock had 4 points
and 9 boards and Jake Leopold had 8 points
and 6 rebounds.
Temple Christian 56, Continental 44
LIMA Josh Rone scored 18 points and
Temple Christian moved to 2-0 with the non-
league win over visiting Continental. Kent
Brenneman had 12 points for Temple, Evan
Sutton scored 11 points and Justin Kroehler
had 10 points. Chaz Slattman scored 11 points
for Continental.
Fort Jennings 72, Ayersville 48
FORT JENNINGS Jeremy Kohli went off
for 28 points and 15 rebounds for Fort Jen-
nings in the victory. Chad Recker scored 15
for Fort Jennings and Cody Warnecke added
14 points.
Ottoville 67, Lincolnview 30
VAN WERT Abby Siefker scored 20
points for Ottoville, which improved to 3-0
with the win. Rachel Beining scored 10 points
for Ottoville, which jumped out to a 17-9
first-quarter lead. Megan Bendele and Lauren
Koch each had 8 points for the Big Green.
Claire Dye had 9 points and 3 assists for Lin-
colnview (2-1), Kaitlyn Brant had 8 points and
Carley Springer had 8 boards and 2 points.
Fort Jennings 48, Bluffton 29
FORT JENNINGS Kelsey VonLehmden
scored 12 points for Fort Jennings and pulled
down 6 rebounds in the win. Cassie Linde-
man had 10 points for Fort Jennings. Sierra
Amstutz scored 10 points for Bluffton.
Miller City 61, Holgate 52
HOLGATE Jessica Nienberg scored 21
points and grabbed 6 rebounds to lift Miller
City to the win and a 4-0 record. Melissa
Michel had 13 rebounds and 8 points for Miller
City, Jessica Leis had 14 points and Marissa
Schroeder added 11 points.
Fridays boys basketball
Ottoville 41, Cory-Rawson 38
OTTOVILLE Ottoville overcame a 13-4
deficit after the first quarter to slip by visit-
ing Cory-Rawson for a victory. Derek Schim-
moeller scored 13 for the Big Green while
Ryan Honigford scored 8 points and pulled
down 8 rebounds. Jeremiah Alspach scored 11
points for Cory-Rawson and Tyler Harris had
10 points.
Paulding 46 Continental 28
PAULDING Kyle Kauser scored 13 for
Paulding in the victory while Anthony Arrelano
scored 11 points. Brett Slattman scored 9
points for Continental.
JOYCE HONIGFORD PutnamVoice
Ottovilles Ryan Honigford spins past
the defense towards the bucket. Otto-
ville beat Cory Rawson in their first
game of the season.
COMMUNITY
putnamvoice.com
V6
December 7 - 13, 2011
Call Putnam County Health Department to enroll
419-523-5608
Putnam County Breast Health Project
Supported by a grant from:
QuaIifications:
% Age: 40-64 years old (or high risk 30-39 years old)
% HeaIth Insurance: $200 or higher deductible or no
insurance
% Income EIigibIe:
HousehoId Size MonthIy Income
1 $2708
2 $3643
3 $4578
4 $5513
5 $6448
6 $7383
j



See Bob Schmersal for
Ahl your auto needs.
419-296-1385
bobschmersal@tomahl.com
Bob
Schmersal
Your Putnam County Connection at
Tom Ahl
617 King Ave. Lima
SOLAR SALT 50 lb. bag .........................................................................................
$
6.10
DURACUBE SALT 50 lb. bag ........................................................................
$
7.05
RED OUT SALT 50 lb. bag .................................................................................
$
8.00
BOTTLED WATER 5 gal. ................................................................................
$
4.25
HYDROGEN PEROXIDE 1 case/4gallon .........................................
$
18.75
FklDAY, JAN. 8 * 8-5:30
5AIUkDAY, JAN. 9 * 9-J
SALT SALE
BOTTLED WATER SALE
750 Bellefontaine Ave. Lima, OH
1-800-947-4147 419-228-6161
24 Hour Culligan Vended Water Now Available 25 Per Gallon.
50lb. bag
50lb. bag
50lb. bag
5 gal.
1case/4gallon
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9 8-5:30
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10 9-1
SERVICE SALES SATISFACTION
Pellet - Corn - Wood - Coal - Gas
Stoves - Inserts - Fireplaces - Boilers
Locally Owned On-Staff-Installers
Service & Delivery up to 100 miles
Warm Wishes
at the Holidays
RURAL ENERGY PRODUCTS, LLC.
Your Alternative Heating Specialists
www.ruralenergyproducts.com
9296 Van WertWillshire Rd., Van Wert800-546-3319419-238-4580
snow blower
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Replaceableskidshoes
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Dealer Imprint Area
woodsequipment.com
WOODSSNOW BLOWERS
H.G. Violet Equipment
2103 North Main St.
Delphos, OH 45833
Phone 419-695-2000
www.hgviolet.com
WEEKLY RARE
COIN AUCTION
Howards Coin Shop
128 E. Main Street, Leipsic
Gold, Silver, Rare
Coins & More
Tyler Abel, Auctioneer
OHIO LICENSE #2011000138
Tuesday 12:00pm
Aluminum cans:
65

/lb
Nov. 1 30
3Steel
3Iron
3Copper
3Brass
3Aluminum
3Stainless
3Lead
3Zinc
For over 80 years, Kohart has been buying
all grades of ferrous & non-ferrous metals.
Also offering container service for metals and trash
(roll-off boxes, van, dump &low-boy trailers).
Your full service scrap recycling facility
3 convenient locations to serve you!
PAULDING, OHIO
State Route 613 E. - 419-399-4144
FOSTORIA, OHIO
634 Spruce St. - 419-435-7792
DELPHOS, OHIO
905 S. Main St. - 419-692-4792
Aluminum cans:
65

/lb
Nov. 1 30
3Steel
3Iron
3Copper
3Brass
3Aluminum
3Stainless
3Lead
3Zinc
For over 80 years, Kohart has been buying
all grades of ferrous & non-ferrous metals.
Also offering container service for metals and trash
(roll-off boxes, van, dump & low-boy trailers).
Your full service scrap recycling facility
3 convenient locations to serve you!
PAULDING, OHIO
State Route 613 E. - 419-399-4144
FOSTORIA, OHIO
634 Spruce St. - 419-435-7792
DELPHOS, OHIO
905 S. Main St. - 419-692-4792
Aluminum cans:
65

/lb
Nov. 1 30
3Steel
3Iron
3Copper
3Brass
3Aluminum
3Stainless
3Lead
3Zinc
For over 80 years, Kohart has been buying
all grades of ferrous & non-ferrous metals.
Also offering container service for metals and trash
(roll-off boxes, van, dump &low-boy trailers).
Your full service scrap recycling facility
3 convenient locations to serve you!
PAULDING, OHIO
State Route 613 E. - 419-399-4144
FOSTORIA, OHIO
634 Spruce St. - 419-435-7792
DELPHOS, OHIO
905 S. Main St. - 419-692-4792
Aluminum cans:
65

/lb
Nov. 1 30
3Steel
3Iron
3Copper
3Brass
3Aluminum
3Stainless
3Lead
3Zinc
For over 80 years, Kohart has been buying
all grades of ferrous & non-ferrous metals.
Also offering container service for metals and trash
(roll-off boxes, van, dump &low-boy trailers).
Your full service scrap recycling facility
3 convenient locations to serve you!
PAULDING, OHIO
State Route 613 E. - 419-399-4144
FOSTORIA, OHIO
634 Spruce St. - 419-435-7792
DELPHOS, OHIO
905 S. Main St. - 419-692-4792
Aluminum cans:
65

/lb
Nov. 1 30
3Steel
3Iron
3Copper
3Brass
3Aluminum
3Stainless
3Lead
3Zinc
For over 80 years, Kohart has been buying
all grades of ferrous & non-ferrous metals.
Also offering container service for metals and trash
(roll-off boxes, van, dump &low-boy trailers).
Your full service scrap recycling facility
3 convenient locations to serve you!
PAULDING, OHIO
State Route 613 E. - 419-399-4144
FOSTORIA, OHIO
634 Spruce St. - 419-435-7792
DELPHOS, OHIO
905 S. Main St. - 419-692-4792
Aluminum cans:
65

/lb
Nov. 1 30
3Steel
3Iron
3Copper
3Brass
3Aluminum
3Stainless
3Lead
3Zinc
For over 80 years, Kohart has been buying
all grades of ferrous & non-ferrous metals.
Also offering container service for metals and trash
(roll-off boxes, van, dump &low-boy trailers).
Your full service scrap recycling facility
3 convenient locations to serve you!
PAULDING, OHIO
State Route 613 E. - 419-399-4144
FOSTORIA, OHIO
634 Spruce St. - 419-435-7792
DELPHOS, OHIO
905 S. Main St. - 419-692-4792
Aluminum cans:
65

/lb
Nov. 1 30
3Steel
3Iron
3Copper
3Brass
3Aluminum
3Stainless
3Lead
3Zinc
For over 80 years, Kohart has been buying
all grades of ferrous & non-ferrous metals.
Also offering container service for metals and trash
(roll-off boxes, van, dump &low-boy trailers).
Your full service scrap recycling facility
3 convenient locations to serve you!
PAULDING, OHIO
State Route 613 E. - 419-399-4144
FOSTORIA, OHIO
634 Spruce St. - 419-435-7792
DELPHOS, OHIO
905 S. Main St. - 419-692-4792
Aluminum cans:
65

/lb
Nov. 1 30
3Steel
3Iron
3Copper
3Brass
3Aluminum
3Stainless
3Lead
3Zinc
For over 80 years, Kohart has been buying
all grades of ferrous & non-ferrous metals.
Also offering container service for metals and trash
(roll-off boxes, van, dump &low-boy trailers).
Your full service scrap recycling facility
3 convenient locations to serve you!
PAULDING, OHIO
State Route 613 E. - 419-399-4144
FOSTORIA, OHIO
634 Spruce St. - 419-435-7792
DELPHOS, OHIO
905 S. Main St. - 419-692-4792
Aluminum cans:
65

/lb
Nov. 1 30
3Steel
3Iron
3Copper
3Brass
3Aluminum
3Stainless
3Lead
3Zinc
For over 80 years, Kohart has been buying
all grades of ferrous & non-ferrous metals.
Also offering container service for metals and trash
(roll-off boxes, van, dump &low-boy trailers).
Your full service scrap recycling facility
3 convenient locations to serve you!
PAULDING, OHIO
State Route 613 E. - 419-399-4144
FOSTORIA, OHIO
634 Spruce St. - 419-435-7792
DELPHOS, OHIO
905 S. Main St. - 419-692-4792
Aluminum cans:
65

/lb
Nov. 1 30
3Steel
3Iron
3Copper
3Brass
3Aluminum
3Stainless
3Lead
3Zinc
For over 80 years, Kohart has been buying
all grades of ferrous & non-ferrous metals.
Also offering container service for metals and trash
(roll-off boxes, van, dump &low-boy trailers).
Your full service scrap recycling facility
3 convenient locations to serve you!
PAULDING, OHIO
State Route 613 E. - 419-399-4144
FOSTORIA, OHIO
634 Spruce St. - 419-435-7792
DELPHOS, OHIO
905 S. Main St. - 419-692-4792
Steel
Iron
Copper
Brass
Aluminum
Stainless
Lead
Zinc

0DSOH&UHVW
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und Lo scIeduIe u personuI Lour.
BIuIILon, OH www.mmIIIvIng.org
Kalida knocks off young Ottawa-Glandorf
P-G boys basketball
handles Bluffton
Pandora-
Gilboas
Owen Lugin-
buihl, Josh
Breece, and
Levi Hovest
defend
against
Allen East
last week-
end.

