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Contents

INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................... 2 PROPOSAL CONTEXT ............................................................................................................................... 2 ASSESSMENT FOR LEVEL OF EIA REQUIREMENT .................................................................................... 3 EIA SCREENING PROCEDURE ............................................................................................................... 3 SCHEDULE 1 ASSESSMENT .................................................................................................................. 4 SCHEDULE 2 ASSESSMENT .................................................................................................................. 6 CASE-BY-CASE ANALYSIS TO DETERMINE EIA REQUIREMENT ................................................................ 7 CONCLUSION ......................................................................................................................................... 23 REFERENCES .......................................................................................................................................... 24 APPENDIX .......................................................................................................................................... 2726 APPENDIX A: .................................................................................................................................. 2726

INTRODUCTION The following screening opinion is produced on behalf of Salford City Council, on request from Green Energy Solutions Ltd under Regulation 5(1) of The Town and Country Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment) Regulations 2011 (SI. 2011 No. 1824) (hereby referred to as EIA Regulations 2011). PROPOSAL CONTEXT The proposed planning project from Green Energy Solutions Ltd entails the construction and operation of a combined heat and power (CHP) plant, which will produce electricity and residual thermal energy via combustion of biomass primarily for the University residential properties located at Aldephi Street, with excess thermal energy supplied to nearby residential properties. Construction of the plant is set to take 18 months, when fully operation it will provide employment for 20 people. The plant is rated at 25MW, with an efficiency of 80%, and is expected combust material at a rate of 3 tonnes per hour. The main CHP plant will be situated at the junction of Silk Street and Blackfriars Road (of Flax Street) occupying 1.3ha, with the Fuel Processing and Storage depot situated adjacent to St. Simon Street occupying 0.7ha, both will be connected by an conveyor over Blackfriars Road. It will be supplied with green waste generated from municipal parks and gardens supplemented with woodchips from municipal and commercial waste within the Greater Manchester Area. Supply and removal of waste will require 25 vehicle movements per day (see Figure 1. for Map).

Fi gure 1. M ap showi ng the proposed locati on of the CHP plant and Fuel Processi ng and Storage depot .

ASSESSMENT FOR LEVEL OF EIA REQUIREMENT EIA screening procedure The EIA Regulations 2011 sets out the legislative context for determining whether EIA is required and whether an Environmental Statement needs to be submitted in the support of a planning application. Along with the guidance notes from Circular 02/99 the need to undertake EIA follows the steps outlined in Figure 2. This process is known as Screening and is one of the initial steps in the overall EIA process.

Fi gure 2. Adapted from Screeni ng process i n accordance to EIA R egulati on 2011 and Ci rcular 02/99

Schedule 1 Assessment The project could have potentially fallen under any three clauses in Schedule 1, these were: Clause Reason for consideration Reason for non applicable applicabilitynonapplicability
Does not adhere to the 300MW or more heat output threshold as the BiomassCHP station plant will only have rated output of 25MW. Does not fall under defined categories of disposal operations defined in Annex IIA to Council Directive 75/442/EEC (a) under heading D9 (amended under 2008/98/EC as Annex I). Waste used is not hazardous as defined in regulation 6 of the Hazardous Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2005(b) stated as: 6. Subject to regulation 9, a waste is a hazardous waste if it is (a)listed as a hazardous waste in the List of Wastes(1); (b)listed in regulations made under section 62A(1) of the 1990 Act; or (c) A specific batch of waste which is determined pursuant to regulation 8 to be a hazardous waste, and the term hazardous and cognate expressions shall be construed accordingly. Nor does it apply to defined hazardous waste under Annex III of 2008/98/EC. Does not fall under defined categories of disposal operations defined in Annex IIA to Council Directive 75/442/EEC (a) under heading D9 (amended under 2008/98/EC as Annex I). Project does not apply to this category since it will not breech the threshold requirement set in the clause 10 i.e. the plant will only process 72 tonnes of nonhazardous waste per day, whereas the clause states an

2(a) Thermal power stations and other combustion installations with a heat output of 300 megawatts or more; and 9. Waste disposal installations for the incineration, chemical treatment (as defined in Annex IIA to Council Directive 75/442/EEC(a) under heading D9), or landfill of hazardous waste as defined in regulation 6 of the Hazardous Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2005(b).