WENDIE
SWARY
PutnamVoice
PREP ROUNDUP
GIRLS BASKETBALL
BOYS BASKETBALL
SPORTS
Gavin Windau and Tregg
Keysor both go 4-0 on Sat-
urday to lead the Bulldog
Wrestling Team to a second
place finish.
Windau who pinned all of
his opponents was voted as
most valuable wrestler.
Team Standings:
1. Cory-Rawson 4-0.
2. Columbus Grove 3-1.
3. Ottawa-Glandorf 2-2.
4. Lima Senior 1-3.
5. Ada 0-4.
Dual Meet Scores
Round 1:
Columbus Grove 42, Ottawa-
Glandorf 21
Lima Senior 42, Ada 30
Round 2:
Cory-Rawson 50, Ottawa-
Glandorf 16
Columbus Grove 51, Lima
Senior 15
Round 3:
Cory-Rawson 51, Columbus
Grove 21
Ottawa-Glandorf 37, Ada 9
Round 4:
Cory-Rawson 60, Ada 18
Ottawa-Glandorf 33, Lima
Senior 30
Round 5:
Cory-Rawson 63, Lima
Senior 12
Columbus Grove 53, Ada 15
CG vs. OG
106 Double Void
113 Tregg Keysor (CG)
pinned Austin Escobedo (OG)
:33 120 Brett Sampson (CG)
won by void
126 Chr i st i an
Stechschulte(CG) won by void
132 Double Void
138 Mathias Klausing (OG)
dec. over Dylan Kleman (CG)
2-1
145 Jacob Siebeneck (OG)
pinned Tyler Schroeder (CG)
3:16
152 Hunter Giesige(CG)
pinned Ralph Recker (OG)
1:26 160 Alec Gladwell (CG)
dec over Wayne Erford (OG)
5-2 170 Brandon Benroth
(CG) dec over Derek Ebbes-
kotte (OG) 8-3
182 Jacob Wells (OG)
pinned Marty Stever (CG) 3:56
195 Gavin Windau (CG)
pinned max Inniger (OG) 1:43
220 Wyatt Karhoff (OG) won
by void
285 Alex Shaffer (CG) won
by void
CG vs. Lima Senior
106 Double Void
113 Tregg Keysor (CG)
pinned Chris Holbrook (LS)
2:27 120 Brett Sampson (CG)
won by void
126 Andrew William-
son dec over Christian
Stechschulte(CG) 17-11
132 Hunter Vermillion (LS)
won by void
138 Tyler Schroeder (CG)
won by void
145 Dylan Kleman (CG) dec
over Quay Brown 6-2
152 Hunter Giesige(CG)
pinned Chris Proby (LS) 2:34
160 Alec Gladwell (CG) pinned
LaQuan Odom (LS) 1:57 170
Brandon Benroth (CG) pinned
Danny Garundisch (LS) 2:24
182 Marty Stever (CG)
pinned Alex Wick (LS) :45
195 Gavin Windau (CG)
pinned Alex Moore (LS) 2:28
220 Jermaine Springer (LS)
won by void
285 Alex Shaffer (CG) won
by void
CG vs. Cory Rawson
106 Devin Meyer (CR) won
by void
113 Tregg Keysor (CG) won
by void
120 Zach Smith(CR) pinned
Brett Sampson (CG) 3:29
126 Austin Swisher (CR)
Christian Stechschulte(CG)
:43
132 Double Void
138 Austin Brown (CR) dec
over Tyler Schroeder (CG) 8-7
145 Dylan Kleman (CG) dec
over Dylan Hartman (CR) 8-7
152 Justin Simpson (CR)
pinned Hunter Giesige(CG)
4:15 160 Corson Hummel
(CR) pinned Alec Gladwell (CG)
5:45 170 Austin Heath(CR)
pinned Brandon Benroth (CG)
4:29
182 Marty Stever (CG)
pinned Trevor Miller (CR) 1:17
195 Gavin Windau (CG)
pinned Chase Oler (CR) 1:35
220 Nathan Davis (CR) won
by void
285 Mitch Karhoff (CR)
pinned Alex Shaffer (CG) 3:29
CG vs. Ada:
106 Double Void
113 Tregg Keysor (CG) won
by void
120 Brett Sampson (CG)
won by void
126 Christian Stechschulte
(CG) won by void
132 Double Void
138 Tyler Schroeder (CG)
won by void
145 Dylan Kleman (CG)
pinned Matt Higgins(A) :47
152 Hunter Giesige (CG)
won by void
160 Austin Windle (A) dec.
Alec Gladwell (CG) 4-2 170
Brandon Benroth (CG) tech fall
over Noah Beach (A) 17-1
182 Justin Woodland pinned
Marty Stever (CG) 4:50
195 Gavin Windau (CG)
pinned Brady Pitney (A) :30
220 Jared Woodland (A) won
by void
285 Alex Shaffer (CG) pinned
Joey Vermillion (A) 2:38
Those wrestling in JV
matches for Grove were:
Robert Lindeman - He
recorded a record of 3-0 with 3
pins Will Selhorst- He recorded
a record of 2-0 with 2 pins
Johan Shank, - He recorded a
record of 2-0 with 2 pins Con-
ner Schroeder- He recorded
a record of 1- 1 with 1 pin
Andrew Burgei- He recorded
a record of 1-1 with 1 pin
Thomas Prichard- He recorded
a record of 1-1 with 1 pin
Kenny Smith- He recorded a
record of 1-1 with 1 pin Blake
Dunifon- He recorded a record
of 1-1 with 1 pin Jay Elsberry-
He recorded a record of 0-2
WRESTLING
Groves Windau pins all opponents
SUBMITTED PHOTO Putnam Voice
COMMUNITY
putnamvoice.com
V7
December 7 - 13, 2011
NEW PUTNAM COUNTY HEALTH & DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
OPEN HOUSE CELEBRATION
SUNDAY DECEMBER 11, 13PM
102 PUTNAM PARKWAY, OTTAWA, OHIO
Introduce your family and friends to quality, hometown healthcare
designed around you. Meet our physicians and health care professionals, tour
our beautiful new facility, enjoy refreshments and discover what makes
Putnam County Health & Diagnostics Center so different.
Youll see our Family Practice, Radiology, Laboratory Services and
Occupational Health Services capabilities up close and personal. And have
plenty of time to nd out more about our extended hours and unique
Walk-In Care Center. Mark your calendar for an afternoon of healthy fun.
Call 419-523-9632 for more information.
PUTNAM COUNTY HEALTH &
DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
102 PUTNAM PARKWAY, OTTAWA, OHIO
|
419-523-9632
AN OPEN
INVITATION TO
BETTER HEALTH.
www.doclmpc.org
L3DG
REGISTER
TO WIN AN
iPad 2
at the open house
LIMM166 Putnam County FACILITIES OPEN HOUSE Ad half pg 10.39x10.75_05.indd 2 11/29/11 11:36 AM
Sarah Wischmeyer, PA-C
Certified Physician Assistant
L I MA MEMORI AL PROF ESSI ONAL CORPORAT I ON I S PL EASED TO WEL COME
Putnam County
Family Care - Ottawa
102 Putnam Parkway
Ottawa, OH 45875
Phone: 419.523.9632
www.doclmpc.org
Board Certied as a Physician Assistant by
the Ohio State Medical Board.
Clinical Interests:
t $PNQSFIFOTJWFDBSFGPSQBUJFOUT
PGBMMBHFT
t %JTFBTFNBOBHFNFOUJODMVEJOHEJBCFUFT
t 1SFWFOUBUJWFNFEJDJOF
t 8FMMDIJMEDIFDLTBOEJNNVOJ[BUJPOT
t 0DDVQBUJPOBMIFBMUITFSWJDFT
Sarah Wischmeyer, PA-C, welcomes new patients.
Please contact her ofce at 419.523.9632 or
877.DOC.LMPC to schedule an appointment.
WEEKLY PUZZLE ON PAGE V4
PUZZLE ANSWERS
Columbus Grove wrestler Gavin Windau wrestling Max Inni-
ger of Ottawa Glandorf last Saturday. (Submitted photo)
SPORTS
NANCY KLINE PutnamVoice
Ottawa Lions Club members were busy filling bags with
treats for young guests who attended the Movie Time
Saturday morning at Trinity United Methodist Church.
The event was co-hosted by the Lions, Task Force for
Youth Red RIbbon Committee, Jerry Lewis Ottawa
McDonalds, and Trinity United Methodist Church.
COMMUNITY
putnamvoice.com
V8
December 7 - 13, 2011
Get Tickets Now!
A 2nd Show Added - Wed. Dec. 7!
10700 SR 118 S., Van Wert, OH l 419.238.NPAC (6722) l www.npacvw.org l
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ic
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e
ts
$
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0
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6
5
G
roup D
iscounts
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vailable
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Kenny G
Christmas
December 6 ~ 7:30 PM
December 7 ~ 7:30 PM
Tickets still available for this show!
S
O
L
D
O
U
T
Sponsored in part by
The Lima News
WDOH
101 East Main Street
Pandora, OH 45877
(former location of Sommers Flooring)
419-384-3102
Full Line of Floor Coverings!
Hours M-F 10a to 5p; Sat 9a to 1p also open by appointment Sales and Installation
Seasons Greetings
Pandora Flooring & Supply
from your friends at
Lions
host
Movie
Time
The Ottawa-Glandorf Jaycees and the O-G
Area Browns Backers collaborated to donate
items to Putnam County Job and Family Ser-
vices Christmas Program. The Jaycees held
a reverse raffle in the spring and a Feather
Party in the fall, in which 96 turkeys, four
hams and three turduckhens were raffled off.
The Browns Backers donated cash. The two
groups then purchased toys and other items
for needy children in the county. Pictured are:
Traci Kohls and Ofelia Butler, Putnam County
Job and Family Services Christmas Program
coordinators; Matt Burwell, representing the
Ottawa-Glandorf Jaycees; and Tim Maag, rep-
resenting the O-G Area Browns Backers.
BECKY LEADER PutnamVoice
NANCY KLINE PutnamVoice
Ottawa Chevrolet owners Jamie Warner and Mike Pauley
(right), donated $1,200 to the Putnam County Cancer
Assistance Program last Friday. Accepting the check
were CAP board members Marilyn Burkhart and Ruth
Gerding. The money was raised at the Ottawa dealership
from money set aside during National Breast Cancer
Awareness Month from car washes, vehicles sold and
other business transactions.
Ella Macke has
a soft place to
rest in the arms
of the Lions Club
Lion following
Movie Time last
Saturday at Trin-
ity United Meth-
odist Church.
NANCY KLINE
PutnamVoice
On Nov. 11, the Kalida students organized
a dance with all proceeds from ticket
sales for the dance going to the Kalida
Park Fund. Proceeds from the dance,
combined with proceeds from the cos-
tume day allowed the students to make a
$200 donation to the park fund. Pictured
are: Kalida Cats Who Care President
Casey Unverferth presenting a check to
Kalida Park Board members Ron Kahle,
Senior and Kent Kahle.
Submitted photo
Kalida park donation
Car dealer gives to cancer fight
O-G Jaycees, Browns
Backers give to needy
Lions treat at Movie Time
FARM LAND FOR SALE
LOTS ACREAGE FOR SALE
300
RENTALS RENTALS
CONDO/TOWNHOUSES
FOR RENT
UNFURNISHED
HOMES FOR RENT
UNFURNISHED
APARTMENTS FOR RENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
WANTED: Farm Ground to
rent. Putnam & Allen counties.
Cash rent or shares. Young
farmer looking to expand.
Please call 419-615-9818
5.7 acres SOLD! 24.8 acres
dense woods (1+ acre cleared
frontage) can be split in 2 par-
cels. Kalida 419-393-4243.
2 BEDROOM 2 bath ranch du-
plex in Pandora. All appliances
including washer & dryer, cen-
tral air & heat. 2 car garage. No
pets. $550 per month + $550
deposit. Call 419-306-8886
**** Spacious country home,
remodeled, 4 bedroom, 1 acre,
garage. 8614 Road P, Colum-
bus Grove. $645/month. In-
cludes well water. Call 734-
751-9305
1 BEDROOM EFFICIENCY,
available January 1, furnished,
no pets, Gatehouse Condos,
$390/month. 440-823-1410
2 BEDROOM 1 bath apartment
at Kalida Golf Course. Washer
/Dryer hook-up, garage, no
pets. Call 419-303-8186
COMPUTERS
SALES &
TECHNICAL
SUPPORT
Immediate opening for two
full time positions, one for a
sales position and the other
a technical support position.
Wastewater knowledge a
plus. Must have good com-
puter skills, strong communi-
cation and interpersonal
skills. Must be able to travel.
Competitive starting salary
based on experience. Send
resume to:
AllMax Software, Inc
PO Box 40
Kenton, OH 43326
GENERAL
Cleaners Needed
In the Lima Area. Must trav-
el to Elida three times a
week, Gomer, Beaverdam,
Bluffton monthly. $8.00 an
hour. 12-15 hours per pay
period. Mileage paid $.51
per mile. Must have experi-
ence, clean background and
reliable transportation. Call
1-800-349-0468
DRIVERS

Drivers Needed

Bee Line Trucking is in
need of (2) full-time drivers
out of Ottoville for new dedi-
cated automotive routes.
Both evening routes. Run-
ning same tractor and route
daily. Good Pay, Good
Equipment, Paid Vacations,
Paid Holidays, Group Medi-
cal, 401K, Class-A CDL.
Two years driving experi-
ence a must. Call Ed
Kraetschmer 419-453-2273
TRADES
EXPERIENCED
MECHANIC
NEEDED
Excellent pay and benefits,
retirement. Established com-
pany, must be adaptable to
truck agriculture. Send
resumes to:
Box # 5044
C/O The Lima News,
3515 Elida Rd,
Lima, Ohio 45807
DRIVERS
DRIVERS NEEDED
Start at 36 cpm with
one yr exp
Effective Earnings up
to 42 cpm
Medical/vision and dental
benefits; 401K, paid
vacation
Home most weekends
Call our recruiters or go
on-line at:
hinertransport.com
877-860-2023
DRIVERS
FULL TIME
DRIVERS
With 5+years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42 per mile and higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
PLEASE CALL 419-222-
1630
Schedule Your Personal Tour TODAY!
Meadow Glen Condominiums Oakview Drive, Ottawa, OH
Relax and Live..Luxurious, Maintenance-Free Living
Located in a quiet neighborhood with easy access to shopping,
restaurants, health care, and workout facilities. We offer many
designs and foor plans, the choice is yours!
419-523-4862
www.meadowglencondos.com
Single Unit Condominium
T
h
is
C
o
uld be Your V
ie
w
!
CLASSIFIED V8
putnamvoice.com
December 7 - 13, 2011
COMMUNITY
AUCTIONS AUCTIONS AUCTIONS
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
700
MERCHANDISE MERCHANDISE
FARM EQUIPMENT
DEALERS/SUPPLIERS
FURNISHINGS
PETS
PRODUCE
800
TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION
AUTOMOBILES
SNOWMOBILES
VANS
DRIVERS
MIDWEST
LOGISTICS
IMMEDIATE
POSITIONS FOR:

FULL-TIME DRIVERS
DEDICATED ROUTES /
HOME DAILY
FULL BENEFITS
INCLUDING: 401K,
MEDICAL, DENTAL &
VISION
CDL CLASS A REQUIRED
2 YEARS EXPERIENCE
GOOD MVR
CALL 419-222-9193 EX 1
DRIVERS
WANTED Tandem dump
truck and end dump owner
operators for hauling sand
and salt. 419-236-6334
DRIVERS
Want to be known by
your name and not just
a truck number?
Looking for a place you
can call home for years
to come?
If so, then you need to
give Pohl Transportation,
Inc. a call!
Up to 39 cents/mile with
Performance Bonus
$1500 Sign On Bonus
Great Home Time
1 year OTR CDL A
Call Wally 1-800-672-8498
or visit: www.pohltransport
ation.com
GENERAL
ENVIRONMENTAL
SERVICES
SUPERVISOR
Baton Rouge Health Serv-
ices Community has a full-
time opening for an Environ-
mental Services Supervisor
responsible for cleaning; in-
ventory control; staff supervi-
sion, quality assurance
rounds, etc. Successful can-
didate will have a minimum
of 2 years cleaning experi-
ence in a medical facility. In-
terested persons should ap-
ply at:
Baton Rouge Health Serv-
ices Community
ATTN: Human Resources
2440 Baton Rouge Avenue
Lima, Ohio 45805
Fax: 419-331-2205
www.batonrougelima.com
GENERAL
FENIX, LLC
Production Team Members
For Our Manufacturing
Facility in Wapakoneta, OH
Seeking highly motivated,
career minded individuals
capable of excelling in a
team environment. The
openings are currently for
night shift only. The plant op-
erates on a 12-hour shift ba-
sis. The ideal candidate
should have 3-5 years of ex-
perience in a manufacturing
facility. Experience in operat-
ing computer-controlled
equipment and high school
diploma would be a plus.
We offer a competitive wage
and benefit package.
Please send resume to:
HUMAN RESOURCES
319 S. Vine St.
Fostoria, Ohio 44830
GENERAL
HOME INSTALLER
NEEDED
Full time position; no experi-
ence required, but prefer-
red. Construction Electrical,
HVAC, or Plumbing back
ground a plus; High School
Diploma or equivalent re-
quired. Applications must be
submitted by: December 9,
2011.
Barry Electronics, Inc
419-222-1547
1703 Allentown Rd
Lima, Oh 45805
GENERAL
Manager and Service help
for Mobile Home Park. Lima
740-852-7878
GENERAL
MATERIAL
HANDLER
Transportation Logistics
Company seeks experi-
enced individual for material
handler position. Candi-
dates must have prior
warehouse environment ex-
perience. Qualified candi-
dates should have at least
1 to 3 years of warehouse
experience with duties in-
cluding:
Experience with using
forklifts, pallet jacks, etc.
Knowledge of inventory
management programs.
Experience with bills of
lading.
Previous shipping/ receiv-
ing experience.
Ability to use computer as-
sisted scanning equipment.
CDL Class A license a
plus
Please send your replies to
applyaip@gmail.com
E.O.E.
GENERAL
OFFICE MANAGER/
LEAD
ACCOUNTANT
We seek a highly organized
person to do our Account-
ing. Must have experience
with computerized account-
ing in both receivables and
payables. Will be responsi-
ble for all aspects of ac-
counting department.
MECHANIC
We seek a self-motivated
individual who possess ex-
cellent mechanical, organiza-
tional and communication
skills. Must have own hand
tools and good driving re-
cord. Candidate should
have two years diesel ex-
perience or Tech Degree.
PARTS SALESMAN
We seek an individual to sell
farm equipment parts. Must
have good organizational,
computer and communica-
tion skills. Parts sales and
or Farm equipment experi-
ence necessary.
Fax or deliver resume to:
Homier & Sons Inc.
21133 St Rt 613
Continental, OH 45831
419-596-3965
Fax 419-596-3964
email: Wilfred@tds.net
GENERAL
RMS of Ohio seeking Part-
time direct care staff to as-
sist adults with disabilities in
Ottawa. Morning, evening
and weekend hours availa-
ble. Please call 419-222-
8806 for more details.
Website:
www.teamrms.com.
GENERAL
SECURITY
OFFICERS
Immediate Placement
Must be over 21, pass drug
screen & background check.
Earn up to $1,060.00/week
Candidates with previous ex-
perience in security, military,
or law enforcement is ideal.
Apply in person with Photo
ID & Birth Certificate or
SS Card Monday - Friday,
9am - 11am, 1pm - 3pm
108 W. Front St
Findlay OH 45840
HEALTHCARE
Champaign Residential
Services Inc is looking for
SUPPORT
SPECIALISTS
Part-Time
Positions Available
10 to 15 Hours a Week
Monday to Thursday or just
weekends
20 to 35 Hours a Week -
Monday to Sunday
No experience necessary
Just a Desire to Help Others
PROVIDE DIRECT CARE
SERVICES TO ADULTS
WITH DEVELOPMENTAL
DISABILITIES
Must have a valid Ohio
drivers license and a high
school diploma/GED.
STNAs & CNAs welcome!
Please apply in person
Monday to Friday 8:30am
to 3:00pm at:
Champaign Residential
Services, Inc.
2450 Mandolin Drive
Lima, Ohio 45801
419-229-3200
Or visit our website at
www.crsi-oh.com
for more information.
TRADES
Immediate position
available for a full-time
Auto Body Technician
3+ years experience and
must have own tools.
Competitive compensation
based on education, training
and experience. Excellent
benefit package including
medical, dental and vision
insurance, paid holidays
and vacations and 401k.
Looking for a dependable in-
dividual with a good work
history.
Please apply in person at
the body shop office or
call
419-422-1855.
Drug-Free Workplace.
Downtown Findlay
www.larichecars.com
HEALTHCARE
COUNSELOR
Gateway Outreach Center
has an immediate opening
for a Chemical Dependency
Counselor for an out-patient
alcohol and drug abuse cen-
ter. Certification as a Chemi-
cal Dependency Counselor
or eligible for certification
preferred. The successful
candidate will provide treat-
ment and prevention serv-
ices for addictions and do-
mestic violence. Salary is
commensurate with degree,
experience, and certifica-
tion. The position reports to
the Clinical Director. Hours
are daytime and evening.
Send cover letter, resume
and salary requirements to:
Teresa Smith
Gateway Outreach Center
800 Pro Drive
Celina, OH 45822
on or before
December 7, 2011.
The fax number is
419-586-3268
The email is
tsmith@gateway
outreachcenter.org
Gateway is an equal provid-
er of services, equal op-
portunity employer, and a
contract agency of the
Tri-County ADAMHS Board.
HEALTHCARE
RN/LPNs
Due to recent changes in
scheduling, Baton Rouge
Health Services Community
has full and part-time open-
ings for RN/ LPNs on all
shifts. Prefer qualified can-
didates have experience in
hospital and/or extended
care facilities. Competitive
benefits package and wage
scale based on experience.
Interested persons should
send resumes to:
BATON ROUGE HEALTH
SERVICES COMMUNITY
Attn: Human Resources
2440 Baton Rouge Avenue
Lima, Ohio 45805
Fax (419) 331-2205
www.batonrougelima.com
HEALTHCARE
Hospitalist Program
Coordinator
St. Ritas Professional Serv-
ices is an LLC of St. Ritas
Medical Center with the
mission to recruit, retain and
support physicians in West
Central Ohio. Due to compa-
ny growth, SRPS has an
opening for a full-time
Hospitalist Program
Coordinator.
This position has the respon-
sibility to facilitate the devel-
opment and execution of
hospitalist initiatives and is
responsible for the coordina-
tion of multiple priorities that
impact patient care, quality,
cost, risk and patient satis-
faction. The successful can-
didate will be responsible for
data collection and organiza-
tion of aggregate quality
information, as well as prep-
aration and analysis of statis-
tical data that affects quality
and utilization of resources.
Responsibilities include
assuring compliance with
TJC. This position communi-
cates with, and provides
summaries of quality infor-
mation to the Program Direc-
tor and Area Manager and
supports the Hospitalist Pro-
gram Director with adminis-
trative duties.
The successful candidate
will be a registered nurse
with a BSN from an accredit-
ed professional school of
nursing with current, non-
restricted Ohio License or
RN with a Bachelors de-
gree in Healthcare Adminis-
tration or Business Adminis-
tration required. MSN, MHA
or MBA preferred. Minimum
5 years of clinical experi-
ence to include manage-
ment knowledge, clinical
knowledge, budget/finance
planning, ability to organize,
knowledge of
policies/procedures, good
common sense and regulato-
ry requirements. Lean train-
ing is preferred. Computer
Proficiency including Micro-
soft Word, Excel, and
PowerPoint; experience in
word processing, spread-
sheets, database and graph-
ic programs.
Please submit resume to:
St. Ritas Professional
Services, HR Generalist,
300 W. Market St.,
Lima, OH 45801,
fax (419) 996-2659)
or e-mail to:
AMGoldsberry@health-
partners.org.
St. Ritas Professional Serv-
ices is an Equal Opportunity
Employer.
HEALTHCARE
RMS of Ohio Hiring
Part-time
Medical Coordinator
Responsibilities include
scheduling, attending and
transporting clients to medi-
cal appointments. Strong
communication and organi-
zational skills and depend-
ability a must. Two years
experience working with
individuals with develop-
mental disabilities, or two-
year degree in a related
field. Call 419-222-8806 for
more details. Apply in per-
son or go to:
www.teamrms.com
HEALTHCARE
MOBILE FIELD
EXAMINER
Needed in Lima and sur-
rounding area to obtain
medical history and have 1
year phlebotomy skills. Po-
sition requires excellent
communication and organi-
zational skills and a high
level of professionalism.
Flexible hours. Computer
and Fax machine a must.
Must pass a background
check. Submit resume to
P.O. Box 923, Perrysburg,
OH 43551 or fax to 419-
873-7777
INDUSTRIAL
Tower International a world-
wide manufacturing leader
of body structures, lower
vehicle structures, suspen-
sion components and mod-
ules for nearly every major
automotive manufacturer in
the world is looking for a
GREAT SENIOR
Weld / Controls
ENGINEER
to join our team at our
stamping facility in Bluffton
Ohio.
The successful candidate
will have the following attrib-
utes.
Bachelors degree in
Electrical/controls engineer-
ing.
Working knowledge and
experience with appropriate
electrical controls and safety
engineering standards and
industry practices.
Working knowledge and
experience with PLC hard-
ware and Ladder Logic pro-
gramming.
Robotic/Weld engineer ex-
perience
Six or more years of relat-
ed technical, hands on ex-
perience in a manufacturing
environment. Preferably in
stamping/welding/assembly.
Understanding electrical
/controls circuitry and sche-
matics.
Working knowledge of
AutoCAD
Motivated
Strong work Ethic
Position offers competitive
salary and comprehensive
benefit package. If you en-
joy working in a dynamic
team based environment
that encourages colleague
growth and advancement,
please go to:
www.towerinternational
.com/careers position
number 3715 to apply.
Equal Opportunity Employer
OFFICE/CLERICAL
OFFICE HELP
NEEDED
Quickbooks, Payroll, HR,
Excel, Word, and Custom-
er Service. Send Resume
to: Box # 5045 C/O The
Lima News, 3515 Elida Rd,
Lima, Ohio 45807
PROFESSIONAL
Juvenile Residential
Center
Looking for quality individu-
als to work with severely
troubled teens in a home
enviroment. High stress posi-
tion requires patient and con-
fident individuals. Work
schedule is 4 days on 3
days off including one week-
end day. College degree pre-
ferred but will train qualified
candidates. Excellent pay
and benefits. Interested ap-
plicants should send cover
letter and resume to:
Recruitment Director
PO Box 150
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
TRADES
In business for thirty years
in Lima area, our excavating
company is looking for (4)
excellent, qualified heavy
equipment operators that
can trackhoes, dozers, and
scrapers. Also looking for
general laborers and skilled
pipe layers, must be motivat-
ed hard workers. Anyone ap-
plying with a CDL will go to
top of hire list. Please send
Reply to:
Box # 1072
C/O The Lima News
3515 Elida Rd
Lima, Ohio 45807
Equal Opportunity Employer
TRADES
EXPERIENCED
ELECTRICIAN
POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
FOR NEW
CONSTRUCTION
PROJECTS
Please submit resumes to:
1264 East Hanthorn RD
Lima, Ohio 45804
PROFESSIONAL
Physician Accounting
Manager Full-time
Day Shift
St. Ritas Professional Serv-
ices (SRPS), a subsidiary of
St. Ritas Health Partners, is
currently seeking an experi-
enced Physician Accounting
Manager to support its
expanding operations.
SRPS includes primary and
specialty physician practices
and physician extenders in
numerous practice locations
throughout West Central
Ohio.
Responsibilities include the
oversight of daily accounting
operations through leader-
ship and supervision of
accounting personnel and
preparation of financial
reports to ensure accuracy
and reliability of information.
This is accomplished
through preparation and
review of accounting entries
for the monthly financial
operations, preparation of
audit work papers, review of
financial accounts, prepara-
tion of budgets and practice
pro-formas. The Physician
Accounting Manager will
report to the SRPS Finance
Manager with interface to
the SRPS leadership team
and the SRHP Regional
Finance Director. The de-
sired Physician Accounting
Manager will capably contrib-
ute leadership to the growth
and diversification of SRPS
operations and other SRHP
business entities.
Candidates must have a
minimum of a Bachelors
Degree in Accounting or
Finance, 1-3 years progres-
sive physician practice
accounting or finance man-
agement experience, strong
analytical and financial prob-
lem solving skills, proficien-
cy in Windows-based PC
business applications, as
well as excellent communi-
cation skills. CPA certifica-
tion and healthcare finance
or public accounting is
preferred.
Please submit resume to:
St. Ritas Professional
Services, HR Generalist,
300 W. Market St.,
Lima, OH 45801,
fax(419)-996-2659
or e-mail to:
AMGoldsberry@health-
partners.org.
St. Ritas Professional Serv-
ices is an Equal Opportunity
Employer.
RETAIL
POOLS N MORE
Is seeking the right individual
to become a part of team!
We are accepting applica-
tions for a full time
Sales/Service Associate.
Qualified individuals will have
experience in retail or food
service and be mechanically
inclined. Hourly plus commis-
sion nets 22K-25K first year.
Apply in person at:
4175 Elida Road
Monday through Friday
12:00pm - 6:00pm only.
TRADES
BODY MAN
Position available for Experi-
enced Body Man. Contact
Uppenkamp Body Shop in
Wapakoneta, Ohio. Phone
419-738-9681
WANTED: Farm Ground to
rent. Putnam & Allen counties.
Cash rent or shares. Young
farmer looking to expand.
Please call 419-615-9818
SECRETARY DESK Excellent
condition. Made by Jasper Fur-
niture Company. $200. Call
419-523-4255
GOOD USED WHEELCHAIR.
Asking $30. Call 419-943-1535
PUGGLE PUPPIES 2 males, 3
females $250. Beabull Puppies
1 male, 1 female $300. All pup-
pies 11 weeks old and up to
date on vaccinations. Call 419-
263-2347
www.mypuppiestolove.com
Havenese & Contons, ready
Christmas Eve, taking deposits,
for info & pricing 419-942-1830
POTATOES FOR SALE