Producing heat through combustion process therefore can be regarded as the other combustion installation stated in clause. Consideration given, since the CHP Biomass plant can be potentially regarded as a waste disposal installation due to the definition of disposal under the newer 2008/98/EC Article 3 (19) disposal means any operation which is not recovery even where the operation has as a secondary consequence the reclamation of substances or energy. Annex I sets out a non-exhaustive list of disposal operations. Can be regarded as an incineration plant since incineration through combustion will take place (defined as incineration plant in 2007/76/EC: any stationary or mobile technical unit and equipment dedicated to the thermal treatment of wastes with or without recovery of the combustion heat generated)

10. Waste disposal installations for the incineration or chemical treatment (as defined in Annex IIA to Council Directive 75/442/EEC under heading D9) of nonhazardous waste with a capacity exceeding 100 tonnes per day.

Consideration given, since the CHP can be potentially regarded as a waste disposal installation due to the definition of disposal under the newer 2008/98/EC Article 3 (19) disposal means any operation which is not recovery even where the operation has as a secondary consequence the reclamation of substances or energy. Annex I sets out a non-exhaustive list of disposal operations.

Can be regarded as an incineration plant since incineration through combustion will take place (defined as incineration plant in 2007/76/EC: any stationary or mobile technical unit and equipment dedicated to the thermal treatment of wastes with or without recovery of the combustion heat generated) The waste that will be used is non-hazardous as defined in regulation 6 of the Hazardous Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2005(b)

EIA would be required for a plant that exceeds 100 tonnes/day.

From the examination of Schedule 1 of EIA regulation it has been determined that the planned project will not fall under a mandatory requirement for EIA. Therefore Schedule 2 is consulted. It has been determined that the project does not fall under the disposal category of Directive 75/442/EEC i.e. D9 of Annex IIA nor Annex I of the amended directive i.e. 2008/98/EC. Therefore it has been referred to in Annex II of 2008/98/EC as a Recovery operation, specifically under R1 category of Annex IIB of 75/442/EEC Annex II of 2008/98/EC (or or Annex II of 2008/98/ECAnnex IIB of 75/442/EEC) i.e. waste Use principally as a fuel or other means to generate energy. This is clarified by 2008/98/EC, since it states what the threshold is for an operation to be classified as Recovery: This includes incineration facilities dedicated to the processing of municipal solid waste only where their energy efficiency is equal to or above: l to or above: 0,60,60 for installations in operation and permitted in accordance with applicable Community legislation before 1 January 2009, 0,65,65 for installations permitted after 31 December 2008 The proposed plant has an energy efficiency of 80%; if below 65% it would have been classified as a waste disposal treatment facility under Schedule 1 due to the statutory definition with regards to 75/442/EEC. However under Schedule 2 the definition of waste disposal is non-statutory and can include recovery operations (Circular 02/99 paragraph A36). In reference to Circular 02/99 paragraph 10: Projects of the types listed in Annex II (i.e. Schedule 2 of the EIA Regulations) . must be subject to EIA whenever they are likely to have significant effects on the environment. A determination of whether or not EIA is required must be made for all projects of a type listed in Annex II. (i.e. Schedule 2 of the EIA Regulations).

Schedule 2 Assessment To determine if the project is excluded from EIA Schedule 2 of EIA Regulations 2011 is consulted:
Project mentioned in Schedule 2 Column 1 Being carried out in a sensitive area as defined in 1 Regulation 2 (1) Has the project exceeded/met any of the thresholds/criterion in Schedule 2 Column 2

Potentially 3(a) since the CHP will be producing thermal energy. Potentially 11(b) since the waste is being used as part of a disposal process (generalised definition of disposal and waste applies)

No the CHP will not be carried near any sensitive areas, as defined.

In consideration to 3(a) the CHP has a combined floor space exceeding 0.5ha i.e. Inconsideration to 11(b) the CHP applies to all the points i.e. disposal is occurring through incineration (combustion process); the floor space exceeds 0.5ha; the CHP will be situated within 100m of the River IErwell (controlled water).

Regulation 2(1) defines 'sensitive areas', which include Sites of Special Scientific Interests (SSSIs), land to which Natural Conservation Orders apply, International Conservation Sites, National Parks, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, World Heritage Sites and Scheduled Monuments

Since the proposed CHP plant potentially falls under two sections of Column 1 of Schedule 2: 3(a) and 11(b) and exceeds the subsequent thresholds set in Column 2 of Schedule 2, a case-by-case examination incorporating Schedule 3 criteria will be required to determine if EIA would potentially be required.

CASE-BY-CASE ANALYSIS TO DETERMINE EIA REQUIREMENT In accordance with Schedule 3 criterias a case-by case analysis of potential significant impacts have been determined, and produced as two tables:
Tabl e 1: Summary i de nti fi cati on of pote nti al envi ro nme nt al i mpacts and si gni fi cance

Criteria Particularities

Assessment
The development consists of the CHP combustion plant that will be situated on the land near to Flax Street. This will have a floor size of 1.3 ha; connected to the fuel processing and storage depot adjacent in St. Simon Street, which will have a floor space of 0.7ha. The combined space of the development will be 2ha; this will be significantly larger than any of the local estates. Current access route to the development site will remain with no modifications to roads.

Characteristics of development

the size of the development

the accumulating with other development

Currently there are no developments planned on the site where the biomass plant is to be situated, however the land next to St. Simon Street has a previous planning application made by the University of Salford for student accommodation (11/60830/FUL see Appendix A).

the use of natural resources

Normal construction materials will be used for the development; there will be no locally sourced natural resources that will be used in the construction of the plant. and Ooperation of the biomass plant will be dependent on green waste from municipal parks and gardens supplemented by woodchips from municipal and commercial waste. . There is likely to be waste produced as a result of the construction phase of the project i.e. the land for the biomass plant will require removal of debris and vegetation. The land for the fuel processing plant currently has car park and depot which will require demolition. Also solid waste will be present produced during the day-today running of the site in the form of residual ash due tofrom incineration combustion process.

the production of waste

pollution and nuisances

Increase in air pollution and nuisance dust during demolition and construction (aerial debris and particulates) and during plant operation (i.e. stack emission). Increase in air pollution also from increased traffic to and from the CHP plant and Fuel Processing and Storage. Visual, noise and vibration pollution is also likely to increase for the nearby residents and River Erwell Irwell users during and after construction (both operational such as from plant machinery and also from vehicular traffic), however the routes Blackfriars Road and Silk Street are already significantly used by heavy vehicles such as busses and lorries so impact is likely to be cumulate less. Also. Also possible nuisance odours from the waste that is received and stored can effect local population.

the risk of accidents, having regard in particular to substances or technologies used

There is a possibility of contamination of surrounding vicinity and River IrwellErwell from leachate of waste materials produced by plant (which can be in the form of leachate) in storage., Ffire hazards possibility (dueexists due to the nature of the biomass material (wood chips and green waste) waste material being used and from the process of combustion itself). Careful consideration will be required to ensure no route is made available for contamination of river water e.g. from rainwater run-off or if the River IrwellErwell was to ever flood. Since the plant will be near residential areas there is a possibility of unauthorised trespass.

Location of development

the existing land use

The location of the development is near to residential area, and next to the River ErwellIrwell, which is associated with Salford Unitary Development Plan policies EN9/EN17 and R5 (Wildlife Corridor, Pollution Control, and Countryside Access Network respectively). The land for the plant is currently brownfield, although the land for the fuel processing plant has an existing car park and depot situated in place ('Trinity Management Area Local Operations Depot'). It should be noted that the land for the Fuel Processing and Storage depot was once a coal mining area, which had been a 'constraint' designated to previous s 11/60830/FUL (see Appendix A) planning application on St. Simon Street. The River IrErwell currently accommodates wildlife such as wild ducks, geese, as well as a variety of fishes such as bream, carp, roach, etc. ((REF)Waterscape, 2011) and is a frequent fishing spot and recreational area. Recovery of wildlife inI the area has been slow since the river was highly contaminated in the past, a remnant of the industrial era n of Salford (GMLRC, 2011).

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the relative abundance, quality and regenerative capacity of natural resources in the area

the absorption capacity of the natural environment, paying particular attention to the following areas: wetlands coastal zones mountain and forest areas nature reserves and Location of site does not apply to these areas

parks

There are no nature reserves and parks in the immediate vicinity of the proposed sites, the nearest Site of Biological Interest and significant nature park is Botany Bay Wood over 1km away.

areas designated by Member States pursuant to Council Directive 2009/147/EC on the conservation of wild birds(a) and Council Directive 92/43/EEC on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora(b); areas in which the environmental quality standards laid down in EU legislation have already been exceeded

There are neither sensitive sites nor those that conform to EU Directives 2009/1477 /EC or 92/43/EEC within the immediate vicinity of the plant location.