419-384-3398
2007 CTS CADILLAC, 26,000
miles. 6 cylinder, Midnight Blue
exterior, matching leather inte-
rior. Clean. $17,900. Call 419-
273-2279
2007 IMPALA, 28,000 miles,
Red Jewel exterior, Black inte-
rior, all options, excellent
shape. $16,500. Call 419-943-
3363 evenings.
BUYING SNOWMOBILES
All makes, models, parts &
condition considered.
419-384-3800 or 419-303-1786
1998 PONTIAC TRANSPORT,
mini van 128,000 miles, good
shape. $4,500/best offer. Call
for details 419-523-6940 Otta-
wa.
SELL SELL SELL SELL SELL SELL SELL SELL
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Public Auction
Saturday, December 10, 2011 at 10:00 a.m.
1275 North Cole Street, Lima, OH
Automobile: 2005 silver Grand Marquis LS 16480 miles, 1985
Oldsmobile Regency 98 brougham 121000 miles.
Tools: Craftsman 13 5 Speed 1/3 HP Drill Press, Craftsman
Grinder, Craftsman 11 Band Saw, Craftsman 4 gallon Compressor,
Craftsman 18 Scroll Saw, Craftsman Planer/Jointer, Craftsman
Router, Craftsman Belt Sander, Bench vice, work bench, wood tool
cabinet, Homelite chain saw, Makita battery drill, Rigid shop vac, Guild
table router, many machinist tools, many hand tools, Husky charger,
wood clamps, Craftsman 12 wood lathe, many Stanley wood planes,
lathing tools, walnut lumber, bench drill press, belt and disk sander,
Craftsman table router.
Farm, Lawn and Garden: Speed ZTA 30 mower, Cub Cadet 1015
mower, Toro push mower, Toro CCR 2400 snow blower, Coleman
Powermatic 5000 generator, Echo TC-2100 tiller, Homelite electric
weed eater, wheel barrel, yard trailer, garden tools, Toro leaf blower,
Black and Decker edger, Werner aluminum ladders, Scotts lawn
spreader, ice fshing poles, Weslo pursuit 310 CS exercise bike,
patio furniture, Big Husky log water, small show tack box, nice sheep
stand, 2 wheel wood stock trailer, white slat fence, old wagon, Stewart
clippers with sheep heads, small poly wheel barrel, halogen lamp
stand, Pax 300 fountain, galvanized water tank, yard ornaments, fsh
fnder, 7x16 fat tandem bumper trailer, Evinrude boat motor, Red hawk
diesel generator, 6600 watts Honda EU 3000 watt generator.
Household and Furniture: Maytag washer and dryer, GE washer and
dryer, three Lazy boy recliners, LG fat screen TV, Emerson fat TV,
sofa, magazine rack, Whirlpool side by side refrigerator, GE electric
stove, dining table with 6 chairs, small tables, handmade desk and
chair, several foor lamps, comforters, 5 pc bedroom suite, framed
mirrors, hutch cane chairs, wood offce desk, chest of drawers, offce
supplies, paper cutter, sun twin heater, paper shredder, HP photosmart
C-4180 printer, computer desk, Dell computer, kitchenware, glassware,
pictures, microwave, microwave stand, quilt rack, wood offce chair,
Hoover steam vac, wardrobe dresser, Steelers candy dispenser, Jenny
Lyn baby bed, Longaberger basket and pottery, Technic 5x-KN1400
keyboard.
Antique: Hoosier cabinet, parlor clock, oak wardrobe, Victorian
furniture, bird cage, oak frame mirror, pictures, crocks, rug beaters,
parlor table, Victorian chair, Victorian desk and chair, cane rocker,
electric hurricane lamp, saddle irons, jugs candy container, apple
peeler, cherry pitter, wood planes, hull planter, lanterns, ball and claw
piano stool. Some coins and medallions and German bonds.
Gun: High Standard Mdl 103 22 caliber
Owners: Clifford F Rison Estate Lima - Probate # 2011-ES-524
Mary Lou Grismore - Columbus Grove
Frank S Treglia Living Trust Waynesfeld
To view pictures visit www.auctionzip.com.
Auction conducted by
Reindel Auction Service
Auctioneers: Mike Reindel 419-235-3607
Mark Knoch , Doug Fenbert
Apprentice: Brandon Daniels, Jeff Schott
All auctioneers licensed and bonded in favor of the State of Ohio
Terms: Cash or Check with proper ID
Conditions: All items sold as is with no guarantees applied.
Lunch available.
SELL SELL SELL SELL SELL SELL SELL SELL
PRIVATE PARTY
SPECIALS
ITEMS PRICED UNDER $1000
25 WORDS 3 WEEKS
FREE!*
ITEMS PRICED $1,001 - $2,000
25 Words 3 Weeks
$
5
00*
*Additional words 10 per word.
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P U T N A M
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putnamvoice.com
December 7 - 13, 2011
NANCY KLINE Putnam Voice
BECKY LEADER Putnam Voice
BECKY LEADER Putnam Voice
NANCY KLINE Putnam Voice
The Cavern Club Winery opens in Ottawa
Memory
tree
Preschoolers
learn about
Christmas
Two angels and a cow
Area children put on annual Christmas program
Artists in training
WHAT
WERE UP
TO .
HOME
PHOTOS
AND MORE!
So you think you have
a pretty neat photo of
a family member, pet or
fun event? Wed love to
see it.
E-mail it to info@put-
namvoice.com and well
publish it on the Web
and we might just pub-
lish it here too.
putnamvoice.com
V10
December 7 - 13, 2011
Friends and
family mem-
bers of
Margaret
Howell deco-
rated Mar-
garets Tree:
Honoring
the Memory
of Margaret
Howell on
display at
the Putnam
County Dis-
trict Library.
NANCY KLINE
PutnamVoice
Megan Horstman, Averie Fox and Derek Horstman dressed up for afternoon ses-
sion of the Ecumenical Christmas School program.
Karen Schroeder (right), co-owner of the Cavern Club Winery in Ottawa, is assisted by Holly Huber
as they wait on customers during their opening last Saturday. Schroeder and her husband Doug
have worked on the building since the flood of 2007.
Preschoolers in the
afternoon session of last
weeks Ecumenical Christ-
mas School at Trinity
United Methodist Church,
Ottawa, performed last Fri-
day afternoon.
BECKY LEADER
PutnamVoice
Potential future members of the Blanchard RIver Art Guild were busy Saturday
afternoon working on their artistic skills during the BRAG Holiday Art Show at
the Schroeder Center for the Arts.
Pupils in the afternoon Ecumenical Christmas School program in Ottawa last Friday were busy
singing and waving to their parents.
See a slideshow of both morning and afternoon Ecumenical Christmas School program at www.
putnamvoice.com
These angels were singing carols during the afternoon program
for the Ecumenical Christmas School program in Ottawa last
Friday.
BECKY LEADER Putnam Voice
Angels we have heard on high
BEEN SPOTTED
a special publication of the PUTNAM VOICE
DECEMBER 7-13, 2011
Ways to keep small
business registers ringing
during the holidays
Ease the stress of
grocery shopping during
the holidays
Dont wait until the
holidays to start planning
your annual cookie
exchange
Holiday gift-giving tips
for the teen on your list
Garden accents for the
holidays
How to fnd the right gift
for the hard-to-please
teen
Use your photos to make
personalized holiday
gifts that last a lifetime
Tips for shopping
smarter this
holiday season
Finding gift ideas for
the impossible-to-shop-
for person
Personalization the
key to giving unique
holiday baby gifts
(ARA) Hectic schedules often
make meal-related decisions a chore.
And planning for a bigger family meal
over the holidays just adds to the stress.
Affordable and simpler shopping rou-
tines could help you start savoring fam-
ily meal time again.
Consider these tips from national gro-
cery retailer Save-A-Lot before your
next shopping trip:
Create a weekly meal planner
Many grocery shoppers make the
mistake of only planning for a big spe-
cial meal when they can cut time and
cost by planning for several. Think
about what you and your family mem-
bers typically consume each day. If
there is a particular food item or meal
idea that your whole family enjoys,
make sure to stock up when it is on
sale. Ask each family member to pick a
meal for dinner.
Decide ahead of time how your fam-
ily might want to use leftover meat or
veggies from the meal, and buy extra
ingredients to create new meals.
Track ingredients to replenish
Youve got everything laid out to
make chocolate chip cookies, but you
forgot to buy the baking soda - noth-
ing is more frustrating than having to
make a return trip to a store.
Keep track of ingredients you fre-
quently use in your cooking. Then, as
soon as you use up an item, immedi-
ately add it to your ongoing grocery
list. By the end of the week, not only
will your shopping list be complete,
but also you wont be stuck in the store
trying to remember what is or is not
in your cupboard. You also wont be
tempted to buy something you dont
need.
Check to see if your store is offering
discounts in exchange for signing up
for their shopping clubs year round.
For example, Save-A-Lot offers a $5
coupon for signing up for its Smart
Shopper Club.
Take advantage of store brands
Many grocery stores offer their own
exclusive brands of foods and everyday
items, and frequently these items are of
equivalent quality as more expensive
national brand names.
Simplify shopping trips
A popular strategy for many shoppers
is to shop at several retailers through-
out the week for bargains. While this
approach may add up to a couple of
cents saved on a receipt, it is quickly
gobbled up in fuel costs as well as time.
Instead, save both time and money by
limiting shopping trips to one day a
week or add a stop to the grocery store
on the commute to or from work.
With these few simple tips, youll not
only save money at the grocery store,
but youll have more time to enjoy
cooking and celebrating with those you
love.
SHOPPING
Ease the stress of groceries this holiday
COMMUNITY
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December 7 - 13, 2011
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ARA Photo
Affordable and simpler shopping routines could help you
start savoring family meal time again.
Headphones come in a variety of designs and price points from $10 and up.
(ARA) Shopping for the perfect gift for
kids and teenagers can be tough. Its hard to
know what theyre going to like, especially
without a wish list in hand as you head out
to the stores.
Get ahead of the crowds and make sure
you come home with a gift they are sure to
love this holiday season using these simple
tips.
Dont make assumptions. Everyone on
your list is unique, and just because your
kids like something, doesnt mean your niece
or nephew will. Talk with parents, look at
their hobbies and listen for special interests.
You can get a better idea of what they like by
simply paying attention.
Let them choose. Teens will tell you cash
is the best gift. But if you want to be a little
more personal in your gift, consider turning
that cash into a gift card to a favorite store, to
purchase music online, or for a hobby shop.
If the teen has their drivers license, consider
gifting a gas card. With a gift card, teens can
select their own gifts and you can still claim
ownership of the present. An added step
would be to schedule a shopping date with
the teen so the two of you can spend some
time together, and they can pick out that
perfect gift.
Let them try before you buy. Video
games are extremely popular gift items - 72
percent of American households have mem-
bers playing games according to the Enter-
tainment Software Association - but at $60 a
piece, you want to be sure the title you buy
is one theyll really like. Before spending all
that cash, rent the game from a local Red-
box kiosk for just $2 a night and let them try
it first. A recent Redbox survey found that
72 percent of respondents wish gift recipi-
ents could test video games before adding
them to their gift lists.
Reserve games in advance online at
redbox.com or through your iPhone or
Android-enabled device. If you dont have a
gaming system, get together with friends or
neighbors and organize a game night to pre-
view several gift options at once. Not only
will you please the teen on your list, but
youll make an informed and fun purchase.
And if youre still in need of an idea,
just ask. More often than not, teenagers
arent looking for a surprise - theyd rather
receive a really cool gift, even if they know
it in advance. Open lines of communication
will give you all the insight you need into
becoming a gold-star gift giver this holiday
season.
Holiday gift-giving tips
for the teen on your list
Practical but fun presents
(ARA) The building anticipation, the
frantic ripping of wrapping paper and the
discovery of what those colorful packages
hold - holidays and birthdays are great
times to be a kid. But as any parent can
attest, gifts received during holidays some-
times end up gathering cobwebs in the fol-
lowing months.
While its fun to go for novelty items
that catch a childs attention when they
are opened, giving the children in your life
something that will truly stand the test of
time will be much appreciated by both
child and parent alike. And a practical gift
doesnt have to be boring, either. Here are
five things to consider as you search for a
gift that will get a lot of use.
* Consult with the parents. It may be
against your instinct to ask the childs par-
ents what their child needs, since everyone
loves a good surprise. However, it wont
ruin the surprise for the child if you take
the time to find something that he or she
could truly use, and parents know their
children best.
* Books or magazine subscriptions. If
theres one thing a child cant get enough of,
its stories. Books are a great gift because
they are sure to be read and dont take up
a lot of room. A subscription to a magazine
carries the added bonus of being a new gift
every time it comes in the mail. If you get
something that caters to the childs interest,
you cant go wrong.
* Add some fun to clothing gifts. When
you were a kid, you might not remember
clothing as the most fun gifts you received,
but the fact remains that clothing is one of
the most practical gifts you can give a child.
To make your gift of clothing a little more
interesting, throw in a fun clothing item
with something more practical. You can
never go wrong with a pair of jeans for the
utility aspect and then a fun T-shirt from
your recipients favorite TV show or movie.
The Signature by Levi Strauss & Co. brand
offers comfortable and affordable jeans for
kids for under $25, so you can pick up a pair
and have room in your budget for some-
thing else to complement them.
* The gift of tickets. If youre having trou-
ble identifying a toy or gift that the child
would really like, tickets to a kid-friendly
concert or another event are a great option.
You could also opt for a pass to a science
museum or zoo - another gift that keeps
giving throughout the year. Or personalize
it by offering to take the child somewhere
fun, which is a nice touch if youre a favorite
aunt, uncle or grandparent.
* Give something thats alive. No, not a cat
or dog - unless you have a parents permis-
sion. But a fun and unique plant can be a
fascinating gift for children as they can take
care of it and watch it grow. Consider pair-
ing this with a child-friendly book about the
type of plant you are giving or gardening in
general. Plants are also a nice gift, because
if gives children and parents a project they
can work on together.
By finding a practical gift that the child