The location of the site falls under Nitrate Vulnerable Zone (NVZ) and Air Quality Management Area (AQMA) boundary as declared in 2005 by Salford. The newest report confirms that there has been no change in the area so the AQMA remains in effect (Salford, 2010) (see Figure 3. and 4.)

densely populated areas

The plant will be situated within 100m of existing residential densities located on Blackfriars Road, Silk Street and St Simon Street. The plant could can also have a negative impact of the value of residential properties as it will be the only large nonresidential construction within the vicinity and will not adhere to the general residential aesthetics of the area.

landscapes of historical, cultural or archaeological significance

River IErwell and boundary has local significance and has recognised importance by Salford UDP due to policy associations in terms of environmental, leisure and tourism; Polices EN9/15 17 and R5. There are no nearby landscapes of historical, cultural or archaeological significance.

Characteristics of the potential impact

the extent of the impact (geographical area and size of the affected population)

Any adverse effects will be localized during construction and operation, however there is potential for wider impact if there is contamination of the local controlled water and from air emissions. Benefits associated with savings of CO2, NOx, PM10, etc. as a result of plant operation in comparison to traditional energy and heat producing facilities can have wider implications and contribute towards local, national and European emissions targets and strategies N/A in this case. Any impacts in terms of air emissions and water contamination are likely to be complex, considering the site is in an AQMA and the where river pollutants can accumulate and enter the human food chain i.e. due to the fishing that occurs there. Impact from pollution is lhighly significant and likely ikelyespecially with regards to air emissions from stack and traffic on and offsite. Although less likely if the plant is constructed appropriately i.e. to reduce chance ofwaterWater run-off and dischargefrom site into river is likely to occur during periods of precipitation the, the probability of impacts increases since the site falls under a 'moderate-high' flood risk zone designated by the Environment Agency (2011) (see Figure 5.) Any impacts are likely to become long-term if not managed during plant operation, air emissions from the plant will be frequent and would require BAT, and if contamination of waters should occur, the complexities can also constitute to long term effects that cannot be easily reversed and can be difficult to reverse

the trans-frontier nature of the impact the magnitude and complexity of the impact

the probability of the impact

the duration, frequency and reversibility of the impact

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Tabl e 2: In-dept h a nal ysi s of pote nti al i mpacts and t hei r si gni fi cance (Low, Moderate , and Hi gh, where Hi gh sugg ests defi ni te consi derati o n for EIA)

Impact Criteria

Social, Economic and Local Community

Short-term

Local economy will benefit from daily expenditures by contract construction workers on site local food and convenience stores

Reversibility

Source and Description of potential impacts

Complexity of impact

Duration of potential impact

Probability of occurrence of the potential impact (low: unlikely, moderate: likely, high: certainly

Additional Information

Significance of effect

Simple

High

Low, due to short-term contract of construction workers N/A

Long-term

Potential for new business from employees at the plant for local food and convenience stores

Simple

High

Low, few workers therefore revenue from are likely to be low N/A Location of plant falls adjacent to area designated as Existing Strategic Recreation route and Proposed Strategic Recreation route in accordance with local Policy R5 (see Figure 7.)

Reversible

Short-term

During construct recreational users such as anglers, birdwatchers, boat rowers and other tourists of the River Irwell can be effected from the noise, dust, visual and increased traffic pollution

Simple

LowModerate

Low, due to short-term nature of impact

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Short-term

Dust accumulation on nearby buildings from construction materials and processes, which can potentially damage structures and/or inconvenience residents

Irreversible (once the site has had the Irreversible (damage to CHP plant built upon) buildings)

Irreversible

Long-term

Plant operation can have an impact on local recreation of the river i.e. due to visual/noise impacts, thereby reducing tourism and potential income to nearby stores

Complex

Moderate

Location of plant falls adjacent to area designated as Existing Strategic Recreation route and Proposed Strategic Recreation route in accordance with local Policy R5 (see Figure 7.)