in your life is sure to love, youll make sure
that the happiness youre hoping to give
continues long after the holidays are over.
Chic entertaining for less
(ARA) A beautiful holiday table can be
the centerpiece of any celebration. However,
many hostesses are discouraged by the idea
and potential cost of fancy linens, expensive
serving ware and a perfect centerpiece.
A beautiful tablescape doesnt have to be
costly, says Target Style Expert for Home
and HGTV designer Sabrina Soto. Layer-
ing in key holiday trends to your everyday
pieces can be a cost-effective way to create
a one-of-a-kind dinner table.
Soto, together with celebrity TV chef and
Target culinary partner Giada De Lauren-
tiis, offer the following tips for creating a
festive, yet affordable holiday setting.
Set a beautiful foundation
Instead of feeling compelled to use tra-
ditional red and green hues, any color
combination can be the basis for a festive
table, says Soto. She favors soft, season-less
colors for decorating with added touches of
gold and silver, which work with any color
scheme and interior aesthetic. You can use
everyday dinnerware, but create a holiday
feel by adding glamorous metallic chargers,
chic beaded placemats or napkin rings.
Add elegance with a striking centerpiece
Centerpieces are the focal point of an
elegant table but dont need to be expensive
to be beautiful. A single silver or metallic
accessory can increase the glam factor of
your centerpiece or try clustering several
accessories for a sparkling effect. Polish
up grandmas old silver vases or purchase
some inexpensive mercury glass items such
as hurricane or votive candle holders - the
seasons hottest trend.
A crystal vase for the centerpiece can
elevate the tables elegance quotient. Fresh
flowers can be pricey during the holidays;
Soto suggests filling the vase with small
glass ornaments. Mixing mirrored orna-
ments with fresh pine cones or seasonal
fruit can make for a festive yet sophisti-
cated decorative piece.
Plan a stress-free menu
A beautiful table sets the stage for an
evening of delicious food and warm conver-
sation. Plan ahead and prepare most of the
food in advance, rather than trying to cook
everything at once. Youll feel less stressed
and will be able to enjoy the party.
Try to leave only one item for last minute
prep - this brings everyone into the kitchen
and sets the tone for a cozy, comfortable
evening, says De Laurentiis. I prepare most
dishes in my Giada De Laurentiis ceramic
bake ware because it can go directly from
the oven to the table, and still look great.
To further simplify the menu, De Lau-
rentiis suggests selecting foods that can be
served at room temperature. Try a red pep-
per or basil cheese cake that can be made
ahead of time, and will be fine sitting out
before the party even begins. While foods
like fish or shrimp are delicious, they are
hard to keep fresh if you are serving food
buffet-style.
GIFT GUIDE
(ARA) Tis the season
for delicious treats and fes-
tive gatherings. The fun of
baking, sharing recipes and
getting together for holiday
parties, such as a cookie
exchange, are what make
the season extra special.
Inspired by their more
than 40 years of collec-
tive baking and entertain-
ing experience, Hersheys
Kitchens Linda Stahl and
Betty Crocker Kitchens
Kristen Olson will share
advice through a weekly
blog on FavoriteCookies.
com as well as provide reci-
pes, cookie exchange tips
and give holiday hosts the
chance to share recipes and
photos with each other.
For those looking to cre-
ate the ultimate cookie
exchange, Stahl and Olson
offer the following tips to
turn any party into a sweet
success:
Invite guests at least
two weeks in advance and
ask each guest to RSVP
with the recipe they plan to
make to avoid duplicates.
Ask each guest to bring
at least a half dozen cook-
ies for each person attend-
ing the party.
Encourage participants
to bring an empty, sealable
container to take home
goodies, along with cop-
ies of their recipe to share.
Be sure to have extra bags
or containers on hand for
guests to transport cookies
home.
Make it personal
showcase the cookies in
a decorative arrangement
and ask each participant to
introduce themselves and
explain why they chose
their recipe and what ingre-
dients they used.
Be sure to offer refresh-
ments, such as seasonal
beverages, but keep it sim-
ple so the cookies are the
stars of the show.
Send guests home with
a goodie bag filled with a
homemade recipe book-
let youve created to com-
memorate your party. Ask
for participants recipes in
advance so you can pre-
pare.
Cant decide what holiday
cookie you should make as
the host? Try the classic
Peanut Butter Blossoms.
Peanut Butter Blossoms
Makes about three dozen
cookies
Ingredients:
36 Hersheys Kisses Brand
Milk Chocolates
1 pouch Betty Crocker
Peanut Butter Cookie Mix
2 tablespoons vegetable
oil
1 tablespoon water
1 egg
Granulated sugar
Directions:
Heat oven to 375 F.
Remove wrappers from
chocolates. Stir cookie
mix, oil, water, and egg in
a medium bowl until soft
dough forms. Shape dough
into 1-inch balls. Roll in
granulated sugar; place on
ungreased cookie sheet.
Bake eight to 10 minutes
or until lightly browned.
Immediately press a choc-
olate into center of each
cookie; cookie will crack
around edges. Remove
from cookie sheet to wire
rack. Cool completely.
For more recipes, tips and
ideas for hosting a cookie
exchange, visit www.Favor-
iteCookies.com.
(ARA) If youre like
most Americans, youll be
approaching this years big-
gest gift-buying season a bit
more cautiously. With ongo-
ing economic uncertainties,
shoppers are expected to
take a different approach to
holiday shopping this year,
preferring gifts that provide
long-term real value versus
those that provide an imme-
diate, but short-lived wow
effect.
So what types of gifts
deliver the most bang for
the buck? Homemade gifts,
whether they are baked
goods, crafts, artwork or are
knitted or embroidered, rank
high on the list of favorites.
They deliver a strong mes-
sage that you care enough
to give of your time and not
just your money. Personal-
ized gifts also send a strong
message, even though they
dont require a lot of money.
Simple gifts can easily be
made to appear extra spe-
cial with just a few added
touches. For example, why
not give a picture frame with
a favorite picture inside? Or
consider including a DVD of
the persons favorite actor, or
a big box of candy or even a
special book with an added
gift of a bookmark.
Another highly economi-
cal gifting approach is the
purchase of a single larger
item that can be shared and
enjoyed by multiple family
members, such as a gam-
ing system, electronics or a
ride-on vehicle. Smaller, less-
expensive items that can be
enjoyed by the whole family
include board games, candles
and flowers.
Educational gifts, especially
when purchased for children,
also provide a real long-term
value. With the high cost of
books and school supplies,
its sometimes hard to keep
up with just the basics for
school-aged kids, so the holi-
days provide an ideal time
to purchase those tools that
give students an added edge
in school. A mark-my-time
digital booklight is just one
example of an educational
gift that provides immediate
appeal and continues to bene-
fit the student throughout the
school year and even through
summer reading programs. A
bookmark, timer and book-
light in one, it helps kids track
their required reading time
- day or night - and, in the
process, encourages them to
build strong reading habits.
Available at retail stores or
through mark-my-time.com
in a number of eye-catching
colors, including blue, pink
and green camouflage, it
actually makes reading fun.
(ARA) The holiday shop-
ping season is the time of the
year that service and retail
businesses big and small
look forward to all year. In
fact, National Retail Federa-
tion research shows that the
last two months of the year
can account for between 25
and 40 percent of all annual
sales. For small businesses
especially, the holiday sea-
son is often a crucial make-
or-break opportunity to earn
the revenue required to sus-
tain the business the follow-
ing year.
Fail to plan, plan to fail
Smart planning is essential
to keeping the registers ring-
ing during the holidays. For
starters, a spike in customer
traffic often means need-
ing to hire seasonal help.
While thats a good problem
to have, managing sched-
uling, payroll and other
concerns for an expanded
group of employees can
put additional strain on
already stretched resources.
According to small business
expert Steve Strauss, iden-
tifying and implementing
tools they can trust to man-
age operational demands
effectively can help small
business owners focus on
whats most important -
serving customers and mak-
ing sales - during the holiday
season and beyond.
Running a small busi-
ness is a complicated jug-
gling act, says Strauss. To
keep all the balls in the air,
small businesses owners
should take advantage of
the many easy and afford-
able resources available to
them today.
For example, Bank of
America small business cus-
tomers have access to Intuit
Full Service Payroll. This
payroll support program
can relieve a major stress on
small business owners by
taking on the responsibility
of staff paychecks and pay-
roll taxes.
With peace of mind that
workers will be paid error-
free and on-time, here are
some ideas to ensure that
your small business will stay
busy:
Make sure you have an
online presence - Review
your website, especially if
you use it to make direct
sales, to confirm that your
interface, search and pay-
ments functionality is fast
and user-friendly. You may
also want to consider opti-
mizing your content and key
words to appear more fre-
quently in Web searches.
Use your size to your
advantage - Your competi-
tors may have larger adver-
tising budgets, but they dont
have the flexibility to per-
sonalize their promotions
to the community. Tap into
whats unique to your city or
neighborhood to design spe-
cial discounts and use your
network of relationships to
enhance visibility and loy-
alty by hosting demonstra-
tions/tastings at local events
or donating items to charity
auctions.
Shout it from the digi-
tal rooftops Twitter and
Facebook are easy, fast
and free tools to announce
sales, showcase products
with videos, photos and tes-
timonials, and run contests
to keep interest and excite-
ment going throughout the
holiday season. For example,
you can feature surprise dis-
counts every day for a week
or encourage customers to
shop with you by giving a
certain amount of proceeds
to charity from any purchase
made with a special Twitter
or Facebook code.
For more information on
issues that matter to small
business owners, visit www.
bankofamerica.com/small-
business and smallbusines-
sonl i necommuni ty. bank
ofamerica.com.
Keep small-business registers ringing
COMMUNITY
putnamvoice.com
V13
December 7 - 13, 2011
H
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PH. 419-659-5311
Happy Holidays
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DOWNTOWN OTTAWA SINCE 1888
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Purchase that perfect gift for that special someone.
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For small businesses especially, the holiday season is often a crucial make-or-break oppor-
tunity to earn the revenue required to sustain the business the following year.
Shopping smarter this season
With some careful planning and creative thinking, its still
possible to find the perfect gift that fits your budget.
Dont wait to plan your
holiday cookie exchange
The fun of baking, sharing recipes and getting together for holiday parties, such as a
cookie exchange, are what make the season extra special.
Bakers share advice through weekly blog
GIFT GUIDE
(ARA) - Shopping for holiday gifts
would be a lot more fun - and so much
easier - if you knew exactly what you
wanted to get for everyone. But theres
a good chance your list includes an
impossible-to-shop-for friend or family
member.
If youve struggled in the past to find
the perfect gift for this person, you may
have resorted to giving gift cards they
applied to their everyday shopping, or
asking them to give you a wish list.
Tackle those impossible-to-shop-for
people on your list with a new approach
to finding good - and unexpected - gift
ideas with the following tips:
* Head to the public library and
browse through magazines that cater
to his special hobbies. Pay close atten-
tion to ads and products in the articles.
If you see something you dont think
he has already, make a mental note to
scope out his house or work area the
next time youre visiting, just to make
sure. Or chat with someone else who
shares his hobby and would know if
youve discovered the perfect gift that
hell use and appreciate.
* Go online and visit shopping sites
like CouponHeaven.com, which fea-
tures hundreds of niche stores. For
example, CouponHeaven.com allows
you to sort shopping opportunities
by stores and categories, and you can
browse the latest specials. You can also
find great ideas from coupon codes and
discounts posted for sites like Barnes
and Noble for the book lover, Gar-
deners Supply for the green thumb
and even Joann Fabric for the crafty
person.
* Take her out for a window-shop-
ping experience, disguised as a walk
through the mall for exercise, or as
a trip to purchase gift ideas for other
people on your list. Pay close atten-
tion to anything she takes a second
look at - whether its clothing, beauty
items, household items or even exer-
cise equipment. Make mental notes
on those items, and either schedule a
trip back to the store to purchase the
item she was interested in, or head
home and look the store up on Coupon-
Heaven.com to see if any coupon codes
or discounts are available for that store
or item. Since shes already invested an
interest in the item, youll know it will
be enjoyed and used after she unwraps
it during the holiday season.
* If the person on your hard-to-shop-
for list lives far away, preventing you
from looking around his house or tak-
ing him window-shopping, then start
investigating his life. Call his friends
and family and interview them. Check
out his postings on social networking
sites to see if hes mentioned any inter-
ests you could follow up on. Paying
attention is key to finding the perfect
gift, so make notes whenever you can.
Dont delay in trying these holiday gift
idea finding tips, because the earlier in
the year you start, the more ideas will
be presented to you. And if you come
across several gifts that could work,
write those ideas down, so youre pre-
pared for next years holiday season.
Wow the impossible-to-shop-for person
COMMUNITY
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V14
December 7 - 13, 2011
Homestead Col l ecti on
Your Compl ete Home Furni shi ngs & Gi ft Store