High, due to long-term nature of impact and effect it can have on local economy

Simple

LowModerate

Moderate, due to close proximity (<50m) of residential buildings and high residential densities along Blackfriars Road and Silk Street.

Plant will deprive land for further residential development or other local amenity development

Simple

High

Building of plant will be on land designated by Salford Council UDP for future residential development i.e. Policy H9/1

Long-term

Moderate-High, depending on updated national policy (PPS 3: Housing) as local authorities are no longer required to maintain a minimum density for residential development of 30 dwellings per hectare, therefore City of Salford can reallocate (although the Policy H9/1 has been saved beyond 2009)

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The CHP plant can potentially create jobs for local community

Short-term Long-term

Increased traffic flow during construction and plant operation can potentially increase traffic congestion

Reversible

Long-term

Increased traffic flow during construction and plant operation can potentially impact road safety, as Silk Street and Blackfriars Road are frequently used by local residents and school children for access to The Friars Primary School opposite the proposed plant location

Simple

Moderate

Moderate, Silk Street and Blackfriars Road are already considered busy routs however vehicles to and from the plant will be large lorries, therefore risk of accident can increase

Simple

Moderate

Low-Moderate, Blackfriars Road and Silk Street are already busy traffic routes utilised by large vehicles therefore impact is likely to be less significant

Simple

Moderate

Low, few jobs available (20) comprising of mainly technical level positions

Simple

Moderate

Long-term

The CHP plant will provide thermal heating to local residents

Low, primarily supplying heat to University residents, with excess thermal heat being conferred to some locals N/A

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Short-term or Long-term (depending on the extent of the fire occurring)

Possibly reversible over a long-period (depending on extent of fire)

Risk of fire hazards due to the nature of the fuel used (i.e. green waste and wood chippings imply high flammability)

Complex (if fire occurs emissions from burning will contribute as air pollution, and impact negatively to local residents, extent of which may not be foreseeable due to weather condition factor)

Moderate

High, significance increases considering that plant will be in close proximity (<50m) of residential densities along Blackfriars Road and Silk Street which can be drastically affected depending on nature and extent of a fire)

Potential for risk of injury from unauthorised persons on site due to trespass

Simple

LowModerate

Moderate, this depends upon security measures at the sites, if these athese widely used by the public prior to CHP plant construction, then in conjunction with lax security could have significant impact. Significance increases considering that plant will be in close proximity (<50m) of residential densities along Blackfriars Road and Silk Street and nearby The Friars Primary school. Reversible Long-term

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Irreversible

Long-term

The location of the CHP plant/fuel processing depot and connecting conveyor can potentially impact aesthetics of the area (due to prominence of residential properties), which can potentially reduce value of residential properties on Blackfriars road and Silk Street

Simple

Low

Moderate-High, if value of local homes are likely to decrease greater then national average and a link can be established with the location of the plant it can lead to friction amongst public. Will also proof to be a visual impact not in keeping with local Policy EN17

Provisions of green energy utilising non-hazardous waste materials from the CHP plant

Simple

High

Noise, light and vibration nuisance

Long-term

Noise and light nuisance effecting local residents during operation of CHP plant due to plant machinery especially during night time

Complex (can accumulate with noise from current traffic)

Irreversible

High, as building of the plant will help City of Salford to adhere to national policy PPS22: Renewable Energy Developments and local policy EN 21: Renewable Energy. It will contribute towards local, national and European emissions targets and strategies due to reduced emissions in comparison to traditional sources of energy and reduce waste going to incineration/landfill (REFEPUK 2009)

Long-term

High

assumption made that the plant will be running 24 hours due to size and expected capacity (require specific details)

Moderate-High-due to close proximity (<50m) of residential buildings and high residential densities along Blackfriars Road and Silk Street. Also impact will potentially be in contradiction to Salford UDP Policy EN17

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Increased air pollution from vehicular emissions (NOx, SO, Particulate Matter, CO2, etc.)

Complex (since area is already in an AQMA, and the fact that secondary pollutants can arise further away from the source location)

Short-term (during construction)/ Longterm (during operation of plant)

Long-term

Vibration and noise nuisance from increased traffic which can disturb residents, especially during the night time

Complex (can accumulate with existing traffic)

High

assumption made that the plant will be running 24 hours due to size and expected capacity (require specific details)

Moderate-High due to close proximity (<50m) of residential buildings and high residential densities along Blackfriars Road and Silk Street. Also impact will potentially be in contradiction to Salford UDP Policy EN17

High

High, location of plant in an AQMA (see Figure 3) and Nitrate Vulnerable Zone (see Figure 4), therefore periods of exceeding set limit values are more likely to occur and this will impact local and nation air quality strategies. Also impact will potentially be in contradiction to Salford UDP Policy EN17.