Visit all 10 buildings with over 10,000 sq. ft. of display!
Gifts for all ages & dcor for any home!

Decorative Lighting Braided Rugs
Swan Creek Candles - Curtains & Other Linens
Unique Childrens Gifts - Fontanini Nativity
Vera Bradley Chamilia - Kameleon


Shop wi th us for al l of your HOLI DAY needs!
*Gifts for everyone of the list!
*Dips & Soups for the get-togethers!
*Decorations for inside & out!
*FREE Gift Bagging!

11300 County Road 99 Findlay, OH Exit 161 I-75
419-422-8286 Find us on FACEBOOK!
Monday-Friday 10-6 Saturday 10-5 Sunday 12-5
Home Decor, Unique forals, gifts, food demos, trees and decor,
jewelry, accessories, candles, fresh fowers, organic teas.
Home for Christmas
A Seasonal Celebration!
Home, Gift & Florals
1316 E. Main St., Ottawa 419-523-2222
www.serendipityohio.com Rhonda Wolke, Designer
Hours: Mon.-Wed.-Thurs. 9-5
Fri. 9-6; Tues 9-7;
Sat 9-4
New items daily. We deliver!
Happy Holidays to all
Our Valued Customers
Check out our Great Selection of Jim Shore Collectibles!
OSU & Michigan Items School Spirit Items Precious Moments
Great Priced Throws Unique Gifts Web Kinz
Willow Tree Cookbooks Melissa & Doug Toys
Hawkeys Pharmacy & Gifts
114 N. High St., Columbus Grove 419-659-2366
Store Hours: Mon-Thurs. 9-7; Fri. 9-6; Sat. 9-2
Youll fnd that special gift
for everyone on your list.
We have one of the areas largest selection
of Precious Moments, Willow Tree and
Foundations IN STOCK.
Tackle those
impossible-to-
shop-for people
on your list with
a new approach
to finding good
and
unexpected
gift ideas.
ARA Photo
Princess play can teach manners
(ARA) If your daughters imagination
often takes her to a land of magic castles,
gorgeous gowns and glittery tiaras, then
shes likely in what is known as the prin-
cess phase. Its a magical time in a girls life
when her imagination takes over playtime
to include kings and queens, princes and
princesses staged in an enchanted world
where anything is possible.
This stage provides a wonderful oppor-
tunity for parents to engage their girls with
lessons about good manners and etiquette
- helping them learn the true meaning of
being a princess. Through princess play
parents can teach their daughters that being
a princess means being kind, poised, and
well-mannered.
Its never too early to teach good man-
ners; they are important life lessons for
young children, says Elise McVeigh
founder of Mrs. McVeighs Manners and
Parents magazines etiquette expert.
Through simple teaching techniques,
leading by example and helpful materials,
children can learn and share the art of eti-
quette quickly.
McVeigh suggests using kid-friendly tools
and activities to introduce good manners
and etiquette in a fun and relevant way
for children. Whether you make a game
out of setting the table or creating a man-
ners checklist on the wall, kids respond
to learning when the lessons are engaging
and interactive.
Princess-themed childrens movies, dolls
and toys can also serve as a conversation-
starter about good manners between par-
ents and their daughters, allowing them to
practice and play out these lessons in a
fun way. For instance, McVeigh and Barbie
have teamed up to provide girls and par-
ents an array of tips, tools and lessons that
coincide with the release of the new DVD
movie, Barbie Princess Charm School.
McVeigh and Barbie offer these tips to
bring the princess in every girl to life
through five simple lessons:
1. Meet and greet - It is important that a
princess know how to properly meet new
people and greet friends.
2. Set a table - Every princess needs to
know how to set a perfect princess table
for friends and family. A proper table set-
ting must include: napkin, salad fork and
main fork on the left, and knife (with blade
toward the plate), spoon and glass (placed
above the knife) on the right.
3. Table manners - When sitting at the
table with guests and friends, a princess
must practice perfect table manners. A
polite princess should remember these
important rules:
4. How to receive a gift - Princesses are
lucky to have lots of friends and family
members who may give them gifts. When
receiving a gift, a polite princess must
always happily say, Thank you.
5. How to write a thank-you note - When
a princess receives a gift, she should use
lovely stationery and write a thank-you
note right away.
The princess stage is a special time for
parents to teach valuable life lessons.
Personalization is a great way to make unique baby gifts even more precious.
Personalize baby gifts
(ARA) Gift-buying sea-
son is just starting and will
soon be in full swing. You
may have a few new names
on your list with newborns
joining your family and
friends families. More than
any other gift-buying task,
finding unique baby gifts can
be a challenge.
For adults, teens or even
children, you can find out
what the recipient likes and
tailor your gift purchase
accordingly. But babies are
a clean slate. So what guide-
lines can you follow when
choosing a gift for them?
Personalized options are
unique baby gifts that both
delight parents, and provide
kids with plenty of playtime
enjoyment. Seeing their own
name or image on a beloved
possession helps reinforce
childrens sense of self and
encourages them to interact
with their environment.
Here are five ideas for per-
sonalized baby gifts that you
can give at any time of year:
1. Make her the star of her
own story. Celebrity moms
Brooke Shields, Courtney
Cox and Jessica Alba have
all purchased personal-
ized books from childrens
publisher ISeeMe.com. The
site offers a large selection
of colorful, appealing, age-
appropriate books that can
be personalized with a childs
name. Some books include
the childs name on the
cover, others throughout the
story, and still others feature
rhymes and text about the
spelling of the childs name.
Personalized books
increase a childs self esteem
and celebrate their unique-
ness, says Maia Haag, author
and co-founder of ISeeMe.
com. The goal is to show
each child how absolutely
unique and special he or she
is, to teach the child how to
spell his or her name, and to
build vocabulary skills.
2. Help him grow into his
personality. Kids love growth
charts. Being able to track
their own progress helps
anchor children to their past
while encouraging them to
look toward the future. Per-
sonalizing growth charts can
be as simple as adding the
childs name to the top of a
wall-mounted chart. You can
also find plenty of options
that elevate the level of per-
sonalization. For example,
Redenvelope.com offers a
growth quilt. Hung on the
wall, the quilts tree design
features 12 circles that can
be personalized with the
childs handprint, allowing
parents to chart every month
in one year of a childs life, or
stretch the fun over 12 years.
3. Let her make her
mark on the world. Craft-
making has an almost uni-
versal appeal for children,
and when the crafts involve
personalization, kids enjoy
them even more. Its easy to
find stepping stone kits that
can be personalized with a
childs name, handprint or
even footprint. Young chil-
dren will enjoy making the
kit with a parent and put-
ting their handprint in the
finished product. Parents of
infants can also cherish the
project when they create it
themselves and press their
babys footprint into the clay.
4. Protect his lovey
from all challengers. Its
not unusual for babies and
very young children to have
a favorite stuffed animal or
security blanket. A lovey
helps them fall asleep, and
can provide comfort and
even companionship. Per-
sonalizing a childs security
blanket or stuffed animal
with her name can help rein-
force her sense of self and
understanding of the con-
cept of possession.
5. Pictures are worth a
thousand words. Its easy
to find online software and
photo websites that allow
you to create high-quality
photo books with your own
images. Parents will love
seeing their pride and joy
featured in a photo montage.
Babies love looking at pic-
tures of faces, something
that helps stimulate their
brain development.
GIFT GUIDE
COMMUNITY
putnamvoice.com
V15
December 7 - 13, 2011
(ARA) Finding the perfect gift for
teenagers can be a notoriously difficult
task. Their likes and dislikes can often
change within seconds based on the
latest trends and fads.
So how can you please even the
most challenging-to-shop-for teen? Gift
cards and cash work, but are also very
impersonal. Here are a few gift ideas to
satisfy even the pickiest teen.
Clothing
Face it, as much as youd like to be
on top of the hot styles that teens are
wearing, youre probably several steps
behind whats actually in. Give him or
her a spending limit and take your teen
shopping for some clothes. They will
get a gift they really want and youll
learn about what they like to wear.
Plus, it gives you the ultimate veto
power over questionable purchases if
youre paying for it.
Music
As with clothes, most parents prob-
ably have differing musical tastes than
their kids. Instead of a gift card to a
music store, get a list of the music they
like and gift it to them via iTunes. Plus,
it also gives you the opportunity to
learn what they like even if it isnt
what youd listen to on your iPod.
Technology
What teen doesnt want the latest
tech toy? Whether its a new MP3
player, headphones, mobile device or
video game system, you probably cant
go wrong. If your teen has a gaming
system already, a new game is one
place to turn.
Teens overwhelmingly favor action
or adventure video games, according
to a Kaiser Family Foundation survey,
and role-playing games have always
been among the best-selling, most pop-
ular games available. Two new Marvel
games from Activision fit both the
action/adventure and role-playing cri-
teria.
Spider-Man: Edge of Time and
X-Men Destiny will immerse your
teenage gamer into new storylines
from legendary comic book writers
Peter David and Mike Carey, respec-
tively giving them an authentic,
interactive comic book experience.
You can learn more at facebook.com/
herohq.
Spider-Man: Edge of Time lets
gamers play the roles of the classic
Amazing Spider-Man and futuristic Spi-
der-Man 2099 through a high-octane,
adrenaline-fueled adventure in which
the heroic web-slingers must urgently
work together across time to save
each other and prevent a disaster that
ultimately leads to the death of Peter
Parker.
X-Men Destiny introduces gam-
ers to three all-new mutant characters
forced to choose between siding with
the X-Men or Brotherhood of Mutants.
Players customize the path, powers
and development of their character
and decide their role in the mutant
cause alongside, or against Marvel
characters such as Magneto, Cyclops,
Wolverine and Gambit.
Dont believe the myth that teens
are hard to shop for. With the right
approach, you can find the perfect gift
for the most discerning teenager.
Gift ideas for the hard-to-please teen
(ARA) The holiday sea-
son is full of festivities from
childrens plays to office par-
ties to checking off shopping
lists. That means many con-
sumers are multitasking.
Never fear, there are an
array of apps for both the
iPad and smartphones to
help you accomplish your
seasonal tasks on the go.
Epicurious: Free
A staple of the holidays
is food and lots of it.
Whether cooking up a feast
for a dozen or assigned to
bring a side to the family
event, the Epicurious app
has you covered.
The app offers more than
30,000 recipes from publica-
tions like Bon Appetit and
well-known chefs and cook-
books. Browsing is simple
with specific categories
from party snacks to deca-
dent desserts and users
can search by not only typ-
ing in keywords, but also
using icons such as whats
in season and what holidays
are approaching.
The app automatically
updates so you can be sure
to snag the latest recipes
and features a handy shop-
ping list you can save for
when you hit the supermar-
ket.
A newer feature lets
amateur chefs share favor-
ite dishes with friends via
Facebook, Twitter and
email. And when it comes
to actually putting together
your culinary masterpiece,
Epicurious helps there too
offering cooking-friendly
views that make it easy to
follow a recipe step-by-step.
For $1.99, you can also save
favorite recipes and sync
your Favorites list in the app
with your online Recipe Box
at Epicurious.com. A great
feature for if you create a
hit that the clan wants again
next year.
Amazon Price Check:
Free
In the store holiday shop-
ping and think you just
might find a better deal on
online?
Amazon Price Check helps
you make sure. Use Price
Check to scan a barcode,
snap a picture, or type or
say an item name to check
prices on Amazon.com prod-
ucts and buy them directly
from the app.
You also can add items to
your Amazon Wishlist and
share via Twitter, Facebook,
text message and email link.
Camera +: 99 cents
Whats the holidays with-
out pictures to capture the
memories?
On sale for a limited
time for less than a buck,
Camera + lets you enhance
your smartphone photos by
zooming in (up to 6x) and
out, cropping, editing, add-
ing color filters and more.
You can set exposure sepa-
rately from focus for more
control over your shots and
use a flashlight to brighten
up your photos perfect
for outdoor holiday snow
scenes.
It also comes with a sta-
bilizer to steady your cam-
era for sharper pictures and
a built-in grid so you can
line up your shots and avoid
angled photos.
Other features include bor-
ders, sharing via Facebook,
Twitter, and Flickr and cool
effects from professional
photographer, Lisa Bettany,
ranging from Grunge for
that urban city feel to shim-
mer effects with HDR that
are just right for shots by
the tree.
Orbitz Hotels App for
iPad: Free
Whether booking travel
for the holidays or to escape
afterwards, the Orbitz Hotels
App for iPad makes it easy
to book on the go.
The app not only lets trav-
elers book hotels at any of
the global destinations avail-
able on Orbitz, it also allows
consumers to find hotels
nearby using the iPads GPS
capabilities particularly
convenient for same-day
bookings.
Consumers can also
search by city, address, zip
code or landmark and fil-
ter and sort hotels by price,
star rating, review score,
distance and even neighbor-
hood.
The neighborhood fea-
ture is a handy tool if you
want to book near relatives
over the holidays but are
unfamiliar with their area
or if you want to be close
to the slopes but avoid the
high cost of staying right at
the resort.
Users also can compare
hotels and prices on an
interactive map while tiles
alongside the map provide
summarized hotel informa-
tion that expands to show
photographs, guest reviews,
special offers, amenities and
detailed hotel/room descrip-
tions.
And, if your holiday shop-
ping has you on an extra
tight budget, the app lets
you toggle from a map view
of hotels to an innovative
matrix view to easily com-
pare many hotel options
(and prices) at once.
Calculate Discount and
Sales Tax: Free
Stores are littered with
so many discounts over the
holidays it can be confusing
to figure out what they all
mean for your bottom line.
Enter the Calculate Dis-
count and Sales Tax App, a
handy way to quickly know
how much 25 percent off
actually equals in a shop-
ping trip and tally how
much youre spending.
It also can calculate sales
taxes for a specified area
a bonus for those out-of-
town shopping trips.
Five handy apps for
the festive season
(ARA) Nothing says how much
you value a person more than a per-
sonalized handcrafted card or gift. And
making your own can be far easier
on your budget than buying from the
store. So consider putting your cre-
ative skills to the test this year.
Where to start?
First, assess your computers capa-
bilities and obtain the right software.
The more RAM (amount of memory)
the computer has the better, according
to Keld Bangsberg, academic director
in Media Arts & Animation at The Art
Institute of Portland in Oregon. This
will allow you to store many photos