Air

Stack emissions during operation of plant (release of CO2, N2o, Methane) (REF)

Long-term

Complex (since area is already in an AQMA, and the fact that secondary pollutants can arise further away from the source location)

ModerateHigh

Emissions from stack can be reduced by ensuring Best Available Techniques are used, however emissions will still contribute and can potentially be higher than normal coal power station without Best Available Techniques (REFUSEPA 2011)

High, location of plant in an AQMA (see Figure 3) and Nitrate Vulnerable Zone (see Figure 4), therefore periods of exceeding set limit values are more likely to occur and this will impact local and nation air quality strategies. Also impact will potentially be in contradiction to Salford UDP Policy EN17.

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Water

Long-term

Complex (due to wide area that can be affected)

Potentially Irreversible

Potential for contamination of River Irwell from surface run-off from site from plant waste, stored biomass fuel, any chemicals are onsite, and residue from vehicle exhaust and washings.

Long-term

Complex (due to wide area that can be affected)

Potentially Irreversible

Potential for contamination of groundwater resource from plant waste, stored biomass fuel, any chemicals are onsite, and residue from vehicle exhaust and washings.

Long-term

Odour from stored biomass at fuel processing and storage depot (organic nature of fuel implies decomposition occurring)

Simple

LowModerate

Can be negated by ensuring suitable techniques are employed and biomass feed stock is stored in a sealed area

Low-Moderate, due to close proximity (<50m) of residential building and high residential densities opposite fuel processing depot

LowModerate

Plant will be situated on land designated Waste can become leachate if mixed with liquids

High, although feed material is nonhazardous it may form leachate that can penetrate into groundwater supply along with any chemicals are onsite, residue from vehicle exhaust and washings these can do the same.

High

Waste can become leachate if mixed with liquids, this can have

High, due to precipitation that will occur on site, which can accumulate and drain in to the nearby River Irwell which is <10m from site location

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Potentially Irreversible

Potential for contamination of River Irwell from plant waste, stored biomass fuel, any chemicals are onsite, and residue from vehicle exhaust and washings.

Long-term

Complex (due to wide area that can be affected such as downstream locations and the connecting River Merseyside)

High

Waste can become leachate if mixed with liquids. In accordance to PPS 25: Development and Flood Risk (due to the nearby River Irwell) it has been determined the location of the CHP plant and Fuel Processing and Storage Depot will be designated in a Moderate flood risk area (EA 2011)

High, due to 'moderate' flood risk designation by the Environmental Agency (2011) and the close proximity of the proposed site location to River Irwell (<10m)

Waste

Long-term

Primary residual waste produced as a part of the process will be ash which will be removed from site and disposed of

Simple

High

Unknown, significance will depend upon where the waste is being taking to (long journey to deposal site mean greater traffic emissions and impacts to receptors along the route), and method of disposal (most likely to landfill).

Short-term

Waste produced as a result of clearing of the site and during construction process and at the end-of-life of the CHP plant and Fuel Processing and Storage Depot

Simple

High

Moderate-High, as this will need to be moved offsite and disposed of (traffic emissions and waste to landfill). Also potential for any waste on site that is not removed immediately to contaminate River Irwell via run-off/during flooding considering location of site is <10m

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Long-term

Potential for seepage of waste/leachates and other chemicals onsite into soil/ground

Complex (can react with other substances in soil and rock strata to cause mobilisation secondary pollutants)

Geology of location

Low

Rock strata is Upper Carboniferous Coal Measures (REFNatural England 2011)

Unknown, significance will depend upon any chemicals onsite, and possible leachate/runoff at the site relative to impacts on the soil/rock strata

Operation of plant can result in noise that can disturb the local bird life e.g. geese and wild ducks

Simple

Moderate

Require analysis of River Irwell wildlife near the proposed plant to determine if displacement of wildlife (especially birds) will have long-term negative effects and whether these birds are unique to that part of the river (i.e. determine any nearby nesting grounds) Also under Salford UDP the River near to site has been designated a Wildlife Corridor (E9) Long-term

Wildlife

Moderate, depending on whether these animals are effected and possibility of relocation

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Fi gure 3. AQMA i n Salford area located on proposed si te for CHP and Fuel Processi ng and Storage Depot (REF)

Fi gure 4. NVZ i n Salford area locat ed on proposed si te for CHP and Fuel Processi ng and Storage Depot (REF)

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Fi gure 5. T he extent of floodi ng that can occur if the River Irwell ov erflow i s shown; the locati on for proposed CHP plant and Fuel Processi ng and storage depot falls wi thi n a m oderate f lood ri sk zone c lassi fi ed by Environm ental Agency (2011).

Fi gure 6. Groundwater source protecti on zones and ground water v ulnerabi li ty zones accordi n g to Environm ental Agency (2011)

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Fi gure 7. Shows exi sti ng poli ci es near locati on of proposed plant. Assessm ent of Salf ord UDP poli cy m ap also suggest no sensi tiv e areas as defi ned i n Regulati on 2(1), howev er the Riv er Irwell i s of local si gni fi cance and has appropri ate poli cy associ ati ons (E9/R5).

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CONCLUSION Conclusion ItIt has been determined that the project does not fall under Schedule 1; however it is regarded as a recovery operation and therefore referred to as a Schedule 2 installation, where it has been determined a case-by-case screening is required to determine if EIA is necessaryto be a Schedule 2 installation. It has been assessed that the project can potentially cause significant impact haespecially with regards to air pollution, (for which the site is already in an AQMA and NVZ), and water contamination of River Irwell next to the plant location due to risk of flooding and surface run-off. Due to the close proximity of residential properties the potential risk to local people is regarded as significant in terms of noise, vibration, light, and visual nuisances during construction and during plant operation. However decommission of plant at a later date can also lead to significant impacts. It is therefore the expert opinion that an EIA should be carried out in accordance to EIA Regulations 2011Therefore an EIA will be, which will require required and an Environmental Statement from Green Energy solutions Ltd as stated in Circular 02/99 point paragraph 21 should be presented from them.

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REDO FOR FINAL DRAFT TO REDUCE WORD COUNT AND TABULATE, SCHEDULE THREE SECOND TABLE FOR POLLUTION SPECIFICS AND POTENTIAL IMPACT SIGNIFICANCE (LOW/MED/HIGH) MAYBE? WILL WATER FROM THE RIVER BE USED AS A COOLANT? =DISCHARGE=THERMAL POLLUTION? HTTP://WWW.EPA.GOV/CHP/BASIC/RENEWABLE.HTML FOR BENEFITS (DO AS A TABLE?) REFERENCES

Communities, European. (2001). Guidance on EIA: EIS Review. (9289413360). Office for Official Publications of theof the European Communities Retrieved from ec.europa.eu/environment/eia/eia-guidelines/g-review-full-text.pdf. DCLG. (1999). Circular 02/99: Environmental impact assessment. The Stationery Office Limited Retrieved from http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/planningandbuilding/circularenvironment alimpact. DCLG. (2000). Environmental impact assessment: A guide to procedures. The Stationery Office Limited Retrieved from http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/planningandbuilding/environmentalimpa ctassessment. DCLG. (2004a). Planning Policy Statement 22: Renewable Energy. Retrieved from http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/planningandbuilding/pps22. DCLG. (2004b). Planning Policy Statement 23: Planning and Pollution Control. Retrieved from http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/planningandbuilding/planningpolicystate ment23. DCLG. (2005). Planning Policy Statement 1: Delivering Sustainable Development. Retrieved from

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APPENDIX Appendix A:
Data for the following planning permission associated with the planned site for the location of Fuel Processing and Storage Depot obtained from City of Salford Council: Reference: 11/60830/FUL

Application Received: 30 Aug 2011 Address: Former Riverside House 1 St Simon Street Salford M3 7ET

Proposal: Erection of student accommodation comprising 242 bedrooms with ancillary accommodation including 15 car parking spaces together with associated creation of new vehicular access and alterations to existing vehicular access and landscaping. Variation of condition 12 amended elevations and site layout on planning permission 03/46609/FUL Status: Constraint Type: Application Permitted Property lies in a coal mining area

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