and video files, which take up room
in your hard drive. Machines with a
minimum of 4 gigabytes are recom-
mended. You dont need a high end
machine to accomplish good work,
but having a machine that doesnt fight
against you is helpful.
For software, Ric Peterson, The Art
Institute of Seattle academic director
in Photography and Video Production
recommends Adobe products, which
he says are the industry standard.
Consumers should be able to find a
wide range of new software these days
for photo and video editing, particu-
larly on Apple platforms.
Plan the project for success
For crafty projects such as greeting
cards or a memory album, try to go
beyond just selecting the right pho-
tos. Add special touches that repre-
sent your family, your interests, where
you live, favorite vacations or beloved
pets. This can include scanned images
of your childs artwork, a postcard,
famous quotes or poems, for example.
Bangsberg also recommends think-
ing about foundational elements such
as color and what kind of mood the
color conveys. Ask yourself are you
working within a color palette that
is compatible, or are the colors dis-
jointed, and dont match? he adds.
When tackling video, the best way
to get started, according to Peterson,
is to map out a small storyboard to
plan out the shots. Another aspect to
consider is how you frame your scenes
you can use close-ups to focus the
attention and perhaps heighten the
moment, or use broad vistas, where
the camera is farther away.
Learn to release creativity
For most novices, learning how to
release your creativity may be the
most difficult challenge.
Practice is the most surefire way to
getting better in any creative endeavor,
says Bangsberg. First, find a simple
way to get your ideas recorded. Dont
expect perfection on your first try,
its all about capturing the inspiration
when it strikes.
Norton Young, department director
in Advertising and Graphic Design at
The Art Institute of Portland, agrees.
He recommends carrying a small jour-
nal so you can write down anything
that is a trigger such as words, color
combinations, or objects that you can
work off of later.
Shutterstock Photo
Nothing says how much you value a person more than a personalized hand-
crafted card or gift.
Personalize greeting cards and gifts
(ARA) As autumn fades and
winter draws near, homes begin
to reflect the approaching holi-
day season. For many of us, the
cooler weather also signifies a
lifestyle change.
In the south, cooler tempera-
tures make this a great time of
year for gardening and outdoor
entertaining. For northerners,
winter brings snow sports and
indoor activities. Regardless of
your region, you can decorate
for the approaching holidays by
bringing the beauty of the out-
doors in. Use natural elements
from the yard and garden to
create a festive decor to not only
recycle natures bounty, but also
perk up your home for winter
entertaining.
Outside:
In the north, annuals and
perennials are done for the year.
But, there are still plenty of other
ways to add color and interest to
an outdoor space. After remov-
ing all the remains of the sum-
mer flowers, take a long look
at the remaining landscape and
add focal points.
Is the front door the main area
of interest? Feature a lovely
evergreen with a light dusting
of snow. Solar landscaping lights
in containers work great next to
the front door with a spot light
angled to accent that beautiful
tree. Want the apartment bal-
cony to express a festive spirit?
Set the mood and accent the
desired focal points by incorpo-
rating other creative lighting. Try
a string of festive lights across
the balcony and evergreens in
decorative pots.
Live evergreens of every size
and shape are abundantly avail-
able in most areas at this time of
year. You can easily plant them
in yards in warmer regions, or
pop them into a container to be
placed on the front steps or along
the walkway to welcome guests.
Many types of these ever-
greens are available in most
home improvement stores
nationwide. Add your own
lights for a personal touch. Cre-
ate your own topiary form by
using chicken wire to structure
a simple cone shape. Then, sim-
ply tuck in some moss or a few
branches of greenery. Ask for
some discarded branches that
have been trimmed from Christ-
mas trees at the local nursery or
tree farm. Place your topiary in a
large pot and wrap with twinkle
lights to welcome guests to the
front door. Come spring, trans-
plant these trees in the yard with
Miracle-Gro Garden Soil.
Inside:
Invite guests with fragrances
of the season with well-placed
potpourri or bits of cut ever-
greens.
Pair the freshly cut boughs of
evergreen with holly to accen-
tuate the celebratory atmo-
sphere of the season. Wire them
together to make a garland with
florist wire or tape. Then, place
on the mantle, hang over the
banister or use as a centerpiece
for a table. Incorporate fruit
such as apples, oranges, lemons,
limes or pomegranates into gar-
lands or floral arrangements for
a fresh, fruity twist.
Use elements from nature that
are unexpected for a splash of
creativity. Dried flowers can sim-
ply be tucked into the boughs of
a Christmas tree for an extra pop
of festivity. Nuts are for more
than just snacking; add them
to the decorating mix for a sur-
prise. Drill holes through acorns,
walnuts or pecans and string
them into a woodsy garland. Do
not forget to use potted plants
for decorating as well. Small live
herbs trimmed in topiary forms
can easily add a festive feel and
fragrance to your home. Pot-
ted plants also make great host-
ess gifts and provide a beautiful
bloom all year long.
This holiday season, do not
leave the beauty of the garden
outside. Welcome guests indoors
with bits of the outdoors as fabu-
lous decor.
Garden accents for the holidays: Bring beauty of the outdoors in
Use natural elements from the yard and garden to create a festive decor to not
only recycle natures bounty, but also perk up your home for winter entertaining.
ARA Content
Theres more than gift cards and cash to satisfy even the pickiest teen.
GIFT GUIDE
(ARA) Finding that perfect
holiday gift for friends and fam-
ily is always challenging. Clothes
are difficult unless you know the
perfect size and style. You can miss
the mark on books and music if
youre not intimately familiar with
the genres that interest the recipi-
ent. One type of gift that will never
go out of style is the personal, hand-
made present.
While that may sound cliche, the
fact is, something heartfelt cre-
ated from memories new and old
will almost always be more valuable
to someone than something store-
bought and mass-produced. The
hard part is narrowing down the list
of things you can make. A good start
is to recall all your favorite memo-
ries by looking through the pictures
youve taken throughout the year.
After all, clothes may go out of style,
but photos never will so you will
want pictures that will last for years
to come.
How many photos do you and
your family take each year? Hun-
dreds? Thousands? Unfortunately,
many of those photos end up staying
stored indefinitely on your camera
or smartphone, your hard drive or
in email attachments. Creating great
gifts with those photos right from
home is a snap, and the key is to
start with great-looking photos.
Printing a high-quality image in
the convenience of your home has
never been easier. With Kodak print-
ers you are guaranteed exceptional
lab-quality photos that will last a life-
time. Kodak has always been trusted
with capturing and preserving lifes
memories. And with photos that dry
instantly and are smudge and fade
resistant, theyre ready for any proj-
ect right off the printer! Learn more
at Kodak.com/go/aio.
Make frames. One of the easi-
est ways to get your kids involved
in the gift making is frames. Start
with Popsicle sticks either col-
ored sticks or the plain wood ones
that they can color or paint on their
own, and decide what size frame
you want to make. You can also buy
a frame with a large solid-colored
mat around it so your children can
decorate it, and you can simply put
their photo in the middle either
are great gift ideas for parents and
grandparents.
Make fun collages. With so many
great family memories from the year,
picking just one picture to highlight
can be a challenge. One great way to
put more of those memories in the
spotlight is by making a collage. It
can serve as a wrap-up of your year
and a perfect complement to your
familys annual holiday card. Pick
several really fun photos to cut out
and lay the parts you want to use on
a sheet of paper. Make sure you give
the placement of the photos careful
consideration before gluing it down
to the paper or youll have to start
over.
Share the holidays with friends
and family from afar. We all have
friends and relatives who arent
close by. Take photos of your holi-
day dinner, your family opening gifts
or decorating your home, and send
them to your out of town loved ones
so they can still be a part of your
holiday festivities. After all, a picture
is worth a thousand words.
Holiday gifts dont need to be
costly or store bought to have that
real, warm impact. Bright, quality
pictures and a little creativity are
usually all you need to get the job
done right at home.
(ARA) Every year, lists fly
around the Internet and airwaves,
parents line up in stores and every-
one talks about what the seasons
hottest toys will be. All the chatter
can make it seem like everyones
forgotten the single most enduring
toy at the disposal of every child
imagination.
Plenty of high-tech toys encour-
age creativity, but to really fire up
a childs imagination its hard to
beat the power of timeless, classic
toys that rely on a childs interac-
tion rather than on electronics. This
type of nostalgic toy can become
a childs best friend, and parents
will be happy their children have
something that doesnt require bat-
teries and doesnt stop working just
because its dropped a few times.
Here are five timeless, nostal-
gic, low-tech toys that every child
should have:
1. A classic doll: Countless gen-
erations of little girls have fallen in
love with a special doll. This is one
toy that can serve many functions,
from best friend and confidante
to teacher and even role model. If
some of todays brash, in-your-face
styles of dolls leave you shaking
your head, never fear: you can still
find dolls that offer contemporary
appeal combined with more home-
spun values. Cracker Barrel Old
Country Store, the popular family
restaurant/retail store found across
the country, recently introduced
a line of rag dolls called Butter-
flies. Soft and cuddly, these 15-inch
dolls of relatable characters, such
as a ballerina, princess, cheerleader
and schoolgirl, make a wholesome,
imagination-inspiring addition to
a little girls toy box. Visit www.
crackerbarrel.com/store/butterflies/
to learn more.
2. A wagon: Whether its an old-
fashioned metal one in fire-engine
red or one of the modern, SUV-
sized plastic numbers available
today, nothing beats a wagon for
getting kids moving. Its also a toy
that can keep pace with a childs
development and changing styles
of play. Very young children will
enjoy riding as parents tow them
along on trips to the park or walks
around the neighborhood. As chil-
dren grow, they begin to use the
wagon themselves, employing it to
transport toys or other children.
Turn it over and its a makeshift
fort or castle.
3. A building set: Whether its
plastic, wood, or metal, a building
set can fire the imagination of bud-
ding engineers. Building materials
that link together have a leg up
on old-fashioned blocks, allowing
kids to create increasingly complex
structures. With so many different
construction toys available, its pos-
sible to find a building set for virtu-
ally any age or skill level.
4. Dress-up items: Pretend play is
an important way children explore
their own potential. Dressing up as
a doctor, nurse, firefighter or police
officer helps children learn about
career choices and adult roles, and
facilitates creativity through role
playing. Creating a dress-up chest is
simple and low-cost. Parents can fill
a plastic bin with hand-me-downs,
old Halloween costumes and even a
few store-bought items.
5. An easel and drawing pad:
Sure, coloring books are great, but
theres something about an easel
that makes a child feel like a real
artist. A simple wooden frame hold-
ing a large drawing pad can become
the launch pad for flights of fancy
rendered in crayon, watercolor and
even washable magic marker. What-
ever your childs media or favorite
subject, putting him or her in front
of an easel will enhance enjoyment
of the artistic experience and give
you a birds-eye view of your bud-
ding artist at work.
Imagination is truly the greatest
toy and tool of childhood. For-
tunately, you can find plenty of no-
tech toys to nourish your childs
creativity and imagination, even in
todays high-tech world.
COMMUNITY
putnamvoice.com
V16
December 7 - 13, 2011
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ARA photo
Its hard to beat the power of timeless, classic toys that rely on a childs interaction rather than on electronics.
Shutterstock photo
Holiday gifts dont need to be costly or store bought to have that real,
warm impact. Bright, high-quality pictures and a little creativity are usu-
ally all you need to get the job done right at home.
(ARA) Whether its for
the holidays or another big
occasion, hosting people in
your home can be both grati-
fying and stressful.
It can be especially tricky
when youre entertaining out
of town guests for days at a
time.
By planning ahead, you can
avoid some of the common
pitfalls that can cause a gath-
ering to go south in a hurry
and ensure that both you and
your guests have such a great
time that everyone will be
looking forward to the next
get-together once its all over.
Here are some common
challenges of hosting guests
at your home and solutions
for getting around them:
Problem: Overcrowding.
Sharing space particularly
bathrooms and bedrooms
can cause conflict.
Solution: Organize the
chaos by setting out towels
and mini bathroom toiletries
in guests rooms. You can
develop a bathroom sched-
ule for the morning so every-
one has time to get ready for
the day and no one ends up
going without a shower.
Dont be ashamed to admit
that you dont have the space
to host overnight guests in
your own home. Your guests
will thank you for pointing
them in the direction of a
comfortable hotel that feels
like a home away from
home, so they can spread out
and have their own space.
Consider an all-suites hotel
brand like Embassy Suites
Hotels, where guests get two-
room suites with separate liv-
ing and sleeping areas, free
cooked-to-order breakfast
and a free, nightly Managers
Reception.
Problem: Cabin fever.
Guests become bored or
restless at your home.
Solution: No matter how
much you love your friends
and family, being crammed
together in one house can
make everyone a little stir
crazy. If your guests are in
town for a few days, con-
sider a planned activity like
bowling or visiting a local
museum. These activities
will offer some variety, as
well as promote interaction
and conversation among
guests. Its also a good idea
to allow your guests some
time to explore on their own.
Providing maps and bro-
chures on local attractions is
a nice touch.
Problem: Meals. Feeding
multiple mouths can be a
challenge.
Solution: Dont feel obliged
to provide every meal while
your guests are in town. Its
a good idea to have easy
snacks, beverages and fix-
ings for sandwiches on
hand should your guests
want something simple and
easy. Check with guests in
advance to determine if any-
one has a food allergy or
alternately, a favorite snack
you can stock up on.
Hosting
doesnt
need to be
stressful
Five no-tech toys every child should have
Use your photos to personalize holiday gifts
GIFT GUIDE